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View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Welcome back, everybody.
This is meeting number 28 of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage.
Pursuant to the order of reference of Tuesday, February 16, the committee resumes its clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-10, an act to amend the Broadcasting Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other acts.
We are doing this, of course, virtually—
View Rachael Harder Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Chair, I wish to move a point of order. It has come to my attention that this committee was provided with a charter statement from the Minister of Justice, and that this charter statement was prepared on the bill based on its original form on November 3.
At that point in time, our party was largely in favour of making the proposed amendments to the Broadcasting Act and other acts in order to modernize them and create a level playing field between streaming services like Netflix and the Canadian broadcasters, and the justice minister's charter statement was in good standing. However, that was before the bill was amended, and as you know, there are some significant changes that have since taken place.
One of the things that was stated in the justice minister's charter statement was that, and I quote, “clause 3 would specify that the Act does not apply in respect of programs uploaded by unaffiliated users [for example, you and me] to social media services for sharing with other users, and in respect of online undertakings whose only broadcasting consists of such programs.”
When the bill was amended, however, to remove clause 3—the portion that I just read his opinion on—the entire scope of the bill was changed. Given that the entire scope of the bill has now changed with the removal of that clause, the statement no longer stands as accurate.
Last Friday, those changes were made, taking away the protection for individual users—again, such as you and me—for the things we post on Facebook, the things we post on YouTube, the things an aspiring artist posts and the cat video that my grandmother posts in order to share with her friends and engage with them. When this change was made, it removed the protections that were once offered to individuals who use these platforms.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Ms. Harder, just one second. I appreciate the recognition of the content that you're providing here with the removal of the clause.
Can you get a little more specific about how this is counter to—
View Rachael Harder Profile
CPC (AB)
Yes. Thank you, Mr. Chair.
The removal of proposed section 4.1 from Bill C-10 fundamentally changes the legislation and dissolves the ground on which the charter statement stood to justify charter compliance. Therefore, the original charter statement should be considered null and void if this committee wishes to do due diligence. Therefore, I would propose to you that we need a new charter statement from the justice minister, based on the transformational edit that was done on Friday.
Mr. Chair, I believe this is extremely important, because it's about protecting Canadians and their freedoms.
View Julie Dabrusin Profile
Lib. (ON)
I have a point of order.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Ms. Harder, could I get you to summarize what you're reading right now, very quickly, so that I can go to Ms. Dabrusin? It sounds like you're going into the arguments on the content of what you're talking about. I need you to, again, be specific as to the point you're trying to make. I assume you're trying to withdraw or cease what we're doing right now. Is that correct?
View Rachael Harder Profile
CPC (AB)
No, I'm not. If you'll just oblige me for a moment here, I need to outline my case, and then I am happy to summarize or to conclude.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Rachael Harder Profile
CPC (AB)
At the end of the day, this is about Canadians. This is about standing up for their charter rights and freedoms. I understand that this committee wishes to get to clause-by-clause. However, I believe that in the best interests of Canadians and respecting their charter rights, the bare minimum we can do is to take the next three minutes and allow me to explain why this is of such crucial importance.
Protecting Canadian's rights and freedoms and making sure—
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Hold on, everyone, one moment.
Ms. Dabrusin, I'm going to let you step in. Go ahead.
View Julie Dabrusin Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you.
We are midway through a clause-by-clause, and in this virtual world, it's a little different from when we normally do it. We would be through it quite a bit more quickly, but we are still midway through in this clause-by-clause process. I am not sure what this member is seeking to bring forward, but don't believe she has clearly stated what she wants to do. At this point, it seems that it is putting the cart ahead of the horse, as far as what we're working on.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
To follow up on the remarks of my honourable colleague, Ms. Dabrusin, I feel that Ms. Harder has the privilege of speaking in committee and that she has something important to bring to our attention. As we see it, both the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and freedom of expression itself were cast aside when the committee adopted an amendment to the bill to eliminate a section that it was proposing to add to the Broadcasting Act.
I feel that Ms. Harder deserves a few minutes to express her point of view and to tell us what she wants to propose. The least we can do as a committee is to listen to her arguments and then decide together. Mr. Chair, if I may, she has a perfect right—
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Mr. Rayes, I'll get to her point, but I have to move on from you in order to do that. I see what you're saying.
Before I go back to Ms. Harder, I have a question.
Were you about to move a motion?
View Rachael Harder Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Chair, I will be seeking support from the committee.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Well, I can't do that on a point of order. The Standing Orders state that you may bring a point of order and then tell the committee why we're out of bounds, as it were. Within that, according to the Standing Orders, I'm just going to pre-empt by saying that you can't move that motion or seek the permission of the committee, as you say, within the realm of a point of order, which is what you're doing. That's why I want you to get to the reason we're going outside of the rules of this particular committee.
Go ahead.
View Rachael Harder Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Chair, thank you. I understand that it is your perspective. Perhaps in just a moment you can confer further with the clerk.
I would like to outline context for the request I'm going to make to the committee, and I believe it is appropriate for me to do so on a point of order.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
How about I confer with the clerk first, and then I'll come back to you?
View Rachael Harder Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Chair, I respect your request. However, you don't yet know what my request is, so if I could continue outlining the context, as is my privilege as the member of Parliament for Lethbridge and as a current member of this committee—
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
I understand what your privileges are, Ms. Harder, but the thing is, on a point of order.... You're going to describe now, I'm assuming, why you raised this point of order and why we're outside the realm of the rules standard to the procedures of committee.
Go ahead.
View Rachael Harder Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Mr. Chair, the original intent of this legislation was to modernize the Broadcasting Act. However, by removing this clause 3 of Bill C-10—the proposed new section 4.1 of the act—there's a significant difference in what this is now, and I would argue that it potentially impedes upon the freedoms of Canadians that are granted under section 2(b) of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
Social media platforms are the new public square. That's where people engage in conversation.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Sorry, Ms. Harder, this is the third time now. I'm trying to give you as much latitude as I can, but we're arguing about content on which a vote has taken place. There are ways by which you can move a motion and seek consent.
Are you asking to revisit something that was done previously in this committee? May I ask that?
View Rachael Harder Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Chair, I understand the desire to rush through. I understand the desire of the members of the governing party to move this through as quickly as possible, and I understand that there is an attempt to squelch my voice right now.
I would ask to be given the opportunity to speak and to make the points that are appropriate to make at this point in time, and then to seek the committee's support.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Ms. Harder, I'm not trying to squelch you. I could have cut this off a long time ago. I'm just trying to get to the point here, because you called up a point of order, and as chair I have to make this flow the way it should, as given to us by the Standing Orders.
I'm trying to figure out.... If you want to do a motion as such, there's a place to do that, but when you bring up a point of order....
I see you, Ms. Dabrusin. Did you want to respond?
View Julie Dabrusin Profile
Lib. (ON)
No. I simply wanted to say that it has veered into debate, and I just wanted to—
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Okay. Sorry, Ms. Dabrusin, but I don't want to further that debate.
Ms. Harder, now that I've heard what you.... I think I know where you might be going. I'm assuming that in this particular case, I repeat, you want to revisit something that's already been addressed by clause-by-clause here. Is that correct?
View Rachael Harder Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Chair, I appreciate your patience. What I would like to do is seek unanimous consent to move the following motion.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
I'm sorry, Ms. Harder. I can't let you move a motion in the middle of a point of order, but, for the sake of fairness, here's what I'm going to do. I'm going to suggest something, but I have to confer with the table staff before I do that, okay? How about I do that first, as you mentioned earlier, as you recommended? I will be as quick as I can, and we'll come back and reconvene.
Now I know that you wish to propose a motion. You're seeking unanimous consent. I'm going to come back to you and see what I can do on that particular ruling.
View Rachael Harder Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Simms, if I may, very quickly, as you go and approach the clerk to confer on this, I would contend that there is a significant issue here with the removal of the proposed section 4.1 in this legislation, and we must do our best as members of this committee to contend for Canadians and their freedoms.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Okay, Ms. Harder. I have no doubt that we'll address that. I appreciate that; I really do, but I have to go now and try to figure out how to fit what you want to do within the confines of the Standing Orders of the House of Commons, so please, if I could just suspend for a few moments, I'll come back to you with the appropriate way of doing this, as you wish to do.
View Rachael Harder Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Simms.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
All right, folks, we're going to suspend for a few minutes. I'll be back shortly.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Hello, everyone, and welcome back to this meeting.
I want to apologize to those listening abroad to this webcast. We had some technical difficulties as we went down. These seem to be fixed, and everything seems to be okay. We'll keep you posted.
Ms. Harder, I may have a suggestion for you. The reason I couldn't let you expand on the points you were making is that in the beginning you put up your hand and I asked whether you were on a point of order. You said yes, and we moved from there, so this is probably as much my fault as yours.
That being said, if you wish to bring up the points that you wish to make, you may proceed when these proceedings and the debate begin.
I'm going to call for amendment G-10, which reminds me to tell everyone, don't forget about the “raise hand” function on the side, because it makes life a lot easier for me and everyone else technically. Also, let's not try to talk over each other. Because of interpretation, it makes life extremely difficult, and also for our folks at Hansard it makes it very difficult.
Ms. Harder.
View Rachael Harder Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair. If you look to page 1064 of the fabulous green book we have that guides the procedure in these things, you will see a section that outlines the protocols with regard to unanimous consent.
It's my understanding that I have the ability to seek unanimous consent to move a motion, and if I'm granted that unanimous consent, then I am able to move a motion during a point of order.
I would wish, then—
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
One moment, please. Just nod in my direction if I'm getting this right.
You can seek unanimous consent on a point of order to proceed with your motion. This is what you're asking.
You can do that, or you can withdraw your point of order and then we can launch into amendment G-10, concerning which I would advise you to raise your hand at that point, if you wish to discuss what you wish to discuss.
I'm not playing; I'm just trying to make things easier for you, because I know you want to get your opinion in.
Do you wish to withdraw your point of order, or do you want to seek unanimous consent to proceed with a motion within your...?
I'm sorry. To be very clear, what I'm saying to you is that you can withdraw the point of order and we can begin debate, for which you could be recognized from the floor.
View Rachael Harder Profile
CPC (AB)
If we begin the debate and I am recognized from the floor, it is within the context of clause 10. Is that correct?
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Not necessarily. I'm pretty easy about the way things proceed here. I can be quite flexible on these things. If we proceed to clause-by-clause and you raise your hand, I'll give you the floor.
I'm not trying to trick you, Ms. Harder. I'm just trying to make this path easier for you.
View Rachael Harder Profile
CPC (AB)
Okay, Mr. Simms, I'm going to trust you and I'm going to wait until you get started with clause-by-clause.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
I'm assuming you're withdrawing your point of order?
View Rachael Harder Profile
CPC (AB)
In good faith.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Indeed.
Okay folks, we're back to the meeting.
Thank you very much. I'm sorry for the technical difficulties in between. They happen from time to time, but this is the first time this has happened to us.
As you know, we're picking up clause-by-clause once more. Don't forget about your “raise hand” function, as I mentioned earlier.
We left off last time on amendment G-10.
Ms. Harder.
View Rachael Harder Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Simms, thank you so much for giving me the floor.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Rachael Harder Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Chair, I understand that this committee is doing, I believe, its best to get through this legislation quickly and to move it to a point that it can be voted on in the House of Commons. I believe, however, that there are some things that need to be considered before getting to that point.
As I've outlined previously, clause 3, or proposed section 4.1, was removed from the legislation last week. When that took place, the nature of this bill changed.
There is a charter statement that was provided by the justice department under the name of the justice minister. That charter statement determines whether or not this piece of legislation, Bill C-10, would be in agreement with or within the purview of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
That statement is now null and void, because a significant portion of the bill was removed last week. That being the case, I believe this committee needs to seek another statement with respect to the charter and whether the charter rights of Canadians are in fact being respected within the new outline provided within this bill.
I would draw the committee's attention to a few opinions or viewpoints that have been offered by experts. Most notably, former CRTC commissioner Peter Menzies said that this legislation “doesn't just infringe on free expression; it constitutes a full-blown assault upon it and, through it, the foundations of democracy.”
Mr. Chair, that is an incredibly damning statement in regard to this piece of legislation as it stands now, because that clause was removed last week. That being the case, I believe this committee needs to take the responsibility of seeking another charter statement.
The argument has been made by some members at this table—and by other members of the governing party when this has been raised in the House of Commons during question period—that Canadians shouldn't worry; that there would never be an imposition on their freedom and what they post on social media.
At the end of the day, however, if it's not there, it's not there. In other words, if the protection isn't granted, then there's no protection. It's that simple. If the protection is not outlined in this legislation, then there is no protection for Canadians.
We're talking about a regular component of their daily lives. We're talking about a video they post of their cat, about a video they post of their kids, about a conversation they're having with a friend on a social media platform. This is a new form of public square, and based on the charter, our right to freedom of expression should not be imposed upon.
I would argue, and many other experts have argued, that they are being imposed upon. That being the case, I believe we need to seek a new charter statement based on this legislation as it stands now.
I want to move a motion for this committee's consideration. If I may, I would like to read it into the record.
It reads:
That, given that the deletion of section 4.1, clause 3 of Bill C-10, would extend the application of the Broadcasting Act to programs uploaded by users of social media services, which in turn could violate paragraph 2(b) of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms;
and given that the current “Charter Statement” required under section 4.2 of the Department of Justice Act with respect to the potential effects of Bill C-10 directly states that “users of social media who upload programs for sharing with other users and are not affiliated with the service provider will not be subject to regulation” as part of its argument that Bill C-10 respects section 2(b) of the Charter, the committee:
(a) request that the Minister of Justice produce an updated “Charter Statement” under section 4.2 of the Department of Justice Act with respect to the potential effects of Bill C-10, as amended to date, on the rights and freedoms that are guaranteed by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms;
(b) invite the Minister of Canadian Heritage and the Minister of Justice to appear before the committee to discuss the implications of Bill C-10, as amended to date, for users of social media services; and
(c) suspend clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-10, notwithstanding the Committee's decision of March 26, 2021, until it has received the updated “Charter Statement” requested under paragraph (a) and has heard from the ministers invited under paragraph (b).
Mr. Chair, that is the end of my motion. I would reiterate how vitally important it is that this committee composed of legislators do its work responsibly and seek this statement from the justice minister.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Okay, everybody understands the motion.
Have you sent a copy of this, Ms. Harder, to our clerk?
View Rachael Harder Profile
CPC (AB)
Yes, a copy has been submitted in both French and English.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Julie Dabrusin Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Chair. I have two points.
I would like to be very clear, because it keeps being talked around. There is a clear exclusion, which has already been passed by this committee, to exclude individuals posting to social media. I need to make that absolutely clear. There is an exclusion for individuals posting content to social media. Beyond that, the Broadcasting Act does not cover content. This is not about moderating content.
I will, however, go one step further and also indicate that we are in the middle of clause-by-clause study. We do not have a completed bill before us. We are still in the process of a clause-by-clause study, and it is simply premature to be taking any moment to review what the impact of the bill would be until we have actually completed the process of determining what the bill will look like.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Anthony Housefather Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
I'd like to start by saying that I agree entirely with Ms. Dabrusin. The preamble of the motion takes a position that I don't agree with. I think it's a flawed interpretation of the removal of clause 3 of the bill. I also believe, as Ms. Dabrusin said, that the bill will continue to be amended, so for us to stop at each point in the bill, which may not reflect the bill at the end, to ask for updated charter statements is illogical.
Furthermore, and more importantly, let me direct you to the Department of Justice website as to what the rules are with respect to charter statements.
These charter statements, which were put into effect by our government, the Liberal government, basically originally included charter statements only for justice bills. Then, on December 13, 2019, through amendments to the Department of Justice Act, we created a new duty on the Minister of Justice to ensure that a charter statement is tabled in Parliament for every government bill. The charter statements are a transparency measure intended to inform parliamentary and public debate on a bill and help increase awareness and understanding of the charter.
The website explicitly states:
Charter Statements are intended to provide information to the public and Parliamentarians. Although a bill may change over the course of its passage through Parliament, Charter Statements reflect the bill at [the] time of introduction and are not updated.
Let me repeat that. Charter statements reflect the bill at the time of introduction and are not updated. It goes on to say, “Charter Statements are not legal opinions on the constitutionality of a bill.”
For a multiplicity of reasons, then, Mr. Chairman, I am against this motion: number one, that the legislation does not contemplate ever updating a charter statement, and it is explicitly stated that charter statements “reflect the bill at time of introduction and are not updated”; and second, because we are in the middle of a clause-by-clause debate on the bill, and if it were to be updated at any point for whatever reason, if that were permissible, it would make sense to do so only at the end of debate on the bill, once all the amendments had been adopted and one knew what the legislation would look like.
Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Scott Aitchison Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I think this is a very wise move.
To Ms. Dabrusin's point about a new subsection proposed in this bill that protects users—she's referring, I think, to proposed new subsection 2(2.1), which does protect users specifically—the removal of proposed new section 4.1 refers specifically to the programs that users use to upload their content.
We need to be really careful here. Effectively, I think what this is doing is pushing the regulatory impacts onto users. They're actually shifting them to the programs themselves. I think we need to be careful, and frankly, having a new charter statement—a review of this matter—may have tremendous impacts as we continue the clause-by-clause.
I realize the Liberals really want to rush this through and want to get it done, because they didn't do it in the first five years they had, but I think it behooves us to make sure we do this very carefully and make sure that something as fundamental as freedom of expression for Canadians is not hindered in any way by any moves we make here.
This is fundamental to our democracy and our way of life, and to ask a Liberal justice minister for a review of it is, I think, a very reasonable compromise to make sure, as we proceed and continue to go clause by clause, that we're doing so while ensuring that we're not in any way infringing on Canadians' fundamental freedom of expression—
View Martin Champoux Profile
BQ (QC)
View Martin Champoux Profile
2021-04-30 13:46
A point of order, Mr. Chair.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Hold on one second, Mr. Aitchison. There is a point of order from Mr. Champoux.
View Martin Champoux Profile
BQ (QC)
View Martin Champoux Profile
2021-04-30 13:46
I am sorry to interrupt Mr. Aitchison. I am finding the debate very impassioned, but I still have not received the motion in French. Our colleague Ms. Harder says that she had sent it in English and in French. However, I don't have the French version, or even the English version. To be able to discuss the motion, I would really like to have the French version, please. Can the clerk send it to me as soon as she can?
Thank you.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
I got a thumbs-up. I believe she's sending it. If you don't receive it in the next little while, Mr. Champoux, just let us know.
Mr. Aitchison, back to you, without any prejudice of course.
View Scott Aitchison Profile
CPC (ON)
There's none taken, anyhow.
I was summing up my point that making sure we get this right is far more important than getting it done quickly. I have real concerns that shifting the onus onto the programs that individual Canadians use opens up too many questions. It is very concerning that the CRTC, while it maybe wouldn't do so, would have the ability and the authority to start regulating the content that individual Canadians post to social media. This is the fear I have. Freedoms aren't taken away in one fell swoop in societies. They're chipped away bit by bit, all under the cover of some important protection from some fear that we should have.
It is well worth taking a pause and asking for a review by the justice minister to make sure we're not getting this wrong. This is so fundamental to our way of life and to the freedoms Canadians expect. We need to make sure we get it right, and that's the reason I think this is a wise pause. We're asking a Liberal minister of justice as well. This is not a partisan issue, I don't think. This is just good governance and making sure we take the time to get this right. That's all we're asking for.
View Rachael Harder Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Chair, to Ms. Dabrusin's point, originally there were two sections within this bill that had to do with individuals. One had to do with individual users, and one had to do with the programs those individuals might use to convey their message or the material they're wishing to share.
The section having to do with users is still intact. The section having to do with the programs that users use was removed. If an individual were to use YouTube, Facebook, TikTok or Twitter, they would be held to the regulations within the CRTC in terms of how those programs are used. That is a direct imposition on their freedom.
I'm not necessarily one who is arguing this on my own. In fact, when Ms. Dabrusin first brought forward the idea that clause 3 should be removed from the bill, Mr. Owen Ripley had comments to make in that regard. Mr. Owen Ripley, of course, is the director general of the broadcasting, copyright and creative marketplace branch at Canadian Heritage. These are his words. He said, “Ms. Dabrusin has signalled, the government intends to...repeal...section 4.1”.
At that point, it was only an intent. Now it's been followed through on.
He went on to say:
...meaning that there would no longer be any exclusion for social media services at all.
He explained:
For the benefit of the committee, in our previous sessions, the committee upheld the exclusion for users of social media companies. In other words, when you or I upload something to YouTube or some other sharing service, we will not be considered broadcasters for the purposes of the act. ...The CRTC couldn't call us before them, and we couldn't be subject to CRTC hearings.
However, Mr. Ripley continued by saying that if the exclusion were to be removed and the proposed new section 4.1 struck down, as it was last week, “the programming we upload onto YouTube, the programming we place on that service, would be subject to regulation moving forward but would be the responsibility of YouTube or whatever the sharing service is.” It is very important to note his words when he said, “it would be subject to regulation moving forward”. Those were his words. This is an expert.
For Ms. Dabrusin to try to mislead this committee, and for the government to try to mislead Canadians into thinking they wouldn't be impacted by this change, is wrong. If they are not scared to have this challenged, then why not allow for a charter statement to be redrafted based on the change that was made last week?
Of course, Mr. Ripley is not the only one who provided that type of commentary. In addition to him, former CRTC commissioner Peter Menzies—and I would hope if we're going to listen to any expert, we would want to listen to him—said that this legislation, “doesn’t just infringe on free expression; it constitutes a full-blown assault upon it and, through it, the foundations of democracy.” That is an extremely strong statement.
He also stated, “It’s difficult to contemplate the levels of moral hubris, incompetence or both that would lead people to believe such an infringement of rights is justifiable.”
Mr. Chair, this is a huge issue. For us to move forward as a committee with little to no regard for wanting to protect the charter rights of Canadians is frightening.
We like the charter. We post it proudly on our walls, as members of Parliament. We talk about it in the House of Commons with passion. We defend it rigorously. At least, that's what we used to do. For us to treat it as if it's just a suggested document rather than the supreme law of the land, is a shame on us.
To suggest we can just move forward, that it's not a big deal or that we will just wait until the end, which probably isn't true, is wrong. It's so wrong. Canadians deserve better. Canadians deserve to have their charter rights protected. Canadians deserve to have the members of this committee wish to seek greater clarity.
Michael Geist, a law professor at the University of Ottawa and the Canada research chair in Internet and e-commerce law, said, “The government believes that it should regulate all user generated content, leaving it to [the] regulator to determine on what terms and conditions will be attached the videos of millions of Canadians on sites like Youtube, Instagram, TikTok, and hundreds of other services.”
He is an expert in this field, and that is what he is saying. He is raising a massive red flag with regard to the part of this bill that was removed last week, which thereby removed protection for individuals and their use of social media and the content they post on the various platforms that are available to them. For us to move forward with little regard for the words spoken by former CRTC commissioner Peter Menzies, or Michael Geist, an expert in this area, or Mr. Owen Ripley, who is the director general of the broadcasting, copyright and creative marketplace branch, and pretend that somehow as individual members of Parliament we know better is incredibly pompous and incredibly irresponsible of us.
We have an opportunity here to do the right thing, so I'm confused as to why members wouldn't wish to do that. Why wouldn't we wish to push the pause button and seek a charter statement? That's simply what we're asking for here. If the charter statement says there is no problem and the bill aligns with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, then I guess it's the prerogative of the government to put the legislation through, if they have the votes within the House of Commons.
The whole point of clause-by-clause is to carefully analyze the legislation that is before a committee, and to ask good questions, seek clarification and make sure we are doing the right thing and acting in the best interests of Canadians. As of right now, based on the things that have been said by the experts I have listed, I am concerned that this bill, as it stands right now with the amendments that have been made, goes too far, and that it does infringe on the rights and freedoms of Canadians.
My request is very simple. I am respectfully asking that we push the pause button, seek a charter statement, move forward after we have that statement and do so in the best interests of Canadians, fighting for their freedom, defending their voices and ultimately standing by what we call the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which in subsection 2(b) offers protection for people's “freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression”. That thought, belief, opinion and expression can take place in the reality we call “nonvirtual” and in the reality we call virtual, such as social media platforms or apps. I believe we need to make sure we're contending for that and protecting it, and that we are on the side of Canadians and the supreme law of the land.
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