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View David Anderson Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Madam Chair. Thank you to our witnesses for being here today.
I would like to start in the future and then work back to the present, so I'm going to ask you this. I think Ms. Michels mentioned that the last 13 years have seen a decline in religious freedom. Where will the hot spots be over the next two years?
I'll ask each of you, and if your answer is different from hers, then you can just add to that.
View David Anderson Profile
CPC (SK)
Does anyone else have a comment they'd like to make?
Mr. Brobbel, you look like you're jumping on the mat.
Go ahead, Ms. Kuo.
View David Anderson Profile
CPC (SK)
Can I interrupt you? They're going to take away my mike here pretty quickly, and I'd like you to comment on the social credit card, the ID card that is being required, and the impact that will have on the Christian community. I understand that it's tied to your activities, the choices you make, the comments you make online and those kinds of things. Can you address how that will impact the Christians in China?
View David Anderson Profile
CPC (SK)
I think the intent is to have it in place by the end of 2020 across the nations.
I think my time is probably up.
View David Anderson Profile
CPC (SK)
Ms. Stangl, you mentioned the social media issue a little earlier, and I think Ms. Hardcastle brought that up as well. I'd like to talk to you about that, because I'm wondering if there's a way that this can be used well. When people have a video of others or themselves beating somebody down, isn't that something we can use to name and shame—I don't know if you want call it that—or to raise the issue and to begin to profile it? Is there anybody who's doing that effectively? Should we be trying to do that?
I would ask Ms. Kuo to respond to that, too, as a journalist. Is there a way in which we can use these kinds of social media contacts, the videos and those kinds of things, to actually highlight the issue and to name and shame—if you want to call it that—the Indian government into doing something on these...? Can that be done effectively?
View David Anderson Profile
CPC (SK)
Ms. Kuo, do you have a reaction to that as a journalist?
View David Anderson Profile
CPC (SK)
I understand that Ms. Hardcastle's making a motion, but we haven't heard this before so I think we will defer on it for now.
I wanted to have the floor just to thank people. Since 2010, I've been focused on some of the freedom issues around speech and belief and religious freedom. Starting in 2012-13, I was on the foreign affairs committee for a couple of years, and then since 2015 I've been able to be here to work on the projects we've worked on. I'm not coming back, so this is my last chance, I guess, to do that.
I want to thank the staff who have served us so well. There are our clerks and our analysts. We've gotten to be friends over the years and have done some travelling together. There are also the folks who work in the translation booth and the people who have had to put up with our coming in here at the end of one meeting and have then been expected to set up instantaneously for us. They've done so well on that. I want to just thank those people who have set up for their service.
I also want to thank my colleagues. We've had a good run here, and it's good that we can have the kind of discussion that Ms. Hardcastle is speaking about. I want to recognize that.
I also want to say that I was disappointed that this was not on TV. I know yesterday we made the decision given that there were challenges to it, but as I approached the whip's staff—not only ours but also those of some of the other parties—and tech staff, I was getting contradictory messages from a number of them. I think on issues like this one that are this important, and even for two hours on a subject, we should be trying to televise those. I'm not going to get into any more detail than that, so I will just leave it at that.
I want to thank you for your time and for the work that we have put together. I think we have made a difference. Even today, I think this is probably some of the most important work that's been done on the Hill today. We need to recognize that for what it is.
Thank you.
A voice: Hear, hear!
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Chair. Thank you, witnesses, for being here this morning.
I'm going to start by saying that the Conservatives are going to support this deal. We've already indicated that. We worked with the Liberals all the way through this and we've had our ups and downs, but we still have lots of concerns. We're still hearing a lot from industries within Canada about concerns that are coming up.
I'll use the example of fabricated steel. They're looking at tariffs coming on August 1, until USTR will decide, and then we'll see what that looks like. We still have no resolution on softwood lumber; that was not addressed in NAFTA. We still have buy American provisions sitting there in the background, which are going to have implications for our industries.
How do you guys square that? I know you want stability and bankability, but in the same breath, are you really getting that in this deal?
I'll start off with you, Brian, and then go to Mathew.
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
Mathew, quickly.
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
What concerns me, like fabricated steel, the government's been preaching about how it got rid of the tariffs and everybody thinks they're all gone, but what they've really been telling us is that these guys have been trying to meet with this government to address this. They've been down in the U.S. a substantial number of times, and there's no response. Nobody's mentioning it, and nobody's highlighting it. Everybody's closing their eyes, plugging their ears, saying, “We'll get through this and then we'll deal with that later.”
I also have to deal with the fact of the tweets. I almost think EDC needs to offer insurance for tweets because of the unpredictability and instability those create. How do you take that out of the marketplace? Maybe that's an option they should look at.
Dan, you talked about the vintners and the excise tax. How many more times do you have to say that? This is something we heard right before the budget came into implementation, and we've heard it year after year. It's nice to see B.C. making movement on the grocery stores, because that was a big issue. I think we would have lost at WTO, so it needed to move forward on that.
What else do you think we need to do to get this government to understand? Maybe a new government will actually understand that better. What else can be done there? Is there compensation coming if you should lose that WTO case because it didn't react accordingly?
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
Okay. I'm going to stop you right there just so I can ask Roger one question.
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
I have 20 seconds.
Roger, what did they offer you for compensation, in light of the fact that you are one of the losers in this deal? You are giving up market access that you normally have. What is there for the losers, the people who are not getting or maybe are more a victim of a deal like this?
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
There was nothing pre-negotiated, then.
Mr. Roger Pelissero: Not really, no.
Mr. Randy Hoback: It's election year. You should be good.
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2019-06-18 10:47
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you, witnesses, for being here and for attending by video conference.
Mr. Volpe, you talked about wanting to have this ratified right away. I just want some clarification. When you say “right away”, do you mean in sync with the U.S., or do you want us to go ahead of the U.S. in the ratification process?
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2019-06-18 10:47
I just want clarification.
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2019-06-18 10:48
Will it change anything? I don't know, but I want to see it for sure.
Ms. Citeau, is that the same interpretation you have, that you want to see it done now, and we'll take whatever we get, or do you want to see it move along with the U.S.?
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2019-06-18 10:48
Yes. They just want to see it done at the end of the day, once everybody agrees, and I agree with that.
When you look at the agreement, and when you look at the beef producers and grain producers in that scenario, do you see any real change in market access? Do you see any real change in the supply chains and how they're going to operate? Do you see any harmonization when it comes to regulatory requirements for new medications and standard stuff like that? Is there anything there you'd identify that has been an improvement compared to what we had before?
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2019-06-18 10:49
Do you want me to ask them that?
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2019-06-18 10:49
Okay. I appreciate that.
Mr. Adams, you talked about global automakers. Canada has lots of market access around the world. We have a labour force second to none. It's educated. It's there. What is preventing more of the global auto players from relocating in Canada? You could do a platform here and supply anywhere in the world. Why are we not seeing that investment happening here? Why is there hesitance? What's the issue?
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2019-06-18 10:51
Mr. Volpe, I'll go to your side of things. You talked about three facilities on the OEM side. I look at it differently. The U.S. is not going to get any more market access. I don't think they are going to do any more trade agreements under this administration. I just don't think it's going to happen. But Canada already has them, so why haven't we leveraged that fact? We could say, “You know what? You can have a facility in the U.S. take care of the domestic market. I get it. But you could have another facility two hours north, and you could export all around the world from that facility.”
Why haven't we leveraged that? What is the thing that's holding them back? Is it our competitiveness? Is it the taxation? Is it the unionization? What are the issues that are keeping them from coming up north?
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2019-06-18 10:53
[Inaudible—Editor] and rationalized their domestic production to one facility in the U.S., and then they went to Asia. Why didn't we grab that second facility and say that they can still export to Asia, and they're only three hours away?
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2019-06-18 10:54
Really?
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2019-06-18 11:53
Thank you, Chair, and thank you, witnesses, for being here today.
Chief Bellegarde, I'm going to start off with you.
You talked about how you'd like to see an amendment put forward as we go through this. Let's flesh that out a little bit as to what you're looking for in that amendment and how it would act. You say you don't want to reopen it, and I think we all agree with that, but how would an amendment actually impact the implications?
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2019-06-18 11:54
That's something we could do in committee or we could do it in the House itself.
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2019-06-18 11:54
Okay. I appreciate that.
You also talked about economic activity. I agree with you. I think we need to look at the trade missions, the whole.... I'll take a step back. We have this issue in Canada where we do an agreement, and then we go with the rest of the people back to Canada and we say, “Okay, the agreement is done”, but nothing happens. Chrétien did the team Canada missions once in a while and I think they worked fairly well. I'm not sure if that's the right approach, but how do we ensure that first nations get a chance to participate in this? What are the things we can do proactively to lay the groundwork to make sure that happens?
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2019-06-18 11:56
How do we identify the appropriate people in, as you said, softwood lumber in northern B.C.? How does a government find the appropriate people to tap in first nations?
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2019-06-18 11:56
Okay. Thank you.
Mr. Masswohl, on the beef side, and Mr. Lowe, I agree with you; it looks like it's good. I just want to flesh out a little bit of the regulatory side, the harmonization side of medications, treatments and stuff like that.
Do you see this actually being improved under this agreement? Did we make some headway to get some harmonization in some of those areas?
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2019-06-18 11:57
There's one other area I wanted to ask you about, and I asked the auto manufacturers the same thing.
With the trade agreements that we have with TPP and CETA and things like that—well, maybe not so much CETA for the beef sector, but TPP—do you see a historical change in the flow? It used to be that cows were born in Canada, maybe background in Canada, and were finished off in the U.S. Do you see now that we have market access coming out of Canada that might reverse that, and you would see more of the finishing done in Canada, as well as more of the packing and distribution out of Canada?
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2019-06-18 11:58
So you can actually maintain a steady supply to any consumer who wants to purchase it from anywhere.
View David Anderson Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you.
Thanks to both of our witnesses for being here today.
Doctor, I'd just like to ask you this. Some of the strongholds have been taken back over time by Assad's government and it's meant imprisonment for a lot of people. I'm just wondering. You have about two and a half million people, I think, in the Idlib area. It sounds like over a million of them have moved there from other places.
Both of you as witnesses have talked about that movement of the population, the disruption that it brings. What is the situation there? How long do you expect the opposition to be able to hold out? Is this something that will be long term? Will it be like some of the other places that we've talked about at this committee? They were in opposition when we talked to them but then, within a matter of a month or so, were taken over by the Assad government.
I'm just wondering if you can give us an update on that situation.
View David Anderson Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
Both of you touched a bit on the displacement of local communities, and I asked a question about that earlier, but one of the things we studied previously was the Nineveh plain and people trying to return to that area, finding that their communities were under the control of other people and that the justice system wasn't functional. I'm wondering if both of you would like to comment on that.
I think, Mr. Windsor, you made a comment on that issue. Could you fill that out a little, and the doctor could follow you? As these people are returning to their communities, in areas where they can, what are they finding? Are the structures in place to allow them to return to the communities and be able to successfully integrate, if you want to call it that, or reintegrate with their neighbours and the people whom they lived with in the past?
View David Anderson Profile
CPC (SK)
What do you see in Syria, then, as well? Is it similar to that, or is it different because the government has re-established control?
View David Anderson Profile
CPC (SK)
It's a different situation.
Doctor, what would be your response to that?
View David Anderson Profile
CPC (SK)
Just for clarity, is Hezbollah aligned with Assad's regime in that area?
View David Anderson Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
Thank you to our witnesses for being with us today.
Thank you, Mr. Morgan, for those generous words at the beginning.
I want to ask you about lack of discipline by government forces. I understand that this is a complex issue and that there are a number of different players involved here. One of the common themes seems to be government forces' excessive violence. Can you talk a bit about that? Is it a lack of discipline? Is it a deliberate escalation by leadership that's causing this to happen?
I note that the U.S., Germany, France, China and Israel all supply arms to the military. Is it possible that between them they could bring some restraint through the pressures of cutting those military supplies? I know that the U.S. has already cut back a bit. Could you talk about that a bit? Is this a lack of discipline of the government forces? Is it a deliberate escalation of violence that's being done for some people's purposes?
View David Anderson Profile
CPC (SK)
I have a very short time here. Are you suggesting then, that it's local commanders who are escalating the violence?
View David Anderson Profile
CPC (SK)
Ms. Agbahey, can you address that as well?
View David Anderson Profile
CPC (SK)
Do they have francophone and anglophone units in the military or are they combined? Is that an issue, as well, in terms of the conflict?
View David Anderson Profile
CPC (SK)
Okay.
Just moving quickly along, I noticed in some of our material that some of the anglophone schools have been shut down for the past two years. This is common in conflict areas. The first thing that seems to go is children's access to education. I'm wondering if you could talk a bit about the situation that typically leads to a lost generation of young people and then further conflict. I hope you don't mind addressing that.
I had one more question for Mr. Morgan. You wanted to talk about suppressing information outside of Cameroon. Could you get ready to address the issue of how the government has been suppressing the information outside of Cameroon? I may have enough time for that.
Please talk first about the schools, if you would.
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Chair.
Minister, it concerns me that it took you so long to determine whether or not families of veterans were concerned about Christopher Garnier's scenario and its impacting them. Believe me, it did impact them. As a matter of fact, it was very clear very quickly that they were very unhappy with this service being provided to him, a non-vet and not a dependent of a veteran's family.
I want to ask you a question specifically in regard to a promise that was made by the Liberal Party in the 2015 election to Aaron Bedard, who was with Equitas at the time. It was in writing to him that they promised they would create a dedicated veterans addictions and mental health treatment centre that would invest directly into the health and recovery of veterans—a hands-on actual treatment centre.
I'm curious. Could you tell me if that's on schedule, and is this promise going to be met before the end of this sitting?
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
No. He asked specifically for treatment, a physical place to treat veterans. It's not to do research, but a place where veterans could go rather than going to these other centres where there are many other different types of people. They wanted a specific treatment centre—hands on.
Yes or no, is that promise being kept?
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
No. This was a separate specific facility for veterans.
Okay, so let's talk about Ste. Anne's—
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
No. I want to carry on.
Let's talk about Ste. Anne's Hospital.
I was able to visit with some wonderful people in eight Legions who came together in Moncton to speak with me at a round table. They are very concerned about their veterans health centre in New Brunswick, which is also, like Ste. Anne's, being handed over to the province. However, there is a memorandum of agreement between the federal government and the province that their care as veterans would be continued in those sites. They're very concerned about what's happening there.
I would like to know, with that memorandum of agreement, have you followed up? Are you making sure that the agreement is being met? How often is that happening?
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Okay.
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Will the veterans health centre be included in that as well? There's also a memorandum of agreement there and it's being handed over to New Brunswick.
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Okay.
Will that report be provided to the committee, please?
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Will that be provided to the committee, please—the results of that report—and also in regard to the veterans health centre in Moncton, yes or no?
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
I think if you create a memorandum of agreement and promise veterans that they are going to continue to have care in those places, the government should be making sure that the province and the health care system there are being accountable.
Again, we can talk about the pension program. The Parliamentary Budget Officer has made it clear that there are discrepancies between what has been promised and what has happened with the new pension for life.
Medric Cousineau, as well, has indicated that there are many, especially the most needy, who are ending up with less, losing an amount equivalent to $300,000. Sammy Sampson, with the Rwanda vets of Canada, has come up with a very amazing tool called a “pension disparity calculator”. It's based entirely on the government's data for computer use, and it's being shared with veterans across Canada.
You've heard about this disparity. Will this disparity be fixed quickly and what is the timeline?
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
When?
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Okay. Good. Thank you.
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Sir, I want to know as well, with all of the 40,000 backlog, there was an increase moving up towards April 1, because there were a lot of individuals who were very concerned that when this pension came in.... As we can see, for the career impact allowance and its supplement, they have not qualified and that's where they're losing.
For anyone who has applied already, even though they're in a backlog, they should be able to get the funding they deserve in that regard, even though it's ending up that because there's a backlog in the department they weren't processed prior to April 1.
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Okay. Thank you.
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Okay. That's good to hear. They'll be watching for that, then. I appreciate that.
You've mentioned in regard to case managers that there were not enough case managers when you came into government.
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
The Conservatives had already committed funding for 400 more in their budget.
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
No. There were 400 in the budget going forward when we lost the election, so you haven't invested more funds.
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
But you haven't rehired them—
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Minister and General, it's good to see you again. Thank you for being here.
A year ago, the number of veterans waiting to get access was 30,000. Wait times were 16 weeks. I think I heard today, General, that you said it's now up to 32 weeks. Ultimately, last year the government committed $42 million, plus hiring more front-line staff, to improve that. What did it do? It's up to 40,000. It's almost like climbing up a ladder and then falling down.
My question to you is this. What did you get out of that? You put in $42 million and you've increased the backlog.
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
But it's not accomplishing what you want, so—
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
—you're putting money in and throwing money away.
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
Sorry, I'm short on time.
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
You did answer it and I appreciate that. Now I'd like to continue.
On Monday, we met with the ombudsman, as you're aware. My colleague Mr. Chen described the ombudsman's report card, which he presented to us, as a failing report card, with the number of items that were not completed in the past year. Some of them—I'll just read a couple of them—were triage applications upon receipt based on health and financial need; ensure that all VAC benefits are in place at time of release; upon receipt, immediately return applications if required documents are missing; provide each applicant with an individualized, expected turnaround time for their application, and inform them if the decision will be delayed and why.
Why has this government not implemented these easy fixes? They're easy fixes. No wonder we're seeing a backlog, and no wonder we're getting that report card from the ombudsman.
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
I received some correspondence from a veteran who states that he was forced to surrender in Bosnia and was held captive for 15 days, but because he was only.... The ruling is that you need to be held captive for 30 days or longer. Now as far as I'm concerned, if you're a prisoner of war, whether it's one day, 30 days or 300 days, who knows what the outcome will be?
Ultimately the decision on these 30 days comes down to the minister, so my question to you is this: Where are we standing on this and why are we taking something like this—and whether it's this gentleman or others who have been subjected to this—and determining that 30 days is the set time versus 15 or two? Regardless, you're held captive. Who knows how veterans handle this stress? What might happen for some is that it may roll off their backs, but to others, it may be extremely stressful.
Where are you on this, and if you're not, will you get on it?
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Chair.
Our colleagues at the government operations committee recently learned that the government bargained away seniority rights for veterans transitioning from the Canadian Armed Forces to the civil service. This took place in the last round of collective bargaining. Transition, as you know, is already a very difficult step for Canadian Armed Forces members to navigate. I'm just wondering, were you aware of this?
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Okay. Thank you.
Budget 2019 provides VAC with $13.5 million to improve its transition services. I think this is a thing—the seamless transition between VAC and DND—that's so important. Several of the measures being considered will be developed in partnership with CAF and are under the authority of the Department of National Defence.
On the $13.5 million, I don't know the spread—if that's per year, for the year or what—but that seems like peanuts to do what needs to be done here. Since the Department of National Defence has the authority, are they also putting a lot of money in there? What's happening?
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Just briefly on the funding, then, that's fine.
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
That's fine, then. I won't worry about the amount; that is in agreement.
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
On the applications, you were talking about how some applications are longer and harder to process than others. If an individual has a bad back or a bad neck or whatever, are they able to provide up front the documents from their doctor in terms of diagnosis, prognosis and X-rays when they submit an application? Or do they have to wait until they apply and then start to get those things?
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Okay. That's great.
For the veterans caregiver recognition benefit, it indicates here that just over 500 people will receive it in 2019-20. I'm a little confused, because they increased the amount, but at the same time, individuals who received it previously somehow no longer qualified for it.
It's like Canada summer jobs. You say that you're going to do more jobs but you cut back on the number of hours. There are people who were receiving it and no longer receive it. Why do they no longer receive it?
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Does this number sound reasonable to you? Would there be only 500 caregivers across all of Canada who would qualify for support?
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Okay. Fine.
Here's a quick question as well. Let's talk about Veterans Affairs offices. They're open—great—10 of them. What did it cost to reopen them as far as getting them up and going is concerned, and are they fully staffed?
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
I'd like to know as well the cost per year to run each one and how many visits have been documented for each.
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Could you submit that?
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
That would be great.
View Tom Lukiwski Profile
CPC (SK)
Colleagues, we are convened in public.
We welcome our witnesses here today.
Mr. Matthews, thank you for being here with your officials on relatively short notice. Of course, as you well know, the estimates have already been tabled, so this round of interventions will be slightly more informal. I understand you have a very short opening statement, and then we'll go to questions.
To my colleagues, rather than having a preordained, formal list of questions, if you do have questions for our witnesses, please indicate that by a show of hands, and we'll do it fairly informally. We'll try to get through this as quickly as we can.
We have Mr. Jowhari, Mr. McCauley, Mr. Blaikie and Madam Ratansi. We'll go in that order. Once we have completed all of the questions committee members may have, we'll be in a position, perhaps, to dismiss the panel.
Mr. Matthews, please proceed.
View Tom Lukiwski Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you very much.
Also, committee colleagues, Mr. Matthews and Mr. Bombardier have generously agreed to dispense with their opening statements, which I have with us. I am suggesting that if we can get a consensus on this, we accept both of those statements as read and have them appended to the evidence. Do we have agreement, committee members?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
[See appendix—Remarks by Bill Matthews]
[See appendix—Remarks by Denis Bombardier]
The Chair: That's fine. In that case, we will proceed directly to questions.
Mr. Jowhari, we'll start with you for five minutes.
View Tom Lukiwski Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Linklater.
View Tom Lukiwski Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you very much.
Mr. McCauley, you have five minutes.
View Tom Lukiwski Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Blaikie, you have five minutes, please.
View Tom Lukiwski Profile
CPC (SK)
Go ahead.
View Tom Lukiwski Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you very much.
Madam Ratansi.
View Tom Lukiwski Profile
CPC (SK)
It can be whoever you wish.
Mr. Drouin.
View Tom Lukiwski Profile
CPC (SK)
We'll go to Mr. McCauley, then, for five minutes.
View Tom Lukiwski Profile
CPC (SK)
A short answer, please.
View Tom Lukiwski Profile
CPC (SK)
Madam Ratansi, for five minutes please.
View Tom Lukiwski Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. McCauley, do you have anything more?
View Tom Lukiwski Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you very much.
Madam Yip, you have five minutes, please.
View Tom Lukiwski Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Blaikie, no questions?
We'll do one-offs now, if there are other questions.
Seeing none, then, gentlemen and lady, I would like to thank you for being here. I know that sometimes it's a little awkward to come here on short notice, but we do appreciate your attendance here today.
Colleagues, we will suspend for a few moments while we get our next panel to the table.
View Tom Lukiwski Profile
CPC (SK)
Colleagues, I'll call the meeting to order again.
I want to thank the Treasury Board Secretariat for being with us today. We have a number of witnesses before us.
Mr. Purves, welcome back again, sir. It's good to see you again. I understand that you have a brief opening statement. If you could commence with that, sir, and then we'll go directly into questions.
Mr. Purves, the floor is yours.
View Tom Lukiwski Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you very much.
We'll start with a five-minute round, beginning with Madam Ratansi, please.
View Tom Lukiwski Profile
CPC (SK)
Give a very brief answer if that's possible.
View Tom Lukiwski Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you very much.
Mr. McCauley, you have five minutes.
View Tom Lukiwski Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you.
Mr. Blaikie, you have five minutes please.
View Tom Lukiwski Profile
CPC (SK)
I'm afraid we're completely out of time. We will have additional questions, though, Mr. Blaikie. Don't worry. We won't leave here until you satisfy your curiosity.
We'll go to Ms. Mendès for five minutes.
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