Interventions in Committee
 
 
 
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View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
I also wanted to pass along some thanks to the interpreters in the booth, the technical folks and the staff who sit behind us and prepare us for these meetings. This wouldn't be able to happen without you.
Minister, this is a great week for Canada. I'm really excited about the prospect of Trans Mountain. You've been a leader in our party not only on the infrastructure file, but since you've taken over this very delicate but economically vital matter of twinning of the Trans Mountain pipeline. You've been a very steady hand at the wheel.
I just want to get a sense from you of how important it is not only to you personally but also to Albertans to have this significant victory in finally getting an opportunity to triple the capacity of this pipeline.
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you very much, Minister.
In your opening remarks, you chastised the Conservatives for wanting to do appeals and for taking the legislative route. I must admit that I was also nervous about the path that had been chosen. You and the Minister of Finance convinced me that it was the right way and, of course, I guess now I have to admit that I was wrong on this and you were right, so congratulations on that.
I also have found that some of the opposition rhetoric on this project—including at today's meeting, when the member suggested that somehow we should have begun the process of obtaining permits and entering into construction contracts prior to the completion of the process—demonstrates a fundamental misunderstanding of how this process is meant to work. How irresponsible would it have been to prejudge the outcome or to have rushed this court-required and constitutionally required process?
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
I'm sorry, Mr. Minister, but were all those decisions and mistakes that were highlighted in the Federal Court of Appeal decision made when the Conservatives where in power?
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
We've had a lot of difficulty until very recently on clearing exploratory drilling on the east coast, and of course we have the injunction on TMX. Bill C-69 seems to achieve the right balance and seems to push us beyond the mistakes that existed in CEAA 2012 to ensure these types of mistakes don't happen again. Are you confident that's the case?
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
We were very excited to see that completed in December to provide an off-ramp from exploratory drilling and massive environmental assessments on a well-by-well basis. That's a great initiative from your and Minister McKenna's departments.
Another concern that's been expressed to me is that we want to make sure the Canadian building trades have access to as much of the work on the Trans Mountain expansion as possible. I know there are different thresholds and limits in other projects. How can we ensure that Canadian workers benefit as much as possible from this megaproject?
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
As a final very short question, there's been some scuttlebutt at the table here about whether or not a constitutional right is implicated in this process. I'm perhaps not as close to this issue as you are, but do you feel that the section 35 rights of indigenous peoples are implicated by the expansion, and was that something that we were trying to make sure we got right with Bill C-69?
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
Welcome, everyone.
I call to order the 167th meeting of the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration. This is very likely our last meeting before Parliament rises, which is expected to happen this week.
I'd like to welcome a couple of new members to our committee today, temporary members Don Rusnak and Linda Lapointe.
Don, I'd like to thank you for your four years in Parliament. I understand you're not seeking re-election, but thank you for your service.
We'll begin with an opening statement by the departmental officials here to brief us today on the rural and northern immigration pilot, followed by normal rounds of questioning.
I understand there may be interruptions over the course of the next half-hour. We might be seeking unanimous consent to continue to pose questions to the witnesses until the time to vote, so that all parties will have an opportunity to participate in the debate.
Without further ado, I'd like to welcome Natasha Kim, Lara Dyer and Corinne Prince.
Ms. Kim, please proceed.
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you very much, Ms. Kim.
Mr. Tabbara.
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
You have about 30 seconds, Mr. Tabbara.
Are you sharing your time with Ms. Zahid?
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
I think we'll probably have an opportunity to get through 20 minutes of questions, and maybe another 10 minutes after that.
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
I'm not sure if it's possible.
Is the templates for the MOUs prepared for our review?
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
Very briefly, please.
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Mr. Maguire.
Ms. Kwan.
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
That's an interesting question, and perhaps we may get to it in further rounds of questioning.
Mr. Sarai.
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
You have only a few seconds left, Mr. Sarai.
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
That's perfect. Thank you very much.
Voices: Oh, oh!
The Chair: Mr. Maguire.
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
We only have about 15 seconds to go, so if Ms. Prince could provide us with a slight elaboration, we can then move to Madame Lapointe.
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Ms. Prince.
The last opportunity goes to Madam Lapointe.
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
You can ask questions until the bell rings, probably in a few minutes.
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, everyone.
I'd like to thank the officials for coming today and providing us with this briefing on the announced 11 new rural communities that will participate in the rural northern immigration pilot.
For committee members, this will now adjourn our 167th meeting and our last regularly scheduled meeting of the 42nd Parliament. I invite members to stay to meet a German delegation that is here to discuss the integration of immigrants and refugees into the labour market, and how to best attract a skilled labour force to Canada, including persons with disabilities in this challenge. If you could let the clerk know if you intend to stay, we can arrange the room accordingly.
The meeting is adjourned.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-17 15:42
I call the meeting to order.
Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), we are studying the adequacy of enforcement and penalties for infractions of the Fisheries Act.
For the first hour, by video conference, we have Bernie Berry from the Coldwater Lobster Association.
From the Prince Edward Island Fishermen's Association, we have Robert Jenkins, President, and Ian MacPherson, Executive Director.
As an individual, we have Alexandra Morton, Independent Biologist with the Pacific Coast Wild Salmon Society.
We'll start with Bernie Berry from the Coldwater Lobster Association. For your opening statement, you have seven minutes.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-17 15:51
Thank you, Mr. Berry.
We'll now go to the Prince Edward Island Fishermen's Association for seven minutes.
Gentlemen, I don't know if you're sharing your time.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-17 15:58
Thank you, Mr. MacPherson.
We'll now go to Alexandra Morton for seven minutes or less, please.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-17 16:06
Thank you, Ms. Morton, for that.
We'll now go into our question round.
I know the time, but in looking at it, we only have one witness in the second hour. Probably what we'll do is a full round of seven minutes in this part of the session, and at the end of the second hour, we'll take a few minutes just to catch up on committee business.
On the government side, we have Mr. Fraser. You have seven minutes or less, please.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-17 16:14
Thank you, Mr. Fraser.
We'll now go to the Conservative side and to Mr. Arnold, for seven minutes or less.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-17 16:21
Thank you, Mr. Arnold. Mr. Johns, you have seven minutes or less, please.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-17 16:29
Thank you, Mr. Johns. Your time is well past. We'll now go back to the government side.
Mr. Morrissey, go ahead for seven minutes or less, please.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-17 16:30
If I may respond, they were invited, but they're at a conference. They were unavailable today.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-17 16:30
It's not that they refused to come. They are actually at a conference and couldn't attend.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-17 16:38
Thank you for that.
Thank you, Mr. Morrissey.
Thank you to our witnesses, both by teleconference and by video conference, for your participation here this afternoon. We greatly appreciate it.
Committee members, I know the bells are ringing. I believe it's a 30-minute bell. We probably could disconnect or suspend for a minute and disconnect the video conference that we've got hooked up now and get ready for Mr. McIsaac. We could get his testimony and then look the time we have left in relation to the vote. Is that agreed?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
The Chair: All right. We'll suspend for a moment and allow the technicians to connect the new witness.
The Chair: Apparently we're having some technical difficulties in hooking up Mr. McIsaac from B.C.
I know this is our last meeting until probably well into the fall, or it may be the winter before any Fisheries and Oceans committee meets again. I wanted to take the opportunity to thank all our staff for being so supportive, including our translators.
I also want to thank the committee members for being so patient. I think as a committee we operated pretty well, and for the most part in a non-partisan way, on the studies we have done. I know at times there might have been a scattered little jab here and there, but it wouldn't be any fun if that didn't take place.
I want to thank even those who sub in the odd time, such as Vance, and of course our friend Robert Sopuck, who was a regular member of the committee prior to this time. It's always good to see you back.
Again, thank you to everyone for making this an enjoyable committee to work on and to chair and to have any involvement with whatsoever.
Some hon. members: Hear, hear!
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-17 16:45
Yes. I wouldn't say no to you.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-17 16:46
I know I did say some of them were at a conference. Others were also meeting with their U.S. counterparts, and unfortunately this was left to the last minute, I think. If we had more time, I think we would have postponed the meeting if the officials weren't available, but we couldn't do that today because we agreed we wouldn't have a meeting on Wednesday.
It is unfortunate, because it's always good to have the officials here and put them in the line of fire, for the lack of a better word, and we've done well with them in the past.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-17 16:46
Mr. McIsaac, we finally have you online. We have the bells ringing for a vote, but we'd certainly like to have the opportunity to hear your opening statement. We'll see how much time we have left for some questioning after that.
When you're ready, Mr. McIsaac, you go right ahead for seven minutes or less.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-17 16:55
Thank you for that, Mr. McIsaac.
We can probably do a round of three minutes. That will give us three minutes to get to the House, if everybody is in agreement and can get up all the stairs quickly enough.
We'll go to Mr. Hardie for three minutes or less, and I'll be very strict on the time. I might even cut you a little bit short.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-17 16:57
Mr. Sopuck, you have a question or two.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-17 17:00
Thank you, Mr. Sopuck.
I'm going to give Mr. Johns the chance for a question, or maybe two.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-17 17:03
Thank you, Mr. McIsaac. I'm sorry we have to rush off. It's just getting interesting, but we have a vote in four minutes, so we have to adjourn here.
I want to thank everyone and wish everyone a great summer after we rise, hopefully this week.
The meeting is adjourned.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
He doesn't predate me, I can tell you that. In 2004, my friend, it was the Paul Martin minority government, and I went from government to opposition to third party and back to government. That's one thing I've got on you—
Some hon. members: Oh, oh!
Mr. Scott Simms:—that I've been all around the circle.
There's an old joke in Newfoundland where a Newfoundlander and, I'll say, a Hamiltonian were in the woods one day and a big grizzly bear walked out and growled and showed his teeth. The Newfoundlander bent over and started tying up his shoe and the Hamiltonian asked, “You don't think you're going to outrun that bear, do you?” The Newfoundlander says, “No, I just just have to outrun you.”
The reason I bring up that story is that this is the type of business where we mark our own personal performance by the marching of others. On many occasions I find myself giving my interventions that, one, are at least understood by all and, two, using a cadence that will keep everyone's attention—at least for a short period, until I get my main point out.
David did that with such absolutely astonishing ease. He made it seem so easy. The best professional athletes make their profession look easy, and David does that. He makes this profession look easy, but it's not easy. I've seen him on television and in the House and certainly at committee, and it's the passion that he brings from the grassroots to here. I say “grassroots” in the strictly political sense, from the municipal level to the provincial and now federal level.
I think the past few weeks are a good way to summarize his opinion about how this place should work, because I have noticed with a great deal of angst that what has really driven him to a point of anger, which I didn't see before, was the idea of a dissenting report. Dissension was starting to get under David's skin, and it's still there perhaps. Whether or not we have a dissenting report, I think is a testament to how he wants us all to get along or, as he likes to say, “come along”.
Anyway, David, you will be missed. I had a card for you here.
A Voice: No. We're working on it.
Mr. Scott Simms: Oh, you're working on it. All right.
A Voice: A family card.
Mr. Scott Simms: We're working on a card. All the best, my friend.
I suspect you will not be with title, but certainly with opinion, and one that I hope you never extinguish. David, all the best.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Before I do I would like to expose the.... I hope you take it in a lighthearted way, but we asked our spokesperson to be the front of our presentation to you and this card. If a spokesperson would like to—
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you very much, Mr. Sorenson.
Speaking of the work plan for 2019-20, what performance audits will you do?
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
Great. Thank you very much.
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
No, this is perfect.
Mr. Leswick, with respect to that, are there other departments or agencies within government that have the mandate to look at the results and measures that Ms. Thomas says the Auditor General wants to have a project on instead of cybersecurity and Arctic sovereignty, and that might be better positioned to do that work?
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
That's fair enough.
Maybe Mr. Christopherson was right: maybe you were thrown to the wolves a little today.
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
It's very interesting.
As to the decision to be made between doing the respect in the workplace audit, the immigration audit, and student financial assistance audit, why was the decision made to prioritize those over the things that the committee and parliamentarians have made very clear are our priorities, which would be cybersecurity and Arctic sovereignty? I think if the choice were up to parliamentarians—and perhaps it should be—I think we would reprioritize your work plan.
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
That's interesting. You're then telegraphing, I guess, that you feel that the four you mentioned would present a greater risk to Canadians than the two you're cancelling.
They're not in the top four audits that you think need to be done.
View Nick Whalen Profile
Lib. (NL)
So you're saying that, even if you had the money today, because the team isn't ready, you couldn't have delivered on cybersecurity anyway. It's really capacity within your organization over a long period of time that's preventing the cybersecurity audit from being done, because you don't have the team that's built up. This is really a longer term problem; that's my understanding of what's being said.
It doesn't really seem to be anything that's related to the current funding gap. This seems to be a problem that arises entirely because, over the period of time, you did not have two technical teams for IT audits.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-12 15:29
I call the meeting to order.
Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), in our study of the implementation in Canada of a third party habitat banking framework, we have several witnesses here today. We have a couple by video conference and one in person.
By video conference we have Marian Weber, Professor, Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology, University of Alberta. Welcome.
We also have, from Poulton Environmental Strategies Incorporated, Mr. David Poulton, Principal. He is here by video conference as well.
Here in person we have a witness who is well known to all of us Newfoundlanders anyway—and to people from the mainland, as we call it—the Honourable David Wells, Senator.
Thank you for being here, all three of you, by video conference and in person.
We'll begin with presentations by our witnesses. We'll go first to video conference. I'd like to get that out of the way first, in case there's a problem with the connection later.
Ms. Weber, when you're ready, please, you have seven minutes or less.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-12 15:36
Thank you, Ms. Weber.
We'll now go to Mr. Poulton for seven minutes or less, please.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-12 15:47
Thank you, Mr. Poulton.
We will go now to Senator Wells for seven minutes or less, please.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-12 15:54
Thank you, Senator Wells.
We'll now go to rounds of questioning, and we'll start with the government side. I understand Mr. Morrissey was going to go first, so we'll go now to the second one. Mr. Rogers, you have seven minutes or less, please.
View Churence Rogers Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Dr. Poulton, I have a couple of questions around your presentation. Can you speak to other jurisdictions that we can learn from when it comes to habitat banking?
Also, I have a couple of follow-up questions. How long has it been in place in these jurisdictions? Can you also speak to some of the legislative complexities that go with habitat banking systems?
View Churence Rogers Profile
Lib. (NL)
In the U.S. it seems to be a fairly complex process. Legislation on habitat banking there is in excess of 100 pages. How complex is that system compared to the Victoria one that you talk about?
View Churence Rogers Profile
Lib. (NL)
I thank you for that comparison and clarification.
There have been concerns raised around jurisdictional issues as well. Who do you think is important to bring into the conversation in terms of indigenous groups and communities?
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-12 16:00
Thank you, Mr. Rogers.
We will go to the Conservative side. We have Mr. Doherty for seven minutes or less, please.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2019-06-12 16:08
Thank you, Mr. Doherty.
Now we go to the NDP and to Mr. Johns for seven minutes or less, please.
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