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2019-07-17 [p.5745]
— Nos. 421-03696, 421-03817, 421-03889, 421-04148 and 421-04455 concerning oil and gas. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-67-15;
2019-06-18 [p.5679]
— by Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni), one concerning the fishing industry (No. 421-04538) and one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-04539);
2019-06-17 [p.5654]
— No. 421-03505 concerning oil and gas. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-67-14;
2019-06-12 [p.5546]
— by Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands), one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-04455);
2019-06-12 [p.5549]
Q-2437 — Ms. Laverdière (Laurier—Sainte-Marie) — With regard to the Canada–Mexico Partnership, Canada's relationship with Mexico in the areas of mining, energy and the environment, and visits between both countries, since October 2018, with members of the administration of Mexican President Andrés Manuel Lopez Obrador: (a) what are the agreements reached between Canada and Mexico with regard to training, technical support, exchanges and other types of support pertaining to consultation of Indigenous peoples and other mining-affected communities and their participation in natural resource development projects; (b) what are the agreements reached between Canada and Mexico with regard to training, technical support, exchanges and other types of support pertaining to increasing public confidence in mining; (c) what are the agreements reached between Canada and Mexico with regard to training, technical support, exchanges and other types of support pertaining to good governance and best practices in the mining sector; (d) is there a guide, guidelines, model or other document that outlines what the government considers as good governance and best practices, used in this or other similar collaborations; (e) what are the agreements reached between Canada and Mexico with regard to training, technical support, exchanges and other types of support pertaining to security and human rights in mining and energy activities; (f) is there a guide, guidelines, model or other document that outlines what the government considers to be exemplary in terms of security and human rights in mining and energy development projects, used in this or other similar collaborations; (g) what are the agreements reached between Canada and Mexico with regard to training, technical support, exchanges and other types of support pertaining to sustainable mining; (h) is there a guide, guidelines, model or other document that outlines what the government considers to be sustainable mining, used in this or other similar collaborations; (i) have there been or will there be training or capacity building sessions between Canada and Mexico in the areas of consultation of Indigenous peoples and other mining­affected communities and their participation in natural resource development projects, increasing public confidence in mining, good governance and best practices in the mining sector, sustainable mining, or security and human rights in mining and energy activities and, if so, (i) when have these taken place during the administration of President Enrique Peña Nieto, (ii) when have these taken place with members of the incoming administration of President Andrés Manuel Lopez Obrador, between October 1 and December 1, 2018, (iii) when have these taken place or are scheduled to occur after December 1, 2018; (j) what are the objectives of the training or capacity-building sessions being provided in the areas of consultation of Indigenous peoples and other mining-affected communities and their participation in natural resource development projects, increasing public confidence in mining, good governance and best practices in the mining sector, sustainable mining, or security and human rights in mining and energy activities; (k) what is the nature of the technical support or capacity building that Canada is providing or envisions providing to Mexico in the areas of consultation of Indigenous peoples and other mining-affected communities and their participation in natural resource development projects, increasing public confidence in mining, good governance and best practices in the mining sector, sustainable mining, or security and human rights in mining and energy activities, including (i) who is providing such training or capacity building, (ii) who is participating on the part of both countries, (iii) what funds have been allotted for this work, (iv) what is the source of these funds; (l) what exchanges have taken place or are planned or envisioned to take place between Canada and Mexico in the areas of consultation of Indigenous peoples and other mining­affected communities and their participation in natural resource development projects, increasing public confidence in mining, good governance and best practices in the mining sector, sustainable mining, or security and human rights in mining and energy activities, including (i) who is participating on the part of both countries, (ii) what funds have been allotted for this work, (iii) what is the source of these funds; (m) what was the program and related agenda of Mexican public officials from the Lopez Obrador administration who visited Canada in October and November of 2018, including (i) meetings held, (ii) mine sites visited, (iii) other events, (iv) guests present, (v) main takeaways and agreements reached, (vi) whether informal or formal; (n) what policies, norms or official guidelines do Canadian public officials need to respect with regard to security and human rights of communities affected by mining and energy projects when collaborating with the Mexican government in these areas; (o) what policies, norms or official guidelines do Canadian public officials need to respect with regard to security and human rights of communities affected by mining and energy projects when engaging with the private sector for related activities and investments or potential investments in Mexico; and (p) what mechanisms exist in the case where there are complaints as a result of violations on the part of Canadian public officials of the policies, norms or official guidelines delineated in (n) and (o)? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2437.
2019-06-06 [p.5458]
— by Mr. Richards (Banff—Airdrie), one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-04148);
2019-05-27 [p.5337]
— No. 421-03415 concerning drinking water. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-46-06;
2019-05-16 [p.5318]
— by Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby), one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-03817);
2019-05-16 [p.5319]
— by Mr. Donnelly (Port Moody—Coquitlam), one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-03889).
2019-05-09 [p.5282]
— by Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands), one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-03696);
2019-05-03 [p.5232]
— by Mr. Yurdiga (Fort McMurray—Cold Lake), one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-03505);
2019-04-30 [p.5198]
Pursuant to Order made Monday, April 29, 2019, the House proceeded to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion of Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona), seconded by Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay), — That, in the opinion of the House, corporate executives and their lobbyists have had too much access to and influence over the Government of Canada, setting working Canadians and their families back by:
(a) encouraging attempts by the Prime Minister to undermine the independence of the Public Prosecution Service of Canada and the integrity of Canada’s rule of law;
(b) forcing Canadians to pay high prices for prescription drugs by blocking the establishment of a single, public and universal drug insurance plan;
(c) providing huge subsidies to large oil and gas companies, while putting corporate interests over the protection of Canada’s Pacific coastal waters in the Kinder Morgan pipeline approval process;
(d) motivating the Minister of Environment and Climate Change to give a handout of $12 million to a multi-billion-dollar corporation owned by one of Canada's wealthiest families;
(e) giving Canada's most profitable banks the chance to review and revise a report intended to shed light on anti-consumer banking practices; and
(f) leaving intact a host of tax loopholes that allow the richest Canadians to avoid paying their fair share for Canada’s public services like health care, pensions and housing;
and that therefore, as a first step toward addressing these failings, the government should immediately move to recover the $12 million given to Loblaws and reinvest it to the benefit of working Canadians and their families.
The question was put on the motion and it was negatived on the following division:
(Division No. 1299 -- Vote no 1299) - View vote details.
YEAS: 46, NAYS: 251
2019-04-29 [p.5177]
The Order was read for the consideration of the Business of Supply.
Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona), seconded by Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay), moved, — That, in the opinion of the House, corporate executives and their lobbyists have had too much access to and influence over the Government of Canada, setting working Canadians and their families back by:
(a) encouraging attempts by the Prime Minister to undermine the independence of the Public Prosecution Service of Canada and the integrity of Canada’s rule of law;
(b) forcing Canadians to pay high prices for prescription drugs by blocking the establishment of a single, public and universal drug insurance plan;
(c) providing huge subsidies to large oil and gas companies, while putting corporate interests over the protection of Canada’s Pacific coastal waters in the Kinder Morgan pipeline approval process;
(d) motivating the Minister of Environment and Climate Change to give a handout of $12 million to a multi-billion-dollar corporation owned by one of Canada's wealthiest families;
(e) giving Canada's most profitable banks the chance to review and revise a report intended to shed light on anti-consumer banking practices; and
(f) leaving intact a host of tax loopholes that allow the richest Canadians to avoid paying their fair share for Canada’s public services like health care, pensions and housing;
and that therefore, as a first step toward addressing these failings, the government should immediately move to recover the $12 million given to Loblaws and reinvest it to the benefit of working Canadians and their families.
Debate arose thereon.
2019-04-29 [p.5183]
Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) laid upon the Table, — Government responses, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), to the following petitions:
— No. 421-03277 concerning environmental assessment and review. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-118-04;
2019-04-29 [p.5184]
By unanimous consent, it was ordered, — That, at the conclusion of today's debate on the opposition motion in the name of the Member for Elmwood—Transcona, all questions necessary to dispose of the motion be deemed put and a recorded division deemed requested and deferred until Tuesday, April 30, 2019, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions.
2019-04-29 [p.5189]
Q-2305 — Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — With regard to the credit agreement between Trans Mountain Pipeline Finance and Her Majesty in Right of Canada: (a) what was the source of funds used to secure the environmental obligation required by the National Energy Board and how will Export Development Canada (EDC) report on this transaction in the future; (b) how was the interest rate of 4.7% determined, who authorized it, and were any officials outside of EDC involved in the decision; (c) does the Trans Mountain Corporation (TMC) have a legal obligation to repay the $6.5 billion borrowed from the Canada Account; (d) what will be the source or sources of revenue the Canada Development Investment Corporation (CDEV) will draw upon to satisfy repayment provisions of the credit agreement; (e) was any portion of the $70 million (earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization) in revenue reported for Trans Mountain by the Department of Finance in its November 2018 Budget update transmitted, and if so, to what entities was it transmitted; (f) how will monies allocated by the TMC to give to CDEV for repayment of the debt to the Canada Account be identified in annual financial reports by the TMC and its subsidiaries; (g) does an amortization chart exist detailing how TMC operations will repay borrowed funds, and if so, what are the details of that chart; (h) if generated revenues are insufficient to cover CDEV’s debt to the Canada Account, what organization or organizations within government will be responsible for repayment; (i) how will payment for the purpose of paying down the principal and interest owed to the Canada Account be described in CDEV’s future financial disclosures; and (j) how will EDC identify the receipt of repayment funds from CDEV to the Canada Account? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2305.
2019-04-29 [p.5190]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona), seconded by Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay), in relation to the Business of Supply.
The debate continued.
2019-04-29 [p.5191]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona), seconded by Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay), in relation to the Business of Supply.
The debate continued.
2019-04-29 [p.5191]
Pursuant to Order made earlier today, the question was deemed put on the motion and the recorded division was deemed requested and deferred until Tuesday, April 30, 2019, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions.
2019-04-10 [p.5133]
— by Mr. Dusseault (Sherbrooke), one concerning rail transportation (No. 421-03401) and one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-03402);
2019-04-09 [p.5118]
— by Mrs. Gallant (Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke), one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-03343) and five concerning firearms (Nos. 421-03344 to 421-03348);
2019-04-05 [p.5092]
Q-2223 — Mr. Caron (Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques) — With regard to government advertising for oil pipeline projects, including approved projects and projects in the evaluation phase, since November 4, 2015: what is the total amount spent on advertising, broken down by (i) year, (ii) pipeline project, (iii) department, (iv) advertising platform, (v) supplier? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2223.
2019-03-22 [p.5042]
— Nos. 421-03190, 421-03215 and 421-03233 concerning oil and gas. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-67-12;
2019-03-22 [p.5042]
— Nos. 421-03206 and 421-03250 concerning the protection of the environment. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-3-70;
2019-03-18 [p.4698]
Q-2162 — Mr. Dreeshen (Red Deer—Mountain View) — With regard to the twinning of the Trans Mountain Pipeline and the statement made multiple times by the Prime Minister in the House on February 13, 2018, that “We will get the pipeline built”: (a) when will the government get the pipeline built; and (b) how many kilometers of the pipeline expansion were built or completed in the 2018 calendar year? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2162.
2019-02-28 [p.4671]
— by Mr. Warkentin (Grande Prairie—Mackenzie), one concerning environmental assessment and review (No. 421-03277);
2019-02-26 [p.4629]
— No. 421-03145 concerning oil and gas. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-67-11.
2019-02-20 [p.4597]
— No. 421-03120 concerning oil and gas. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-67-10.
2019-02-20 [p.4599]
— by Mr. Choquette (Drummond), one concerning the protection of the environment (No. 421-03232) and one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-03233);
2019-02-07 [p.4578]
— by Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni), one concerning the protection of the environment (No. 421-03206);
2019-02-05 [p.4561]
— by Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands), one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-03190);
2019-01-31 [p.4549]
The Deputy Speaker laid upon the Table, — Report of the Parliamentary Budget Officer entitled "Canada’s purchase of the Trans Mountain Pipeline – Financial and Economic Considerations" for the year 2019, pursuant to the Parliament of Canada Act, R.S., 1985, c. P-1, sbs. 79.2(2). — Sessional Paper No. 8560-421-1119-30.
2019-01-28 [p.4501]
— by Mr. Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan), one concerning refugees (No. 421-03116), one concerning Afghanistan (No. 421-03117), one concerning China (No. 421-03118), one concerning firearms (No. 421-03119), one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-03120) and one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-03121);
2019-01-28 [p.4501]
Pursuant to Standing Order 39(7), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the returns to the following questions made into Orders for Return:
Q-2030 — Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — With respect to the Trans Mountain pipeline purchased by the government on August 31, 2018: (a) did the Minister of Natural Resources seek a cost-benefit analysis of acquiring the existing pipeline and of building an expansion; (b) if the answer to (a) is affirmative, (i) when was the analysis sought, (ii) when was the finalized analysis received, (iii) in what format was the finalized analysis received, for instance as a briefing note, a memo, a report, etc.; and (c) if the answer to (a) is affirmative, what are the details of the analysis, including (i) name and credentials of the author or authors, (ii) date of publication, (iii) the WTI/WCS differential used in the calculations, (iv) the range in years from which data on Canada’s oil industry was captured and analyzed for the study, (v) the impact of an expanded pipeline on jobs in the Parkland refinery, (vi) the estimated number of construction jobs and of permanent jobs created by the expansion project, (vii) the projected construction costs of the pipeline expansion project, (viii) an assessment of the impacts of a tanker spill or pipeline leak on British Columbia’s tourism and fisheries industries, (ix) the government’s liability in the event of a spill or leak, broken down by recovery costs for marine, alluvial, and land-based ecologies (including but not limited to remediation, rehabilitation and restoration of sites and species, especially endangered species) and financial compensation for loss of livelihood and involuntary resettlement of human populations? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2030.
2019-01-28 [p.4525]
Q-2140 — Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland) — With regard to the proposed Eagle Spirit Energy Corridor project for a pipeline between Fort McMurray, Alberta, and Grassy Point, British Columbia: (a) has the government conducted an analysis of the impact of Bill C-48, the Oil Tanker Moratorium Act, on the proposed project and, if so, what are the details of such an analysis, including the findings; and (b) will the government exempt vessels transporting oil in relation to the project from the moratorium proposed in Bill C-48? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2140.
2019-01-28 [p.4527]
Q-2146 — Ms. Quach (Salaberry—Suroît) — With regard to the pipelines passing through the region of Vaudreuil-Soulanges: (a) since 2008, how many hydrostatic tests and any other safety tests (integrity, corrosion, etc.) have been conducted on all the pipelines over their entire length from Ontario to Quebec, broken down by (i) pipeline, (ii) type of test, (iii) date, (iv) federal entity or contractor, (v) test location and province, (vi) test result; (b) when requesting flow reversal for the 9B and Trans-Northern pipelines, did the government or any other entity calculate the greenhouse gas emissions upstream and downstream of the project; (c) if the answer in (b) is affirmative, what are the upstream and downstream emissions for each of the projects; (d) since 2008, how many leaks have there been on all the pipelines, in either Ontario or Quebec, broken down by (i) pipeline, (ii) location and province; (e) for each of the leaks in (d), what is (i) the quantity of the spill in litres, (ii) the company responsible for the pipeline, (iii) the direct or indirect cost to the federal government, (iv) the date of the spill, (v) the date on which the government or one of its regulatory agencies became aware of the spill; (f) since 2008, have the official emergency response plans been sent to the municipal public safety authorities and the regional county municipality for each of these pipelines; (g) if the answer in (f) is affirmative, for each plan sent, what is (i) the date it was sent, (ii) the date of confirmation of receipt, (iii) the names of the sender and the recipient; (h) since 2008, what are the details of all the cases of non-compliance, deficiencies and violations of federal laws and regulations found by the National Energy Board with respect to the pipelines, including (i) the date, (ii) a description of the deficiency found and the corrective action requested, (iii) the location of the deficiency, (iv) the pipeline and the name of the company that owns the pipeline, (v) the amount of the fine paid; (i) for each case of non-compliance, deficiency or violation in (h), on what exact date did the National Energy Board or a federal government department follow up with the respective companies and verify that the corrective action had been carried out; (j) for each follow-up in (i), what actions were taken; (k) since 2008, how many detection system failures have been identified by the National Energy Board on the pipelines and what are the details of each failure, including (i) the date, (ii) the pipeline, (iii) the location, (iv) the reason for the failure; (l) for each pipeline, in the event of a spill in the Soulanges area, what is the expected time (i) to detect it, (ii) to stop the flow of oil, (iii) for emergency services to arrive on site; and (m) where are the companies that have been hired to respond to a spill in the Soulanges area and how long will it take them to arrive on site? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2146.
2018-12-13 [p.4471]
Q-2029 — Mrs. Vecchio (Elgin—Middlesex—London) — With regard to the impact of increased fuel costs as a result of the federal carbon tax on the Canadian Forces: (a) what was the total amount spent on fuel by the Canadian Forces in the 2017-18 fiscal year; (b) what is the projected increase in the amount spent on fuel by the Canadian Forces as a result of the carbon tax for each of the next five years; and (c) what are the projected total fuel expenditures for each of the next five years? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2029.
2018-12-10 [p.4445]
Q-2024 — Mr. Maguire (Brandon—Souris) — With regard to the increase in fuel costs for school buses as a direct result of the federal carbon tax: does the government have any plans to compensate every local school board which will have to pay increased fuel costs and, if so, how much will each local school board receive in compensation funding? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2024.
2018-12-03 [p.4392]
Q-1987 — Mr. Falk (Provencher) — With regard to the government’s decision to purchase the Trans Mountain pipeline and its related infrastructure from Kinder Morgan: (a) what is the breakdown of the $4.5 billion spent on the purchase, including (i) the sum spent to purchase the real pipeline assets, (ii) the sum spent to purchase the rights and easements of the pipeline assets, (iii) the sum spent to pay salaries, (iv) the sum spent to pay legal fees, (v) descriptions and sums of any other expenditures contributing to the $4.5 billion total; (b) what was the rationale for the final purchase being completed before the Federal Court of Appeal’s ruling was issued; (c) what is the explanation as to why the purchase was not made conditional subject to regulatory approval; (d) what is the summary of measures considered in anticipation of how the Federal Court of Appeal might rule; (e) what was the estimated worth of the pipeline in market terms at the time of purchase; (f) what is the date of the most recent evaluation of the condition of the existing pipeline; (g) what was the valuation of the expansion project at the time of purchase; and (h) what is the the current estimated cost to complete the Trans Mountain expansion? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1987.
2018-11-30 [p.4384]
— Nos. 421-02804 and 421-02844 concerning oil and gas. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-67-08;
2018-11-28 [p.4371]
Pursuant to Standing Order 52, Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland) asked leave to move the adjournment of the House for the purpose of discussing a specific and important matter requiring urgent consideration, namely, the Canadian oil and gas sector.
The Speaker decided that the matter was proper to be discussed and, pursuant to Standing Order 52(9), directed that it be considered later today, at the ordinary hour of daily adjournement.
2018-11-28 [p.4372]
By unanimous consent, it was ordered, — That, notwithstanding any Standing Order or usual practice of the House, during the debate on the motion to concur in the 18th Report of the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration, and during the debate pursuant to Standing Order 52, no quorum calls, dilatory motions or requests for unanimous consent shall be received by the Chair; and that, at the conclusion of the debate on the motion to concur in the 18th Report of the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration, the question be deemed put and a recorded division deemed requested and deferred to Wednesday, December 5, 2018, immediately before the time provided for Private Members' Business.
2018-11-28 [p.4373]
At 8:41 p.m., pursuant to Standing Order 52(10), the House proceeded to the consideration of a motion to adjourn the House for the purpose of discussing an important matter requiring urgent consideration, namely, the Canadian oil and gas sector.
Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland), seconded by Mr. Kmiec (Calgary Shepard), moved, — That this House do now adjourn.
Debate arose thereon.
2018-11-28 [p.4373]
At midnight, the Speaker declared the motion adopted.
2018-11-19 [p.4285]
Q-1971 — Mrs. Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster) — With regard to the new round of consultations announced on October 3, 2018, in relation to the Trans Mountain Pipeline by the government: what is the complete list of individuals, First Nations and organizations which the government is planning on consulting? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1971.
2018-11-06 [p.4241]
— No. 421-02689 concerning oil and gas. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-67-07;
2018-11-05 [p.4230]
Q-1890 — Mr. Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley) — With regard to the impending purchase of the Trans Mountain pipeline by the government, can the Minister of Natural Resources confirm in relation to the Pipeline Safety Act and National Energy Board Act: (a) whether the government considers itself a company as authorized under these acts to operate a pipeline; and (b) if the answer to (a) is affirmative, how this pertains to the National Energy Board’s mandate under these acts to order a company to reimburse the costs incurred by any government institution due to the unintended or uncontrolled release of oil, gas or any other commodity from a pipeline? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1890.
2018-11-05 [p.4231]
Q-1891 — Mr. Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley) — With regard to consultations undertaken by Kinder Morgan with Indigenous groups impacted by the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion and given the impending purchase of the pipeline by the government, will the Minister of Natural Resources: (a) table all mutual benefit agreements previously reached between Kinder Morgan and First Nation band councils given that they will soon constitute agreements reached with the Crown; and (b) guarantee that all such agreements established the free, prior and informed consent to the pipeline from each band? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1891.
2018-10-31 [p.4207]
— Nos. 421-02580, 421-02594, 421-02706 and 421-02753 concerning oil and gas. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-67-06;
2018-10-29 [p.4165]
— by Ms. Malcolmson (Nanaimo—Ladysmith), one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-02844);
2018-10-23 [p.4096]
— by Mr. Donnelly (Port Moody—Coquitlam), one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-02804);
2018-10-16 [p.4070]
— by Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands), one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-02753).
2018-10-02 [p.4028]
— by Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands), one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-02706);
2018-09-28 [p.4020]
— by Mr. Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly), one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-02689);
2018-09-24 [p.4000]
Pursuant to Standing Order 66(2) and to Order made Tuesday, May 29, 2018, the House resumed consideration of the motion of Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland), seconded by Mr. Viersen (Peace River—Westlock), — That the Second Report of the Standing Committee on Natural Resources, presented on Wednesday, September 21, 2016, be concurred in. (Concurrence in Committee Reports No. 24)
The debate continued.
2018-09-18 [p.3967]
— by Mr. Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan), one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-02594) and one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-02595);
2018-09-17 [p.3923]
Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) laid upon the Table, — Government responses, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), to the following petitions:
— Nos. 421-02352, 421-02472, 421-02486, 421-02492, 421-02496, 421-02508, 421-02553 and 421-02564 concerning the protection of the environment. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-3-57;
2018-09-17 [p.3924]
— Nos. 421-02509 and 421-02558 concerning oil and gas. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-67-05;
2018-09-17 [p.3924]
— No. 421-02548 concerning navigable waters. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-101-24;
2018-09-17 [p.3925]
— by Ms. Malcolmson (Nanaimo—Ladysmith), one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-02580);
2018-06-20 [p.3871]
— by Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland), one concerning navigable waters (No. 421-02548);
2018-06-20 [p.3872]
— by Ms. Boutin-Sweet (Hochelaga), one concerning chronic fatigue syndrome (No. 421-02557) and one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-02558);
2018-06-19 [p.3858]
— by Mr. Champagne (Minister of International Trade) — Copy of the Directive to Export Development Canada regarding the Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion (P.C. 2018-683), pursuant to the Financial Administration Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. F-11, sbs. 89(4). — Sessional Paper No. 8560-421-1087-03. (Pursuant to Standing Order 32(5), permanently referred to the Standing Committee on International Trade)
2018-06-18 [p.3821]
— by Ms. Malcolmson (Nanaimo—Ladysmith), one concerning the protection of the environment (No. 421-02508) and one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-02509);
2018-06-11 [p.3613]
Q-1694 — Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie) — With regard to all types of subsidies and all types of loans to the gas, oil and coal industry: (a) what was the dollar value of the grants provided to natural gas, oil and coal industry companies, in Canada and abroad, between 2015 and 2018 inclusive, broken down by (i) year, (ii) type of industry (oil, gas, coal), (iii) company name, (iv) amount provided; (b) what was the dollar value of the loans provided to natural gas, oil and coal industry companies, in Canada and abroad, between 2015 and 2018 inclusive, broken down by (i) year, (ii) type of industry (oil, gas, coal), (iii) company name, (iv) amount provided; (c) what was the dollar value of the tax relief provided to natural gas, oil and coal industry companies, in Canada and abroad, between 2011 and 2018 inclusive, broken down by (i) year, (ii) type of tax relief used, (iii) type of industry (oil, gas, coal), (iv) dollar value of the tax relief; and (d) according to the government’s estimates, when does it expect to completely eliminate subsidies for fossil fuels such as natural gas, oil and coal, in Canada and abroad? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1694.
2018-06-11 [p.3617]
Q-1705 — Mr. Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay) — With regard to the approval of the Trans Mountain Pipeline Project and the work of the Ministerial Review Panel appointed by the government in this matter: (a) can construction of a new Trans Mountain Pipeline be reconciled with Canada’s climate change commitments; (b) in the absence of a comprehensive national energy strategy, how can policy-makers effectively assess projects such as the Trans Mountain Pipeline; (c) how might Cabinet square approval of the Trans Mountain Pipeline with its commitment to reconciliation with First Nations and to the UNDRIP principles of “free, prior, and informed consent”; (d) given the changed economic and political circumstances, the perceived flaws in the National Energy Board process, and also the criticism of the Ministerial Panel’s own review, how can Canada be confident in its assessment of the project’s economic rewards and risks; (e) if approved, what route would best serve aquifer, municipal, aquatic and marine safety; and (f) how does federal policy define the terms “social licence” and “Canadian public interest” and their inter-relationships? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1705.
2018-05-30 [p.3321]
Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland), seconded by Mr. Viersen (Peace River—Westlock), moved, — That the Second Report of the Standing Committee on Natural Resources, presented on Wednesday, September 21, 2016, be concurred in. (Concurrence in Committee Report No. 24)
Debate arose thereon.
2018-05-24 [p.3280]
Pursuant to Standing Order 69(2), on motion of Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland), seconded by Mr. Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope), Bill S-245, An Act to declare the Trans Mountain Pipeline Project and related works to be for the general advantage of Canada, was read the first time and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.
2018-04-16 [p.3103]
Pursuant to Standing Order 52, Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland) asked leave to move the adjournment of the House for the purpose of discussing a specific and important matter requiring urgent consideration, namely, the Trans Mountain Expansion Project.
The Speaker decided that the matter was proper to be discussed and, pursuant to Standing Order 52(9), directed that it be considered later today, at the ordinary hour of daily adjournment.
2018-04-16 [p.3106]
Pursuant to Standing Order 52(10), the House proceeded to the consideration of a motion to adjourn the House for the purpose of discussing an important matter requiring urgent consideration, namely, the Trans Mountain Expansion Project.
Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland), seconded by Mr. Warkentin (Grande Prairie—Mackenzie), moved, — That this House do now adjourn.
Debate arose thereon.
2018-02-13 [p.2698]
Pursuant to Standing Order 45, the House proceeded to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion of Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland), seconded by Mr. Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock), — That, given the Trans Mountain Expansion Project is in the national interest, will create jobs and provide provinces with access to global markets, the House call on the Prime Minister to prioritize the construction of the federally-approved Trans Mountain Expansion Project by taking immediate action, using all tools available; to establish certainty for the project, and to mitigate damage from the current interprovincial trade dispute, tabling his plan in the House no later than noon on Thursday, February 15, 2018.
The question was put on the motion and it was negatived on the following division:
(Division No. 450 -- Vote no 450) - View vote details.
YEAS: 88, NAYS: 223
2018-02-12 [p.2681]
The Order was read for the consideration of the Business of Supply.
Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland), seconded by Mr. Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock), moved, — That, given the Trans Mountain Expansion Project is in the national interest, will create jobs and provide provinces with access to global markets, the House call on the Prime Minister to prioritize the construction of the federally-approved Trans Mountain Expansion Project by taking immediate action, using all tools available; to establish certainty for the project, and to mitigate damage from the current interprovincial trade dispute, tabling his plan in the House no later than noon on Thursday, February 15, 2018.
Debate arose thereon.
2018-02-12 [p.2690]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland), seconded by Mr. Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock), in relation to the Business of Supply.
The debate continued.
2018-02-12 [p.2691]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland), seconded by Mr. Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock), in relation to the Business of Supply.
The debate continued.
2018-02-12 [p.2691]
The question was put on the motion and, pursuant to Standing Order 45, the recorded division was deferred until Tuesday, February 13, 2018, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions.
2018-01-29 [p.2600]
Q-1325 — Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — With regard to the figure of 15,000 jobs related to the Trans Mountain project cited by the government, what are the details of: (a) any correspondence, reports, or documents prepared to brief the Minister of Natural Resources' office; (b) any correspondence, reports or documents prepared to brief the Office of the Prime Minister; and (c) any correspondence, reports, or documents that relate or support this figure of 15,000 jobs including (i) date, (ii) sender, (iii) recipients, (iv) title? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1325.
2017-11-30 [p.2470]
— No. 421-01748 concerning oil and gas exploration. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-67-04.
2017-10-25 [p.2273]
— by Mr. Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan), one concerning oil and gas exploration (No. 421-01748);
2017-06-06 [p.1843]
Pursuant to Order made Thursday, June 1, 2017, the House proceeded to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion of Mr. Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope), seconded by Mr. Ritz (Battlefords—Lloydminster), — That the House agree that the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Expansion Project: (a) has social license to proceed; (b) is critical to the Canadian economy and the creation of thousands of jobs; (c) is safe and environmentally sound, as recognized and accepted by the National Energy Board; (d) is under federal jurisdiction with respect to approval and regulation; and (e) should be constructed with the continued support of the federal government, as demonstrated by the Prime Minister personally announcing the approval of the project.
The question was put on the motion and it was agreed to on the following division:
(Division No. 292 -- Vote no 292) - View vote details.
YEAS: 250, NAYS: 51
2017-06-01 [p.1810]
The Order was read for the consideration of the Business of Supply.
Mr. Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope), seconded by Mr. Ritz (Battlefords—Lloydminster), moved, — That the House agree that the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Expansion Project: (a) has social license to proceed; (b) is critical to the Canadian economy and the creation of thousands of jobs; (c) is safe and environmentally sound, as recognized and accepted by the National Energy Board; (d) is under federal jurisdiction with respect to approval and regulation; and (e) should be constructed with the continued support of the federal government, as demonstrated by the Prime Minister personally announcing the approval of the project.
Debate arose thereon.
2017-06-01 [p.1811]
By unanimous consent, it was ordered, — That, at the conclusion of today's debate on the opposition motion in the name of the Member for Chilliwack—Hope, all questions necessary to dispose of the motion be deemed put and a recorded division deemed requested and deferred until Tuesday, June 6, 2017, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions.
2017-06-01 [p.1811]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope), seconded by Mr. Ritz (Battlefords—Lloydminster), in relation to the Business of Supply.
The debate continued.
2017-06-01 [p.1811]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope), seconded by Mr. Ritz (Battlefords—Lloydminster), in relation to the Business of Supply.
The debate continued.
2017-06-01 [p.1811]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope), seconded by Mr. Ritz (Battlefords—Lloydminster), in relation to the Business of Supply.
The debate continued.
2017-06-01 [p.1812]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope), seconded by Mr. Ritz (Battlefords—Lloydminster), in relation to the Business of Supply.
The debate continued.
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