Committee
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 15 of 1234
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
CPC (NS)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
My question is for the Minister of Agriculture.
In the Annapolis Valley, berry producers are facing significant losses due to COVID-19. With a one-month delay for bringing in foreign workers and the 14-day quarantine, Millen Farms is facing a 25% to 40% loss of its planned strawberry harvest. In addition to being fewer in number than last year, missing 50 foreign workers means less work is being done. Since the rules of social distancing are also creating a lot of problems when it comes to “you pick”, it's very difficult for farmers to recoup in that manner.
How are government programs helping berry producers like Millen Farms?
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
CPC (NS)
How about this? Last year, Louise Endres, a blueberry producer in my riding, was affected by Hurricane Dorian. It damaged a large portion of her fields and caused substantial loss. This year, her annual foreign workers arrived. Of course, there were fewer of them, so hectares of blueberry bushes aren't being pruned for optimum growth.
In order to meet the criteria for financial assistance from the government, producers must provide financial statements from last year to show losses. In this case, last year was also a year of losses due to Hurricane Dorian.
What kind of support can this producer expect?
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
CPC (NS)
In this morning's news, we learned that an Annapolis Valley tomato producer had to abandon production of 26,000 tomato plants because he was only able to hire four of his normal 18 Mexican labourers, since they've been blocked by delays due to COVID-19. No locals are responding to the ads to help since the government has basically paid them to stay at home for another month or so.
Producers do not believe that the government has their backs. What should I tell producers when they're desperately asking for support?
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
CPC (NS)
Thank you very much.
My next question is a follow-up from last week's question to the Minister of Public Safety about the mass shooting in Nova Scotia. I asked about the secrecy surrounding the file, the investigation that was ongoing and the move to push for an inquiry.
Today the justice minister in Nova Scotia, one of the minister's partners, confirmed that Nova Scotia is interested in some kind of review, like an inquiry. When will the government be clear on what such a review will be?
View Bernadette Jordan Profile
Lib. (NS)
Mr. Chair, since we found out about the landslide at Big Bar, our government has been extremely active in making sure that the salmon have a passage through. We know how critically important the salmon are to the Fraser River, as well as to the indigenous communities along the Fraser. We're working diligently to make sure that we get that passage cleared.
So far, we've made significant progress, but we know there's more work that needs to be done. That's why we'll continue to work with indigenous communities and the province to make sure that these—
View Bernadette Jordan Profile
Lib. (NS)
Mr. Chair, I want to thank my hon. colleague for the question.
Invasive species are a real challenge for our waterways. We know that a lot more has to be done. We're working diligently to find the answers to deal with some of the problems we are seeing from invasive species. We are continuing to monitor situations in waterways. I am committed to making sure that I meet my commitments within my mandate letter, and I will have more to say on that soon.
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
CPC (NS)
As much as I like seeing my friends on the big screens, there are no big screens yet, so we don't know who's on and who's not on. I was wondering if there was going to be a TV coming up soon here, Mr. Chair.
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
CPC (NS)
Yesterday, the Minister responsible for tourism, ACOA and official languages was happy to close our national Tourism Week by announcing investments of $70 million to offset financial losses in the tourism industry across Canada.
Where's the big clap?
Some hon. members: Hear, hear!
Mr. Chris d'Entremont: There you go, give her a clap.
More than $70 million will be invested to support this sector and promote Canadian destinations. Southern Ontario received $30 million, northern Ontario received $7 million and western Canada received $3.5 million. There's nothing for Atlantic Canada yet.
Knowing that we just had an announcement from the Minister of Transport that there will be no cruise ships in Atlantic Canada or anywhere in Canada this year, resulting in hundreds of millions of dollars in losses, where is the program for Atlantic Canada?
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
CPC (NS)
That would be all great if we weren't in the middle of a pandemic and you can't even cross the Nova Scotia-New Brunswick border without having to self-isolate for two weeks. It's going to make travelling, through the Maritimes at least, very difficult.
In Saint John, New Brunswick, 79 cruise ships and more than 270,000 passengers will not be giving back to that local community. At home in Nova Scotia, it's about 118 or 130 vessels. In terms of a minimum financial loss, $165 million will not be generated. There will be job losses and permanent closures of restaurants and boardwalk shops.
Prince Edward Island, which was expected to have a record attendance year, will lose visits of 97 ships and 154,000 passengers, and $60 million to the province's economy will be lost.
Mr. Chair, my question to the minister is this: Who is ACOA going to be working with, and what kinds of programs are going to be available to help them through this very difficult year?
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
CPC (NS)
Mr. Chair, like the minister, last week, I spoke with Simon-Pierre Poulin, the director of Le Franco newspaper in Alberta, about the “Sauvons Saint-Jean” movement.
He asked me why we could not continue to work on official languages and on modernizing the act even though Parliament is sitting in a different configuration. Unfortunately, I had to explain to him that many restrictions were associated with the current format of this fake Parliament.
The pandemic is also threatening the protection of French in minority communities. The Liberal government made a commitment to modernize the Official Languages Act in the first six months of its mandate.
How will it proceed?
View Bernadette Jordan Profile
Lib. (NS)
Mr. Chair, I want to thank my colleague for the very good question.
The Ontario inland fishers and the people in Ontario are eligible for other programs that are offered through the regional development agencies.
We are going to make sure that no industry is left behind when it comes to our fisheries. We're making sure that we're addressing the concerns of inland fisheries as well as coastal fisheries. Those programs will be available to anyone who needs to apply through the RDAs.
View Bernadette Jordan Profile
Lib. (NS)
Mr. Chair, we're making sure that they have the same access to programs through the regional development agencies as there is through the seafood stabilization fund. We're making sure that everyone who is in need of support through the programs will be able to access it.
View Bernadette Jordan Profile
Lib. (NS)
Mr. Chair, we've recognized how hard the pandemic has hit our fishers and our fishing sector. We've made available a number of different measures. One of the things we're doing primarily is the harvesters' benefit, which allows all harvesters to take advantage of a benefit as well as a grant contribution to help them get through. We're also changing EI so they can now qualify for their EI benefits based on previous seasons, not this one, recognizing they're going to face challenges this year.
The Freshwater Fish Marketing Board is a Crown corporation. We know it's been a very difficult time for them. We are continuing to look at ways we can address the challenges within the industry and we'll continue to work with them to make sure we are addressing those needs.
View Kody Blois Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Kody Blois Profile
2020-05-29 14:58
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you, witnesses, for your testimony today.
I'm going to start with the Chicken Farmers of Canada.
In my riding of Kings—Hants, we have the most supply-managed farms east of Montreal. The poultry and dairy industries in particular are of very strong importance.
Mr. Fontaine and Mr. Laliberté, Nick de Graaf is the second vice-chair of Chicken Farmers of Canada. We had a conversation this week and we talked about your industry. You talked about an 11% cut in production for July to August. Have you looked at what it could be afterward? Nick was saying it could be down to about 7%. Are things improving generally as we move along?
View Kody Blois Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Kody Blois Profile
2020-05-29 15:00
It's definitely a testament to the strength of supply management and what that system means.
I have one more question for you. We've talked about the cost to farmers of losing their bird population if they have to depopulate. Can that cost be recovered as part of the cost of production study? I know, like dairy, the poultry industry would consider the farmers' costs. Could that be incorporated into the cost of production down the line?
Results: 1 - 15 of 1234 | Page: 1 of 83

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data