Committee
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 100 of 47258
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
I'd just like to welcome everybody here to the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics, meeting number 160. We are dealing with committee business and two motions: the first from Mr. Kent and the second from Mr. Angus.
I would like, first of all, to welcome some members with us today who aren't usual members of the ethics committee. Ms. May was supposed to be here but I don't see her yet. We're going to welcome her here today, as well as Ms. Raitt, Mr. Poilievre, Ms. Ramsey and Mr. Weir. I think that's everybody. While the extra members are not members of this committee, as a courtesy we typically give guests the right to speak.
Having said that, I'll turn the floor over to Mr. Kent.
J'aimerais vous souhaiter à tous la bienvenue à la 160e séance du Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique. Nous sommes saisis de deux motions. La première a été présentée par M. Kent et la seconde, par M. Angus.
J'aimerais souhaiter la bienvenue aux députés ici présents qui ne sont pas des membres du comité de l'éthique. Mme May était censée venir, mais elle n'est pas arrivée. Elle sera parmi nous, et nous accueillons également Mme Raitt, M. Poilievre, Mme Ramsey et M. Weir. Je crois que c'est tout. Bien que les députés supplémentaires ne soient pas des membres de ce comité, par courtoisie, nous donnons habituellement le droit de parole à nos invités.
Cela dit, je cède la parole à M. Kent.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Kent.
We have a speaking order: Ms. Raitt, Mr. Angus and Mr. Poilievre.
Ms. Raitt.
Merci, monsieur Kent.
Il y a une liste d'intervenants: Mme Raitt, M. Angus et M. Poilievre.
Madame Raitt.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
The speaking order is Mr. Angus, Mr. Poilievre, Ms. May, Mr. Weir and Ms. Ramsey.
Go ahead, Mr. Angus.
Voici l'ordre des interventions: M. Angus, M. Poilievre, Mme May, M. Weir et Mme Ramsey.
Allez-y, monsieur Angus.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Just to be clear, he said he'd make himself available on short notice. Based on some questions from all parties here, he has made himself available today by video conference so he is standing by if a motion is passed.
Je veux seulement préciser qu'il a dit qu'il serait disposé à le faire à court préavis. Sur la base de certaines questions de tous les partis ici présents, il a dit qu'il pouvait comparaître par vidéoconférence aujourd'hui et qu'il sera prêt si jamais une motion est adoptée.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Angus.
Next is Mr. Poilievre.
Merci, monsieur Angus.
C'est maintenant au tour de M. Poilievre.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Poilievre.
Next up we have Ms. May.
Merci, monsieur Poilievre.
C'est maintenant au tour de Mme May.
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thanks to the committee for the opportunity to speak.
Thanks to Mr. Poilievre's intervention, I don't have to recite the jobs questions I asked at the justice committee.
I'm deeply troubled by what faces us. All of you around the table I regard as friends, and I try to approach things in a very non-partisan way, which is very hard on the eve of an election. Everybody goes into hyper-partisan mode then, and this is, in a lot of ways, red meat right before an election. I know that, but something is really wrong here. Something is deeply wrong here, and I beg my friends around the table to allow Mr. Dion to speak to us.
I thought I knew what had transpired in the SNC-Lavalin mess based on the testimony of our former justice minister and former attorney general. Her chronology, her notes, I thought covered everything that had occurred, and I believed her every syllable, but Mr. Dion's report has shaken me far more than our former attorney general's testimony, and I'll tell you why.
We now know there were meetings that took place on the edge of other international gatherings, like in Davos, including the Minister of Finance, Bill Morneau and the CEO of SNC-Lavalin, and that the idea of changing our law to insert a deferred prosecution agreement into the Criminal Code came from SNC-Lavalin for their use specifically.
No wonder the machinery of government began to panic when the plan wasn't working out. There was a hiccup because the justice minister and attorney general at the time respected the principle of prosecutorial independence and wouldn't intervene against the section 13 report of the director of public prosecutions.
This is a critical point: There were other ministers involved. I thought and still think, because I bend over backward to be fair to everyone concerned, that part of the reason the Prime Minister doesn't realize what he did was wrong is that he didn't receive a decent legal briefing from his Clerk of the Privy Council. None was provided to him by the clerk or by his staff, but he did receive a decent legal briefing from Jody Wilson-Raybould, the former minister of justice and attorney general, who told him, “Watch what you're doing. You're interfering in prosecutorial independence”. I know she didn't sit him down and get out a chalkboard and explain it. She didn't think she had to.
What I find really troubling about what Mr. Dion uncovered is the idea that in any government governed by the rule of law a minister of justice and attorney general's position would be so deeply undermined by her colleagues.
I know that a lot of Liberals have said it was wrong of her to tape Michael Wernick. I understood why, under the circumstances, she felt it necessary, but the deeper distrust is to imagine that a report from a former Supreme Court judge, a very respected jurist, John Major, peddled by SNC-Lavalin's lawyer, also a former Supreme Court judge, Frank Iacobucci, blinded people around the cabinet table—because of the power of those justices' titles and the previous work they have done on the Supreme Court—to the reality that the only legal advice they should have been taking was from their own lawyer, the attorney general.
However, what is really shocking to me is that they peddled this report undermining the judgment of their cabinet colleague, the minister of justice and attorney general. They peddled it without even sharing it with her. I ask my Liberal friends to imagine for one minute a scenario in which Jean Chrétien allowed his cabinet colleagues to circulate a memo undermining Irwin Cotler. Can you imagine Pierre Trudeau allowing his cabinet colleagues to circulate a memo undermining the judgment of John Turner?
This is really scandalous. The Prime Minister is guilty here of the kind of offence for which resignation is appropriate. I leave it to him. I'm not calling for his resignation, but it does strike me as beyond belief that this kind of thing could go on. It's not a small matter. It shouldn't be covered up. We really do need to ask Mr. Dion what he uncovered. We need to hear his opinion on the nature of further remedies and how many steps we should take to ensure that cabinet confidentiality is removed so that those nine additional witnesses can be heard.
I also want to say very clearly that I don't think this is a partisan issue. I think it is systemic. It is shocking that the senior civil service of this country could be manipulated by a transnational corporation in this fashion, and I think lots of other transnational corporations may have the same kind of access. This is systemic regardless of who is in the PMO. Regardless if it's a Conservative or a Liberal government, we have to ensure that the machinery of government, our civil service, is not at the disposal of transnational corporations to do their bidding.
I don't think it's about the Prime Minister and making this a political football in the election campaign. I think it's a much larger issue and I think it is systemic. I'd like to hear from the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner.
I think we now have a moral obligation to protect our democracy against the power of large global firms.
Right now our democracy looks weakened by this. We need to get to the bottom of it.
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Merci, monsieur le président. Je remercie le Comité de me donner l'occasion de prendre la parole.
Grâce à l'intervention de M. Poilievre, je n'ai pas à réciter les questions sur les emplois que j'ai posées devant le comité de la justice.
Je suis profondément troublée par ce qui nous attend. Je vous considère tous comme des amis, et j'essaie d'aborder les choses de façon impartiale, ce qui est très difficile à faire à la veille d'élections. Tout le monde devient ultra partisan et, à bien des égards, ceci donne un os à ronger juste avant la tenue d'élections. Je le sais, mais quelque chose ne tourne vraiment pas rond. Il y a quelque chose de fondamental qui ne va pas, et j'implore mes amis ici présents de permettre à M. Dion de venir nous parler.
Je croyais savoir ce qui s'était passé dans le gâchis de SNC-Lavalin à partir du témoignage de notre ancienne ministre de la Justice et procureure générale. Je pensais que sa chronologie, ses notes couvraient tout ce qui s'était passé, et je l'ai crue à chaque syllabe, mais le rapport de M. Dion m'a beaucoup plus secouée que le témoignage de notre ancienne procureure générale, et je vais vous dire pourquoi.
Nous savons maintenant que des réunions se sont déroulées en marge d'autres rencontres internationales, comme à Davos, dont entre le ministre des Finances, Bill Morneau et le PDG de SNC-Lavalin, et que l'idée de modifier notre loi pour insérer un accord de suspension des poursuites dans le Code criminel venait de SNC-Lavalin pour son propre usage.
Il n'est pas étonnant que la machine gouvernementale ait commencé à paniquer lorsque le plan n'a pas fonctionné. Il y a eu un pépin parce que la ministre de la Justice et procureure générale de l'époque respectait le principe de l'indépendance du poursuivant et n'interviendrait pas contre l'avis de la directrice des poursuites pénales donné en vertu de l'article 13.
Voici un point essentiel: d'autres ministres y étaient mêlés. Je croyais, et je le crois encore, car je fais mon possible pour être juste envers toutes les personnes concernées, que si le premier ministre ne comprend pas qu'il a eu tort d'agir ainsi, c'est en partie parce que le greffier du Conseil privé ne lui a pas fourni l'information juridique qu'il fallait. Ni le greffier ni les membres de son personnel ne lui ont donné l'information qui convient à cet égard, mais c'est ce qu'a fait Jody Wilson-Raybould, l'ancienne ministre de la Justice et procureure générale. Elle lui a dit de faire attention à ce qu'il faisait, qu'il était en train de porter atteinte à l'indépendance du poursuivant. Je sais qu'elle ne s'est pas assise avec lui pour lui donner des explications. Elle ne pensait pas qu'elle devait le faire.
Ce que je trouve très préoccupant au sujet de ce que M. Dion a découvert, c'est l'idée que dans un gouvernement régi par la primauté du droit, la position d'un ministre de la Justice et procureur général puisse être aussi profondément minée par ses collègues.
Je sais que de nombreux libéraux ont dit qu'elle n'aurait pas dû enregistrer Michael Wernick. Je comprends pourquoi, dans les circonstances, elle a estimé que c'était nécessaire. Or, ce qui suscite plus de méfiance, c'est de penser qu'une communication d'un ancien juge de la Cour suprême, un juriste très respecté, John Major, diffusée par l'avocat de SNC-Lavalin, qui est également un ancien juge de la Cour suprême, Frank Iacobucci, a aveuglé les gens au Cabinet — en raison de l'importance des titres des juges et du travail qu'ils ont accompli à la Cour suprême — quant au fait que le seul conseil juridique qu'ils auraient dû obtenir, c'est celui de leur propre avocate, la procureure générale.
Cependant, ce qui me consterne vraiment, c'est qu'ils ont fait circuler cette communication qui mine le jugement de leur collègue du Cabinet, la ministre de la Justice et procureure générale. Ils l'ont fait sans même le lui transmettre. Je demande à mes amis libéraux d'imaginer un instant une situation où Jean Chrétien aurait permis à ses collègues du Cabinet de faire circuler une note écorchant la crédibilité d'Irwin Cotler. Pouvez-vous concevoir que Pierre Trudeau aurait pu permettre à ses collègues du Cabinet de faire circuler une note décrédibilisant le jugement de John Turner?
C'est vraiment scandaleux. Le premier ministre est coupable ici du type d'infraction pour lequel il conviendrait qu'il démissionne. Je lui laisse le soin de le faire. Je ne demande pas sa démission, mais il me semble incroyable que ce genre de chose puisse continuer. Ce n'est pas une mince affaire. Et cela ne devrait pas être camouflé. Nous devons vraiment demander à M. Dion ce qu'il a découvert. Il faut qu'il nous donne son avis sur la nature d'autres recours possibles et le nombre de mesures que nous devrions prendre pour que la confidentialité des délibérations du Cabinet soit levée afin qu'il soit possible d'entendre les neuf autres témoins.
Je veux également dire très clairement que je ne crois pas qu'il s'agisse d'une question partisane. À mon sens, c'est un problème systémique. Il est troublant de constater que les hauts fonctionnaires de ce pays puissent se faire manipuler ainsi par une multinationale, et je pense que bien d'autres multinationales pourraient avoir le même type d'accès. C'est systémique, peu importe qui est au Cabinet du premier ministre. Qu'il s'agisse d'un gouvernement conservateur ou d'un gouvernement libéral, nous devons nous assurer que l'appareil gouvernemental, notre fonction publique, n’est pas mis à la disposition de multinationales pour faire leurs quatre volontés.
Je ne pense pas qu'il s'agisse du premier ministre et qu'il s'agisse d'en faire une question politique durant la campagne électorale. Je crois que le problème est beaucoup plus vaste et qu'il est systémique. J'aimerais entendre le commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique.
Je pense que nous avons maintenant l'obligation morale d'agir pour protéger notre démocratie des pouvoirs des grandes entreprises mondiales.
À l'heure actuelle, notre démocratie semble affaiblie par cette situation. Nous devons aller au fond des choses.
Merci, monsieur le président.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Ms. May.
Next up is Mr. Weir.
Merci, madame May.
C'est maintenant au tour de M. Weir.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Weir.
Next we will go to Ms. Ramsey.
Merci, monsieur Weir.
C'est maintenant au tour de Mme Ramsey.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
I still have two others to speak to this. We have to go through the list. If the people on the speakers list want to give up their time to go to a vote, then that's a possibility. I don't see them willing to do that right now.
I have Mr. Gourde next to speak, and then Ms. Raitt again.
Go ahead, Mr. Gourde.
Il reste deux autres intervenants. Nous devons entendre les personnes qui sont sur la liste. Si ces personnes veulent renoncer à leur temps d'intervention afin que nous passions au vote, c'est possible. Je constate que ce n'est pas ce qu'ils souhaitent faire présentement.
Le prochain intervenant est M. Gourde, qui sera suivi de Mme  Raitt à nouveau.
Allez-y, monsieur Gourde.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Gourde.
Next up, we have Ms. Raitt.
Merci, monsieur Gourde.
Je cède maintenant la parole à Mme Raitt.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Ms. Raitt.
Next up is Mr. MacKinnon.
Merci, madame Raitt.
Nous passons maintenant à M. MacKinnon.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Angus.
It's not really a point of order.
Mr. MacKinnon, proceed.
Merci, monsieur Angus.
Il ne s'agit pas vraiment d'un rappel au Règlement.
Monsieur MacKinnon, vous pouvez continuer.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Mr. MacKinnon, are you able to table that for the committee today?
Monsieur MacKinnon, êtes-vous en mesure de déposer cette analyse aujourd'hui?
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
We'll continue with Mr. MacKinnon.
Nous allons poursuivre avec M. MacKinnon.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Angus. That's debate.
We'll go back to Mr. MacKinnon to finish his statement.
Merci, monsieur Angus. Cela tient du débat.
Nous allons revenir à M. MacKinnon pour qu'il termine sa déclaration.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Mr. MacKinnon, to be clear, the chair has the discretion to hear points of order and debate—
Monsieur MacKinnon, pour être clair, le président peut décider d'entendre les rappels au Règlement et les points de discussion...
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
—and has a responsibility to keep things in order.
... et il a la responsabilité de maintenir le bon ordre.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
I hope the committee will acknowledge the chair and his role in keeping things in order.
J'espère que le Comité reconnaîtra le rôle du président dans le maintien du bon ordre.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
We'll go next to Mr. Erskine-Smith.
Go ahead.
C'est maintenant au tour de M. Erskine-Smith.
Allez-y.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Erskine-Smith.
Go ahead, quickly, Mr. Angus.
Merci, monsieur Erskine-Smith.
Monsieur Angus, allez-y et soyez bref.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you for the clarification.
We do have a speakers list again, and we have Mr. Poilievre.
Go ahead.
Merci de cette précision.
Nous avons à nouveau une liste d'intervenants.
Monsieur Poilievre, allez-y.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you again, Mr. Poilievre.
Next up is Mr. Angus.
Merci encore une fois, monsieur Poilievre.
Monsieur Angus, c'est à vous.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Okay, Mr. Angus.
We have two more speakers. We have Mr. Kent and then Ms. Raitt.
D'accord, monsieur Angus.
Nous avons deux autres intervenants, M. Kent puis Mme Raitt.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Kent.
I have just been signalled that the other speaker who was going to speak will not, so we can go to the vote on the motion.
Merci, monsieur Kent.
On vient de m'indiquer que l'autre personne qui voulait prendre la parole ne le fera pas. Nous pouvons donc passer au vote.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
It will be a recorded vote. The motion is as follows:
That, given the unprecedented nature of the Trudeau II Report, the Committee invite the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner to brief the Committee on his report, and that the Committee invite any further witnesses as required based on the testimony of the commissioner.
Nous aurons un vote par appel nominal. La motion se lit comme suit:
Que, compte tenu de la nature sans précédent du Rapport Trudeau II, le Comité invite le commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique à informer le Comité sur son rapport, et que le Comité invite tout autre témoin requis en fonction du témoignage du commissaire.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you for bringing that up, Mr. Poilievre.
We'll list the names here. Go ahead, Mr. Clerk, if you want to list them for Mr. Poilievre's question just for clarity's sake.
Merci de soulever la question, monsieur Poilievre.
Nous avons la liste ici. Allez-y, monsieur le greffier, énumérez la liste pour répondre à la question de M. Poilievre à des fins de clarification.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
And me if there is a tie.
Is that clear, Mr. Poilievre?
Et moi s'il y a égalité.
Est-ce clair, monsieur Poilievre?
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
We are good to proceed with the vote.
(Motion negatived: nays 5, yeas 4)
The Chair: Mr. Kent's motion is defeated.
That said, we have a motion from Mr. Angus still to discuss.
Go ahead, Mr. Angus.
Nous pouvons donc passer au vote.
(La motion est rejetée par 5 voix contre 4.)
Le président: La motion de M. Kent est rejetée.
Cela étant dit, nous devons encore débattre de la motion de M. Angus.
Monsieur Angus, allez-y.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Go ahead, Mr. Angus, please.
Monsieur Angus, allez-y, s'il vous plaît.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Angus, as always.
Next up is Mr. Erskine-Smith.
Merci, monsieur Angus.
Le prochain intervenant est M. Erskine-Smith.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Erskine-Smith.
Next up is Ms. May.
Merci, monsieur Erskine-Smith.
Je donne maintenant la parole à Mme May.
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I just want to make a couple of quick points in response to some of the points put forward by my colleagues. I am not a voting member at this table, of course.
First of all, it's a really hard issue for all of us here around the table, but I have to say that—following somewhat from your point, Mr. Erskine-Smith—I found it unhelpful to describe this case as the Prime Minister telling people that he wanted them to break the law. For what it's worth, I maintain that, to this day, I don't think the Prime Minister understands that what he did was wrong, which is maybe equally troubling or more troubling. I think he's maintained that view because the people around him were overwhelmed by the fact that former Supreme Court judges were telling them what to do and were undermining their Attorney General, who happened to be a younger woman and indigenous, and this part of the story bothers me.
What should the former attorney general have done? I want to remind my friend Mr. Erskine-Smith of her testimony to the justice committee. She said to those lobbying her on behalf of SNC-Lavalin that if they have additional evidence, that goes to the decision-maker, who in this case is Kathleen Roussel, director of public prosecutions. Our former attorney general said, on the evidence, that she had told those lobbying for SNC-Lavalin that if they had a representation on a threat to jobs and they send it to her, she would ensure that it is put before the director of public prosecutions so she can take it into consideration. Such a letter was never sent.
It's also disturbing to me that so many people—and I would like to have before the ethics committee many of them who were mentioned in the testimony of former attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould—were given access by our former attorney general to the section 13 report, which is highly confidential, of the former director of public prosecutions. They declined to read it and seem to have lost it, including a number of political staff in the PMO, the deputy minister of the Department of Justice herself and the former clerk of the Privy Council.
To Mr. Erskine-Smith's point that a corporation can have good people and bad people, that's all true, but this corporation is charged in its corporate state; it is charged as a corporate person. There are no individual officers charged. The corporation must face full trial, which is why I go to one last point, Mr. Chair.
If we're looking for a real motive, we don't have to look far. Some of the most celebrated corporate giants in this country are businessmen with good reputations, people like Gwyn Morgan, former chair of Encana and a major fossil fuel lobbyist against climate action, who was chair of the board throughout the time the alleged bribery took place, and chair of the governance committee. There were a lot of people on the board of directors—whom I won't list—whose reputations could be hurt if what I suspect might be heard in the evidence in open court is actually heard, because these are not just bribery charges of a small nature. This is about working hand in glove with the Gadhafi regime and paying millions of dollars.
By the way, as to the whole idea that SNC-Lavalin has been washed pure as snow, they haven't changed their auditor. Deloitte was their auditor then and Deloitte is their auditor now, and somehow never noticed that $50 million went missing in bribes in Libya.
I think what we're looking at is corporate Canada exerting its influence to not have to face a full trial because reputations would be harmed. I think that's enough of a motive to start leaning on the Prime Minister, the finance minister, the President of Treasury Board and all their friends.
We need to ensure that Canadians understand that this isn't about small things and the Shawcross principle. That's a bridge too far for most Canadians to care about, and I accept that; I get that. But it's really important that Canadians know that no future government, no future prime minister, should ever allow pressure to be brought to bear to stop a full and open trial of the alleged criminal activities of this corporation.
Under the principles of deferred prosecution agreements, as understood in international law, economic disadvantage to the corporation is not a relevant factor. We need to understand that we should protect workers always, but we must not protect criminality because the people whose reputations could be hurt are powerful. You bet they're powerful: They've blocked climate action for quite a while.
I am afraid that this corporation needs to face a trial on the evidence that Kathleen Roussel, as director of public prosecutions, decided under a section 13 report disqualifies them from a deferred prosecution agreement by law.
That's what our former attorney general looked at. That's why she exercised her due diligence to ensure the decision by the director of public prosecutions. I agree with Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith once again. It was a very good move that the former Conservative government brought in the director of public prosecutions and insulated that office from political interference. That's all quite right and good. Canadians need to know that this is about a corporation charged with crimes we don't know, up to and including killing people—we don't know. Evidence is under the section 13 report. We need to have it come before an open court.
That's why I think the pressure was brought to bear. Powerful men have powerful friends. I still think that our Prime Minister needs to understand—and I don't think he does—that what he did was wrong, and he needs to apologize to Jane Philpott, Jody Wilson-Raybould and the people of Canada.
Merci, monsieur le président.
J'aimerais simplement réagir à quelques points soulevés par mes collègues. Bien sûr, je ne fais pas partie des membres votants du Comité.
Tout d'abord, il s'agit d'un dossier difficile pour toutes les personnes réunies ici aujourd'hui, mais je dois dire que j'abonde dans le sens de M. Erskine-Smith: à mon avis, nous n'avançons pas en affirmant que le premier ministre a demandé aux gens d'enfreindre la loi. Je ne pense toujours pas que le premier ministre comprend que ce qu'il a fait est répréhensible, ce qui est peut-être tout aussi troublant, voire davantage. Je pense qu'il reste sur ses positions parce que les gens qui l'entourent étaient dépassés par le fait que d'anciens juges de la Cour suprême leur donnaient des instructions et discréditaient la procureure générale, qui se trouvait à être une femme autochtone d'âge moins avancé — cette partie de l'histoire me dérange.
Qu'aurait dû faire l'ancienne procureure générale? J'aimerais rappeler à mon collègue M. Erskine-Smith ce qu'elle a affirmé durant son témoignage devant le comité de la justice. Elle a dit aux personnes qui exerçaient des pressions sur elle au nom de SNC-Lavalin que si elles avaient d'autres preuves, elles devaient les envoyer à la décideuse, c'est-à-dire, dans ce cas-ci, à Mme Kathleen Roussel, la directrice des poursuites pénales. L'ancienne procureure générale a affirmé, durant son témoignage, qu'elle avait dit aux personnes défendant SNC-Lavalin que si elles avaient de l'information concernant des pertes d'emplois, elles pouvaient la lui envoyer, et qu'elle veillerait à ce qu'elle soit transmise à la directrice des poursuites pénales afin qu'elle la prenne en considération. Or, aucune lettre n'a été envoyée.
Je trouve aussi troublant que l'ancienne procureure générale ait envoyé le rapport visé par l'article 13, un rapport hautement confidentiel préparé par la directrice des poursuites pénales, à autant de personnes. Entre parenthèses, j'aimerais que le comité de l'éthique reçoive nombre des personnes que l'ancienne procureure générale Jody Wilson-Raybould a mentionnées durant son témoignage. Les personnes en question ont refusé de le lire et elles semblent l'avoir perdu. Elles comprennent plusieurs membres du personnel politique du Cabinet du premier ministre, la sous-ministre de la Justice elle-même et l'ancien greffier du Conseil privé.
M. Erskine-Smith a raison: les sociétés peuvent compter des gentils et des méchants. Or, dans le cas présent, la société est accusée en tant que personne morale. Aucun employé n'est accusé individuellement. La société doit subir son procès, ce qui m'amène à mon dernier point, monsieur le président.
Nous n'avons pas à creuser pour trouver un mobile. Au Canada, les géants du milieu des affaires les plus célèbres comptent des hommes d'affaires de bonne réputation, des gens comme M. Gwyn Morgan, l'ancien dirigeant d'Encana et un grand lobbyiste des combustibles fossiles s'opposant à la lutte contre les changements climatiques. M. Morgan était président du conseil d'administration durant la période au cours de laquelle les pots-de-vin auraient été versés, et président du comité de gouvernance. La réputation de nombreux membres du conseil d'administration — que je ne nommerai pas — pourrait être ternie si les témoignages que je soupçonne sont présentés durant une audience publique, car il ne s'agit pas d'accusations de corruption mineures. Il est question d'avoir collaboré avec le régime de Kadhafi et d'avoir versé des millions de dollars.
Soit dit en passant, je ferais remarquer à ceux qui croient qu'un grand ménage a été fait chez SNC-Lavalin qu'elle n'a pas changé de cabinet d'audit. Elle faisait affaire avec Deloitte à l'époque et elle continue à faire affaire avec Deloitte aujourd'hui, et Deloitte n'a jamais remarqué que 50 millions de dollars avaient disparu sous la forme de pots-de-vin payés en Libye.
À mon avis, ce qui s'est passé, c'est que le milieu des affaires canadien a usé de son influence pour éviter d'avoir à subir un procès qui salirait des réputations. D'après moi, c'était assez pour commencer à faire pression sur le premier ministre, le ministre des Finances, la présidente du Conseil du Trésor et tous leurs amis.
La population canadienne doit absolument comprendre que les enjeux dans ce dossier sont importants. Le dossier ne concerne pas le principe de Shawcross, une idée trop abstraite pour que la majorité des Canadiens s'en soucie. Je comprends cela et je l'accepte. Or, c'est très important que la population canadienne sache qu'aucun futur gouvernement, aucun futur premier ministre ne devrait permettre que des pressions soient exercées pour empêcher la tenue d'un procès public sur les activités criminelles présumées de cette société.
Selon les principes des accords de poursuite suspendue, en vertu du droit international, les préjudices économiques subis par la société ne comptent pas parmi les facteurs devant être pris en compte. Nous devons comprendre qu'il faut toujours protéger les travailleurs, mais qu'il ne faut pas protéger la criminalité, car les personnes dont la réputation risque d'être ternie sont puissantes. Elles sont même très puissantes: elles entravent la lutte contre les changements climatiques depuis longtemps déjà.
J'ai bien peur que la société en question doive subir un procès puisque Mme Kathleen Roussel, directrice des poursuites pénales, a décidé, en vertu de la preuve contenue dans un rapport visé par l'article 13, qu'elle n'était pas admissible à un accord de poursuite suspendue.
C'est ce qu'a fait notre ancienne procureure générale. C'est la raison pour laquelle elle a fait preuve de diligence raisonnable en appuyant la décision de la directrice des poursuites pénales. Encore une fois, j'abonde dans le même sens que M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith. L'ancien gouvernement conservateur a bien agi en mettant le directeur des poursuites pénales et son bureau à l'abri des ingérences politiques. C'est très bien ainsi. Les Canadiens doivent savoir qu'il s'agit d'une société accusée de crimes dont on ignore la nature, peut-être de meurtre... on n'en sait rien. La preuve se trouve dans le rapport visé par l'article 13. La preuve doit être communiquée lors d'une audience publique.
Voilà pourquoi je pense que des pressions ont été exercées. Les hommes puissants ont des amis puissants. Je suis toujours persuadée que notre premier ministre doit comprendre, ce qu'il ne semble pas faire, que ce qu'il a fait était répréhensible et qu'il doit présenter des excuses à Jane Philpott, à Jody Wilson-Raybould et au peuple canadien.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Ms. May.
I have two more speakers, Mr. Kent and Ms. Ramsey. If anybody else wishes to speak, we have about an hour and seven minutes left.
Mr. Kent, go ahead.
Merci, madame May.
J'ai encore deux intervenants sur ma liste: M. Kent et Mme Ramsey. Il nous reste environ une heure et sept minutes, si quelqu'un désire prendre la parole.
Monsieur Kent, allez-y.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Kent.
Ms. Ramsey, go ahead.
Merci, monsieur Kent.
Madame Ramsey, à vous la parole.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Ms. Ramsey.
Next up we have Mr. Angus.
Merci, Madame Ramsey.
Au tour maintenant de M. Angus.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Angus.
We have Ms. Raitt, and then Mr. Weir.
Ms. Raitt, go ahead.
Merci, monsieur Angus.
Au tour maintenant de Mme Raitt, et ensuite de M. Weir.
Madame Raitt, je vous en prie.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Ms. Raitt.
Mr. Weir.
Merci, madame Raitt.
Monsieur Weir, c'est à votre tour.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Weir, for that.
I have no other people on the speakers list.
Are we ready—
Merci, monsieur Weir.
Je n'ai plus d'intervenants sur ma liste.
Sommes-nous prêts à...
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
We'll have a recorded vote.
(Motion negatived: nays 6; yeas 3)
The Chair: Ms. Raitt, do you have a comment?
Ce sera un vote par appel nominal.
(La motion est rejetée par 6 voix contre 3.)
Le président: Madame Raitt, avez-vous un commentaire?
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Ms. Raitt, there's a point of order.
Madame Raitt, le Règlement a été invoqué.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Mr. MacKinnon, it's one of those things in committee. It's nice to do, but it's not required that she give notice of her motion.
The motion has come up on the floor today. She is therefore in order to present that motion.
Monsieur MacKinnon, cela fait partie des usages du Comité. C'est toujours bien de donner un préavis, mais ce n'est pas obligatoire.
La motion a été présentée aujourd'hui et elle est recevable.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
To be in order as well it's not required that it be in French. She is completely in order to present her motion as she is stating.
Continue on.
Is this a point of order, Mr. Angus?
La motion ne doit pas être traduite en français pour être recevable. La députée peut présenter sa motion.
Continuez, je vous prie.
Monsieur Angus, invoquez-vous le Règlement?
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Ms. Raitt, please finish, if you would.
Madame Raitt, vous pouvez finir votre intervention.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Ms. Raitt, can you say that one more time for the record?
Madame Raitt, pouvez-vous la relire pour le compte rendu?
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Ms. Raitt.
I have Mr. Angus to speak to the motion.
Merci, madame Raitt.
M. Angus souhaite se prononcer sur la motion.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Angus.
I'll go to Mr. Erskine-Smith.
Merci, monsieur Angus.
Au tour maintenant de M. Erskine-Smith.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Erskine-Smith.
We'll go back to Ms. Raitt.
Merci, monsieur Erskine-Smith.
C'est à vous, madame Raitt.
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
The committee would have to agree to have that motion withdrawn. Is it the will of the committee to do that?
You'd like to vote on it.
Is there any further discussion on the motion?
Le Comité doit être d'accord sur le retrait de la motion. Le Comité est-il d'accord?
Vous voulez mettre la question aux voix.
Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires sur la motion?
View Bob Zimmer Profile
CPC (BC)
It's a recorded vote.
(Motion negatived: nays 7; yeas 2)
The Chair: Is there any further discussion today?
I believe we've exhausted the motions and are ready to head home. Thank you, again, for coming to Ottawa.
We're adjourned.
Ce sera un vote par appel nominal.
(La motion est rejetée par 7 voix contre 2.)
Le président: Y a-t-il d'autres interventions?
Nous sommes passés par toutes les motions et nous sommes prêts à partir. Merci encore d'être venus à Ottawa.
La séance est levée.
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you, Minister, for being with us today.
I'm going to pick up on that commentary about first nations consultation and accommodation. It was this aspect that caused the Federal Court of Appeal to rule against the government last year.
After the announcement that you were okaying the permit, I heard an interview with Chief Lee Spahan of the Coldwater band on CBC, and I've read interviews with him in the press since then. He said that “the meaningful dialogue that was supposed to happen never happened”. This is since the court case, and in that court case, the appeal court said that “missing from Canada's consultation was any attempt to explore how Coldwater's concerns could be addressed.”. This was a band that really wanted accommodation and demanded meaningful accommodation, as the courts have said, and they're saying that it hasn't happened.
I talked to Rueben George of the Tsleil-Waututh recently. They're not happy either.
How confident are you that we're not going back to litigation? It seems that the hard work that needed to be done still has not been done.
Je vous remercie d'être avec nous aujourd'hui, monsieur le ministre.
J'aimerais revenir aux commentaires exprimés sur les consultations et les mesures d'accommodement visant les Premières Nations. C'est justement cet élément qui a poussé la Cour d'appel fédérale à trancher en défaveur du gouvernement l'an dernier.
Après l'annonce selon laquelle vous approuviez le permis, j'ai entendu une entrevue avec le chef Lee Spahan de la bande Coldwater, à la CBC, et j'ai lu divers extraits d'entrevues avec lui dans les journaux depuis. Il affirme que le véritable dialogue qui devait avoir lieu n'a jamais eu lieu, et cela, depuis la décision de la Cour qui a statué ce qui suit: « Le Canada n'a pas exploré les façons de répondre aux préoccupations des Coldwater. » Cette bande souhaitait vraiment obtenir des mesures d'accommodement, elle exigeait de véritables mesures d'accommodement, comme la cour l'a souligné, et son chef affirme qu'on ne leur en a pas consenti.
J'ai également parlé à Rueben George de la Première Nation des Tsleil-Waututh récemment, qui n'était pas content non plus.
Comment pouvez-vous être sûr que vous ne serez pas poursuivi de nouveau? Le travail difficile qui était jugé nécessaire ne semble toujours pas avoir été fait.
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
They're saying that the questions they asked last February—February of 2018—still haven't been answered.
You've just said, I think twice—both in your introductory remarks and in your responses to Ms. Stubbs—that really the only reason we need to build this pipeline.... We've gone through a heck of a lot in this country to try to get this pipeline built, and apparently the only reason is to get our product to tidewater so that we'll have access to Asia and we'll get better prices.
You know this isn't true. This is just a false narrative. Nobody in the industry is saying that we're going to get better prices in Asia. The best prices for our product are in the United States, and they will be for many, many years to come.
Why are we doing this?
We have these price differentials that happen occasionally. They have nothing to do with the fact that the U.S. is our only customer. It's because there are temporary shutdowns of pipelines to fix leaks or because refineries are getting repairs. That seems to be the reason we have this price differential, which covers only about 20% of our oil exports. Eighty per cent of them get world prices because they're exported by companies that are vertically integrated and have their own upgraders and refineries.
Why are we continuing with his false narrative that we're going to get a better price by getting oil to tidewater when that is simply not true?
Ils affirment qu'ils n'ont toujours pas de réponses aux questions qu'ils ont posées en février dernier, en février 2018.
Vous venez de dire, à deux reprises même, tant pendant votre exposé qu'en réponse aux questions de Mme Stubbs, que la seule raison pour laquelle nous avions besoin de construire ce pipeline... On fait des pieds et des mains au Canada pour essayer de construire ce pipeline, mais il semble que la seule raison pour laquelle on veut avoir accès à un port en eaux profondes, c'est pour pouvoir accéder au marché de l'Asie et y obtenir de meilleurs prix.
Vous savez pourtant que ce n'est pas vrai. C'est de la fabulation. Il n'y a personne dans l'industrie qui affirme que nous obtiendrons de meilleurs prix en Asie. C'est aux États-Unis que nous pouvons obtenir les meilleurs prix pour nos produits, et il en sera ainsi encore longtemps.
Pourquoi faisons-nous tout cela?
Il y a occasionnellement des écarts de prix, mais ils n'ont rien à voir avec le fait que les États-Unis soient notre seul client. C'est à cause des fermetures temporaires de pipelines pour colmater les fuites ou parce que les raffineries nécessitent des réparations. Cela semble être ce qui explique les écarts de prix, mais cela ne concerne qu'environ 20 % de nos exportations de pétrole. Pour 80 % de nos exportations, nous obtenons le prix mondial, parce que ce sont des entreprises à intégration verticale qui exportent ce pétrole et qu'elles ont leurs propres raffineries et usines de valorisation.
Pourquoi perpétuer ce mensonge que nous obtiendrons de meilleurs prix en exportant notre pétrole depuis un port en eaux profondes, alors que ce n'est pas vrai?
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
I want to get one more question in before my time is up.
Basically, you're admitting that we're not going to get a better price and that the reason we're building this pipeline is that it's an expansion project because the industry wants to expand its operations in the oil sands.
None of the risks that caused Kinder Morgan to walk away from this project have been alleviated. B.C. is still asserting its rights to protect the environment. Many first nations are still steadfastly against it. Vancouver-Burnaby is against it. The Prime Minister has said repeatedly that the government can give the permits, but only communities can give permission. How are you going to convince them that this pipeline is in the national interest?
It's a project that will fuel expansion of the oil sands and increase our carbon emissions when we're desperately trying to reduce them. This isn't about getting a better price for our oil; it's about expanding our oil production.
I think this is an opportune time.... When you were considering this decision, you could have said, “Let's join the rest of the world and move toward a no-carbon future.” Building a pipeline is locking us into a future that just won't be there in 20 or 30 years, so why are we doing this?
Je veux poser une autre question avant que mon temps soit écoulé.
Pour l'essentiel, vous admettez que nous n'obtiendrons pas un meilleur prix et que si nous construisons ce pipeline, c'est qu'il s'agit d'un projet d'expansion parce que l'industrie veut étendre ses activités dans les sables bitumineux.
Aucun des risques qui ont fait en sorte que Kinder Morgan a abandonné le projet n'a été atténué. La Colombie-Britannique fait toujours valoir ses droits de protéger l'environnement. De nombreuses Premières Nations sont encore fermement contre le projet. Il en est de même pour les gens de Vancouver-Burnaby. Le premier ministre a dit à maintes reprises que le gouvernement peut donner les permis, mais que seules les communautés peuvent donner la permission. Comment allez-vous les convaincre que ce pipeline sert l'intérêt national?
C'est un projet qui renforcera l'expansion des sables bitumineux et qui augmentera nos émissions de carbone alors que nous tentons désespérément de les réduire. Il ne s'agit pas d'obtenir un meilleur prix pour notre pétrole; il s'agit d'accroître notre production de pétrole.
Je pense que c'est un bon moment... Lorsque vous avez envisagé cette décision, vous auriez pu dire « joignons-nous au reste du monde et allons vers un avenir sans carbone ». La construction d'un pipeline nous enferme dans un avenir qui ne sera tout simplement pas là dans 20 ou 30 ans, alors pourquoi faisons-nous cela?
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
I get the last questions of the Parliament. Okay.
À moi les dernières questions de la législature. Très bien.
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
On Monday we passed a motion here in the House of Commons to declare that we are in a climate crisis, a climate emergency. The IPCC, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, says that we have to act immediately, right now, to tackle climate change.
You talked about spending the profits of this pipeline, $500 million a year, on green initiatives. We've spent $4.5 billion buying this pipeline. That's where the profits of that pipeline went. They went to Texas when we bought that pipeline. Now we're going to spend another $10 billion building it over the next two years. That's about $15 billion we could invest right now in fighting climate change, instead of spending all that money and then waiting two years and then dribbling it out over the next 10, 20 or 30 years. We have to do this now.
I just wonder what sort of economics you are using to try to spin this as a win for climate change. It's just Orwellian.
Lundi, la Chambre des communes a adopté une motion pour déclarer que nous traversons une crise, une situation d'urgence climatiques. Le Groupe d'experts intergouvernemental sur l'évolution du climat, le GIEC, nous incite à agir immédiatement, dès maintenant, pour nous attaquer au changement climatique.
Vous avez évoqué l'affectation des profits annuels tirés de cet oléoduc, 500 millions, à des initiatives vertes. L'achat de cet oléoduc nous a coûté 4,5 milliards. Voilà où sont allés ses profits. Envolés au Texas, au moment de l'achat. Nous consacrerons encore 10 milliards à sa construction, dans les deux prochaines années. C'est environ 15 milliards que nous pourrions investir à la place, dès maintenant, contre le changement climatique, au lieu d'attendre deux ans puis de distribuer l'argent au compte-gouttes dans les 10 à 30 prochaines années. Nous devons le faire maintenant.
Je me demande seulement quelles notions économiques vous permettent de le présenter comme un gain pour la lutte contre le changement climatique. C'est simplement orwellien.
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
That has nothing to do with the pipeline.
Ça n'a rien à voir avec l'oléoduc.
View Peter Julian Profile
NDP (BC)
First, I would like to express my condolences to Mr. Kmiec and Mr. Poilievre and to everyone who knew Mark Warawa well. I also want to express my condolences to his widow, Diane, and to his entire family. This is really a sad day.
I want to commend you, Mr. Giroux, because I think this is one of the most important reports you've ever produced.
Over the last four years, we haven't had a single charge from the Canada Revenue Agency on corporate tax avoidance. This is going to become a major issue, I believe, in the federal election campaign because of the fact there has simply not been any action taken against tax avoidance.
At the same time, Canadians are struggling for affordable housing, for medication and to get their kids through school. The answer they're always given is that they're going to have to wait because there are other priorities, but the reality is that there are astronomical sums that seem to be getting around a taxation system, with no action being taken by the federal government.
I want to start by asking you about this, just so I can understand the figures. They seem astronomical.
First, we're talking about nearly a trillion dollars—$996 billion—in reportable transactions with offshore financial centres. Then there are the electronic funds transfers, where we're looking at $1.6 trillion. How much overlap is there between the reportable transactions—that nearly trillion dollars—and the $1.6 trillion? How much of that is actually an overlap? What would be the comprehensive final figure combining those two?
D'abord, j'offre mes condoléances à MM. Kmiec et Poilievre et à tous les gens qui connaissent bien Mark Warawa, ainsi, bien sûr, qu'à sa veuve, Diane, et à toute sa famille. C'est vraiment une triste journée.
Je tiens à vous féliciter, monsieur Giroux, car je crois que c'est un des plus importants rapports que vous ayez produits.
Au cours des quatre dernières années, aucune accusation n'a été portée par l'Agence du revenu du Canada pour évitement fiscal des sociétés. Cela va devenir un enjeu très important, d'après moi, au cours de la campagne électorale fédérale, parce qu'aucune mesure n'a été prise contre l'évitement fiscal.
Parallèlement à cela, les Canadiens ont de la difficulté à trouver des logements abordables, à payer leurs médicaments ou à payer les études de leurs enfants. La réponse qu'on leur donne toujours, c'est qu'ils vont devoir attendre parce qu'il y a d'autres priorités. Cependant, la réalité, c'est que des sommes astronomiques semblent contourner le système fiscal sans que le gouvernement fédéral prenne de mesures.
J'aimerais commencer par vous interroger à ce sujet, parce que j'aimerais comprendre les chiffres. Ils sont astronomiques.
Premièrement, nous parlons de près de 1 billion de dollars en opérations à déclarer — 996 milliards de dollars — qui ont été faites avec des centres financiers à l'étranger. Puis il y a les transferts électroniques de fonds, de l'ordre de 1,6 billion de dollars. Quelle est la mesure du chevauchement entre les opérations à déclarer — de près de 1 billion de dollars — et les 1,6 billion de dollars? Quelle est la proportion du chevauchement? Quel serait le montant final d'ensemble pour les deux?
View Peter Julian Profile
NDP (BC)
You don't have a precise figure to give us, and it is still likely to be in the trillions of dollars.
Vous n'avez pas de chiffres précis à nous donner, mais il demeure vraisemblable que ce soit dans les billions de dollars.
View Peter Julian Profile
NDP (BC)
Those are astounding amounts.
Next, in your conclusion you say that if we assume that 10% of the trillion dollars in reportable transactions has avoided corporate income tax in Canada, it would represent an amount of $100 billion in taxable income that should have been taxed. Then you make an estimate of the billions of dollars that is part of this massive tax chasm that exists.
The assumption of 10% comes from where? Is it possible that the assumption is actually low and that, potentially, the percentage of those transactions avoiding corporate income taxes in Canada is much higher than 10%?
Ce sont des montants ahurissants.
Ensuite, dans votre conclusion, vous dites que si nous présumons que 10 % des opérations à déclarer de 1 billion de dollars ont été soustraites à l'impôt sur le revenu au Canada, cela représenterait un montant de 100 milliards de dollars en revenus imposables qui aurait dû être imposé. Puis, vous faites une estimation des milliards de dollars perdus dans cet immense gouffre fiscal.
D'où vient l'hypothèse des 10 %? Est-il possible que ce pourcentage soit faible et que la proportion des opérations soustraites à l'impôt sur le revenu au Canada soit nettement supérieure à 10 %?
View Peter Julian Profile
NDP (BC)
Okay, but—
D'accord, mais…
View Peter Julian Profile
NDP (BC)
Could I have a final, quick question?
Est-ce que je peux avoir une dernière question rapide?
View Peter Julian Profile
NDP (BC)
What resources would you need to really get to the bottom of this?
Quelles ressources vous faudrait-il pour aller vraiment au fond des choses?
View Peter Julian Profile
NDP (BC)
There were no charges.
Aucune accusation n'a été portée.
View Peter Julian Profile
NDP (BC)
No charges....
Aucune accusation…
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you, Chair.
Commissioner, thank you for being here.
As a state party to the UN convention against torture, Canada's record on preventing and addressing torture and other forms of treatment is periodically reviewed by the UN Committee Against Torture. Canada's most recent review took place last November in Geneva, and in its final report, the committee officially recognized that the “extensive forced or coerced sterilization of indigenous women” in Canada is a form of torture.
The UN committee provided Canada with a number of recommendations, including that the Government of Canada ensure that all allegations of forced or coerced sterilization are impartially investigated.
In your view, which institution in Canada should bear primary responsibility for ensuring that all allegations of forced sterilization are impartially investigated in Canada?
Merci, monsieur le président.
Madame la commissaire, je vous remercie d'être parmi nous.
Le Canada étant signataire de la Convention des Nations unies contre la torture, son bilan en matière de prévention et d'élimination de la torture et d'autres formes de traitement est examiné périodiquement par le Comité des Nations unies contre la torture. Le dernier examen de la situation au Canada a eu lieu en novembre, à Genève. Dans son rapport final, le comité a officiellement reconnu que la stérilisation forcée et répandue de femmes autochtones au Canada est une forme de torture.
Le Comité des Nations unies a soumis au Canada une liste de recommandations, notamment celle voulant que le gouvernement du Canada veille à ce que toutes les allégations de stérilisation forcée ou contrainte fassent l'objet d'enquêtes impartiales.
D'après vous, quelle institution au Canada devrait assumer la responsabilité première de veiller à ce que toutes les allégations de stérilisation forcée fassent l'objet d'enquêtes impartiales au pays?
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
Do you have reason to believe that some of these forced sterilizations could have taken place in areas of jurisdiction under which the RCMP had control?
Avez-vous des raisons de croire que certaines de ces stérilisations forcées pourraient avoir été pratiquées dans des régions qui relèvent de la compétence de la GRC?
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
Okay. As you pointed out, I wrote to you back in February and pointed out to you that a class action lawsuit had been filed, at that time naming some 60 women as complainants and naming the federal government, regional health authorities and individual physicians over incidents of forced or coerced sterilization. I understand that class action has since gone to over 100 women.
With that information, you have a potential source of named victims and a potential source of named defendants. Presumably with a source gathering when and what happened, would that not constitute some evidence that would give you a basis for contacting those people and commencing an investigation starting there?
D'accord. Comme vous l'avez souligné, je vous ai écrit en février dernier, et je vous ai signalé qu'un recours collectif avait été intenté, un recours qui, à ce moment-là, nommait quelque 60 femmes à titre de plaignantes, et nommait le gouvernement fédéral, les autorités régionales de la santé et des médecins particuliers relativement à des incidents de stérilisation forcée. Je crois comprendre que, depuis, le recours collectif est passé à 100 plaignantes.
Sachant cela, vous disposez d'une source potentielle de noms de victimes et d'une source potentielle de noms de défendeurs. Comme je présume qu'une source doit réunir des renseignements sur la date et la nature des incidents, cette information ne constitue-t-elle pas des éléments de preuve qui justifieraient la communication avec ces personnes et l'amorce d'une enquête?
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
Fair enough.
Commissioner Lucki, is it your position that the RCMP does not have the authority to proactively investigate suspected criminal activity in the absence of a complaint?
C'est de bonne guerre.
Commissaire Lucki, êtes-vous d'avis qu'en l'absence d'une plainte, la GRC n'a pas le pouvoir d'enquêter sur une activité criminelle soupçonnée de façon préventive?
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
That could come up through the investigation. This is where I have trouble. If we went outside today and came across a vehicle with its engine running and a broken windshield, and there was blood all over the seats and trailing away from the scene, would you say that there was nothing to investigate until a complaint was received?
Cette question pourrait être soulevée au cours de l'enquête. Voilà ce que je trouve problématique. Si, en sortant dehors aujourd'hui, nous découvrions un véhicule dont le moteur fonctionne, dont le pare-brise est brisé et dont les sièges sont couverts de sang, de même que des traces de sang qui s'éloignent de la scène, diriez-vous qu'aucune enquête n'est pas requise tant qu'une plainte n'a pas été reçue?
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
There is potential evidence of some sort of foul play. Isn't that correct?
Il y aurait alors des preuves potentielles d'un acte criminel, n'est-ce pas?
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
Then let me be more focused on this. I'm going to operate from the assumption that, as former justice minister Jody Wilson-Raybould said, she was content that the current Criminal Code is sufficient to cover this and that performing a surgical procedure on someone against their will or without their consent does constitute a crime. In fact, that was the reason the government gave to the UN Committee Against Torture for why it won't change the Criminal Code to have a specific crime for it.
I'm operating from the assumption that if you operate on someone without their consent, you're committing the crime of aggravated assault as it currently is, so when we know that there are dozens and dozens of women who have said that this has occurred, and we know when it occurred, where it occurred and in some cases who did it, I'm puzzled by why the RCMP would say, “We're just going to sit back and not do anything, even though there seems to be potential evidence of a crime, until someone comes forward.” We would never investigate the Mafia if that were the case.
Alors, permettez-moi de mettre davantage l'accent là-dessus. Je vais partir du principe qu'en sa qualité d'ancienne ministre de la Justice, Jody Wilson-Raybould affirmait qu'elle était convaincue que la version actuelle du Code criminel était suffisamment générale pour englober ce cas, et que la réalisation d'une intervention chirurgicale contre le gré d'une personne ou sans son consentement constituait effectivement un crime. En fait, c'est le motif que le gouvernement a fourni au Comité des Nations unies sur la torture pour expliquer la raison pour laquelle il ne modifiera pas le Code criminel pour prévoir ce crime particulier.
Je pars du principe que, si vous pratiquez une opération chirurgicale sans le consentement de la personne, vous commettez des voies de fait graves, selon la version actuelle du Code criminel. Par conséquent, comme nous savons que des dizaines et des dizaines de femmes ont affirmé que cela leur était arrivé, que nous savons quand cela est survenu et que, dans certains cas, nous savons qui a commis ces infractions, je ne comprends pas pourquoi la GRC dirait qu'elle va simplement attendre sans rien faire jusqu'à ce que quelqu'un se manifeste, même si des preuves relatives à des crimes semblent exister. Si c'était le cas, nous n'enquêterions jamais sur la mafia.
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
Have you contacted the lawyer for the defendants?
Avez-vous communiqué avec l'avocat des défendeurs?
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
Have you checked with the records filed in the courthouse for the class action?
Avez-vous vérifié les dossiers déposés à la cour dans le cadre du recours collectif?
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
Okay.
Now, if a survivor of forced sterilization had previously come forward to the RCMP but was then referred to a medical regulatory authority, would such an interaction be recorded as a complaint, or in any way, with your records?
D'accord.
Si une survivante d'une stérilisation forcée s'était adressée à la GRC auparavant, mais qu'elle avait été renvoyée à un ordre de médecins, cette interaction serait-elle enregistrée comme une plainte ou enregistrée d'une façon ou d'une autre dans vos dossiers?
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
Okay. I'm going to repeat a question that Ms. Gladu asked you. I know you've answered it, but I want to push it a bit.
In terms of a Criminal Code amendment that made performing a surgical procedure on someone without their consent or against their will a specific Criminal Code offence, would you find that helpful in giving the officers under your command greater guidance and maybe a potential source of investigation, or do you feel that the Criminal Code is fine the way it is right now?
D'accord. Je vais maintenant réitérer une question que Mme Gladu vous a déjà posée. Je sais que vous avez répondu à cette question, mais je souhaite approfondir un peu plus le sujet.
Si une modification était apportée au Code criminel pour faire en sorte que la réalisation d'une intervention chirurgicale contre le gré d'une personne ou sans son consentement constitue une infraction particulière du Code criminel, pensez-vous que cela contribuerait à mieux orienter les agents de police sous votre commandement et à leur fournir peut-être une source d'enquête, ou pensez-vous que le Code criminel est adéquat tel qu'il est en ce moment?
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
For my last question, I'm going to go back to the complaint thing. If it came to the police's attention that there was, say, a child who was being sexually abused in a household and you had some sort of information that it might have occurred but no complaint had come forward, would you wait until a complaint was filed before you did anything?
Dans le cadre de ma dernière question, je vais revenir sur le sujet de la plainte. Si quelqu'un attirait l'attention de la police sur le fait que, disons, un enfant était victime de violence sexuelle dans un ménage et que vous disposiez de certains renseignements indiquant que cela pourrait être vrai, attendriez-vous qu'une plainte ait été déposée avant de faire quoi que ce soit?
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
In this case—
Dans ce cas...
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
I'm sorry.
Je suis désolé.
View Ron McKinnon Profile
Lib. (BC)
Thank you, Chair.
We've heard that it's sometimes difficult for women to approach police to lodge a complaint or to register that an incident has occurred. I'm wondering if there are alternatives to that. It comes to mind that information can be sworn to a justice of the peace, I believe, to initiate a criminal action. Is that correct?
Merci, monsieur le président.
Nous avons entendu dire qu'il est parfois difficile pour les femmes de s'adresser aux services de police pour déposer une plainte ou pour signaler un incident. Je me demande s'il y a d'autres façons de procéder. Je me souviens que, pour entamer une poursuite criminelle, on peut fournir sous serment des renseignements à un juge de paix, je crois. Est-ce exact?
View Ron McKinnon Profile
Lib. (BC)
People could approach a justice of the peace and say, “This has been going on and I'd like to lodge a complaint.” That would be passed on to the appropriate police of jurisdiction.
Les gens pourraient s'adresser à un juge de paix et lui révéler que certains événements se sont produits et qu'ils aimeraient déposer une plainte. Ces renseignements seraient transmis par la suite au service de police compétent.
View Ron McKinnon Profile
Lib. (BC)
I respect that. However, I guess I was looking for an alternative other than going through police services and whether a justice of the peace could serve that function.
Je respecte cela. Toutefois, je suppose que je cherchais une solution autre que le recours aux services de police, et je me demandais si un juge de paix pourrait jouer ce rôle.
View Ron McKinnon Profile
Lib. (BC)
That's okay. It can be initiated outside of the police forces. Is that right?
Cela ne pose pas de problème. Le processus peut être amorcé à l'extérieur des services de police, n'est-ce pas?
View Ron McKinnon Profile
Lib. (BC)
Okay.
My other question, if I have time, is about warrants. Medical records typically are privileged. In order to access them, you'd probably need specific incidents to get a warrant about. If you had a complainant who was a victim, you could presumably get a warrant for that person's medical records much more easily to follow up on that specific complaint.
D'accord.
Mon autre question concerne les mandats, si j'ai le temps de la poser. Habituellement, les dossiers médicaux sont confidentiels. Pour y avoir accès, un mandat est nécessaire, et il faut probablement que certains incidents soient survenus pour obtenir ce mandat. Si le plaignant était la victime, vous pourriez vraisemblablement obtenir un mandat beaucoup plus rapidement pour avoir accès aux dossiers médicaux de la personne et pour donner suite à la plainte en question.
View Ron McKinnon Profile
Lib. (BC)
Okay. Great.
Those were my questions.
D'accord. C'est formidable.
C'était là mes questions.
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Dr. Blake, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights and the European Court of Human Rights have both recognized that informed consent can never be given during and immediately after labour and delivery. Is that the position of the society?
Merci, monsieur le président.
Docteure Blake, la Cour américaine des droits de l'homme et la Cour européenne des droits de l'homme ont toutes les deux reconnu que le consentement éclairé ne peut jamais être donné pendant l'accouchement et immédiatement après. Est-ce également l'avis de la Société?
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
You don't have a hard and fast rule that's as clear as that.
Vous n'avez pas de règle stricte aussi clairement définie.
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics has emphasized that “sterilisation for prevention of future pregnancy cannot be ethically justified on grounds of medical emergency.... [She] must be given the time and support she needs to consider her choice.” Is that also consistent with your society's understanding?
La Fédération internationale de gynécologie et d’obstétrique a insisté sur le fait que la stérilisation en vue de prévenir toute grossesse future ne peut pas être justifiée sur le plan éthique en invoquant une urgence médicale et qu'on doit donner à la patiente le temps et le soutien nécessaires pour faire son choix. Est-ce que cela correspond aussi à l'avis de votre Société?
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
Of course, at this committee's last meeting we learned that tubal ligations are being performed on indigenous women in Canada. We heard a story as recently as December 2018. These are being performed while women are in labour or immediately postpartum, when these women are physically and emotionally exhausted, often still under the influence of anaesthetic and unable to give informed consent.
Given that it seems to be well established within your profession that it's not possible to give informed consent for tubal ligation immediately before, during or after labour, why do you think health professionals continue to seek it from indigenous women?
Manifestement, lors de la dernière réunion du comité, nous avons appris qu'on pratiquait la ligature des trompes sur des femmes autochtones au Canada. Nous avons entendu parler d’un cas qui s'est produit aussi récemment qu'en décembre 2018. Ces ligatures sont effectuées pendant l'accouchement ou immédiatement après, lorsque les patientes sont épuisées physiquement et émotionnellement, et souvent encore sous l’influence d'un anesthésique et donc incapables de donner leur consentement éclairé.
Étant donné qu'il semble bien établi, au sein de votre profession, qu'il n'est pas possible de donner un consentement éclairé pour la ligature des trompes immédiatement avant, pendant ou après l'accouchement, pourquoi, selon vous, des professionnels de la santé continuent-ils de tenter de l'obtenir des femmes autochtones?
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
I guess you'd agree that it shouldn't be happening.
Je présume que vous convenez que cela ne devrait pas se produire.
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
I understand that.
We had some testimony before, and I want to clarify something. Is the physician who's performing the tubal ligation or the procedure ultimately responsible for ensuring that informed consent has been given?
Je comprends.
Nous avons entendu des témoignages plus tôt, et j'aimerais obtenir quelques éclaircissements. Le médecin qui effectue la ligature des trompes ou l'acte médical est-il responsable, au bout du compte, de s'assurer que le consentement éclairé a été obtenu?
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
If these in fact have happened, these tubal ligations, then it is the person who's performing.... In all cases it would be a physician, I imagine, of some type. You mentioned that it could be a family physician or an—
Si ces ligatures des trompes ont réellement été effectuées, dans ce cas, c'est la personne qui effectue… Dans tous les cas, ce serait un médecin, j'imagine, quelle que soit sa spécialité. Vous avez mentionné qu'il pourrait s'agir d'un médecin de famille ou d'un…
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
Okay. Thank you.
Dr. Bartlett, I don't know if you were in the room when we heard the testimony of the commissioner of the RCMP who seems to have, up to now, found it difficult to determine the name of a single woman who has had this happen. How difficult is it—you've done some research—to find out the identities or names of women who have reported forced or coerced sterilization in Canada?
D'accord. Merci.
Docteure Bartlett, je ne sais pas si vous étiez présente lorsque nous avons entendu le témoignage de la commissaire de la GRC qui semble trouver qu'il est difficile, jusqu'ici, de connaître le nom d'une seule femme à qui cela est arrivé. Dans quelle mesure est-il difficile — vous avez mené des recherches — de découvrir l'identité ou le nom des femmes qui ont affirmé avoir subi une stérilisation forcée ou contrainte au Canada?
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
Do you know who some of them are?
Connaissez-vous le nom de certaines d'entre elles?
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
You can't say who they are, but you've discovered who they are.
Vous ne pouvez pas divulguer leur nom, mais vous savez qui elles sont.
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
I understand, but you found them.
Je comprends, mais vous les avez trouvées.
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
Right, and I'm going to get to that if I can.
The Saskatchewan Health Authority is currently investigating the case of a 30-year-old woman, a Nakota woman, who says she was the victim of coerced sterilization at a Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, hospital on December 13, 2018. Does the Saskatchewan Health Authority know who that is?
D'accord. Je vais aborder cette question si j'ai le temps.
La Saskatchewan Health Authority enquête actuellement sur le cas d'une femme de 30 ans, une femme nakota, qui affirme qu'elle a subi une stérilisation forcée dans un hôpital de Moose Jaw, en Saskatchewan, le 13 décembre 2018. La Saskatchewan Health Authority connaît-elle l'identité de cette femme?
Results: 1 - 100 of 47258 | Page: 1 of 473

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data