Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 3 of 3
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Scott Brison Profile
2018-03-23 4:38 [p.17974]
moved:
That Vote 5, in the amount of $1,000,000, under Canadian Broadcasting Corporation—Payments, in the Interim Estimates for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2019, be concurred in.
propose:
Que le crédit 5, au montant de 1 000 000 $, sous la rubrique Société Radio-Canada — Paiements, du Budget provisoire des dépenses pour l'exercice se terminant le 31 mars 2019, soit agréé.
View Anthony Rota Profile
Lib. (ON)

Question No. 887--
Mr. Brad Trost:
With regard to the government’s answer to Order Paper Question 7 in the House of Commons on Friday, May 12, 2006: (a) how many individuals are there in Canada who may be potentially considered too dangerous to own firearms; (b) of the individuals in (a), how many are (i) wanted for a violent criminal offence, (ii) persons of interest to police (iii) violent persons, (iv) known sex offenders, (v) known prolific repeat, dangerous, or high risk offenders, (vi) known persons who have been observed to have behaviours that may be dangerous to public safety; (c) how many individuals have been charged with a violent criminal offence; (d) how many individuals are awaiting court action and disposition or will be released on conditions for a violent criminal offence, including (i) on probation or parole, (ii) released on street enforceable conditions, (iii) subject to a restraining order or peace bond; (e) how many individuals have been prohibited or refused firearms; (f) how many individuals have been prohibited from hunting; (g) how many individuals have been previously deported; (h) how many individuals have been subject to a protective order in any province in Canada; (i) how many individuals have been refused a firearms license or have had one revoked; and (j) how many individuals have been flagged in the Firearms Interest Police database?
Response
Hon. Ralph Goodale (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, with regard to (a) and (b), the RCMP does not keep a list of individuals who are “potentially considered” to be too dangerous to own firearms.
With regard to (c), (d), (g), (h), and (j), the collection of this information for statistical or reporting purposes does not fall under the mandate of the RCMP.
The Canadian Police Information Centre is an integrated, automated central repository of operational law enforcement information that allows for immediate storage and retrieval of current information about particular offences and individuals. It does not function as a tool for statistical analysis.
From January 1, 2001, when the Firearms Act required individuals to hold a licence to possess and acquire firearms, until January 31, 2017, 12,609 applications for a firearms licence were refused and 35,300 firearms licences were revoked.

Question No. 891--
Mr. Pat Kelly:
With regard to travel and relocation for public service employees and parliamentary staff, and the independent review recently ordered by the President of the Treasury Board: (a) has any policy been created since September 23, 2016, concerning reimbursement for relocation expenses; (b) what criteria are used to calculate reasonable expenses; (c) what criteria are used to define reasonable expenses; (d) what new requirements must an employee meet in order to receive reimbursement for reasonable expenses; (e) what is the cap, if any, on reimbursable reasonable expenses; (f) which departments, if any, other than the Treasury Board, were involved in creating this new policy; (g) has the policy in (f) been finalized; and (h) if the answer in (g) is negative, when will it be finalized?
Response
Hon. Scott Brison (President of the Treasury Board, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, with regard to (a), (g), and (h), travel and relocation benefits for employees in the core public service are covered by the national joint council travel directive and the national joint council relocation directive respectively. The cyclical review process has begun for the negotiation of the national joint council relocation directive. Parties are to exchange proposals on June 1, 2017. The Treasury Board Secretariat of Canada is not responsible for policies governing parliamentary employees--e.g., employees of the House of Commons and the Senate.
With respect to the exempt staff who work in ministers’ offices, their terms and conditions of employment are governed by the policies for ministers’ offices. As part of a recent commitment by the Government of Canada, a review of relocation benefits provided to exempt staff is currently under way. This review is expected to be completed by summer 2017.
With regard to (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f), it would be premature to answer, as the review is ongoing.

Question No. 892--
Mr. Alexander Nuttall:
With regard to Canada’s Innovation Agenda as published by the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development and “innovation leaders” titled “Innovation for a Better Canada: What We Heard”: (a) what was the total cost incurred by the government for the production of this document; (b) what are the details of the compensation for each of the ten innovation leaders; and (c) what are the costs of the consultation process with the innovation leaders broken down by (i) travel, (ii) hospitality, (iii) meals and incidentals, (iv) lodging, (v) per diems, (vi) rental space for stake holder consultations?
Response
Hon. Navdeep Bains (Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, the Government of Canada believes that Canada needs a bold, coordinated strategy on innovation that delivers results for all Canadians. As such, an engagement process that reflects the commitment to mobilize all Canadians to action and to foster innovation as a Canadian value was launched.
The government invited all Canadians to share their ideas on cultivating a confident nation of innovators--one that is globally competitive in promoting research, accelerating business growth, and propelling entrepreneurs from the commercialization and start-up stages to international success.
The government also brought together 10 Innovation leaders from all walks of life. These are experienced and distinguished individuals who are acknowledged as innovators in their own right. They represented the private sector, universities and colleges, the not-for-profit sector, social entrepreneurs, and businesses owned and operated by indigenous people.
Over the summer, these Innovation leaders hosted 28 round tables across Canada with key stakeholders, as well as in Boston, United States, and Cambridge, United Kingdom, on the six action areas. These round tables brought stakeholders from a range of backgrounds, including academia, industry associations, not-for-profits, indigenous groups, youth organizations, and other levels of government.
With regard to Canada’s innovation agenda as published by the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development and innovation leaders, entitled “Innovation for a Better Canada: What We Heard”, the response is as follows. With regard to (a), the document was developed internally by Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada. The total cost of $1,990.21 incurred by the government was for its translation.
With regard to (b), the 10 innovation leaders were not compensated for this work; however, they were reimbursed for certain expenses.
With regard to (c)(i), the travel cost for the 10 innovation leaders for 26 round tables across Canada and one round table in the United States was $10,613.99. There was one round table in the United Kingdom, but no cost was incurred.
With regard to (c)(ii), the hospitality cost for 28 round tables was $10,391.64.
With regard to (c)(iii), the meals and transportation cost for the 10 innovation leaders for 28 round tables was $306.22.
With regard to (c)(iv), the lodging cost for the 10 innovation leaders for 28 round tables was $2,933.72.
With regard to (c)(v), no additional per diems were provided to the 10 innovation leaders.
With regard to (c)(vi), the total cost for rental spaces for 28 round tables was $6,185.35.

Question No. 893--
Mr. Ben Lobb :
With regard to the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development’s approval of the takeover of Retirement Concepts by Cedar Tree Investments Canada: has the government received any assurances that either Cedar Tree Investments Canada or its parent company, Anbang Insurance, are not controlled by factions with ties to the Chinese government and, if so, what are the details of any such assurances?
Response
Hon. Navdeep Bains (Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, the Investment Canada Act, ICA, contains strict confidentiality provisions in regard to information obtained through its administration. Section 36 of the ICA states that “…all information obtained in respect to a Canadian, a non-Canadian, a business or an entity referred to in paragraph 25.1(c) by the Minister or an officer or employee of Her Majesty in the course of the administration or enforcement of this Act is privileged and no one shall knowingly communicate or allow to be communicated any such information or allow anyone to inspect or to have access to any such information.”
As a result of section 36, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada is unable to disclose any information obtained under the ICA to respond to this question.

Question No. 895--
Mrs. Kelly Block :
With regard to the government commissioning of Credit Suisse to study the sale of federally owned airports: (a) what are the cost of the study; (b) what is the study’s completion date; and (c) what are the findings of the study?
Response
Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, the Credit Suisse study had no official completion date; however, the Credit Suisse contract ended on January 31, 2017.
In processing parliamentary returns, the government applies the Privacy Act and the principles set out in the Access to Information Act, and information pertaining to the cost and findings of the Credit Suisse study has been withheld on the following grounds: with regard to (a), economic interests; with regard to (b), financial and commercial interests of a third party; and with regard to (c), confidence of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada.

Question no 887 --
M. Brad Trost:
En ce qui concerne la réponse du gouvernement à la question 7 inscrite au Feuilleton donnée à la Chambre des communes le vendredi 12 mai 2006: a) combien de personnes au Canada peuvent être potentiellement jugées trop dangereuses pour posséder des armes à feu; b) parmi les personnes en a), combien sont (i) des personnes recherchées pour une infraction criminelle violente, (ii) des personnes d'intérêt pour la police, (iii) des personnes violentes, (iv) des délinquants sexuels connus, (v) des délinquants récidivistes, dangereux et à haut risque connus, (vi) des personnes connues pour avoir eu des comportements qui pourraient être dangereux pour la sécurité publique; c) combien de personnes ont été accusées d'une infraction criminelle violente; d) combien de personnes sont en attente d'une décision et d'un arrêt judiciaire ou d'une liberté sous conditions pour une infraction criminelle violente, y compris (i) sous probation ou en libération conditionnelle, (ii) sous conditions véritablement applicables, (iii) visées par une ordonnance de non-communication ou de bonne conduite; e) combien de personnes se sont vu interdire ou refuser des armes à feu; f) combien de personnes se sont vu interdire de chasser; g) combien de personnes ont déjà été expulsées; h) combien de personnes ont été visées par une ordonnance préventive dans toute province du Canada; i) combien de personnes se sont vu refuser un permis d'arme à feu ou dont le permis a été révoqué; j) combien de personnes figurent dans la base de données des Personnes d'intérêt - Arme à feu?
Response
L'hon. Ralph Goodale (ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en réponse aux parties a) et b) de la question, la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, la GRC, ne maintient aucune liste d’individus qui sont « potentiellement jugés » trop dangereux pour posséder des armes à feu.
En ce qui concerne les parties c), d), g), h), et j) de la question, la collecte de cette information à des fins statistiques ou de rapports ne figure pas dans le mandat de la GRC.
Le système du Centre d’information de la police canadienne est un dépôt central intégré et automatisé d’information policière opérationnelle qui permet de stocker et de récupérer de façon instantanée des renseignements à jour sur les infractions particulières et les individus. Il ne fonctionne pas comme un outil aux fins d’analyses statistiques.
Enfin, en ce qui concerne les parties e), f) et i) de la question, du 1er janvier 2001, depuis que les particuliers doivent détenir un permis pour pouvoir posséder et acquérir des armes à feu aux termes de la Loi sur les armes à feu, au 31 janvier 2017, 12 609 demandes de permis d’armes à feu ont été refusées et 35 300 permis d’armes à feu ont été révoqués.

Question no 891 --
M. Pat Kelly:
En ce qui concerne les déplacements et la réinstallation des fonctionnaires et du personnel parlementaire, ainsi que l’examen indépendant récemment commandé par le Président du Conseil du Trésor: a) depuis le 23 septembre 2016, y a-t-il eu création d’une politique sur le remboursement des dépenses de réinstallation; b) quels sont les critères utilisés pour calculer ce que constituent des dépenses raisonnables; c) quels sont les critères utilisés pour définir ce que constituent des dépenses raisonnables; d) quelles nouvelles exigences un employé doit-il respecter pour obtenir le remboursement de dépenses raisonnables; e) quel est le plafond, le cas échéant, des dépenses raisonnables remboursables; f) quels sont les ministères, le cas échéant, autre que le Conseil du Trésor, ayant participé à la création de la nouvelle politique; g) la politique en f) est-elle finalisée; h) si la réponse en g) est négative, à quel moment la politique sera-t-elle finalisée?
Response
L'hon. Scott Brison (président du Conseil du Trésor, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en réponse aux parties a), h) et g) de la question, les indemnités de déplacement et de réinstallation accordées aux employés de la fonction publique centrale sont prévues par la Directive sur les voyages du Conseil national mixte et la Directive sur la réinstallation du Conseil national mixte, respectivement. Le processus d’examen cyclique a commencé en vue de la négociation de la Directive sur la réinstallation du Conseil national mixte. Les parties échangeront des propositions le 1er juin 2017. Le Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor du Canada n’est pas responsable des politiques régissant les employés du Parlement, par exemple, les employés de la Chambre des communes et du Sénat.
En ce qui concerne le personnel exonéré qui travaille dans les cabinets des ministres, leurs modalités d’emploi sont régies par les Politiques à l’intention des cabinets des ministres. Dans le cadre d’un engagement récent pris par le gouvernement du Canada, un examen des indemnités de réinstallation fournies au personnel exonéré est en cours. Cet examen devrait être terminé d’ici l’été 2017.
Enfin, en ce qui a trait aux parties b),c), d), e) et f) de la question, il serait prématuré de répondre alors que l’examen est en cours.

Question no 892 --
M. Alexander Nuttall:
En ce qui concerne le Programme d’innovation du Canada publié par le ministre de l’Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique et « les chefs de file en innovation » et intitulé « Innover pour un meilleur Canada: Ce que vous nous avez dit »: a) combien ce document a-t-il coûté au gouvernement; b) quels sont les détails de la rémunération pour chacun des dix chefs de file en innovation; c) combien la consultation des chefs de file en innovation a-t-elle coûté, ventilé par (i) déplacement, (ii) accueil, (iii) repas et faux frais, (iv) hébergement, (v) indemnités journalières, (vi) location de locaux pour la consultation des intervenants?
Response
L'hon. Navdeep Bains (ministre de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, le gouvernement du Canada croit que le Canada a besoin d’une stratégie d’innovation audacieuse et coordonnée qui produit des résultats avantageux pour l’ensemble des Canadiens. À ce titre, une démarche de mobilisation qui reflète l’engagement de lancer un appel à tous les Canadiens et de favoriser l’adoption de l’innovation en tant que valeur canadienne a été entreprise.
Le gouvernement a invité tous les Canadiens à présenter leurs idées pour faire du Canada une nation d’innovateurs confiants en leurs capacités. L’objectif est de faire du Canada un pays qui n’a rien à envier aux autres pour ce qui est de promouvoir la recherche, d’accélérer la croissance des entreprises et de propulser les entrepreneurs, des étapes du démarrage et de la commercialisation à celle de la réussite sur le marché international.
Le gouvernement a également rassemblé 10 leaders en innovation provenant de tous les milieux. Ces gens expérimentés et distingués sont eux-mêmes des innovateurs. Ces derniers représentaient le secteur privé, le milieu universitaire et collégial, des organismes sans but lucratif, des entrepreneurs sociaux ainsi que des entreprises détenues et exploitées par des Autochtones.
Au cours de l’été, ces leaders ont tenu 28 tables rondes au Canada avec des intervenants clés, ainsi qu’à Boston, aux États-Unis, et à Cambridge, au Royaume-Uni, sur les six domaines d’action. Ces séances ont réuni divers intervenants, notamment des représentants du milieu universitaire, d’associations de l’industrie, d’organisations sans but lucratif, de groupes autochtones, d’organismes jeunesse et d’autres ordres de gouvernement.
Pour ce qui est des questions sur le Programme d’innovation du Canada, tel que publié par les leaders en innovation et moi-même, et intitulé « Innover pour un meilleur Canada : Ce que vous nous avez dit », en réponse à la partie a), le document a été préparé à l’interne par Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada. Le coût total de 1 990,21 $ encouru par le gouvernement était pour sa traduction.
En ce qui a trait à la partie b) de la question, les 10 leaders en innovation n’ont pas été rémunérés pour ce travail. Toutefois, certaines dépenses ont été remboursées.
En ce qui concerne la partie c)(i) de la question, le coût total des déplacements des 10 leaders en innovation pour 26 tables rondes aux quatre coins du Canada et une table ronde aux États-Unis était de 10 613,99 $. Il y avait une table ronde au Royaume-Uni, mais aucun coût n'a été engagé.
Pour ce qui est de la partie c)(ii) de la question, le coût total de l’accueil pour 28 tables rondes a été de 10 391,64 $.
En ce qui a trait à la partie c)(iii) de la question, le coût total des repas et du transport des 10 leaders en innovation pour 28 tables rondes a été de 306.22 $.
En ce qui concerne la partie c)(iv) de la question, le coût total de l’hébergement des 10 leaders en innovation pour 28 tables rondes a été de 2 933,72 $.
En ce qui concerne la partie c)(iv) de la question, le coût total de l’hébergement des 10 leaders en innovation pour 28 tables rondes a été de 2 933,72 $.
Enfin, en ce qui a trait à la partie c)(vi) de la question, le coût total des locaux loués pour les 28 tables rondes a été de 6 185,35 $.

Question no 893 --
M. Ben Lobb:
En ce qui concerne l’approbation par le ministre de l’Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique de la prise de contrôle de Retirement Concepts par Cedar Tree Investments Canada: le gouvernement a-t-il reçu des garanties selon lesquelles Cedar Tree Investments Canada ou sa société mère, Anbang Insurance, ne sont pas contrôlées par des factions qui ont des liens avec le gouvernement de la Chine et, le cas échéant, quels sont les détails de telles garanties?
Response
L'hon. Navdeep Bains (ministre de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, la Loi sur Investissement Canada, la LIC, contient des dispositions strictes en matière de confidentialité concernant les renseignements obtenus dans le cadre de son application. En vertu de l’article 36 de la LIC, « les renseignements obtenus à l’égard d’un Canadien, d’un non-Canadien, d’une entreprise ou d’une unité visée par l’alinéa 25.1c) par le ministre ou un fonctionnaire ou employé de Sa Majesté dans le cadre de l’application de la présente loi sont confidentiels; nul ne peut sciemment les communiquer, permettre qu’ils le soient ou permettre à qui que ce soit d’en prendre connaissance ou d’y avoir accès ».
En raison de l’article 36, Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique Canada est dans l’impossibilité de communiquer des renseignements obtenus en vertu de la LIC afin de répondre à cette question.

Question no 895 --
Mme Kelly Block:
En ce qui concerne l’étude que le gouvernement a commandée au Crédit Suisse sur la vente d’aéroports de propriété fédérale: a) quels sont les coûts de l’étude; b) quelle est la date d’achèvement de l’étude; c) quelles sont les conclusions de l'étude?
Response
L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (secrétaire parlementaire du ministre des Finances, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, l’étude de Credit Suisse n'avait aucune date officielle d'achèvement, mais le contrat de Credit Suisse a pris fin le 31 janvier 2017.
Lorsqu’il traite les documents parlementaires, le gouvernement applique la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les principes de la Loi sur l’accès à l’information. Le coût et les conclusions du travail de Credit Suisse ne sont pas divulgués pour les motifs suivants: les intérêts économiques, les renseignements financiers et commerciaux de tiers et la possibilité de renseignements confidentiels du Conseil privé de la Reine pour le Canada.
View Bruce Stanton Profile
CPC (ON)

Question No. 123--
Mr. Ron Liepert:
With regard to each meeting of the Treasury Board during the period of November 3, 2015, to April 22, 2016: (a) what was the date of the meeting; (b) where did the meeting occur; (c) who was in attendance; and (d) what was the agenda of the meeting?
Response
Hon. Scott Brison (President of the Treasury Board, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, with regard to each meeting of the Treasury Board during the period of November 3, 2015, to April 22, 2016: (a) when the House of Commons is in session, the Treasury Board usually sits on Thursday.
In response to part (b) of the question, the information requested is a confidence of the Queen’s Privy Council and cannot be provided.
Regarding part (c), the committee members are the President of the Treasury Board, chair; the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, vice-chair; the Minister of Finance; the Minister of Health; the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development; and the Minister of Environment and Climate Change. Alternate members are the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, the Minister of Natural Resources, the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, and the Minister of Democratic Institutions.
In response to part (d), the information requested is a confidence of the Queen’s Privy Council and cannot be provided.

Question No. 129--
Mr. Harold Albrecht:
With regard to the Department of Finance’s estimates relating to the impact of oil prices on government revenues: (a) what information is available on how these estimates are calculated; and (b) does the government make any projections using incremental price increases, and, if so, does the government use $2 increments from $2 to $160 per barrel?
Response
Mr. François-Philippe Champagne (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, in response to part (a) of the question, in Canada, natural resources are owned by the provinces. As such, although royalties are a sizable revenue source for provincial governments, the federal government receives virtually no revenues from resource royalties. Instead, at the federal level, oil and gas extraction impacts federal revenues in three ways.
First is corporate profits and corporate income tax, CIT. When oil prices fall, profits in the industry fall and losses can be experienced. Losses can affect past tax years as firms are able to carry back these losses against taxable income from the prior three years. Firms are also able to carry forward their losses and use them to reduce taxes in future years when oil prices and profits have returned to higher levels.
Second is wages and salaries and personal income tax, PIT. Individuals employed in the oil and gas sector may experience reduced hours or layoffs when firms reduce production and/or expenses. As a result, PIT and GST revenues could also decrease.
Third is other impacts. As a result of layoffs in the sector, federal expenses related to employment insurance benefits may also increase. In addition, lower profits can lead to lower dividend payments, further reducing personal and non-resident income taxes.
Given that the fiscal impacts are indirect, estimating the impact of changes in oil prices on federal government revenues is not a straightforward exercise. The fiscal impacts depend on interrelated factors and will vary depending on the cause of the change in prices as well as the response of individual firms in the sector. For example, if lower prices arise as a result of increased supply, as is currently the case, then the impact on Canada’s economy, and thus federal revenues, would be negative but more limited. This is because demand for oil would be maintained, and may even increase in response to lower prices, such that the same quantity of oil would be sold, albeit at a lower price. If lower prices arise as a result of weaker global demand, then the impact on the economy and federal revenue would be significantly larger. This is because both the price and quantity of oil sold would decline.
The size of the decline in oil prices, and the level from which they fall, or rise, is also important. For example, small price declines from high levels would have little implication for production and investment, while large price declines, which may render certain operations uneconomical, could result in lower production, layoffs, and the cancellation of investment. This would obviously have a bigger impact on federal revenues.
At the aggregate level, the federal government has communicated the changes in federal revenues and expenses from changes in the economic outlook, including changes in the price of oil, in recent budgets and updates.
In response to part (b), no, the government does not make projections using $2 increments from $2 to $160 per barrel.

Question No. 130--
Mr. Harold Albrecht:
With regard to the changes to Old Age Security (OAS) announced in Budget 2016: what are the details of any research conducted into the (i) impact on government revenues, (ii) impact on the costs and sustainability of the OAS program, (iii) anticipated costs of reversing these changes?
Response
Mr. Terry Duguid (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, budget 2016 announced three changes to the old age security program:
an increase to the guaranteed income supplement top-up of $947 annually for the most vulnerable single seniors, starting in July 2016;
the cancellation of the provisions in the Old Age Security Act that increase the age of eligibility for OAS benefits from 65 to 67; and
the extension of the provision that currently allows couples who receive the GIS and who have to live apart for reasons beyond their control to receive higher benefits based on their individual incomes, to couples receiving the GIS and allowance benefits. The costs of each measure are as follows.
The chief actuary estimates the cost of the increase to the GIS top-up for single seniors to be $478 million in 2016-17, rising to $669 million in 2017-18, the first full year of implementation.
The chief actuary estimates that cancelling the increase to the age of eligibility will increase OAS program expenditures by $11.5 billion, or 0.34% of gross domestic product in 2029 30, the first year in full implementation.
The increase in the age of eligibility for OAS benefits was scheduled to begin in 2023, with full implementation in 2029. This estimate includes the cost of the increase to the GIS.
However, the net cost to the government will be lower. The Department of Finance estimates that, in 2029-30, revenues from federal income tax from the OAS pension would rise by an estimated $988 million, and additional revenue from the OAS recovery tax would amount to $584 million, for a total of $1.6 billion.
Furthermore, as an offset to the savings associated with the 2012 changes in the age of eligibility, the previous government had committed to compensate provincial/territorial governments for social assistance payments for low-income seniors who would no longer be eligible for OAS benefits at age 65. In addition, federal income support for veterans and aboriginal peoples would have been extended to age 67. These costs had not been estimated.
The Old Age Security Act currently contains a provision that allows couples who are GIS recipients to receive benefits at the higher single rate if the couple is living apart for reasons beyond their control, such as where one spouse lives in a nursing home. Budget 2016 proposes to extend the provision to couples who receive the GIS and allowance benefits. The cost of this measure is estimated at $1 million for 2016-17 and $3 million per year ongoing.

Question No. 131--
Mr. Harold Albrecht:
With regard to projections calculated by the Department of Finance on the costs of servicing government debt over the next 50 years, has the Department calculated the costs associated with servicing the deficit projected in Budget 2016, and, if so, (i) how were these calculations made, (ii) what interest rates were used for the purposes of these calculations?
Response
Mr. François-Philippe Champagne (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, the Department of Finance has not conducted long-term projections, greater than five years, on the cost of servicing the government’s total stock of interest-bearing debt since the publication of budget 2016, but intends to do so as part of its next fiscal sustainability report, which is typically published in the fall.
The projection of public debt charges up to fiscal year 2020-21, published in budget 2016, includes the debt servicing costs of the entirety of the government’s actual and projected stock of interest-bearing debt. When calculating this projection, the Department of Finance does not attempt to distinguish between the debt charges associated with deficits incurred in particular years and those associated with the underlying stock.

Question No. 138--
Mr. Robert Kitchen:
With regard to the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, for the period of November 3, 2015, to April 22, 2016: (a) how many funding applications have been submitted; (b) how many funding applications have yet to be processed; (c) how many funding applications have been approved for funding; (d) how many funding applications have been rejected for funding; and (e) what is the total funding amount that has been provided to approved applicants?
Response
Hon. Navdeep Bains (Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, with regard to (a), 794 funding applications were submitted to the agency.
With regard to (b), of the applications submitted, 352 had yet to be processed on April 22, 2016.
With regard to (c), 436 funding applications were approved.
With regard to (d), six funding applications were rejected.
With regard to (e), the total funding amount provided to approved applicants is $90.6 million

Question No. 144--
Mr. Martin Shields:
With regard to the government’s policy on seeking clemency for Canadians sentenced to death abroad: (a) under what circumstances will the government seek clemency; (b) when was the current policy adopted; (c) who proposed the current policy; and (d) how was it adopted?
Response
Hon. Stéphane Dion (Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, with regard to (a), the Government of Canada will seek clemency in all cases of Canadians facing the death penalty abroad.
With regard to (b), (c) and (d), the Minister of Foreign Affairs proposed the current policy and, after consultation with the Minister of Justice, announced the policy on February 15, 2016. For more information, please see www.international.gc.ca/media/aff/news-communiques/2016/02/15a.aspx

Question No. 146--
Mr. Martin Shields:
With regard to Temporary Resident Permits (TRP) and Temporary Work Permits (TWP), for the period from November 3, 2015, to April 22, 2016: (a) how many TRP have been issued for individuals suspected to be victims of human trafficking; (b) how many TRP have been renewed for individuals suspected to be victims of human trafficking; (c) how many TWP have been issued to individuals who are exotic dancers; and (d) how many TWP have been renewed for individuals who are exotic dancers?
Response
Hon. John McCallum (Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, with regard to (a), Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada issued 12 temporary resident permits, or TRPs, to individuals suspected to be victims of human trafficking.
With regard to (b), Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada did not renew any subsequent TRPs for individuals suspected to be victims of human trafficking.
With regard to (c), Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada did not issue any temporary work permits, or TWPs, to individuals who are exotic dancers.
With regard to (d), Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada did not renew any TWPs for individuals who are exotic dancers.

Question No. 151--
Mr. Tom Kmiec:
With regard to the Disability Tax Credit (DTC): (a) what are all the medical conditions that successfully qualified for DTC in the 2015-2016 fiscal year; (b) what is the refusal rate of DTC applications submitted by persons diagnosed with phenylketonuria in the 2015-2016 fiscal year; (c) what is the criteria for denying a DTC application for a person diagnosed with phenylketonuria; (d) what is the number of appeals filed for rejected DTC applications related to phenylketonuria since the beginning of the 2015-2016 fiscal year; (e) what is the average DTC amount claimed for expenses related to phenylketonuria; and (f) what are the measures undertaken by the Canada Revenue Agency to ensure its workers have a good understanding of the medical conditions they are reviewing as part of DTC applications?
Response
Hon. Diane Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, the disability tax credit, DTC, is a non-refundable tax credit that helps persons with disabilities, or their supporting persons, reduce the amount of income tax they may have to pay. To qualify, an individual must have a severe and prolonged impairment in physical or mental functions, as defined in the Income Tax Act and as certified by a medical practitioner.
More detailed information is available in the CRA publication Tax measures for persons with disabilities - Disability-Related Information 2015, RC4064(E) Rev. 15, which is available on the CRA website at www.cra-arc.gc.ca/E/pub/tg/rc4064/rc4064-15e.pdf.
With regard to parts (a) and (b), eligibility for the disability tax credit is not based on a medical condition or diagnosis, rather on the effects of the impairment on a person’s ability to perform the basic activities or daily living, or whether the person is blind or requires life-sustaining therapy. For this reason, the CRA does not collect this information.
With regard to part (c), the CRA determines eligibility for the DTC based on the criteria set out in section 118.3 of the Income Tax Act. These criteria are not based on a medical condition or diagnosis, but rather on the effects of the impairment on a person’s ability to perform the basic activities of daily living, or whether the person is blind or requires life-sustaining therapy.
To be eligible, a medical practitioner must certify that a person has a severe and prolonged impairment in physical or mental functions and describe its effects on one of the basic activities of daily living, or provide information indicating the individual is blind or meets the criteria for life-sustaining therapy.
Applications for the DTC are reviewed on a case-by-case basis. A person with the same medical condition as another may not experience the same effects. In addition, there may be other factors that contribute to the severity of impairment, such as other medical conditions or circumstances.
With regard to part (d), the information being requested, by diagnosis, is not captured by the CRA as there is no requirement to do so under the ITA.
With regard to part (e), the average amount for expenses related to phenylketonuria is not captured by the CRA.
With regard to part (f), CRA assessors receive extensive training to make eligibility determinations in accordance with the legislation set out in section 118.3 of the Income Tax Act and by consulting with registered nurses, or RNs, employed by the CRA, who serve as resources for all of the tax centres. When required, the RNs will also contact the medical practitioners who have certified the forms for additional information.
CRA assessors all refer to the procedures manual, and quality reviews of eligibility determinations are conducted on a continuous basis to ensure consistency in the administration of the DTC program.

Question No. 158--
Mr. Bob Saroya:
With regard to the government's planned advertising campaign for Budget 2016, for every instance of an advertisement: (a) what is the medium of the ad; (b) where did or will the ad appear, including but not limited to, location, television station, radio station, publication; (c) what is the duration or size of the ad; (d) when was the ad displayed or when will it be displayed; and (e) what is the cost of the ad?
Response
Mr. François-Philippe Champagne (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, the Department of Finance has not purchased any advertising for budget 2016.

Question No. 163--
Mr. David Anderson:
With regard to the details of any consultations undertaken or advice received by the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, his office, or his Department, for the period of November 4, 2015, to April 22, 2016, regarding a royal regime for farmer saved seed under the Plant Breeders Rights Act: for each consultation, (i) what was the date, (ii) which people were present, (iii) were there any recorded positions on this issue taken at this meeting?
Response
Hon. Lawrence MacAulay (Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, including the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency, did not conduct any consultations with respect to a royalty regime for farmer saved seed under the Plant Breeders’ Rights Act between November 4, 2015, and April 22, 2016.

Question No. 170--
Mr. Robert Sopuck:
With regard to the disposition of government assets, for the period of November 4, 2015, to April 22, 2016: (a) on how many occasions has the government repurchased or reacquired a lot which had been disposed of in accordance with the Treasury Board Directive on the Disposal of Surplus Materiel; and (b) for each occasion identified in (a), what was (i) the description or nature of the item or items which constituted the lot, (ii) the sale account number or other reference number, (iii) the date on which the sale closed, (iv) the price at which the item was disposed of to the buyer, (v) the price at which the item was repurchased from the buyer?
Response
Ms. Leona Alleslev (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Services and Procurement, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, PSPC has not repurchased or reacquired a lot that has been disposed of in accordance with the Treasury Board directive on the disposal of surplus materiel in the period indicated.

Question No. 173--
Hon. Kevin Sorenson:
With regard to the Safe Food for Canadians Act, Bill S-11, 41st Parliament, First session, what is the status of the implementation of regulations related to this Act?
Response
Hon. Jane Philpott (Minister of Health, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, while developing the new regulatory framework for food safety, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has undertaken extensive engagement with stakeholders.
The CFIA hosted two large forums, the Food Forum in June 2013 and the Healthy and Safe Food Forum in June 2014, along with extensive webinars and opportunities for written input to gather stakeholder feedback on proposals for the next regulatory framework.
In 2015, the CFIA released a revised proposal to solicit further feedback and undertook in-depth engagement with micro and small businesses to better understand the potential burden for these businesses and what they would need to comply with the proposed regulations. The comment period on the preliminary draft text closed on July 31, 2015.
Four years of engagement and analysis with more than 15,500 stakeholders has resulted in over 500 written submissions on the proposed safe food for Canadians regulations. The CFIA has undertaken detailed review of this extensive feedback and is preparing the regulatory package.
Under the regulatory process, www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rtrap-parfa/gfrpg-gperf/gfrpg-gperf02-eng.asp, the next opportunity to engage on the draft regulations will occur when the regulatory text is published in the Canada Gazette, part I in late fall 2016.

Question No. 174--
Hon. Kevin Sorenson:
With regard to the findings of scientists at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada with respect to sugar: (a) what scientific evidence exists regarding the biological difference between naturally occurring sugar and added sugar in food; (b) what ability does the Department have to detect the difference between naturally occurring sugar and added sugar through standard food testing methods; (c) is the Department aware of any health benefits of a labelling requirement for added sugar on consumer food products, and, if so, what are they; and (d) and is the Department aware of any potential problems that may be encountered in requiring separate labelling for added sugar on consumer food products, and if so, what are they?
Response
Hon. Jane Philpott (Minister of Health, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, the government is committed to helping Canadians make better food choices for themselves and their families. This includes taking action to improve food labels to ensure that Canadians have the information they need to help them make more informed and healthier choices, including more information on sugars.
With regard to (a), the scientific evidence related to sugar metabolism indicates that there is no biological difference between naturally occurring and added sugar. All sugars present in food are digested and absorbed as one of three monosaccharides, glucose, fructose, and galactose, whether they naturally occur in foods, such as fructose in an apple, or are added to foods, such as fructose in a fruit-flavoured beverage.
With regard to (b), it is not possible to distinguish naturally occurring from added sugars in a food product using standard analytical methods.
With regard to (c), a healthy eating pattern, such as that recommended by Canada’s food guide, leaves limited room for added sugars in the diet. To help Canadians make informed food choices regarding their consumption of sugars, Health Canada proposed two new measures for the labelling of sugars as part of its proposed regulatory amendments to nutrition labelling regulations, published in Canada Gazette, part I, in June 2015.
First, Health Canada proposed that the nutrition facts table include a declaration of the % daily value, DV, for total sugars, based on a DV of 100 grams, to help consumers identify if there is a little sugar, which is 5% DV or less, or a lot of sugar, which is 15% DV or more, in their food.
Second, Health Canada proposed to group sugar-based ingredients, such as molasses, honey, and brown sugar, under the common name “sugars” in the ingredients list. Grouping sugar-based ingredients together provides a clearer indication of the amount of sugars in the food product relative to other ingredients, as ingredients are listed in descending order of their amount in the product.
This would raise awareness of both the sources and the contribution of all sugars, added or naturally occurring, to the total composition of the foods to the consumer.
With regard to (d), analytical methods cannot distinguish between naturally occurring and added sugars, making it a challenge for the verification of information on the nutrition facts table should there be a requirement to declare added sugars. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency, which is responsible for enforcing the regulations, would therefore have to rely on record-keeping to verify compliance with the requirement to declare the amount of added sugars.

Question No. 175--
Hon. Kevin Sorenson:
With regard to the log books for personal use of ministerial executive vehicles, for the period of November 4, 2015, to April 22, 2016: (a) what is the total number of entries for each executive vehicle, broken down by vehicle; (b) what are the dates, time, and length for each entry; (c) what is the trip description, if any, of each entry; (d) what is the identification, if available, of the family member or member of the household that was the driver for each entry; and (e) what is the total number of kilometres travelled for personal use?
Response
Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister, Lib.):
:Mr. Speaker, with regard to parts (a) through (e) of the question, the Privy Council Office has no information to provide regarding the log books for the personal use of ministerial executive vehicles for the period of November 4, 2015 to April 22, 2016. When processing parliamentary returns, the government applies the Privacy Act and the principles set out in the Access to Information Act, therefore certain information has been withheld on the grounds that it constitutes personal information.

Question No. 177--
Bob Saroya:
With regard to any consultations by the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, his staff, or officials at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada or the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, concerning amendments to the regulations concerning the humane transport of animals, from November 3, 2015, to April 22, 2016: for each consultation, identify (i) the persons and organizations consulted, (ii) the government officials present, (iii) the date of the consultation, (iv) the positions presented by those consulted?
Response
Hon. Lawrence MacAulay (Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, between November 3, 2015 and April 22, 2016, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency provided updates to stakeholder groups on the proposal to amend the health of animals regulations regarding humane transportation; however, no consultations took place.
The CFIA has been consulting with stakeholders about the regulatory proposal since 2006. Stakeholders included national industry umbrella organizations, livestock and poultry transporters, and retail organizations, as well as animal welfare and animal rights groups. The CFIA carried out a pre-consultation with targeted groups in 2013, and followed up with two economic questionnaires to over 1,100 individual stakeholders in 2014.
In addition, the CFIA continues to gather data from specific industry groups to validate the cost-benefit analysis portion of the regulatory impact analysis statement.
The proposed amendments will be pre-published in the Canada Gazette, part I, in fall 2016 as outlined in the CFIA forward regulatory plan 2016-18, available at www.inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/acts-and-regulations/forward-regulatory-plan/2016-2018/eng/1429123874172/1429123874922. This will provide all stakeholders with another opportunity to comment.

Question No. 180--
Mr. Todd Doherty:
With regard to court cases between the government and Aboriginal communities and organizations, as of April 22, 2016: (a) how many court cases is the government currently engaged in with First Nations, Métis or Inuit communities or organizations as either an appellant, respondent or intervenor, and what are these cases; (b) how many court cases is the government currently engaged in with First Nations, Métis or Inuit communities or organizations in which the government is the respondent; (c) how much is the government paying to engage in court cases with First Nations, Métis or Inuit communities or organizations as either an appellant, respondent or intervenor, broken down by (i) year, (ii) case; and (d) how many lawyers does the Department of Justice employ to work on Aboriginal court cases?
Response
Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, this request poses challenges that cannot be overcome.
The information required is not readily available. It would require extensive consultations with all government departments. Each department’s inventory would have to be manually searched, and files dealing with aboriginal claims separated. The large number of files involved make this unfeasible.
Justice lawyers are not assigned to work solely on the types of cases addressed by the question so an accurate response to part (d) is not possible.

Question no 123 --
M. Ron Liepert:
En ce qui concerne chacune des réunions du Conseil du Trésor durant la période du 3 novembre 2015 au 22 avril 2016: a) quelle était la date de chaque réunion; b) où la réunion a-t-elle eu lieu; c) qui était présent; d) quel était l’ordre du jour de la réunion?
Response
L'hon. Scott Brison (président du Conseil du Trésor, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en réponse à la partie a) de la question, lorsque la Chambre des communes siège, le Conseil du Trésor se réunit habituellement le jeudi.
En ce qui a trait à la partie b) de la question, l’information demandée concerne les documents confidentiels du Conseil privé de la Reine et ceux-ci ne peuvent être fournis.
Pour ce qui est de la partie c) de la question, le comité est composé des membres suivants: le président du Conseil du Trésor, qui en est le président, le ministre de l’Immigration, des Réfugiés et de la Citoyenneté, qui en est le vice-président, le ministre des Finances, la ministre de la Santé, le ministre de la Famille, des Enfants et du Développement social et la ministre de l’Environnement et du Changement climatique. Les membres suppléants sont le ministre de l’Agriculture et de l’Agroalimentaire, le leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes et ministre des Pêches, des Océans et de la Garde côtière canadienne, le ministre des Ressources naturelles, le ministre de l’Infrastructure et des Collectivités et la ministre des Institutions démocratiques.
Enfin, en ce qui concerne la partie d) de la question, l’information demandée concerne les documents confidentiels du Conseil privé de la Reine et ceux-ci ne peuvent être fournis.

Question no 129 --
M. Harold Albrecht:
En ce qui concerne les estimations du ministère des Finances sur les répercussions du prix du pétrole sur les recettes du gouvernement: a) qu’a-t-on comme information sur la façon dont ces estimations sont calculées; b) le gouvernement fait-il des projections au moyen des hausses de prix progressives et, dans l’affirmative, le gouvernement utilise-t-il l’augmentation de 2 $, de 2 $ à 160 $ le baril?
Response
M. François-Philippe Champagne (secrétaire parlementaire du ministre des Finances, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en réponse à la partie a) de la question, au Canada, les ressources naturelles appartiennent aux provinces. À ce titre, bien que les redevances représentent une source de revenus non négligeable pour les gouvernements provinciaux, le gouvernement fédéral ne tire pratiquement aucune recette des redevances des ressources naturelles. Au niveau fédéral, l’extraction pétrolière et gazière touche plutôt les recettes fiscales par l’intermédiaire de trois manières.
Il y a d’abord les bénéfices des sociétés et l’impôt sur le revenu des sociétés, ou IRS: lorsque le prix du pétrole baisse, les bénéfices de l’industrie baissent et des pertes peuvent survenir. Ces pertes peuvent toucher des années d’imposition antérieures, car les sociétés peuvent reporter ces pertes rétrospectivement pour réduire le revenu imposable des trois années précédentes. Les sociétés peuvent aussi reporter leurs pertes de façon prospective et s’en servir pour réduire les impôts qui seront versés au cours des années ultérieures, lorsque les cours du pétrole et les bénéfices sont retournés à des niveaux plus élevés.
Il y a ensuite les salaires et traitements et l’impôt sur le revenu des particuliers, ou IRP: les particuliers employés dans le secteur pétrolier et gazier peuvent subir une réduction d’heures et des mises à pied lorsque les sociétés réduisent la production ou les dépenses. Par conséquent, l’IRP et les recettes de la taxe sur les produits et services, la TPS, pourraient aussi diminuer.
Il y a encore d’autres répercussions: en raison des mises à pied dans le secteur, les dépenses fédérales liées aux prestations d’assurance-emploi peuvent aussi augmenter. De plus, la baisse des bénéfices peut entraîner une baisse des paiements de dividendes, ce qui réduit encore plus les impôts sur le revenu des particuliers et des non-résidents.
Étant donné que les incidences fiscales sont indirectes, l’estimation des répercussions des changements du prix du pétrole sur les recettes du gouvernement fédéral n’est pas un exercice simple. Les incidences fiscales dépendent de facteurs interreliés et varieront selon la cause du changement du prix ou en fonction de la réaction de chaque société du secteur. Par exemple, si l’offre accrue cause la baisse du prix, comme c’est le cas à l’heure actuelle, les répercussions sur l’économie du Canada, et donc sur les recettes fédérales, seraient négatives, mais plus limitées. Cela s’explique parce que la demande de pétrole serait la même — elle pourrait même augmenter en réaction au prix plus bas —, de telle sorte que la même quantité de pétrole serait vendue, bien qu’à plus bas prix. Si la baisse du prix est attribuable à une demande mondiale plus faible, les répercussions sur l’économie et les recettes fédérales seraient considérablement plus importantes. Cela s’explique parce que le prix et la quantité de pétrole vendu seraient tous les deux en déclin.
L’ampleur du déclin du prix du pétrole et le niveau de sa chute, ou de sa hausse, sont aussi importants. Par exemple, une légère baisse du prix à partir de niveaux élevés aurait peu d’incidence sur la production et les investissements, alors qu’une forte baisse du prix, qui peut rendre certaines opérations peu rentables, pourrait entraîner une baisse de la production, des mises à pied et l’annulation des investissements. Évidemment, cette situation aurait de plus grandes répercussions sur les recettes fédérales.
Sur le plan cumulatif, le gouvernement fédéral a communiqué les changements aux recettes et aux dépenses fédérales par rapport aux changements des perspectives économiques, y compris les changements dans le prix du pétrole, dans les récents budgets et mises à jour.
Enfin, en ce qui concerne la partie b) de la question, la réponse est non. Le gouvernement n’utilise pas l’augmentation de 2 $, de 2 $ à 160 $ le baril pour faire des prévisions.

Question no 130 --
M. Harold Albrecht:
En ce qui concerne les modifications à la Sécurité de la vieillesse annoncées dans le Budget 2016: quels sont les détails des recherches effectuées sur (i) les répercussions sur les recettes publiques, (ii) les répercussions sur les coûts et la durabilité du Programme de la sécurité de la vieillesse, (iii) les coûts prévus de l’annulation de ces modifications?
Response
M. Terry Duguid (secrétaire parlementaire du ministre de la Famille, des Enfants et du Développement social, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, trois changements au programme de la Sécurité de la vieillesse, la SV, ont été annoncés dans le budget de 2016.
Il s’agit d’abord d’une hausse de la prestation complémentaire au Supplément de revenu garanti, le SRG, à compter de juillet 2016, d’un montant de 947 $ par année pour les aînés vivant seuls les plus vulnérables.
Il y a ensuite annulation des dispositions prévoyant faire passer de 65 ans à 67 ans l’âge d’admissibilité aux prestations de la SV.
Enfin, il y a aussi l’élargissement aux couples prestataires du SRG et des Allocations de la disposition en vertu de laquelle les couples prestataires du SRG qui vivent séparément en raison de considérations indépendantes de leur volonté reçoivent un montant plus élevé de prestations, selon leur revenu individuel. Voici le coût de chacune de ces mesures.
Dans le cas de la bonification du SRG, et selon les estimations de l’actuaire en chef, le coût de la bonification du SRG pour les aînés vivant seuls s’élèvera à 478 millions de dollars en 2016 2017 et à 669 millions de dollars en 2017 2018, qui sera la première année complète de mise en œuvre de cette mesure.
Dans le cas de la modification de l’âge d’admissibilité, selon les estimations de l’actuaire en chef, l’annulation de la mesure concernant l’âge d’admissibilité aux prestations de la SV entraînera une augmentation des dépenses de 11,5 milliards de dollars, soit 0,34 % du produit intérieur brut, en 2029-2030, première année complète de mise en œuvre de cette mesure.
L’augmentation de l’âge d’admissibilité aux prestations de la SV devait débuter en 2023 et s’étendre jusqu’en 2029, première année complète de mise en œuvre de la mesure.
La présente estimation inclut la bonification du SRG. Le coût net pour le gouvernement sera toutefois inférieur. Selon les estimations du ministère des Finances, en 2029-2030, les revenus fiscaux provenant de la pension de la SV augmenteront de 988 millions de dollars. S’ajouteront à cette somme 584 millions en impôt de récupération applicable aux prestations de la SV, pour un total estimatif de 1,6 milliard de dollars.
De plus, en contrepartie des économies liées aux changements de 2012 apportés à l’âge d’admissibilité aux prestations de la SV, le gouvernement précédent s’était engagé à indemniser les gouvernements des provinces et des territoires pour les prestations d’aide sociale à verser aux aînés à faible revenu qui n’auraient alors plus été admissibles aux prestations de la SV dès l’âge de 65 ans. Le gouvernement comptait en outre prolonger jusqu’à l’âge de 67 ans le soutien du revenu aux vétérans et aux Autochtones. Cela dit, ces coûts n’avaient fait l’objet d’aucune estimation.
Enfin, pour ce qui est des prestations du SRG et des Allocations aux couples vivant séparément pour des considérations indépendantes de leur volonté, la Loi sur la sécurité de la vieillesse contient une disposition en vertu de laquelle les couples prestataires du SRG qui vivent séparément pour des considérations indépendantes de leur volonté, par exemple lorsque l’un des conjoints vit dans un centre de soins de longue durée, peuvent toucher le taux maximum de prestations du SRG. Dans le budget de 2016, il est proposé d’étendre cette disposition aux couples qui reçoivent des prestations du SRG et des Allocations. Le coût de cette mesure est estimé à 1 million de dollars en 2016 2017 et à 3 millions de dollars annuellement par la suite.

Question no 131 --
M. Harold Albrecht:
En ce qui concerne les projections faites par le ministère des Finances sur les frais de service de la dette du gouvernement sur les 50 prochaines années, le Ministère a-t-il calculé les frais de service du déficit projeté dans le budget de 2016 et, si oui, (i) comment a-t-il fait ces calculs, (ii) quels taux d’intérêt a-t-il employés pour faire ces calculs?
Response
M. François-Philippe Champagne (secrétaire parlementaire du ministre des Finances, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, le ministère des Finances du Canada n’a pas mené de prévisions à long terme, soit de plus de 5 ans quant aux frais de service de l’encours total de la dette portant intérêt du gouvernement depuis la publication du budget de 2016, mais il prévoit le faire dans le cadre de son prochain rapport sur la viabilité des finances publiques, qui est habituellement publié à l’automne.
La prévision des frais de la dette publique jusqu’à l’exercice 2020-2021, publiée dans le budget de 2016, comprend les frais de service de la dette pour l’ensemble de l’encours réel et projeté de la dette portant intérêt du gouvernement. Lorsqu’il calcule cette projection, le ministère des Finances du Canada n’essaie pas de faire la différence entre les frais de la dette associés aux déficits engagés au cours d’années particulières et ceux associés à l’encours sous-jacent.

Question no 138 --
M. Robert Kitchen:
En ce qui concerne l’Agence de promotion économique du Canada atlantique, pour la période du 3 novembre 2015 au 22 avril 2016: a) combien de demandes de financement ont été présentées; b) combien de demandes de financement n’ont pas encore été traitées; c) combien de demandes de financement ont été approuvées; d) combien de demandes de financement ont été rejetées; e) à combien s’élève le montant total du financement accordé aux demandeurs approuvés?
Response
L'hon. Navdeep Bains (ministre de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en réponse à la partie a) de la question, 794 demandes de financement ont été présentées à l’Agence.
Pour ce qui est de la partie b) de la question, 352 de ces demandes n’avaient pas encore été traitées le 22 avril 2016.
En ce qui a trait à la partie c) de la question, 436 demandes de financement ont été approuvées.
En ce qui concerne la partie d) de la question, six demandes de financement ont été rejetées.
Enfin, pour ce qui est de la partie e) de la question, le montant total du financement accordé aux demandeurs approuvés s’élève à 90,6 millions de dollars.

Question no 144 --
M. Martin Shields:
En ce qui concerne la politique du gouvernement concernant la demande de clémence pour les Canadiens condamnés à mort à l’étranger: a) dans quelles circonstances le gouvernement demande-t-il la clémence; b) quand la politique actuelle a-t-elle été adoptée; c) qui a proposé la politique actuelle; d) comment la politique a-t-elle été adoptée?
Response
L'hon. Stéphane Dion (ministre des Affaires étrangères, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en réponse à la partie a) de la question, le gouvernement du Canada fera un appel à la clémence dans tous les cas où des Canadiens sont passibles de la peine de mort à l’étranger.
Pour ce qui est des parties b) à d) de la question, la politique en vigueur a été proposée par moi-même, qui en ai fait l’annonce, après avoir consulté la ministre de la Justice, le 15 février 2016. Pour en savoir davantage, on peut consulter le site Web suivant: http://www.international.gc.ca/media/aff/news-communiques/2016/02/15a.aspx?lang=fra.

Question no 146 --
M. Martin Shields:
En ce qui concerne les permis de séjour temporaire et les permis de travail temporaire, du 3 novembre 2015 au 22 avril 2016: a) combien de permis de séjour temporaire ont été délivrés à des personnes soupçonnées d’être victimes de la traite de personnes; b) combien de permis de séjour temporaire ont été renouvelés pour des personnes soupçonnées d’être victimes de la traite de personnes; c) combien de permis de travail temporaire ont été délivrés à des danseuses exotiques; d) combien de permis de travail temporaires ont été renouvelés pour des danseuses exotiques?
Response
L'hon. John McCallum (ministre de l'Immigration, des Réfugiés et de la Citoyenneté, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en réponse à la partie a) de la question, Immigration, Réfugiés et Citoyenneté Canada, ou IRCC, a délivré 12 permis de séjour temporaire à des personnes soupçonnées d’être victimes de la traite de personnes.
Pour ce qui est de la partie b) de la question, IRCC n’a renouvelé aucun permis de séjour temporaire pour des personnes soupçonnées d’être victimes de la traite de personnes.
En ce qui a trait à la partie c) de la question, IRCC n’a délivré aucun permis de travail temporaire à des danseuses exotiques.
Enfin, en ce qui concerne la partie d) de la question, IRCC n’a renouvelé aucun permis de travail temporaire pour des danseuses exotiques.

Question no 151 --
M. Tom Kmiec:
En ce qui concerne le Crédit d’impôt pour personnes handicapées (CIPH): a) quels sont tous les troubles médicaux ouvrant droit au CIPH pour l’exercice 2015-2016; b) quel est le taux de refus des demandes de CIPH présentées par des personnes ayant reçu un diagnostic de phénylcétonurie pendant l’exercice 2015-2016; c) selon quels critères refuse-t-on la demande de CIPH d’une personne ayant reçu un diagnostic de phénylcétonurie; d) quel est le nombre d’appels interjetés à la suite de demandes de CIPH rejetées liées à la phénylcétonurie depuis le début de l’exercice 2015-2016; e) quel est le montant moyen du CIPH demandé pour des dépenses liées à la phénylcétonurie; f) quelles mesures l’Agence du Revenu du Canada prend-elle pour veiller à ce que ses employés comprennent bien les troubles médicaux qu’ils examinent dans le cadre des demandes de CIPH?
Response
L’hon. Diane Lebouthillier (ministre du Revenu national, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, le crédit d’impôt pour personnes handicapées, le CIPH, est un crédit d’impôt non remboursable qui permet aux personnes handicapées, ou aux personnes qui subviennent à leurs besoins, de réduire l’impôt qu’elles pourraient avoir à payer. Pour y avoir droit, un particulier doit avoir une déficience grave et prolongée des fonctions physiques ou mentales selon la Loi de l’impôt sur le revenu et selon l’attestation un professionnel de la santé.
Des renseignements additionnels sont offerts dans la publication de l’Agence du revenu du Canada, ou ARC, « Mesures fiscales pour personnes handicapées Renseignements relatifs aux personnes handicapées 2015 » RC4064(F) Rev. 15, qui est disponible sur le site Web de l’ARC, à l’adresse suivante: www.arc.gc.ca/F/pub/tg/rc4064.
En réponse aux parties a) et b) de la question, l’admissibilité au CIPH n’est pas basée sur un état de santé ou un diagnostic, mais plutôt sur les effets de la déficience sur la capacité d’une personne à exécuter les activités courantes de la vie quotidienne, ou s’il s’agit d’une personne aveugle ou qui nécessite des soins thérapeutiques essentiels.
En ce qui concerne la partie c) de la question, l’ARC détermine l’admissibilité au CIPH selon les critères énoncés à l’article 118.3 de la Loi de l’impôt sur le revenu. Les critères ne sont pas fondés sur un état de santé ou un diagnostic, mais plutôt sur les effets de la déficience sur la capacité d’une personne à exécuter les activités courantes de la vie quotidienne, ou s’il s’agit d’une personne aveugle ou qui nécessite des soins thérapeutiques essentiels.
Pour y avoir droit, un professionnel de la santé doit attester, par écrit, que la personne a une déficience grave et prolongée des fonctions physiques ou mentales et en décrire les effets sur une des activités courantes de la vie quotidienne. Il peut aussi fournir des renseignements indiquant que la personne est aveugle ou qu’elle répond aux critères pour recevoir des soins thérapeutiques essentiels.
Les demandes du CIPH sont examinées au cas par cas. Une personne avec le même état de santé qu’une autre personne pourrait ne pas éprouver les mêmes effets. De plus, il pourrait y avoir d’autres facteurs contribuant à la sévérité de la déficience, comme d’autres conditions médicales ou circonstances.
Pour ce qui est de la partie d) de la question, l’information qui est demandée par diagnostic n’est pas saisie par l’ARC puisque la Loi ne l’exige pas.
En ce qui a trait à la partie e) de la question, le montant moyen des dépenses liées au traitement de la phénylcétonurie n’est pas saisi par l’ARC.
Enfin, pour ce qui est de la partie f) de la question, les évaluateurs de l’ARC reçoivent une formation approfondie pour prendre des décisions d'admissibilité selon les dispositions énoncées à l'article 118.3 de la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu et en consultant les infirmières autorisées à l’emploi de l’ARC, qui servent de ressources pour tous les centres fiscaux. Lorsque c’est nécessaire, les infirmières autorisées contactent aussi les professionnels de la santé qui ont attesté les formulaires pour obtenir d’autres renseignements.
Les évaluateurs de l’ARC se réfèrent au manuel de procédures, et l’ARC mène des examens de qualité des décisions d'admissibilité sur une base continue pour assurer l’uniformité dans l’administration du programme du CIPH.

Question no 158 --
M. Bob Saroya:
En ce qui concerne la campagne publicitaire prévue par le gouvernement pour le Budget 2016, pour chaque message publicitaire: a) quel est le média utilisé; b) où a paru ou paraîtra ce message publicitaire, incluant, mais sans s'y limiter, l'endroit, la station de télévision, la station de radio, la publication; c) quelle est la durée ou le format du message publicitaire; d) quand ce message publicitaire a-t-il paru ou paraîtra-t-il; e) quel en est le coût?
Response
M. François-Philippe Champagne (secrétaire parlementaire du ministre des Finances, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, le ministère des Finance n’a acheté aucune publicité pour le budget de 2016.

Question no 163 --
M. David Anderson:
En ce qui concerne les détails entourant les consultations menées ou les conseils reçus, le cas échéant, par le ministre de l’Agriculture et de l’Agroalimentaire, son cabinet ou son Ministère, pour la période allant du 4 novembre 2015 au 22 avril 2016, concernant un régime de redevances applicable aux semences conservées par les agriculteurs en vertu de la Loi sur la protection des obtentions végétales: pour chaque consultation, (i) à quelle date s’est-elle tenue, (ii) qui était présent, (iii) des participants ont-ils fait connaître leur position sur le sujet?
Response
L'hon. Lawrence MacAulay (ministre de l'Agriculture et de l'Agroalimentaire, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada, ainsi que l’Agence canadienne du pari mutuel, n’avaient pas mené de consultations en ce qui concerne un régime de redevances applicable aux semences conservées par les agriculteurs en vertu de la Loi sur la protection des obtentions végétales, entre le 4 novembre 2015 et le 22 avril 2016.

Question no 170 --
M. Robert Sopuck:
En ce qui concerne l’aliénation de biens publics du 4 novembre 2015 au 22 avril 2016: a) à combien d’occasions le gouvernement a-t-il racheté un lot qui avait été aliéné conformément à la Directive sur l’aliénation du matériel en surplus du Conseil du Trésor; b) à chacune des occasions identifiées en a), quels étaient (i) la description ou la nature du ou des articles qui composaient le lot, (ii) le numéro de compte de vente ou autre numéro de référence, (iii) la date à laquelle la vente a été conclue, (iv) le prix auquel l’article a été cédé à l’acheteur, (v) le prix auquel l’article a été racheté à l’acheteur?
Response
Mme Leona Alleslev (secrétaire parlementaire de la ministre des Services publics et de l’Approvisionnement, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, au cours de la période indiquée, Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada n’a pas racheté de lot qui avait été aliéné conformément à la Directive sur l’aliénation du matériel en surplus du Conseil du Trésor.

Question no 173 --
L’hon. Kevin Sorenson:
En ce qui concerne la Loi sur la salubrité des aliments au Canada, projet de loi S-11, 41e législature, première session, qu’en est-il de la mise en œuvre du règlement d’application de cette Loi?
Response
L’hon. Jane Philpott (ministre de la Santé, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en développant le nouveau cadre réglementaire pour la sécurité des aliments, l’Agence canadienne d’inspection des aliments, ou ACIA, a entrepris un vaste processus de collaboration avec les intervenants.
L’ACIA a organisé deux vastes forums, le Forum sur la salubrité des aliments en juin 2013 et le Forum sur la réglementation des aliments sains et salubres en juin 2014, avec de nombreux séminaires en ligne et occasions de contributions écrites afin de recueillir des rétroactions de la part des intervenants sur des propositions pour le prochain cadre réglementaire.
En 2015, l’ACIA a émis une proposition révisée afin de solliciter d’autres rétroactions et a entrepris un processus d’engagement approfondi avec des microentreprises et de petites entreprises afin de mieux comprendre la charge potentielle pour ces entités et ce dont elles ont besoin pour se conformer au projet de règlement. La période de commentaires sur le texte de l’avant-projet a pris fin le 31 juillet 2015.
Quatre ans d’engagement et d’analyse avec plus de 15 500 intervenants ont donné lieu à plus de 500 observations écrites sur le Projet de Règlement sur la salubrité des aliments au Canada. L’ACIA a entrepris des examens détaillés de tous ces commentaires et prépare un dossier sur la réglementation.
Dans le cadre du processus d’élaboration des règlements, que l’on peut consulter au http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/hgw-cgf/priorities-priorites/rtrap-parfa/guides/gfrpg-gperf/gfrpg-gperftb-fra.asp, la prochaine occasion de recueillir des commentaires sur le projet de règlement sera la parution du texte réglementaire dans la Partie I de la Gazette du Canada, à la fin de l’automne 2016.

Question no 174 --
L’hon. Kevin Sorenson:
En ce qui concerne les conclusions tirées par les scientifiques d’Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada relativement au sucre: a) quelles sont les preuves scientifiques de la différence biologique entre le sucre présent naturellement dans les aliments et le sucre qui y est ajouté; b) dans quelle mesure le Ministère est-il capable de détecter la différence entre le sucre présent naturellement et le sucre ajouté au moyen des méthodes normalisées d’analyse alimentaire; c) le ministère sait-il si les exigences en matière d’étiquetage relatives au sucre ajouté pour les produits alimentaires de consommation comportent des avantages pour la santé et, si oui, lesquels; d) le ministère est-il au courant d’éventuels problèmes relatifs à l’étiquetage obligatoire distinct pour le sucre ajouté dans les produits alimentaires de consommation et, si oui, quels sont-ils?
Response
L’hon. Jane Philpott (ministre de la Santé, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, le gouvernement est déterminé à aider les Canadiens à faire de meilleurs choix alimentaires pour eux-mêmes et leurs familles. Cela inclut de prendre des mesures pour améliorer les étiquettes des aliments afin que les Canadiens disposent de l'information dont ils ont besoin pour faire des choix plus éclairés et plus sains, y compris de plus d'informations sur les sucres.
En réponse à la partie a) de la question, la preuve scientifique relative au métabolisme du sucre indique qu’il n’existe pas de différence biologique entre le sucre d’origine naturelle et le sucre ajouté. Tous les sucres présents dans les aliments sont digérés et absorbés comme l’un des trois monosaccharides suivants: le glucose, le fructose et le galactose, qu’ils soient d’origine naturelle dans les aliments, comme le fructose qui se trouve dans une pomme, ou qu’ils y soient ajoutés, comme le fructose d’une boisson aromatisée aux fruits.
En ce qui concerne la partie b) de la question, en recourant aux méthodes analytiques normalisées, il n’est pas possible d’établir de distinction entre les sucres d’origine naturelle et ceux qui sont ajoutés aux produits alimentaires.
Pour ce qui est de la partie c) de la question, de saines habitudes alimentaires, comme celles que préconise le guide alimentaire canadien, laissent peu de place à des sucres ajoutés dans l’alimentation. Afin d’aider les Canadiennes et les Canadiens à faire des choix éclairés à l’égard de leur consommation de sucre, Santé Canada a proposé deux nouvelles mesures pour l’étiquetage des sucres. Celles-ci font partie du projet de modification de la réglementation sur l’étiquetage alimentaire, publié dans la Partie I de la Gazette du Canada, en juin 2015.
Premièrement, Santé Canada a proposé qu’un pourcentage de la valeur quotidienne, ou VQ, des sucres totaux figure dans le tableau de la valeur nutritive, fondé sur une VQ de 100 grammes. Cette mesure a pour but d’aider le consommateur à déterminer si l’aliment contient peu de sucre, soit 5 % de la VQ ou moins, ou beaucoup de sucre, soit 15 % de la VQ ou plus.
Deuxièmement, Santé Canada a proposé de regrouper les ingrédients à base de sucre, par exemple la mélasse, le miel et le sucre brun, sous le nom usuel de « sucre » dans la liste des ingrédients. Le regroupement des ingrédients à base de sucre procure une meilleure indication de la quantité de « sucre » qui se trouve dans le produit alimentaire par rapport aux autres ingrédients, puisqu’ils sont énumérés selon l’ordre descendant de leur quantité dans le produit.
Cela sensibiliserait davantage le consommateur à l’origine des sucres, qu’ils soient ajoutés ou naturels, ainsi qu’à la part qu’ils occupent dans la composition totale des aliments.
Enfin, en ce qui a trait à la partie d de la question, les méthodes analytiques ne permettent pas d’établir la distinction entre les sucres d’origine naturelle et les sucres ajoutés. Par conséquent, s’il existait une exigence de déclarer les sucres ajoutés à ce titre, la vérification de l’information figurant dans le tableau de la valeur nutritive constituerait un défi. L’Agence canadienne d’inspection des aliments, laquelle est responsable de l’exécution de la réglementation, devrait conséquemment compter sur la tenue de registres pour vérifier la conformité à l’exigence de déclarer la quantité des sucres ajoutés.

Question no 175 --
L’hon. Kevin Sorenson:
En ce qui concerne les registres destinés à l’usage des voitures de fonction ministérielles à des fins personnelles, pour la période allant du 4 novembre 2015 au 22 avril 2016: a) quel a été le nombre total d’inscriptions pour chaque voiture de fonction, ventilé par voiture; b) quelles sont les dates, les heures et la durée du déplacement pour chaque inscription; c) quelle est la description du déplacement, s’il y en a une, pour chaque inscription; d) quelle est l’identité, si elle est indiquée, du membre de la famille ou du membre du ménage qui était le conducteur pour chaque inscription; e) quel est le kilométrage total parcouru à des fins personnelles?
Response
Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes (secrétaire parlementaire du premier ministre, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en ce qui concerne les parties a) à e) de la question, le Bureau du Conseil privé, le BCP, n’a aucun renseignement à divulguer concernant les registres destinés à l’usage des voitures de fonction ministérielles à des fins personnelles pour la période allant du 4 novembre 2015 au 22 avril 2016. Lorsqu’il traite les documents parlementaires, le gouvernement applique la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les principes de la Loi sur l’accès à l’information. Par conséquent, certains renseignements n’ont pas été divulgués, car il s’agit de renseignements personnels.

Question no 177 --
M. Bob Saroya:
En ce qui concerne les consultations menées par le ministre de l’Agriculture et de l’Agroalimentaire, son personnel ou les représentants d’Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada ou de l’Agence canadienne d’inspection des aliments à propos des modifications à la réglementation sur le transport sans cruauté des animaux, du 3 novembre 2015 au 22 avril 2016: pour chacune des consultations, identifier (i) les personnes ou organismes consultés, (ii) les représentants du gouvernement présents, (iii) la date des consultations, (iv) les points de vue présentées par les personnes consultées?
Response
L'hon. Lawrence MacAulay (ministre de l'Agriculture et de l'Agroalimentaire, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, entre le 3 novembre 2015 et le 22 avril 2016, l’Agence canadienne d’inspection des aliments, ou ACIA, a fourni des mises à jour aux groupes d’intervenants concernant la proposition de modification du Règlement sur la santé des animaux, qui porte sur le transport sans cruauté; toutefois, aucune consultation n’a eu lieu.
L’ACIA consulte les intervenants concernant cette proposition de modification depuis 2006. Parmi les intervenants, il y a des groupes d’encadrement industriels nationaux, des transporteurs de bétail et de volaille, des organisations de vente au détail, ainsi que des groupes de bien-être des animaux et de droits des animaux. L’ACIA a effectué une consultation préalable auprès des groupes ciblés en 2013 et a effectué un suivi à l’aide de deux questionnaires économiques auprès de plus de 1 100 intervenants en 2014.
De plus, l’ACIA continue de recueillir des données de groupes industriels précis afin de valider la partie de l’analyse des coûts et des avantages du Résumé de l’étude d’impact de la réglementation.
Les modifications proposées seront prépubliées dans la Partie I de la Gazette du Canada à l’automne 2016 comme l’indique le Plan prospectif de la réglementation de l’ACIA : 2016-2018, disponible au www.inspection.gc.ca/au-sujet-de-l-acia/lois-et-reglements/plan-prospectif-de-la-reglementation/2016-2018/fra/1429123874172/1429123874922. Cela donnera une occasion supplémentaire à tous les intervenants de fournir leurs commentaires.

Question no 180 --
M. Todd Doherty:
En ce qui concerne les procédures judiciaires entre le gouvernement et les communautés et organismes autochtones, au 22 avril 2016: a) à combien de procédures judiciaires liées à des communautés ou organismes des Premières Nations, Métis ou Inuits le gouvernement participe-t-il, soit en tant qu’appelant, répondant ou intervenant, et quelles sont ces affaires; b) à combien de procédures judiciaires liées à des communautés ou organismes des Premières Nations, Métis ou Inuits le gouvernement participe-t-il en tant que répondant; c) combien le gouvernement paie-t-il pour sa participation à des procédures judiciaires liées à des communautés ou organismes des Premières Nations, Métis ou Inuits en tant qu’appelant, répondant ou intervenant, ventilé par (i) année, (ii) procédure; d) combien d’avocats le ministère de la Justice affecte-t-il aux procédures judiciaires liées aux Autochtones?
Response
L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould (ministre de la Justice et procureure générale du Canada, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, cette demande comporte plusieurs obstacles insurmontables.
L’information requise n’est pas facilement accessible. Des consultations exhaustives avec tous les ministères seraient nécessaires ainsi qu’une recherche manuelle de chacun de leurs inventaires afin d’isoler les dossiers qui portent précisément sur des revendications de droits ancestraux. Le grand nombre de dossiers impliqués rend l’exercice irréalisable.
Les avocats du ministère de la Justice ne se voient pas confier des dossiers portant uniquement sur un sujet. Par conséquent, il est impossible de produire une réponse précise à la partie d) de la question.
Albrecht, HaroldAlleslev, LeonaAnderson, DavidAnimal rights and welfareApplication processAtlantic Canada Opportunities AgencyAttorney General of CanadaBains, NavdeepBrison, ScottBudget 2016 (March 22, 2016)Cabinet ministers ...Show all topics
Results: 1 - 3 of 3

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data