Interventions in Committee
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
Brian Sauvé
View Brian Sauvé Profile
Brian Sauvé
2019-06-17 16:33
Thank you.
My name is Brian Sauvé. I'm a regular member. I'm also a sergeant in the RCMP. I've been on leave without pay to found and start the National Police Federation. Presently, I'm one of the interim co-chairs.
For those who have been following from the sidelines, we made an application to certify the first bargaining agent for members of the RCMP in April 2017. We have been going through every hoop and hurdle imaginable thrown at us since April 2017. A certification vote was held with all 18,000-plus members of the bargaining unit last November and December. We are still awaiting a decision from the Federal Public Sector Labour Relations and Employment Board on that vote with a constitutional challenge.
That being said, with respect to Bill C-98, we wanted to have input to provide the RCMP members' perspective on the CRCC and part VII of the RCMP Act as it deals with public complaints. I'm open to questions on that.
At the time, I saw Bill C-98 as an act to amend the RCMP Act. There are a number of concerns that our membership has expressed with respect to the 2014 amendments to the RCMP Act, otherwise known as Bill C-42, that would be nice to be broadcast or provided questions on.
For example, in Bill C-98, there is an amendment to section 45.37 of the RCMP Act imposing time frames in consultation with the force, and the newly worded public review and complaints commission, as to how long an investigation should take, what should be the result and the consultation between the force and the investigating body.
It would really be nice, from our perspective, from an RCMP member's perspective, to expand that to deal with other areas of the RCMP Act. One of the areas that would be lovely to have some form of consultation on timelines would be the internal disciplinary processes or even grievances or appeals of commissioner's decisions on suspensions and such.
Our experience has been that whether it's a complaint under part VII or an administrative process under part IV or a grievance under part III of the RCMP Act, the RCMP itself is not equipped to deal with these issues in a timely manner. The issues tend to lag on for six months, a year, a year and a half to two years, which leaves the accused or the subject member of either a public complaint or a code of conduct or a griever in a grievance in limbo in an administrative process that takes forever.
Should your committee have questions on that, I'd be more than happy to answer, and we'll go from there.
That would be my presentation. I'm sure you're not going to study all of the submissions I would have on Bill C-42 and how it has impacted the membership of the RCMP, and the sweeping powers of commissioners and commanding officers.
I would love to get into that in more detail some day, but I don't think this legislation is the venue for that. However, timelines in section 45.37 would be something that we would definitely appreciate your looking into.
Mark Schaan
View Mark Schaan Profile
Mark Schaan
2019-05-06 16:08
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
The first issue in this bill concerns changes in insolvency.
Licensed insolvency trustees must renew their licences and pay fees on December 31, annually. This deadline creates unnecessary administrative burden or pressure for many trustees, because it may fall during the end-of-year holiday period. We are proposing, as part of this, two changes.
The first is to change the deadline. The proposed amendment would allow for a licence renewal date that is more convenient. It would be prescribed in regulation. It wouldn't conflict with the end-of-year holiday period or other inconvenient periods.
Right now, trustees are required to keep the original signed copy of specified documents, notably minutes, proceedings and resolutions passed at any meetings of creditors or inspectors, whereas all other estate documents can be kept in digital form. As a function of a long-standing complaint from the trustee community that this requirement is out of date and causes unnecessary administrative burden, the government will allow for digital office practices by licensed trustees.
Monique Moreau
View Monique Moreau Profile
Monique Moreau
2019-04-02 11:17
Good morning. Thank you for the opportunity to be here today.
You should have our presentation in front of you that I'd like to walk you through in the next few minutes.
As many members know, CFIB is a not-for-profit, non-partisan organization that represents more than 110,000 small and medium-sized businesses across Canada. Our members collectively employ more than 1.25 million Canadians and contribute nearly $75 billion or nearly half of Canada's GDP. They represent all sectors of the economy and are found in every region of the country.
As you may be aware, CFIB takes its direction solely from our members through a variety of surveys, which makes us a bit different from other organizations. The data I am sharing with you today is sourced from Statistics Canada, public opinion polling and our own survey on the changing world of work, which had nearly 7,000 respondents in 2017.
I'd like to provide a bit of context before getting into the details of our presentation.
As you can see on slide 2, job vacancy rates are currently at a nearly all-time high, with approximately 409,000 jobs currently unfilled. These vacancies are highest in the construction industry and for personal services—plumbers, mechanics, electricians, hair dressers, you name it. Arguably, this could be creating the best conditions for workers seeking employment.
We know the committee is here to study the notion of precarious work. This can be defined in a number of ways as I'm sure you've heard and will hear, but I'd like to start by challenging the myth that permanent jobs are on the decline.
If you look at slide 3, you'll see that job permanence over the last 18 years has remained virtually unchanged. This StatsCan data shows that 86% of jobs in the economy were permanent in 2018, down slightly from 87.5% that were permanent in the year 2000. The decrease was primarily felt during the 2008-09 recession and the proportion has been stable since then.
There was an increase in term contract work, from 5.8% to 7.1% of the workforce, but part of the increase was offset by reductions in seasonal and casual work. The overall trend of permanent to temporary work during the past 18 years has been kept to an increase of only 0.8% of the workforce, equivalent to about 125,000 jobs of the 15.8 million available in the economy.
Another myth—the notion that precarious work is largely found in the private sector—is disputed by the StatsCan data available to you on slide 4. In fact, most short-term or contract jobs tend to be found in the public sector, as you can see.
Considering, again, data from StatsCan, on slide 5 you'll see that of those individuals who are working part time, the vast majority do so due to personal preference or because they're studying and not because they are forced into it. It was particularly compelling for me to note that while we know there are workers out there who would prefer a full-time job but cannot find one in their chosen profession and so create one out of part-time jobs or contracts, first, this is in fact decreasing, as the data shows if you look at the figures from 1997 compared to now. Second, any recommendations this committee makes should be sure to address this relatively small proportion of workers and not disrupt employment status chosen by students and individuals out of personal preference.
As part of our research into this issue, we conducted a public opinion poll that demonstrated that generally workers are satisfied with their work arrangement. Importantly, as we see on slide 6, 83% of independent contractors in particular are satisfied with their work arrangements.
What is the experience of small business owners? As you can see on slide 7, the vast majority, or 94% of our members, hire permanent employees. This data is from a survey we conducted in 2017 with nearly 7,000 responses. Some members also use temporary employees and just over a quarter use independent contractors.
As you can see on slide 8, in a small business, part-time work often leads to full-time work in nearly half, or 43%, of instances.
When we polled small business owners as to their reasons for hiring independent contractors, as you can see on slide 9, they identify issues such as making it easier to adapt to changes in demand. It gives them access to greater expertise and competency and increases the flexibility of their organization. These are really important measures in a time of a changing and nimble economy. Forty-five per cent of small business owners note that it is the worker's preference to be an independent contractor and cite the red tape involved in hiring employees as a barrier to doing so.
Similarly, when we asked small business owners to share with us why they hire temporary employees, over two-thirds said they did so to help them adjust with changes in demands and as a result of a shortage of qualified labour. In some instances, they simply cannot find someone to work full time. Again, a quarter of small business owners noted that it is the employee's choice in some instances to be a temporary worker. This may be particularly true in situations where the worker is an artist or has another passion project they work on and they use temporary or part-time jobs to keep them afloat in between projects.
The last important piece I'd like to share with the committee today is that many small businesses use temporary employees as a starting point into creating a role for them as a permanent employee. As you can see on slide 11, 43% of small businesses are likely to convert a temporary employee into a permanent one.
In conclusion, we would offer the following recommendations to this committee:
First, support regulations that give flexibility to both employers and employees.
Second, reduce red tape associated with hiring and training employees.
Third, recognize part-time and temporary contracts as a first step toward full-time employment.
Fourth, recognize intention between contractors and employers. This is often a subject on which we get a lot of calls at CFIB. CRA is now coming in and evaluating whether the intention of the parties has made them employers and contractors or employees and employers. It is creating tension, and in some instances, it is costing our members tens of thousands of dollars as they fight this project through the courts.
Fifth, adapt to the changing world of work. Governments cannot regulate the new economy in the same way as they did the old.
Last, as we heard today, help self-employed workers. EI, taxation and a number of other rules need to adapt.
Thank you for the opportunity to be here today. I look forward to your questions.
Let me point out that I can also answer your questions in French, if necessary.
View Raj Saini Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Raj Saini Profile
2019-02-28 16:21
Thank you for that point. I appreciate that.
My second point is that the one benefit that Estonia has is that it has a unitary level of government.
Here in Canada, in the region I come from, southwestern Ontario, there are actually four levels of government, because we have a regional government. Now you have the federal government that is a repository of certain information; you have the provincial government that's a repository of certain information; you have a regional government that does the policing and other things, which is another repository of information; and all my property tax and everything is in another level of government, municipal government.
Andre Boysen
View Andre Boysen Profile
Andre Boysen
2019-02-28 16:21
As well, you need user IDs and passwords for all of them.
View Raj Saini Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Raj Saini Profile
2019-02-28 16:22
That's fine.
The thing is, though, when you look at taxation or at health, if I have to prove something, I might have to acquire information from different levels of government.
How do you get the interoperability?
It's not just one level of government. You can start off at the federal government level, but eventually, if this is going to work, you should have access to all the information that's reposed, deposited or held through the different levels of government.
Andre Boysen
View Andre Boysen Profile
Andre Boysen
2019-02-28 16:22
I'm going to comment, and then Rene is going to add something.
The truth is, the way the world works today, every service makes its own rules. The organizations that you just listed all make their own rules. They want to keep that property. They want to force everybody to do the same thing, because they want to make their own business decisions.
However, what's important, as you said, is that when you talk to the driver's licence folks in Canada, they will tell you that the driver's licence is not an identity document. It just proves that you learned how to drive, yet you cannot sign up for any online service without your driver's licence. It's not an identity card; it just gets used that way.
Andre Boysen
View Andre Boysen Profile
Andre Boysen
2019-02-28 16:23
The important thing here is making sure that we can get a scheme that works for consumers across the economy.
I want to get Rene in, so I will just stop there.
Rene McIver
View Rene McIver Profile
Rene McIver
2019-02-28 16:23
Briefly, the expectation for this service is that all of these departments and authoritative sources of information participate in this ecosystem so that when I as a user need to share information from these multiple sources, I can do that through the service with no expectation that the service is collecting any of that information to now create this new centralized honeypot that becomes another centre of attack.
The authority of the information is where the information stays.
Monique Moreau
View Monique Moreau Profile
Monique Moreau
2019-02-21 11:03
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
Thank you for the opportunity to be here today. You should have a slide deck in front of you. I'd like to walk you through it over the next few minutes.
As I know some members are aware, CFIB is a not-for-profit, non-partisan organization representing more than 110,000 small businesses across Canada. Our members collectively employ more than 1.25 million Canadians. Small businesses across Canada account for $75 billion, or nearly half of GDP. They represent all sectors of the economy and can be found in every region of the country.
As you may be aware, CFIB takes direction solely from our members through a variety of surveys. That makes us a bit different from other organizations. We know that business owners are often too busy to attend round tables or AGMs, so we go directly to them for feedback through our survey process and through our field force of approximately 220 district managers, who knock on the door of approximately 4,000 small businesses a week. This provides us with an opportunity to understand the realities of running a small business at a grassroots level.
As I mentioned, we are a survey and research-based organization. The data I'm presenting to you today is not necessarily focused on the greater Toronto area, but we know that the experiences of business owners across the country, which I will share with you today, can be readily attributed to the experiences of those business owners.
The first piece of research I'd like to share with you is on slide 3. This data is from our Help Wanted report from the third quarter of 2018, which evaluates small business vacancies across the country. This shows that vacancy rates for small businesses are at all-time high, with approximately 430,000 jobs currently unfilled across the country. The vacancies are highest in the construction industry and for services, including personal services—mechanics, plumbers, electricians, hairdressers, etc. This will likely be increasingly a concern as the baby boomer generation retires over the next five to 10 years. Note that in the construction industry alone, 250,000 workers are set to retire in the next 10 years.
I will let members know that while this data is from quarter three, on Monday we will have new data from the fourth quarter of 2018 coming out. I just couldn't share it with you before then, unfortunately.
As you might expect, given those job vacancy numbers, many business owners have had difficulty hiring the employees they need. As you can see from slide 4, 78% of respondents said they've had trouble finding employees, while an additional 36% have had trouble retaining staff. Past research has shown that employers have the most trouble filling positions that require on-the-job training.
In addition to finding the employees, small business owners face many challenges when actually proceeding through the hiring process. As you can see from slide 5, nearly three-quarters, or approximately 70%, have difficulty hiring due to a lack of candidates in their geographic area, while over half have indicated that candidates are underqualified for their businesses' needs. Nearly half have also indicated that candidates for the jobs they are trying to fill have unrealistic expectations with respect to wages, benefits, vacation time, etc.
To address some of these challenges and improve their odds of hiring the right candidate, many business owners are doing what they can to attract and retain employees. As you'll see on slide 6, 60% of small employers have increased salaries and/or benefits to attract candidates, nearly 80% have improved salaries and benefits for the employees they already have, and 64% have increased training opportunities for these employees.
Part of the reason small employers in particular invest so much in their employees, especially ones who've already been hired, is the cost of training new employees. Once they have found an employee who's the right fit for their business, many small employers will turn to training them to improve their productivity within the business. As you can see from slide 7, new hires with no experience, often young people getting their first job, cost the most to train, approximately $4,200. A new hire with some experience still requires a significant investment on behalf of the business owner, around $2,800. As the cost of hiring increases, many employers may hire fewer young workers or may choose to hire more experienced employees rather than youth with little to no job experience.
While I know that this is not the focus of this particular study, it is our view that, as a result, youth could lose out on valuable opportunities to gain work experience, or might be forced to delay getting their first job, meaning that employment rates of youth between the ages of 15 to 18 will remain low. We do think this is a significant solution to the potential problems you've been discussing today, so I will detail that a bit further.
As I mentioned, one solution to the shortage of skilled workers is to invest in youth. We recently completed a report on youth employment. We discovered through surveying over 6,000 members that more emphasis is needed on matching the skills needed by most employers with those that young people have when they enter the job market.
On slide 8, you can see that the most important skills and attributes employers are looking for are general motivation and attitude, communication skills, professionalism, basic literacy, problem-solving and flexibility. Specific industry knowledge, previous work experience and educational attainment are less important to an employer. As you saw in the previous slide, many small employers can and do hire young people, despite the cost to their business.
One way to better prepare young people for the job market is to improve the connection between educational institutions, students and small employers. Community colleges are consistently rated highest by SMEs, as you can see on slide 9, as colleges are connected with the business community and involve the small business community in the creation of their syllabus. In community colleges, instructors often tend to have related on-the-job experience that they can then share with students.
University and high school students are at the bottom of the list in terms of job readiness, which is problematic. High schools should be teaching job readiness skills, as youth often get their first jobs in high school.
Government can also play a role. As you'll see on slide 10, small businesses identified the best ways government can help their businesses hire the workers they need: decrease red tape associated with the hiring process; decrease the costs associated with hiring new employees, either by reducing payroll taxes or by implementing tax breaks for hiring or training; and, provide tax assistance to help them invest in their businesses, such as the accelerated investment initiative.
To conclude, our recommendations are as follows.
We recommend that government consider reducing red tape associated with hiring and training. This can be, for example, records of employment, the LMIA application process for bringing in temporary foreign workers and reporting requirements to access government programs.
We're also suggesting that you consider implementing measures to reduce the cost of hiring and training in the form of perhaps an EI training credit for small business or an EI holiday for youth hiring.
We're suggesting as well that you emphasize and promote the skilled trades as a viable career option among youth and those looking to retrain, and better communicate with small business owners on the government programs that may be able to help offset the costs of hiring and training.
I will conclude on this note. I'm happy to answer questions you may have.
I can also answer your questions in French.
View John Barlow Profile
CPC (AB)
View John Barlow Profile
2019-02-21 12:08
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
I'm going to split my time with Mr. Diotte.
I just have a couple of quick questions for our friends from CFIB. I appreciate your being here.
I wasn't planning on asking the first one, but with all due respect to my colleague, Mr. Sangha, I'm concerned that we're going down this path of the community benefits program in Bill C-344, as if that is somehow going to address labour shortages. Our concern with that bill is that it is nothing more than additional red tape and costs for SMEs. There's a lot of ambiguity in the bill. The minister may request this. There's no definition of what “community benefits” mean. I think this is virtue signalling again, by a government that is not paying attention to the economic impact this will have on SMEs.
I'm just curious. Have you done any work with your members on the the impact a community benefits program would have on your members?
Monique Moreau
View Monique Moreau Profile
Monique Moreau
2019-02-21 12:09
Thanks for the opportunity.
No, we have not, in Ontario, but we did poll our members on a similarly designed bill in B.C. There was very little support, for the reasons you mentioned. Adding layers of paperwork to securing contractors or in the situation where an SME becomes a sub, as Rosemarie mentioned, which is very common.... They're still required to comply and provide the paperwork, and it becomes problematic.
View John Barlow Profile
CPC (AB)
View John Barlow Profile
2019-02-21 12:09
Yes, it's commendable. I don't think there's enough detail in this bill to ensure there won't be additional costs.
Contrary to my colleague Mr. Long's comments the other day, we made some significant changes to the temporary foreign worker program in 2014. Maybe we went a little too far on the restrictions. You were talking about the red tape and obstacles to accessing the temporary foreign worker program, specifically with the LMIA. I hear all the time that it's taking longer and longer to navigate through the system. A lot of them have just given up; it takes too long is too costly.
We've talked about something like a trusted-employer program for those who have been in the system for five years with no problems. They have been audited and everything's been clear.
View John Barlow Profile
CPC (AB)
View John Barlow Profile
2019-02-21 12:10
Have you had conversations along that line? What would you do to make the LMIA program more streamlined or easier to access?
Results: 1 - 15 of 690 | Page: 1 of 46

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|