Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 100 of 297
View Diane Lebouthillier Profile
Lib. (QC)
moved that Bill C-77, an act to amend the National Defence Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other acts, be read the second time and referred to a committee.
propose que le projet de loi C-77, Loi modifiant la Loi sur la défense nationale et apportant des modifications connexes et corrélatives à d'autres lois, soit lu pour la deuxième fois et renvoyé à un comité.
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Scott Brison Profile
2018-05-10 15:13 [p.19340]
moved for leave to introduce Bill C-77, an act to amend the National Defence Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other acts.
demande à présenter le projet de loi C-77, Loi modifiant la Loi sur la défense nationale et apportant des modifications connexes et corrélatives à d'autres lois.
View Geoff Regan Profile
Lib. (NS)

Question No. 1430--
Mr. Gabriel Ste-Marie:
With regard to the national shipbuilding procurement strategy: (a) what is the profit margin allocated by the government to the Irving shipyards in Halifax and the Seaspan shipyards in Vancouver; (b) is there a delivery schedule that the Seaspan shipyards in Vancouver must respect; (c) if the answer to (b) is affirmative, what is the schedule, broken down by ship being built; and (d) what correspondence, including emails, was sent by the Assistant Deputy Minister of Defence and Marine Procurement at Public Services and Procurement Canada and by the Assistant Deputy Minister of Materiel at National Defence regarding the Davie shipyard and Federal Fleet Services between June 1, 2017, and December 12, 2017?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1431--
Ms. Anne Minh-Thu Quach:
With regard to the Kathryn Spirit: (a) did Groupe St-Pierre seek rent for the land, the barge, or anything else, from the Mexican company that it sold the wreck to and, if so, how much was the rent for each; (b) did Groupe St-Pierre warn the government, when it bid with Englobe, that it had been fined for violating Quebec environmental legislation; (c) was the government aware that Groupe St-Pierre, either René St-Pierre Excavation or its affiliates, did not comply with Quebec environmental legislation and had a class action suit brought against it during discussions on the dismantling contract; (d) if the answer to (c) is affirmative, what action was taken in light of this information to the selection process during the call for tenders, particularly in terms of the points awarded to the Kathryn Spirit DJV consortium (the consortium); (e) what are the environmental and safety standards and rules that the consortium must abide by under the wreck dismantling contract; (f) what are the actions, reports, analyses, etc., that the Groupe St-Pierre must undertake for each department concerned in order to abide by the environmental and safety standards set out in the contract; (g) what are all the actions, reports, analyses, etc., that the departments must undertake to ensure public safety and compliance with environmental standards and to check that the consortium abides by them; and (h) since the contract was awarded, has the consortium violated any rules or standards of the contract and, if so, on which occasions, broken down by (i) date, (ii) rule or standard that was violated, (iii) description of the infraction encountered, (iv) end date of infraction, (v) the departments' actions to ensure it does not reoccur?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1432--
Ms. Anne Minh-Thu Quach:
With regard to federal spending in the constituency of Salaberry—Suroît, for each fiscal year since 2010–11, inclusively: what are the details of all grants and contributions and all loans to every organization, group, business or municipality, broken down by the (i) name of the recipient, (ii) municipality of the recipient, (iii) date on which the funding was received, (iv) amount received, (v) department or agency that provided the funding, (vi) program under which the grant, contribution or loan was made, (vii) nature or purpose?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1433--
Ms. Elizabeth May:
With regard to government expenditures related to the National Energy Board Modernization Expert Panel, what were: (a) the costs associated with the Panel; and (b) the costs associated with the Panel to review the federal environmental assessment processes?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1434--
Mr. Ted Falk:
With regard to Health Canada's decisions taken with respect to Mifegymiso: (a) what were the conditions imposed by Health Canada during the initial review and approval of the drug on the (i) manufacturer, (ii) distributor, (iii) retailers, (iv) prescribers, doctors and medical professionals, (v) consumers; and (b) for each of the conditions listed in (a), (i) what rationale was given by Health Canada, (ii) what studies did Health Canada cite to justify the conditions, (iii) which stakeholders were consulted by Health Canada?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1435--
Mr. Alistair MacGregor:
With regard to federal funding investments in infrastructure, programs, and services in the Cowichan—Malahat—Langford riding: what is the total of the monetary investments for the riding across all government departments for the (i) 2015-16, (ii) 2016-17, (iii) 2017-18, fiscal years, thus far?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1436--
Mr. Ziad Aboultaif:
With regard to the government paying for the expenses of stakeholders to attend government news conferences or announcements, since November 4, 2015: (a) what are the details of each expenditure including, (i) stakeholder, (ii) organization represented, (iii) date of announcement, (iv) total expenditure; and (b) what is the itemized breakdown of each travel expense referenced in (a), including (i) airfare, (ii) other transportation, (iii) accommodation, (iv) per diems, (v) other?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1437--
Mr. Ziad Aboultaif:
With regard to staffing levels at the Royal Canadian Mounted Police’s Operational Communications Centres, since January 1, 2017: what were the vacancy rates broken down by province and by month?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1438--
Mr. Ziad Aboultaif:
With regard to concerns raised by veterans and other individuals regarding the Vimy 100 anniversary: (a) how many pieces of correspondence were received by the government; (b) what were the most common concerns raised in the correspondence; and (c) what specific measures is the government taking to address the concerns raised?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1439--
Mr. Arnold Viersen:
With regard to the World Economic Forum in Davos in January 2018: (a) how many government employees travelled to Switzerland in relation to the Forum, excluding any members of the Prime Minister Protection Detail; (b) what are the titles of all employees in (a); (c) what is the complete list of Ministerial Exempt Staff who have travelled to Switzerland in relation to the Forum; (d) are there any other individuals for whom the government paid their travel to Switzerland in relation to the Forum and, if so, who are they; and (e) what is the list of individuals who flew to or from Davos on the government’s Airbus which transported the Prime Minister?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1440--
Mr. Arnold Viersen:
With regard to the December 12, 2017, report from the Parliamentary Budget Officer which states that “the total amount of GST collected on carbon pricing in the four provinces is anticipated to be between $236 million and $267 million in 2017-18, and between $265 million and $313 million in 2018-19”: in light of the report, does the government concede that its carbon tax is not revenue neutral?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1441--
Mr. Steven Blaney:
With regard to projections made by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation regarding mortgage default rates and interest rates: (a) what is the projected increase in the number of mortgage defaults if interest rates increase by (i) 0.5 percent, (ii) one percent, (iii) two percent; and (b) for each of the projections in (a), what is the projected value of the defaulted mortgages?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1442--
Mr. Steven Blaney:
With regard to outstanding tax money recovered by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) and with regard to individuals named in the Panama Papers: (a) how many CRA employees or full-time equivalents are currently assigned to investigate information contained in the Panama Papers; and (b) what is the total amount recovered to date as a result of information contained in the Panama Papers?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1443--
Mr. Bob Saroya:
With regard to federal spending to address addiction to items listed under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act: (a) what is the total federal government spending on programming and transfers specifically related to this issue, broken down by each specific funding envelope and each program funded; and (b) what portion of this funding is committed to (i) prevention and education, (ii) treatment and recovery, (iii) supporting police and justice system efforts to deal with the distributors, (iv) research, (v) harm reduction, (vi) other commitments, broken down by type of commitment?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1444--
Mr.Bob Saroya:
With regard to the pending legalization of marijuana and any resulting change in policy at Global Affairs Canada: (a) what is the anticipated policy regarding the possession and use of marijuana at Canadian missions abroad; and (b) what is the anticipated policy regarding the use of diplomatic mail in relation to marijuana?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1445--
Mr. Bob Saroya:
With regard to flights taken on government aircraft by the Minister of National Defence since November 4, 2015: what are the details of each flight, including (i) date, (ii) origin, (iii) destination, (iv) names of Parliamentarians and exempt staff on each flight, (v) type of aircraft?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1446--
Mr. Jamie Schmale:
With regard to Health Canada’s Cannabis Legalization and Regulation Branch: (a) what is the annual budget for the Branch; (b) how many employees or full-time equivalents have been assigned to the Branch; (c) what is Treasury Board’s employment classifications and associated salary ranges for the employees assigned to the Branch and how many employees are associated with each classification; and (d) what resources have been moved to the Branch from other branches within Health Canada?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1447--
Mr. Jamie Schmale:
With regard to the Prime Minister’s meeting with Joshua Boyle: on what date did the Prime Minister’s Office or the Privy Council Office become informed that Mr. Boyle was under investigation for possible violations of the Criminal Code?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1448--
Mr. Jamie Schmale:
With regard to obligations under the Red Tape Reduction Act, since November 4, 2015: (a) what is the complete list of regulations which have been implemented; and (b) for each of the regulations in (a), what regulation was removed in accordance with the Red Tape Reduction Act?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1449--
Mr. Matt Jeneroux:
With regard to vitamin D, taking into consideration that the tolerable upper level of intake set by Health Canada is 4,000 IU per day and that the limit for a dose allowed by Health Canada is 1,000 IU per dose: (a) why has the amount allowed in one dose not been modified to reflect what is considered a safe intake; and (b) what is the rationale for the 1,000 IU per dose limit?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1450--
Mr. Matt Jeneroux:
With regard to Rickets and the fact that Statistics Canada has reported that 32% of Canadians are vitamin D deficient: (a) what is being done to ensure that all Canadians, especially pregnant women, are educated about the importance of vitamin D; and (b) is there a program to specifically address prenatal health for First Nations, Métis and Inuit?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1451--
Mr. Guy Lauzon:
With regard to grants and contributions from the Communities at Risk: Security Infrastructure Program: what are the details of all funding recipients since November 4, 2015, including (i) name of recipient, (ii) location, (iii) amount, (iv) project description, (v) date funding was received by the organization?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1452--
Mr. Guy Lauzon:
With regard to government priorities: what are the government's top four priorities?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1453--
Mr. Guy Lauzon:
With regard to the maintenance and posting to Twitter accounts: (a) how many employees or full time equivalents are assigned to manage or make postings to Twitter accounts; (b) what is Treasury Board’s classification and associated salary ranges for each employee assigned to Twitter accounts; and (c) what are the Twitter handles or usernames maintained by government employees and how many employees are assigned to each account?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1454--
Mr. Robert Kitchen:
With regard to the carbon tax and the statement by the Minister of Environment and Climate Change on CTV News on January 15, 2018, that “All the revenues go back to the provinces”: what is the projected amount which will be returned to each province as a result of the additional GST revenue collected from the carbon tax?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1455--
Mr. Guy Caron:
With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) and each CRA program that handles suspected cases of tax evasion, aggressive tax avoidance, fraud and other tax offences: (a) what is, since 2010, the number of employees dedicated to each program or unit, broken down by (i) number of contract employees per year, (ii) employee position; (b) what is the total budget allocated to each program; (c) what is the number of investigations launched since 2010, broken down by (i) year, (ii) number of employees who worked on the investigation, (iii) type of offence investigated; (d) since 2010, what share of the CRA’s total annual budget has been allocated to the committee responsible for assessing problem cases in order to recommend whether or not to apply the general anti-avoidance rule as set out in the Income Tax Act, broken down by year; and (e) since 2010, what budget amount has been available to the committee in (d), broken down by year?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1456--
Mr. Guy Caron:
With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) committee responsible for assessing problem cases in order to recommend whether or not to apply the general anti-avoidance rule as set out in the Income Tax Act: (a) how many problem cases has this committee received from CRA auditors since 2010, broken down by (i) year, (ii) reason for the committee’s involvement, (iii) number of employees having worked on the case; (b) how many investigations have been launched following the committee’s involvement since 2010, broken down by (i) year, (ii) reason why the investigation was warranted, (iii) number of employees having worked on the investigation; (c) how many employees are working or have worked on this committee, broken down by (i) number of contract employees per year, (ii) number of contract administrators per year, (iii) number of contract technicians per year; and (d) what is the number of investigations resolved since 2010, broken down by (i) year, (ii) number of employees who worked on the investigation, (iii) type of offence warranting investigation?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1457--
Ms.Candice Bergen:
With regard to the destruction of the Golden Lampstand Church and the Zhifang Catholic Church by the Chinese government: (a) does the government condemn the Chinese government’s actions and, if not, why not; (b) did the government raise any objection to these actions with the Chinese government and, if so, what are the details, including (i) who raised the objection, (ii) what is the title of the Chinese government official who received the objection, (iii) date of objection; and (c) since November 4, 2015, has the government raised the issue of the persecution of Christians by the Chinese government with anyone from the Chinese government and, if so, what are the details?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1458--
Mr. Dave MacKenzie:
With regard to individuals being denied entry into Canada since November 4, 2015: how many suspected war criminals have been denied entry into Canada under the War Crimes Program, broken down by year?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1459--
Mr. Dave MacKenzie:
Does the government consider the Iranian government to be elected?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1460--
Mr. Dave MacKenzie:
With regard to expenditures related to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change's social media accounts, since November 4, 2015, what are the details, including: (a) number of employees assigned to each (i) account, (ii) handle or username, (iii) platform; (b) the details of all expenditures made by Environment and Climate Change Canada in relation to social media, including (i) date, (ii) vendor, (iii) amount, (iv) description of product or service, (v) file number?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1461--
Mr. Dave MacKenzie:
With regard to the Canada 2020 event scheduled for February 8, 2018, at the Canadian Science and Technology Museum: (a) is Canada 2020 being given a preferential rate by the government for the event; and (b) what rate is Canada 2020 being charged for renting out this government space?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1462--
Mr. Michael D. Chong:
With regard to the Gordie Howe International Bridge: (a) what was the original estimated date of completion of the bridge when the project was announced; (b) what is the current estimated date of completion; and (c) if there is a delay, as per (b), why does this delay exist?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1463--
Mr. Michael D. Chong:
With regard to the Ambassador Bridge Enhancement Project: (a) did the Minister of Transport, the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, or the Prime Minister hold any meetings or interactions concerning this project with (i) Manuel (“Matty”) Moroun, (ii) Matthew Moroun, (iii) representatives of the Detroit International Bridge Company, (iv) representatives of the Canadian Transit Company; (b) did officials or exempt staff from the offices of the Minister of Transport, the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, or the Prime Minister’s Office hold any meetings or interactions concerning this project with (i) Manuel (“Matty”) Moroun, (ii) Matthew Moroun, (iii) representatives of the Detroit International Bridge Company, (iv) representatives of the Canadian Transit Compan; and (c) did officials from the Embassy of Canada to the United States or Canadian consulates in the United States hold any meetings or interactions concerning this project with (i) Manuel (“Matty”) Moroun, (ii) Matthew Moroun, (iii) representatives of the Detroit International Bridge Company, (iv) representatives of the Canadian Transit Company?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1464--
Mr. Charlie Angus:
With regard to federal tax expenditures, federal economic development agency programming, and the Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC) over the 2010-17 period: (a) what is the government’s estimate of the annual forgone revenue through tax expenditures claimed by companies with operations in multiple countries and over 250 employees, broken down by sector, year, and tax credit and expenditure claimed; (b) what is the number of companies with operations in multiple countries and over 250 employees claiming tax expenditures, broken down by sector, year and tax credit and expenditure claimed; (c) how much has been spent on federal economic development programming to companies with operations in multiple countries and over 250 employees, broken down by sector, year, federal economic development agency and program; (d) what is the number of companies with operations in multiple countries and over 250 employees receiving funds from federal economic development agencies, broken down by sector, year, agency, and program; (e) how much was spent and invested by the BDC in loans, loan guarantees, or other funds in companies with operations in multiple countries and over 250 employees, broken down by sector, year, and category of service; and (f) how many companies with operations in multiple countries and over 250 employees received loans, loan guarantees or other funds from BDC, broken down by sector, year and category of service?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1465--
Mr. Charlie Angus:
With respect to data, information, or privacy breaches in government departments, institutions, and agencies for 2017 and 2018 to date: (a) how many breaches have occured in total, broken down by (i) department, institution, or agency, (ii) number of individuals affected by the breach; (b) of those breaches identified in (a), how many have been reported to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner, broken down by (i) department, institution, or agency, (ii) number of individuals affected by the breach; and (c) how many breaches are known to have led to criminal activity such as fraud or identity theft, broken down by department, institution, or agency?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1466--
Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:
With regard to the various departments, divisions, or units in the Office of the Prime Minister: (a) what are the various departments, divisions, or units; (b) how many employees are in each referred to in (a); (c) what are the mandates of each department, division, or unit; and (d) what are the budgets of each department, division, or unit?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1467--
Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:
With regard to expenditures on investigations by the government since January 1, 2016: what are the details of all such contracts, including for each the (i) date, (ii) duration, (iii) vendor, (iv) value, (v) summary or description of investigation, (vi) findings?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1468--
Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:
With regard to the 2017 Canada Summer Jobs Program: (a) how many organizations were approved in each riding; (b) how many organizations applied, but were not approved for funding in each riding; (c) how many jobs were funded; and (d) how much money was awarded to each riding to support the jobs?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1469--
Mr. Pat Kelly:
With regard to the recent changes announced by the Canada Revenue Agency: (a) how many paper income tax packages does the government expect to mail out this year; (b) what is the projected cost for the mailing referred to in (a), including (i) printing, (ii) postage, (iii) other expenses; (c) how many individuals does the government anticipate will be using the new “File my Return“ telephone filing system; (d) what is the projected cost of the new “File my Return“ system; (e) what criteria will be used to assess whether or not someone is eligible for the new system; and (f) what are the costs associated with setting up the new system?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1470--
Mr. Larry Miller:
With regard to the government’s delegation to the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in January 2018: (a) what was the delegation’s estimated carbon footprint; (b) what is the breakdown of the estimated carbon footprint by type of activity, including (i) air transportation, (ii) ground transportation, (iii) accommodation, (iv) other; and (c) what are the details of any carbon offsets purchased by the government in relation to the trip to Switzerland, including (i) date of purchase, (ii) vendor, (iii) amount (dollar value), (iv) amount of offsets purchased (carbon dioxide equivalents)?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1471--
Mr. Gord Johns:
With regard to the Department of Veterans Affairs: what was the amount and percentage of all lapsed spending in the Department, broken down by year from 2013-14 to the current fiscal year?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question no 1430 --
M. Gabriel Ste-Marie:
En ce qui concerne la stratégie nationale d’approvisionnement en matière de construction navale: a) à combien s’élève la marge de profits allouée par le gouvernement aux chantiers Irving d’Halifax et Seaspan de Vancouver; b) existe-t-il un calendrier de livraisons que le chantier Seaspan de Vancouver se doit de respecter; c) si la réponse en b) est affirmative, quel est-il, ventilé par navire construit; d) quels sont les détails des correspondances, incluant les courriels, émis par le sous-ministre adjoint d’Approvisionnement maritime et de défense pour Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada, et par le sous-ministre adjoint (Matériels) à la Défense nationale, en lien avec le Chantier naval Davie et la Federal Fleet Services entre le 1er juin 2017 et le 12 décembre 2017?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1431 --
Mme Anne Minh-Thu Quach:
En ce qui concerne le Kathryn Spirit: a) est-ce que le Groupe St-Pierre a demandé un loyer pour le terrain, la barge ou autres, à la compagnie mexicaine à qui elle a vendu l’épave, et, le cas échéant, combien était le loyer pour chacun; b) est-ce que le Groupe St-Pierre a prévenu le gouvernement, lorsqu'il a soumissionné avec Englobe, qu’il avait reçu des amendes pour avoir enfreint la loi environnementale du Québec; c) est-ce que le gouvernement savait que le Groupe St-Pierre, soit René St-Pierre Excavation ou ses affiliés, n’avait pas respecté la loi environnementale du Québec et avait une action collective contre lui lors des discussions pour le contrat de démantèlement; d) si la réponse en c) est affirmative, quelles sont toutes les actions prises à la suite de ces informations sur le processus de sélection lors de l’appel d’offre, notamment, en termes de points donnés à la proposition du consortium Kathryn Spirit DJV (le consortium); e) quelles sont les normes et règles environnementales et de sécurité que le consortium doit respecter dans le cadre du contrat de démantèlement de l’épave; f) quelles sont les actions, rapports, analyses, etc., que doit faire le Groupe St-Pierre à chacun des ministères concernés pour respecter les normes environnementales et sécuritaires inscrites dans le contrat; g) quelles sont toutes les actions, rapports, analyses, etc., que les ministères doivent entreprendre pour assurer la sécurité du public et des normes environnementales et vérifier que le consortium les respecte; h) depuis l’obtention du contrat, est-ce que le consortium a enfreint les règles ou normes du contrat, et, le cas échéant, à quelles occasions, ventilées par (i) date, (ii) règles ou normes qui n’ont pas été respectées, (iii) description des infractions rencontrées, (iv) date de fin des infractions, (v) actions des ministères pour que cela ne se reproduisent plus?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1432 --
Mme Anne Minh-Thu Quach:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses fédérales dans la circonscription de Salaberry—Suroît, au cours de chaque exercice depuis 2010-2011 inclusivement: quels sont les détails relatifs à toutes les subventions et contributions et à tous les prêts accordés à tout organisme, groupe, entreprise ou municipalité, ventilés selon (i) le nom du bénéficiaire, (ii) la municipalité dans laquelle est situé le bénéficiaire, (iii) la date à laquelle le financement a été reçu, (iv) le montant reçu, (v) le ministère ou l'organisme qui a octroyé le financement, (vi) le programme dans le cadre duquel la subvention, la contribution ou le prêt a été accordé, (vii) la nature ou le but?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1433 --
Mme Elizabeth May:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses gouvernementales liées au comité d’experts sur la modernisation de l’Office national de l’énergie, quels ont été: a) les coûts liés au comité; b) les coûts liés à l’examen par le comité des processus fédéraux d’évaluation environnementale?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1434 --
M. Ted Falk:
En ce qui concerne les décisions de Santé Canada au sujet du Mifegymiso: a) quelles étaient les conditions imposées par Santé Canada durant l’examen initial et l’approbation du médicament aux (i) fabriquant, (ii) distributeur, (iii) détaillants, (iv) prescripteurs, médecins et professionnels de la santé, (v) consommateurs; b) pour chaque condition énumérée en a), (i) quelle justification Santé Canada a-t-il fournie, (ii) quelles études Santé Canada a-t-il citées pour justifier les conditions, (iii) quels intervenants Santé Canada a-t-il consultés?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1435 --
M. Alistair MacGregor:
En ce qui concerne les investissements fédéraux dans l’infrastructure, les programmes et les services de la circonscription de Cowichan—Malahat—Langford: quel est le total des investissements dans la circonscription de tous les ministères fédéraux pour les exercices (i) 2015-2016, (ii) 2016-2017, (iii) 2017-2018, jusqu’à présent?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1436 --
M. Ziad Aboultaif:
En ce qui concerne le paiement, par le gouvernement, des dépenses relatives à la participation des intervenants aux conférences de presse ou aux annonces du gouvernement, depuis le 4 novembre 2015: a) quels sont les détails entourant chacune des dépenses, y compris (i) l’intervenant, (ii) l’organisation représentée, (iii) la date de l’annonce, (iv) le total des dépenses; b) quelle est la ventilation de chacune des dépenses de déplacement indiquées en a), y compris (i) les frais de transport aérien, (ii) les autres frais de transport, (iii) les frais d’hébergement, (iv) les indemnités quotidiennes, (v) d’autres frais?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1437 --
M. Ziad Aboultaif:
En ce qui concerne les niveaux de dotation aux stations de transmissions opérationnelles de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada depuis le 1er janvier 2017: à combien s’élevait le taux de poste vacant, ventilé par province et par mois?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1438 --
M. Ziad Aboultaif:
En ce qui concerne les inquiétudes que des gens, notamment des anciens combattants, ont exprimées au sujet du centenaire de la bataille de la crête de Vimy: a) combien de communications le gouvernement a-t-il reçues; b) quelles inquiétudes étaient le plus souvent exprimées dans ces communications; c) quelles mesures précises le gouvernement prend-il pour apaiser les inquiétudes?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1439 --
M. Arnold Viersen:
En ce qui concerne le Forum économique mondial tenu à Davos en janvier 2018: a) à l’exclusion des membres du peloton de protection du premier ministre, combien d’employés du gouvernement se sont rendus en Suisse aux fins du Forum; b) quels sont les titres de tous les employés en a); c) quelle est la liste complète des membres du personnel ministériel exonéré qui se sont rendus en Suisse aux fins du Forum; d) le gouvernement a-t-il payé pour que d’autres personnes se rendent en Suisse aux fins du Forum et, le cas échéant, quelles étaient ces personnes; e) quelles sont les personnes qui se sont rendues à Davos ou qui en sont revenues à bord de l’appareil Airbus transportant le premier ministre?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1440 --
M. Arnold Viersen:
En ce qui concerne le rapport du directeur parlementaire du budget déposé le 12 décembre 2017, où il affirme que le « montant total de la TPS prélevée sur le prix du carbone dans les quatre provinces devrait osciller entre 236 millions et 267 millions de dollars en 2017-2018 et entre 265 millions et 313 millions de dollars en 2018-2019 »: à la lumière de ce rapport, le gouvernement admet-il que la taxe sur le carbone n’est pas sans incidence sur les recettes?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1441 --
M. Steven Blaney:
En ce qui concerne les projections de la Société canadienne d’hypothèques et de logement à propos des taux de défaut de paiement hypothécaire et des taux d’intérêt: a) quelle est la hausse projetée du nombre de défauts de paiement hypothécaire si les taux d’intérêt augmentent de (i) 0,5 pour cent, (ii) un pour cent, (iii) deux pour cent; b) pour chaque projection en a), quelle est la valeur projetée des hypothèques non payées?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1442 --
M. Steven Blaney:
En ce qui concerne l’impôt récupéré par l’Agence du revenu du Canada (ARC) ainsi que les personnes nommées dans l’affaire des Panama Papers: a) combien d’employés de l’ARC ou d’équivalents temps plein ont-ils actuellement le mandat d’examiner l’information contenue dans les Panama Papers; b) quel est le montant total récupéré à ce jour grâce à l’information contenue dans les Panama Papers?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1443 --
M. Bob Saroya:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses fédérales en matière de lutte contre la dépendance aux substances énumérées dans la Loi réglementant certaines drogues et autres substances: a) à combien s’élèvent les dépenses totales du gouvernement fédéral dans les programmes et transferts consacrés à ce problème, ventilées par chaque enveloppe budgétaire et chaque programme financé; b) quelle partie de ce financement est consacrée à (i) la prévention et l’éducation, (ii) le traitement et la désintoxication, (iii) le soutien des initiatives de la police et de l’appareil judiciaire pour ce qui est des distributeurs, (iv) la recherche, (v) à la réduction des méfaits, (vi) d’autres engagements, ventilée par type d’engagement?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1444 --
M. Bob Saroya:
En ce qui concerne la légalisation prochaine de la marijuana et les changements aux politiques d’Affaires mondiales Canada qui pourraient en résulter: a) quelle est la politique à venir en ce qui a trait à la possession et à la consommation de marijuana dans les missions canadiennes à l’étranger; b) quelle est la politique à venir en ce qui a trait à l’utilisation du courrier diplomatique et la marijuana?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1445 --
M. Bob Saroya:
En ce qui concerne les vols effectués par le ministre de la Défense nationale à bord d’appareils du gouvernement depuis le 4 novembre 2015: quels sont les détails de chaque vol, y inclus (i) la date du vol, (ii) le point d’origine, (iii) la destination, (iv) les noms des parlementaires et du personnel exonéré à bord de chaque vol, (v) le type d’appareils?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1446 --
M. Jamie Schmale:
En ce qui concerne la Direction générale de la légalisation et de la réglementation du cannabis de Santé Canada: a) quel est le budget annuel de la Direction générale; b) combien d’employés ou d’équivalents temps plein ont été assignés à la Direction générale; c) quelles sont les classifications d’emploi et les échelles salariales connexes du Conseil du Trésor pour les employés assignés à la Direction générale et combien d’employés sont associés à chaque classification; d) quelles sont les ressources provenant d’autres directions générales de Santé Canada qui ont été réaffectées à la Direction générale?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1447 --
M. Jamie Schmale:
En ce qui concerne la rencontre entre le premier ministre et Joshua Boyle: à quelle date le Cabinet du premier ministre ou le Bureau du Conseil privé a-t-il été avisé que M. Boyle faisait l’objet d’une enquête pour violations possibles du Code criminel?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1448 --
M. Jamie Schmale:
En ce qui concerne la rencontre entre le premier ministre et Joshua Boyle: à quelle date le Cabinet du premier ministre ou le Bureau du Conseil privé a-t-il été avisé que M. Boyle faisait l’objet d’une enquête pour violations possibles du Code criminel?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1449 --
M. Matt Jeneroux:
En ce qui concerne la vitamine D, et compte tenu que Santé Canada fixe l’apport maximal tolérable à 4 000 UI par jour et la quantité maximale de chaque dose à 1 000 UI: a) pourquoi la quantité maximale permise d’une dose n’a-t-elle pas été modifiée en fonction de ce qui est considéré comme un apport sans danger; b) pourquoi la quantité maximale de chaque dose a-t-elle été établie à 1 000 UI?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1450 --
M. Matt Jeneroux:
En ce qui concerne le rachitisme et le fait que, selon Statistique Canada, 32 % des Canadiens ont une carence en vitamine D: a) que fait-on pour garantir que tous les Canadiens, et en particulier les femmes enceintes, sont bien renseignés sur l’importance de la vitamine D; b) existe-t-il un programme qui vise précisément les besoins en matière de santé prénatale des Premières Nations, des Métis et des Inuits?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1451 --
M. Guy Lauzon:
En ce qui concerne les subventions et contributions du Programme de financement des projets d’infrastructure de sécurité pour les collectivités à risque: quels sont les détails relatifs à tous les bénéficiaires du financement depuis le 4 novembre 2015, y compris (i) le nom du bénéficiaire, (ii) l’endroit, (iii) la somme, (iv) la description du projet, (v) la date à laquelle le financement a été reçu par l’organisme?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1452 --
M. Guy Lauzon:
En ce qui concerne les priorités du gouvernement: en quoi consistent les quatre grandes priorités du gouvernement?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1453 --
M. Guy Lauzon:
En ce qui concerne la maintenance de comptes Twitter et les publications sur Twitter: a) combien d’employés ou d’équivalents temps plein sont affectés à la maintenance de comptes Twitter ou aux publications sur Twitter; b) quelle est la classification du Conseil du Trésor et les échelles salariales connexes pour chaque employé chargé des comptes Twitter; c) quels sont les pseudonymes Twitter ou les noms d’utilisateurs que maintiennent les employés du gouvernement et combien d’employés sont affectés à chaque compte?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1454 --
M. Robert Kitchen:
En ce qui concerne la taxe sur le carbone et la déclaration qu’a faite la ministre de l’Environnement et du Changement climatique à CTV News le 15 janvier 2018, selon laquelle « tous les revenus retourneront aux provinces »: quelle est la somme que l’on envisage de remettre à chaque province par suite de la hausse du produit de la TPS provenant de la taxe sur le carbone?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1455 --
M. Guy Caron:
En ce qui concerne l'Agence du revenu du Canada (l'ARC) et pour chacun des programmes qui traitent de cas suspects d'évasion fiscale ou d'évitement fiscal abusif, de fraude et d'autres infractions fiscales au sein de l'Agence: a) quel est, depuis 2010, le nombre d'employés dédiés à chaque programme ou service, ventilé par (i) nombre d'employés sous contrat par année, (ii) poste ou position occupée par les employés; b) quel est le budget total alloué à chaque programme; c) quel est le nombre d'enquêtes lancées depuis 2010, ventilées par (i) année, (ii) nombre d'employés ayant travaillé sur l'enquête, (iii) type d'infraction expliquant l'enquête; d) depuis 2010, quelle est la part du budget total annuel de l'ARC qui revient au comité responsable d'évaluer les cas problématiques afin de recommander ou non l'application de la règle générale anti-évitement comme prévu par la Loi de l’impôt sur le revenu, ventilée par année; e) depuis 2010, quel est le montant du budget dont dispose le comité en d), ventilé par année?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1456 --
M. Guy Caron:
En ce qui concerne le comité responsable d'évaluer les cas problématiques afin de recommander ou non l'application de la règle générale anti-évitement comme prévu par la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu: a) combien de dossiers problématiques ce comité a-t-il reçus de la part des vérificateurs de l'ARC depuis 2010, ventilé par (i) année, (ii) raison justifiant l'implication du comité, (iii) nombre d'employés ayant travaillée sur le dossier; b) combien d'enquêtes ont été lancées à la suite de l'implication du comité depuis 2010, ventilé par (i) année, (ii) raison justifiant l'enquête, (iii) nombre d'employés ayant travaillé sur l'enquête; c) combien d'employés travaillent ou ont travaillé au sein de ce comité, ventilé par (i) nombre d'employés sous contrat par année, (ii) nombre d'administrateurs sous contrat par année, (iii) nombre de techniciens sous contrat par année; d) quel est le nombre d'enquêtes résolues depuis 2010, ventilées par (i) année, (ii) nombre d'employés ayant travaillé sur l'enquête, (iii) type d'infraction expliquant l'enquête?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1457 --
Mme Candice Bergen:
En ce qui concerne la destruction de l’église Golden Lampstand et de l’église catholique de Zhifang par le gouvernement chinois: a) le gouvernement condamne-t-il les actes du gouvernement chinois et, dans le cas contraire, pour quelles raisons; b) le gouvernement a-t-il soulevé des objections à propos de ces actes devant le gouvernement chinois et, dans l’affirmative, quels en sont les détails, notamment (i) qui a soulevé les objections, (ii) quel est le titre du représentant du gouvernement chinois à qui les objections ont été communiquées, (iii) quelle est la date des objections; c) depuis le 4 novembre 2015, le gouvernement a-t-il soulevé la question de la persécution des chrétiens par le gouvernement chinois avec une personne de ce gouvernement et, dans l’affirmative, quels en sont les détails?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1458 --
M. Dave MacKenzie:
En ce qui concerne les personnes qui se sont vu refuser l’entrée au Canada depuis le 4 novembre 2015: combien de présumés criminels de guerre se sont vu refuser l’entrée au Canada sous le régime du Programme sur les crimes de guerre, ventilés par année?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1459 --
M. Dave MacKenzie:
Le gouvernement estime-t-il que le gouvernement iranien a été élu?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1460 --
M. Dave MacKenzie:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses liées aux comptes de médias sociaux de la ministre de l’Environnement et du Changement climatique, depuis le 4 novembre 2015, quels sont les détails, notamment: a) quant au nombre d’employés assignés à chaque (i) compte, (ii) pseudonyme ou nom d’utilisateur, (iii) plateforme; b) quant à l'ensemble des dépenses engagées par Environnement et Changement climatique Canada en lien avec les médias sociaux, y compris (i) la date, (ii) le fournisseur, (iii) la somme, (iv) la description du produit ou du service, (v) le numéro de dossier?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1461 --
M. Dave MacKenzie:
En ce qui concerne l’activité organisée par Canada 2020 le 8 février 2018 au Musée des sciences et de la technologie du Canada: a) Canada 2020 a-t-il obtenu un tarif préférentiel du gouvernement pour l’activité; b) quel tarif de location Canada 2020 a-t-il été facturé pour ce lieu appartenant au gouvernement?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1462 --
M. Michael D. Chong:
En ce qui concerne le pont international Gordie-Howe: a) quelle était, au départ, la date prévue d’achèvement du pont lors de l’annonce du projet; b) quelle est, à l’heure actuelle, la date d’achèvement prévue; c) si les travaux sont retardés, suivant le point b), pourquoi le sont-ils?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1463 --
M. Michael D. Chong:
En ce qui concerne le projet d’amélioration du pont Ambassador: a) est-ce que le ministre des Transports, le ministre de l’Infrastructure et des Collectivités ou le premier ministre ont tenu des rencontres ou eu des échanges relatifs à ce projet avec (i) Manuel (« Matty ») Moroun, (ii) Matthew Moroun, (iii) des représentants de la Detroit International Bridge Company, (iv) des représentants de la Canadian Transit Company; b) est-ce que des responsables ou des membres du personnel exonéré du cabinet du ministre des Transports, du cabinet du ministre de l’Infrastructure et des Collectivités ou du Cabinet du premier ministre ont tenu des rencontres ou eu des échanges relatifs à ce projet avec (i) Manuel (« Matty ») Moroun, (ii) Matthew Moroun, (iii) des représentants de la Detroit International Bridge Company, (iv) des représentants de la Canadian Transit Company; c) est-ce que des responsables de l’ambassade du Canada aux États-Unis ou de consulats du Canada aux États-Unis ont tenu des rencontres ou eu des échanges relatifs à ce projet avec (i) Manuel (« Matty ») Moroun, (ii) Matthew Moroun, (iii) des représentants de la Detroit International Bridge Company, (iv) des représentants de la Canadian Transit Company?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1464 --
M. Charlie Angus:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses fiscales fédérales, les programmes des organismes fédéraux de développement économique et la Banque de développement du Canada (BDC) pour la période allant de 2010 à 2017: a) à combien le gouvernement estime-t-il les recettes annuelles cédées liées aux dépenses fiscales déclarées par des entreprises présentes dans de multiples pays et comptant plus de 250 employés, ventilées par secteur, année, et crédit d’impôt et dépense déclarée; b) combien d’entreprises présentes dans de multiples pays et comptant plus de 250 employés ont déclaré des dépenses fiscales, ventilées par secteur, année, et crédit d’impôt et dépense déclarée; c) quel montant a été consacré à des programmes fédéraux de développement économique pour venir en aide à des entreprises présentes dans de multiples pays et comptant plus de 250 employés, ventilées par secteur, année, organisme et programme fédéral de développement économique; d) combien d’entreprises présentes dans de multiples pays et comptant plus de 250 employés ont reçu des fonds d’organismes fédéraux de développement économique, ventilées par secteur, année, organisme et programme; e) quel montant la BDC a-t-elle dépensé ou investi en vue de consentir des prêts, des garanties de prêts ou d’autres fonds à des entreprises présentes dans de multiples pays et comptant plus de 250 employés, ventilées par secteur, année et catégorie de services; f) combien d’entreprises présentes dans de multiples pays et comptant plus de 250 employés ont reçu des prêts, des garanties de prêts et d’autres fonds de la BDC, ventilées par secteur, année et catégorie de services?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1465 --
M. Charlie Angus:
En ce qui concerne les atteintes à la protection des données, de l’information et des renseignements personnels dans les ministères, les institutions et les organismes du gouvernement en 2017 et en 2018 jusqu’à aujourd’hui: a) combien d’atteintes ont eu lieu au total, ventilées par (i) ministère, institution ou organisme, (ii) nombre de personnes touchées par l’atteinte; b) des atteintes mentionnées en a), combien ont-été portées à l’attention du Commissaire à la vie privée, ventilées par (i) ministère, institution ou organisme, (ii) nombre de personnes touchées par l’atteinte; c) pour combien d’atteintes a-t-il été établi qu’elles ont mené à une activité criminelle comme la fraude ou le vol d’identité, ventilé par ministère, institution ou organisme?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1466 --
Mme Cathay Wagantall:
En ce qui concerne les services, les divisions ou les unités au sein du Cabinet du premier ministre: a) quels sont ces services, divisions ou unités; b) combien d’employés compte chaque secteur mentionné en a); c) quels sont les mandats de chaque service, division ou unité; d) quels sont les budgets de chaque service, division ou unité?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1467 --
Mme Cathay Wagantall:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses effectuées dans le cadre des enquêtes du gouvernement depuis le 1er janvier 2016: quels sont les détails de ces contrats, y compris pour chacun (i) la date, (ii) la durée, (iii) le fournisseur, (iv) la valeur, (v) un résumé ou une description de l’enquête, (vi) les conclusions?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1468 --
Mme Cathay Wagantall:
En ce qui concerne le programme Emplois d'été Canada 2017: a) combien a-t-on approuvé d’organisations dans chaque circonscription; b) combien d’organisations ont présenté une demande, mais n’ont pas été approuvées pour ce qui est du financement dans chaque circonscription; c) combien d’emplois a-t-on financé; d) quel montant a-t-on attribué à chaque circonscription pour soutenir les emplois?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1469 --
M. Pat Kelly:
En ce qui concerne les changements annoncés récemment par l’Agence du revenu du Canada: a) combien de trousses papier de déclaration de revenus le gouvernement compte-t-il envoyer cette année; b) quels sont les coûts projetés de l’envoi mentionné en a), y compris pour (i) l’impression, (ii) l’affranchissement, (iii) d’autres dépenses; c) combien de personnes, selon les prévisions du gouvernement, devraient-elles se servir du nouveau système de déclaration téléphonique « Produire ma déclaration »; d) quels sont les coûts projetés du nouveau système « Produire ma déclaration »; e) de quels critères se servira-t-on pour évaluer si une personne a le droit ou non de se servir du nouveau système; f) quels sont les coûts de l’instauration du nouveau système?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1470 --
M. Larry Miller:
En ce qui concerne la délégation du gouvernement au Forum économique mondial de Davos (Suisse) en janvier 2018: a) à combien évalue-t-on l’empreinte carbone de cette délégation; b) quel est le détail de l’empreinte carbone estimée par type d’activité, y compris (i) le transport aérien, (ii) le transport terrestre, (iii) l’hébergement, (iv) autres; c) quel est le détail des crédits de carbone que le gouvernement a achetés pour le voyage en Suisse, y compris (i) la date d’achat, (ii) le vendeur, (iii) le montant (en dollars), (iv) la quantité de crédits achetés (équivalents en dioxyde de carbone)?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1471 --
M. Gord Johns:
En ce qui concerne le ministère des Anciens combattants: quels ont été le montant et le pourcentage de tous les crédits inutilisés du ministère, ventilés par année, de l’exercice 2013-2014 à l’exercice en cours?
Response
(Le document est déposé)
8555-421-1430 National shipbuilding proc ...8555-421-1431 Kathryn Spirit8555-421-1432 Federal spending in the co ...8555-421-1433 Government expenditures8555-421-1434 Health Canada's decisions ...8555-421-1435 Government spending in the ...8555-421-1436 Expenses of stakeholders t ...8555-421-1437 Staffing levels at the Roy ...8555-421-1438 100th anniversary of the B ...8555-421-1439 World Economic Forum8555-421-1440 Tax neutrality of carbon tax ...Show all topics
View James Bezan Profile
CPC (MB)
Madam Speaker, I am rising on a question that I originally asked on May 9 when I was questioning the trust that people have in our Minister of National Defence when it comes to the lives of those who serve.
He has made misleading comments on numerous occasions, from embellishment of his record to the capability gap he fabricated about our fighter jets, and other misleading comments in Iraq and on other issues.
Last night, during adjournment proceedings, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence actually built on to the embellishment of the minister's record, saying in his closing comments:
His missions as a reservist in Bosnia and his three tours in Afghanistan make him an example to us all.
I agree with that 100%. As a veteran, he did that.
However, then he went on to say:
We all know he helped fight Daesh.
First and foremost, the minister never fought Daesh. He was fighting the Taliban. He was fighting al-Qaeda. Again, it is a bit of stretch of the truth. We definitely know that as a minister, he has provided policy and some direction to our Chief of Defence Staff, who then directs our special operation forces, those who are out there helping our allies and coalition partners in Iraq and Syria in the fight against ISIS or Daesh. However, the minister himself never directly fought Daesh. I just want to point out that embellishment by the parliamentary secretary.
The credibility of the defence minister goes to a number of different issues. We talked about the embellishment of his record in Operation Medusa, that many have also called “stolen valour”. However, there is more than just that. It is more about the transparency of the minister and the government. It is about how we do not get technical briefings anymore on Operation Impact and other deployments that Canada is involved in, such as in Latvia, Ukraine, and elsewhere.
We know that the minister has embellished the truth as to whether or not we should have pulled our CF-18s out of the fight against ISIS in Iraq, when that was done back in December 2015. He had meetings with Iraqi and Kurdish officials and said they had not had one discussion about the CF-18s. However, through access to information requests, we have seen the memo for government officials who accompanied the minister in those meetings who were told that the Iraqi and Kurdish forces were very upset that we were withdrawing our CF-18s.
It was brought up not just once, not twice, but in the memo it actually said that it was brought up on numerous occasions when the minister was asked to consider the decision. This is significant, again, in terms of how the minister has been fast and loose with the truth.
We went through this whole ordeal last spring, when the minister had okayed the reduction in danger pay for our troops involved in Operation Impact, with those serving in Kuwait going to see a cut to their pay and taxable benefits of $1,500 to $1,800 per month. One soldier who spoke to me off the record said, “It feels like we got kicked in the stomach.”
It took a lot of embarrassment to force the minister to change that. Even through the summer, he was still struggling to find a way through that. Then of course there is the defence spending.
I am just putting it on the record again that the minister continues to mislead Canadians, has not been transparent, and that Canadians deserve better.
Madame la Présidente, j'interviens pour revenir sur une question que j'ai posée le 9 mai dernier. J'ai demandé si les gens pouvaient avoir confiance au ministre de la Défense nationale pour se préoccuper du sort des militaires.
À de nombreuses reprises, le ministre de la Défense nationale a tenu des propos trompeurs. Il a notamment embelli ses états de service et a inventé un déficit de capacité au sujet des avions de chasse canadiens, sans parler de ses commentaires trompeurs sur l'Irak et d'autres sujets.
Hier soir, pendant le débat d'ajournement, le secrétaire parlementaire du ministre de la Défense nationale en a rajouté pour embellir les états de service du ministre. Dans ses observations finales, il a déclaré ce qui suit:
Ses missions faites comme réserviste en Bosnie et trois fois en Afghanistan font de lui un exemple pour nous.
Je suis tout à fait d'accord à ce sujet. C'est ce qu'il a fait pendant sa carrière de militaire.
Toutefois, le secrétaire parlementaire a rajouté ce qui suit:
Comme nous l'avons vu, il a aidé à combattre Daech.
Pour commencer, le ministre n’a jamais combattu Daech. Il a lutté contre les talibans. Il a combattu Al-Qaïda. Encore une fois, ce n’est pas tout à fait la vérité. Nous savons certainement qu’en sa qualité de ministre, il propose des politiques et des orientations au chef d’état-major de la Défense, qui dirige ensuite les forces d’opérations spéciales qui, à leur tour, aident nos alliés et partenaires de la coalition dans la lutte contre le groupe État islamique ou Daech en Irak et en Syrie. Par contre, le ministre lui-même n’a jamais directement combattu Daech. Je tenais simplement à souligner cette exagération de la part du secrétaire parlementaire.
La crédibilité du ministre de la Défense est en jeu à divers égards. Nous avons parlé de l’embellissement de ses états de service dans le cadre de l’opération Méduse, que beaucoup ont qualifiée d’« usurpation de hauts faits ». Or, ce n’est pas seulement cela qui est en jeu. Il en va surtout de la transparence du ministre et du gouvernement. Ainsi, nous n'avons plus de séances d’information technique sur l’opération Impact et d’autres déploiements auxquels le Canada est associé en Lettonie, en Ukraine et ailleurs.
Nous savons que le ministre a embelli la vérité en ce qui concerne la décision, prise en décembre 2015, de retirer les CF-18 de la lutte contre le groupe armé État islamique en Irak. Il a affirmé qu'il n'avait pas eu une seule discussion sur cette décision lors de ses réunions avec des représentants irakiens et kurdes. Cependant, grâce à des demandes d'accès à l'information, nous avons pu voir une note de service à l'intention des personnes qui accompagnaient le ministre durant ces réunions, où il est indiqué que les forces irakiennes et kurdes étaient très contrariées par le retrait des CF-18.
Les représentants irakiens et kurdes n'ont pas uniquement exprimé leur mécontentement à une ou deux reprises. D'après la note de service, ils l'ont fait à maintes occasions quand ils ont demandé au ministre de réfléchir à la décision. Ce n'est pas négligeable parce que cela montre, encore une fois, que le ministre prend des libertés avec la vérité.
Puis, il y a eu le fiasco du printemps dernier, lorsque le ministre a approuvé une réduction de la prime de danger destinée aux soldats canadiens participant à l'opération Impact, y compris une baisse de 1 500 $ à 1 800 $ par mois de la rémunération et des avantages imposables accordés aux militaires déployés au Koweït. Un soldat m'a dit en confidence qu'il avait l'impression d'avoir reçu un coup de pied dans l'estomac.
Pour contraindre le ministre à corriger la situation, il a fallu qu'il soit plongé dans un profond embarras. Même pendant l'été, il cherchait toujours une façon de s'en sortir. Ensuite, il y a évidemment le dossier des dépenses militaires.
Je veux répéter encore une fois à la Chambre que le ministre continue d'induire les Canadiens en erreur, qu'il manque toujours de transparence et que les Canadiens méritent mieux.
View Jean Rioux Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean Rioux Profile
2017-10-17 18:28 [p.14202]
Madam Speaker, I thank the member for bringing us back to a question that was first asked five months ago, for the second evening in a row.
I know he listens carefully to our debates, and yes, he was quite right to point out the mistake I made yesterday when I mentioned Daesh. It must have been in the wake of the victory in Mosul under the mandate of the Minister of National Defence.
I appreciate the opportunity the member is giving me to talk about the defence minister's professionalism and unwavering commitment to our men and women in uniform and our armed forces as a whole. In that regard, as I told the member opposite on May 9, the minister worked very hard on developing a new defence policy following the most extensive consultation process in the past 20 years. That policy was released last June. Our friends opposite have not said a word about it. Our colleagues opposite are not talking about the new policy because it is good news for all members of the Canadian Armed Forces and their families.
We absolutely understand that without them, without their dedication and conviction, and without the support of their families, Canada cannot achieve its defence objectives. That is why we have put them at the heart of our new defence policy. Today, the minister, the Canadian Armed Forces, and the Department of National Defence are focusing all their attention on implementing our policy. This policy lays out a bold vision for ensuring the protection of our fellow citizens, guaranteeing security in North America, and promoting Canada's engagement with the world.
Our plan is an ambitious one, containing no fewer than 128 separate initiatives. However, it is above all a realistic, fully costed, and fully funded plan to help Canada meet the defence challenges of today and tomorrow. I have said this more than once in the House, but the Minister of National Defence has one priority, which is to ensure that our soldiers get the support, training, and resources they need in order to do what we ask them to do. The Minister of National Defence has been a particularly effective spokesperson, given that defence spending will increase by close to 70% over 10 years under the new policy.
Thanks to that stable, predictable funding, we have undertaken one of the biggest modernization efforts in decades. We will replace our surface ship fleet by investing in 15 Canadian surface combatants and two joint support ships. We will replace our existing CF-18 fleet with 88 fighter jets to strengthen our sovereignty and fulfill our NORAD and NATO commitments. We will acquire new joint intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance platforms. We will stimulate cutting-edge research and innovation in key defence sectors, which will enable our military forces to adapt to rapidly changing technology and maintain interoperability with our allies.
We will take better care of our military personnel and their families. We will invest in recruitment, retention, and training. Those are just some of the steps the Minister of National Defence has taken to better support our troops. The minister is determined to do what needs to be done to ensure the success of our armed forces and defend Canadians' interests, and we see outstanding proof of that every day.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie le député d'avoir ramené pour une deuxième soirée d'affilée une question posée il y a cinq mois.
Je constate qu'il écoute attentivement nos discours, et il a souligné avec raison l'erreur que j'ai commise hier en parlant de Daech, je le reconnais. Ce doit être dans la foulée de la victoire que l'on a eue contre Mossoul sous le mandat du ministre de la Défense nationale.
Je suis heureux de l'occasion qu'il me donne de parler de l'intégrité, du professionnalisme et de l'engagement indéfectible du ministre de la Défense nationale à l'égard des hommes et des femmes en uniforme et de nos forces armées dans leur ensemble. À cet égard, je disais justement au député d'en face, le 9 mai dernier, que le ministre travaillait étroitement à l'élaboration d'une nouvelle politique de la défense qui a fait l'objet de la plus vaste consultation tenue depuis les 20 dernières années. Cette politique a été rendue publique en juin dernier. Nos amis d'en face n'en ont pas soufflé mot. Nos collègues d'en face ne parlent pas de cette nouvelle politique, car elle est porteuse de très bonne nouvelle pour tous les membres des Forces armées canadiennes et leurs familles.
Nous comprenons très bien que sans eux, sans leur dévouement et leur conviction, et sans le soutien de leurs familles, le Canada ne peut atteindre ses objectifs en matière de défense. C'est pourquoi nous les avons placés au coeur de notre nouvelle politique de défense. Aujourd'hui, toute l'attention du ministre, des Forces armées canadiennes et du ministère de la Défense nationale se porte désormais sur la mise en oeuvre de notre politique. Cette politique présente une vision audacieuse pour assurer la protection de nos concitoyens, pour assurer la sécurité en Amérique du Nord et pour promouvoir l'engagement du Canada dans le monde.
Notre plan est ambitieux car il compte non moins de 128 initiatives distinctes, mais c'est surtout un plan réaliste, entièrement chiffré et financé, pour que le Canada puisse répondre aux défis d'aujourd'hui et de demain en matière de défense. Je l'ai souvent réitéré à la Chambre: le ministre de la Défense nationale a une priorité, celle de faire en sorte que nos militaires reçoivent le soutien, la formation et les ressources dont ils ont besoin pour accomplir ce que nous leur demandons. Le ministre de la Défense nationale s'est avéré un porte-parole particulièrement efficace, car la nouvelle politique prévoit une augmentation des dépenses de la défense de près de 70 % en 10 ans.
Grâce à ce financement stable et prévisible, nous avons entamé l'un des efforts de modernisation les plus importants des dernières décennies. Nous allons remplacer la flotte de navires de surface en investissant dans dans 15 navires de combat de surface canadiens et 2 navires de soutien interarmées. Nous allons acquérir 88 chasseurs pour remplacer la flotte actuelle de CF-18 afin de renforcer notre souveraineté et de respecter nos engagements à l'égard du NORAD et de l'OTAN. Nous allons acquérir de nouvelles plateformes de renseignements de surveillance et de reconnaissance interarmées. Nous allons stimuler la recherche de pointe, l'innovation, dans des domaines critiques pour la défense, ce qui permettra à nos forces militaires de s'adapter à l'évolution rapide de la technologie, et à conserver l'interopérabilité avec nos alliés.
Nous allons prendre un plus grand soin de nos militaires et de leurs familles. Nous allons investir dans le recrutement, la rétention et la formation. Ce ne sont là que quelques exemples des efforts consentis par le ministre de la Défense nationale pour mieux soutenir nos militaires. Ce ministre est déterminé à faire le nécessaire pour assurer le succès de nos forces armées et pour défendre les intérêts des Canadiens. Il le prouve chaque jour avec brio.
View James Bezan Profile
CPC (MB)
Madam Speaker, we have had many discussions on this. My hon. friend must not have been listening when I said, on the defence policy review, that we do not believe it. In their first two budgets, the Liberals cut $3.7 billion in the first budget and $8.5 billion in the second budget. That was $12 billion in defence spending gone, and all the promises the Liberals made in the defence policy for new equipment will not take place until after the next election.
The member mentioned the CF-18 fighter jet replacement. That has turned into a circus, from inventing a capability gap, which all the experts say does not exist—and again that undermines the credibility of the minister himself—and then the member went on to talk about what happened to sole sourcing for the Super Hornets, and then the Bombardier-Boeing fights started. Now, the Liberals are actually going to buy used, worn-out F-18 legacy Hornets from Australia.
This is not the way to serve our military. The Liberals have not bought any new kit, they continue to mislead Canadians, and we deserve better.
Madame la Présidente, nous avons parlé à maintes reprises de ce sujet. Mon collègue ne devait pas m'écouter lorsque j'ai dit, à propos de l'examen de la politique de défense, que nous n'en croyons pas nos yeux. Dans les deux premiers budgets du gouvernement, les libéraux ont amputé les dépenses militaires de 3,7 milliards de dollars et de 8,5 milliards de dollars, respectivement. Ainsi, 12 milliards de dollars en dépenses militaires ont disparu. Toutes les promesses de renouvellement de l'équipement faites par les libéraux dans la politique de défense ne se réaliseront qu'après les prochaines élections.
Le député a parlé du remplacement des avions de chasse CF-18. Ce dossier est devenu un véritable cirque. Les libéraux ont inventé un déficit de capacité qui, selon tous les experts, n'existe pas, ce qui contribue encore une fois à miner la crédibilité du ministre. Le député a aussi mentionné le projet d'achat des Super Hornet auprès d'un fournisseur unique, qui a été suivi par une lutte entre Bombardier et Boeing. Les libéraux ont maintenant décidé qu'ils feront l'acquisition auprès de l'Australie de F-18 Hornet d'occasion, usés, des appareils d'ancienne génération.
Ce n'est pas digne des militaires canadiens. Les libéraux n'ont rien acheté de neuf, et ils continuent d'induire les Canadiens en erreur. Nous méritons mieux.
View Jean Rioux Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean Rioux Profile
2017-10-17 18:33 [p.14203]
Madam Speaker, I had the opportunity to meet our troops in other countries and here in Canada. Last night, at the leadership dinner for members of the command staff in the capital, I really noticed the enthusiasm of all the military members, but especially that of the chief of the defence staff, General Vance, for this new policy.
For the first time, members of the military feel like they are at the heart of this policy. We are looking after them, their families, their training, and their equipment. For the first time, we have a budget designed to ensure they have this equipment, that is to say fighter planes and ships. This is a far cry from the Conservatives' plans for just six surface ships.
Madame la Présidente, j'ai eu la chance de rencontrer les troupes ailleurs dans le monde et ici au Canada. Encore hier soir, lors du souper du leadership pour l'ensemble des membres de l'état-major de la grande capitale, je n'ai pu que constater l'enthousiasme de l'ensemble des militaires, et surtout l'enthousiasme du chef d'état-major, le général Vance, envers cette nouvelle politique.
Pour la première fois, les militaires se sentent au coeur de cette politique. Nous nous occupons d'eux, de leur famille, de leur formation et de leur équipement. Pour une première fois, nous avons un budget planifié pour faire en sorte qu'ils aient cet équipement, soit des avions chasseurs et des navires, contrairement aux conservateurs qui avaient planifié seulement six navires de surface.
View James Bezan Profile
CPC (MB)
Mr. Speaker, I am rising on a question I originally asked on May 8 in regard to comments the Minister of National Defence made on April 18, when he was in India. He gave a speech and embellished the facts when he said, “On my first deployment to Kandahar in 2006...I [was] the architect of...Operation Medusa, where we removed 1,500 fighters, Taliban fighters, off the battlefield”. On May 8, I asked if the minister could honestly explain whether he has any integrity left.
It comes back to the National Defence code of ethics he was bound by, not only as the Minister of National Defence but as a former member of the Canadian Armed Forces. It says that “being a person of integrity calls for honesty, [and] the avoidance of deception”. It requires the “pursuit of truth regardless of personal consequences”.
If we look at the minister's behaviour, I know he apologized for his comments. He has made it more than once. It also appeared in a video in 2015, and I believe he understands the consequences of his actions, but it also brings into question all the other things that have changed under his direction as Minister of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces, because there is a real lack of transparency.
The Conservatives used to provide all sorts of briefings and updates and explained to Canadians what our armed forces were doing in things like Operation Impact, and now we never get any briefings on what our troops are doing in the battle against ISIS in Iraq or in Syria. We know there have been changes, because the media have reported on them, but there have not been briefings offered to us as parliamentarians. There have not been technical briefings offered to reporters and Canadians in general to find out exactly where our troops are off to.
The rules of engagement have actually just changed again in the last few weeks. We now know that our special operations forces have expanded what they are doing in dealing with unexploded ordinances and going out and assisting the peshmerga as well as Iraqi security forces in taking the offensive in the last few holds ISIS still has.
If we go beyond that and look at what the Prime Minister's code of ethics states, it says that ministers must act with honesty. We are going through this whole process where the Minister of Finance has been caught and has not been practising the code the Prime Minister laid out to make sure that they are honest. According to the code of ethics, parliamentary secretaries and ministers of the crown are given 60 days to respond to the issue of making sure they put all their assets out there. He did not talk about his villa for two years, not 60 days. He did not put his assets into a blind trust, which everyone else had to. I put my farm in a blind trust when I was parliamentary secretary.
I want to come back to how the minister has not been honest in how he has dealt with the replacement of our CF-18s. The minister has made a circus of the replacement of our fleet of fighter jets here in Canada, and that goes from when the Prime Minister first said he would not buy the F-35 because he did not think it worked. Then the Liberals invented an imaginary capability gap, despite what we heard from all sorts of experts and former commanders of the Royal Canadian Air Force. Then they were going to sole source Super Hornets but then were in a fight between Bombardier and Boeing, and the circus continues. Now they are not going to buy the Super Hornets but are going to buy used, worn out fighter jets from Australia. It is a circus. There is no integrity. We ask for some clarity, transparency, and integrity from the Minister of National Defence.
Monsieur le Président, j’interviens à propos d’une question que j’ai posée le 8 mai dernier au sujet des commentaires faits le 18 avril en Inde par le ministre de la Défense nationale. Dans son discours, il a embellit la réalité en déclarant: « Pour ma première mission à Kandahar en 2006, j’ai été l’architecte de l’opération MEDUSA, qui a permis le retrait du champ de bataille de 1 500 combattants talibans. » Le 8 mai dernier, donc, j’ai demandé au ministre s’il lui restait la moindre parcelle d’intégrité.
Cela revient au code d’éthique de la Défense nationale auxquelles il est soumis, non seulement à titre de ministre de la Défense nationale, mais aussi en tant qu’ancien membre des Forces armées canadiennes. Selon ce code, « pour être intègre, une personne doit être honnête [et] éviter les supercheries ». Cela exige « la recherche de la vérité quelles qu'en soient les conséquences personnelles ».
Je sais que le ministre a plus d’une fois présenté ses excuses. Il apparaît dans une vidéo de 2015 et je pense qu’il comprend les conséquences de ses actes, mais je pense que cela remet aussi en question tous les autres changements apportés sous sa direction à titre de ministre de la Défense nationale et des Forces armées canadiennes à cause d’un manque réel de transparence.
Les conservateurs avaient l'habitude de tenir des séances d'information, de présenter des mises à jour et d'expliquer aux Canadiens les tâches accomplies par les forces armées dans le cadre de missions, comme l'opération Impact. À l'heure actuelle, le gouvernement n'organise jamais de séances d'information pour expliquer ce que font les militaires canadiens dans la bataille contre le groupe État islamique en Irak ou en Syrie. Nous savons qu'il y a eu des changements parce que les médias en ont fait état, mais le gouvernement n'a pas tenu de séances d'information à l'intention des parlementaires. Il n'a pas non plus organisé de séances d'information techniques destinées aux journalistes et à la population canadienne en général pour leur expliquer en quoi consiste exactement la mission des militaires canadiens.
En fait, les règles d'engagement ont encore changé au cours des dernières semaines. Nous savons maintenant que les forces d'opérations spéciales du Canada assument désormais un rôle élargi dans l'élimination des munitions non explosées et dans les opérations d'assistance menées auprès des peshmergas et des forces de sécurité irakiennes qui lancent l'assaut contre les quelques positions encore détenues par le groupe État islamique.
Si nous allons au-delà de cette question précise et si nous consultons le code d'éthique du premier ministre, il y est dit que les ministres doivent agir avec honnêteté. En ce moment, nous traversons une période où le ministre des Finances s'est fait prendre. Il ne met pas en pratique le code que le premier ministre a établi pour veiller à ce que tous les ministres soient honnêtes. Selon le code d'éthique, les secrétaires parlementaires et les ministres disposent de 60 jours pour déclarer tous leurs actifs. Il n'a pas parlé de sa villa pendant deux ans; nous sommes loin des 60 jours. Il n'a pas placé ses avoirs dans une fiducie sans droit de regard, ce que tous les autres ont dû faire. J'ai placé ma ferme dans une fiducie sans droit de regard lorsque j'étais secrétaire parlementaire.
Je reviens sur le fait que le ministre n'a pas été honnête dans le dossier du remplacement des CF-18. Le ministre a transformé le remplacement de la flotte de chasseurs au Canada en véritable cirque. Tout a commencé lorsque le premier ministre a affirmé qu'il n'achèterait pas de F-35 parce qu'il ne pensait pas que c'était approprié. Les libéraux ont ensuite inventé un déficit imaginaire de capacité, malgré les témoignages de toutes sortes d'experts et d'anciens commandants de l'Aviation royale canadienne. Ils ont envisagé d'acheter auprès d'un fournisseur unique les Super Hornet, pour ensuite entrer dans une lutte entre Bombardier et Boeing. Le cirque continue. Ils ont maintenant décidé de ne pas acheter les Super Hornet, mais ils feront l'acquisition de vieux avions de chasse usés de l'Australie. C'est une vraie blague. Il n'y a aucune intégrité. Nous demandons au ministre de la Défense nationale de faire preuve de clarté, de transparence et d'intégrité.
View Jean Rioux Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean Rioux Profile
2017-10-16 18:44 [p.14129]
Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member for the question he asked more than five months ago.
As the parliamentary secretary, I have the privilege of working with the Minister of National Defence every day. I can attest to his honesty, integrity, and determination in carrying out his mandate. The minister has the support of the military, his colleagues, and the Prime Minister.
The primary responsibility of the minister and the government is to ensure that the Canadian Armed Forces have the training and equipment they need. That is the goal towards which the Minister of National Defence has been striving with singular determination for almost two years now. He is working to discharge his mandate with the greatest respect for our men and women in uniform.
The minister is a proud Canadian with 26 years' experience in the Canadian Army Reserve, during which time he served his country with honour and distinction in four overseas missions. He served on an extraordinary team of Canadian, American, and Afghani soldiers who made Operation Medusa a success.
His commanding officer in Afghanistan, General Fraser, considered him to be one of the best intelligence officers he had ever worked with. He said:
He was the best single Canadian intelligence asset in theatre, and his hard work, personal bravery, and dogged determination undoubtedly saved a multitude of Coalition lives. Through his courage and dedication, [the minister] has single-handedly changed the face of intelligence gathering and analysis in Afghanistan.
Retired British Army colonel, Chris Vernon, said:
[W]ithout [the defence minister's] input as a critical player, major player, a pivotal player I’d say, Medusa wouldn’t have happened. We wouldn’t have the intelligence and the tribal picture to put the thing together.
The Minister of National Defence made a major contribution in his deployments as a reservist and he is making an even greater contribution within our government. He oversaw the most ambitious defence policy review of the past 20 years. He is now overseeing the implementation of more than a hundred initiatives that will ensure that the Canadian Armed Forces are fully able to meet current and future challenges.
He has established solid and effective contacts with all of our allies, including within NATO, and especially with our American neighbours, our most important military and economic partner. With the help of his cabinet colleagues, he has made major improvements to the procurement process.
I am proud of what he has accomplished. I am happy to work by his side, and I am convinced that, thanks to his vision, leadership, and hard work, our government will continue to ensure that the Canadian Armed Forces have the tools they need to serve Canada for many years to come.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie le député de sa question, qu'il a posée il y a plus de cinq mois.
En ma qualité de secrétaire parlementaire, j'ai le privilège de côtoyer le ministre de la Défense nationale sur une base quotidienne. Je suis bien placé pour témoigner de son honnêteté, de son intégrité et de la détermination qu'il emploie dans la mise en oeuvre de son mandat. Le ministre a l'appui des militaires, de ses collègues et du premier ministre.
La responsabilité première du ministre et du gouvernement consiste à veiller à ce que les Forces armées canadiennes disposent de la formation et de l'équipement dont elles ont besoin. Depuis bientôt deux ans, c'est l'objectif que poursuit le ministre de la Défense nationale avec une vigueur peu commune. Il s'applique à mener à bien son mandat dans le plus grand respect des hommes et des femmes en uniforme.
Le ministre est un fier compatriote qui compte 26 ans d'expérience au sein de la Réserve canadienne, au cours desquelles il a servi son pays avec honneur et distinction dans quatre missions à l'étranger. Il a servi son pays au sein d'une équipe extraordinaire composée de soldats canadiens, américains et afghans qui ont fait de l'opération Méduse un succès.
Son commandant en Afghanistan, le général Fraser, le considérait comme l'un des meilleurs agents de renseignement avec qui il ait jamais travaillé. Il a dit de lui:
[...] en matière de renseignement, il était le meilleur atout du Canada sur le théâtre des opérations. Son ardeur au travail, son courage et sa détermination farouches ont sans aucun doute contribué à sauver une multitude de vies au sein de la Coalition. Par son dévouement et son courage, le ministre a réussi à modifier à lui seul la manière de recueillir et d'analyser le renseignement en Afghanistan.
Le colonel à la retraite de l'armée britannique Chris Vernon a déclaré:
L'opération Méduse n’aurait pas vu le jour sans la contribution majeure, essentielle et centrale qu’a apportée le ministre. Nous n’aurions pas disposé des renseignements et des données tribales nécessaires à l’opération.
Le ministre de la Défense nationale a apporté une grande contribution dans le cadre de ses déploiements à titre de réserviste, et il est en train d'apporter une contribution encore plus grande au sein de notre gouvernement. Il a présidé à la plus ambitieuse révision de la politique de défense des 20 dernières années. Il veille maintenant à la mise en oeuvre de plus d'une centaine d'initiatives qui vont faire en sorte que les Forces armées canadiennes seront pleinement en mesure de répondre aux défis actuels et futurs.
Il a établi des liens solides et efficaces avec tous nos alliés, notamment au sein de l'OTAN, et en particulier avec nos voisins américains, notre plus important partenaire sur les plans militaire et économique. Avec l'aide de ses collègues au sein du Cabinet, il a apporté de grandes améliorations au processus d'approvisionnement.
Je suis fier de ce qu'il a accompli, je suis heureux de travailler à ses côtés et je suis convaincu que, grâce à sa vision, à son leadership et à son travail acharné, notre gouvernement va continuer de faire en sorte que les Forces armées canadiennes aient les outils dont elles ont besoin pour servir le Canada pendant de nombreuses années à venir.
View James Bezan Profile
CPC (MB)
Mr. Speaker, I know what the minister did in uniform, and we are all proud of the work he did. We are not questioning that work; we are questioning his integrity, the embellishment of what he did, what they call “stolen valour”, by taking full credit for an operation on which he had to backtrack.
More important, the parliamentary secretary has failed to mention how the Liberals have created a complete circus out of replacing our tired CF-18 fighter fleet and how they have gone from one extreme, saying they will not buy the F-35 to they might have an open and fair competition, which we need to have happen right now. They invented the idea of an imaginary capability gap. Again, that has nothing to do with the actual requirements of the Canadian Armed Forces for the last 30 years and how we fulfill our NATO and NORAD responsibilities in the protection of Canadian sovereignty.
He failed to mention that the Liberals were not planning to buy the Super Hornets now because of the Boeing-Bombardier fiasco they created and the war of rhetoric going on back and forth between them, Bombardier, and Boeing. He fails to recognize that buying used legacy Hornets from Australia is a waste of time and money when we should be investing right now in an open and fair competition to find the right plane for our pilots, for our aerospace industry, and for the protection of Canadians.
Monsieur le Président, je sais ce que le ministre a fait lorsqu'il portait l'uniforme, et nous sommes tous fiers du travail qu'il a fait. Nous ne remettons pas ce travail en question; nous remettons en question son intégrité, l'embellissement de ce qu'il a fait, ce qu'on appelle l'« usurpation de hauts faits », en s'attribuant tout le mérite pour une opération, ce qu'il a dû rétracter.
Surtout, le secrétaire parlementaire omet de mentionner comme les libéraux ont créé un véritable cirque pour ce qui est du remplacement de notre flotte vieillissante de chasseurs aériens CF-18, comme ils sont passés d'un extrême à l'autre, déclarant qu'ils ne feraient pas l'acquisition de F-35, puis qu'ils tiendraient peut-être un appel d'offres ouvert et équitable, auquel nous devons procéder sur-le-champ. Ils ont inventé de toutes pièces l'idée d'un déficit de capacité. Encore une fois, cela n'a rien à voir avec les besoins réels des Forces armées canadiennes depuis 30 ans et la façon dont nous nous acquittons de nos responsabilités à l'égard de l'OTAN et du NORAD pour protéger la souveraineté canadienne.
Le secrétaire parlementaire a omis de mentionner que les libéraux ne prévoyaient pas acquérir les Super Hornet maintenant en raison du fiasco Boeing-Bombardier qu'ils ont créé et de la guerre de beaux discours qui se déroule entre eux, Bombardier et Boeing. Il omet de reconnaître que l'achat de Hornet d'occasion de l'Australie est une perte de temps et d'argent alors que nous devrions investir dès maintenant dans un appel d'offres ouvert et équitable pour trouver le bon appareil pour nos pilotes, pour notre industrie aérospatiale, et pour la protection des Canadiens.
View Jean Rioux Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean Rioux Profile
2017-10-16 18:49 [p.14130]
Mr. Speaker, I am very proud to be the parliamentary secretary to the Minister of Defence. I see him as a model to us all.
His missions as a reservist in Bosnia and his three tours in Afghanistan make him an example to us all. We all know he helped fight Daesh. We have seen the praise he received.
The most important thing to keep in mind about the minister is that he has drawn on his experience and held cross-Canada consultations to find out what our soldiers need. Canadians asked us to look after these men and their families during and after their service. They want us to make sure our troops are well trained and have the equipment they need. That is what we are doing.
We have announced new equipment purchases. We will have 88 new fighters and 15 new frigates. Contrary to what the Conservative government did, this equipment will be funded. We will be able to carry out our missions at home and abroad.
Monsieur le Président, je suis très fier d'être le secrétaire parlementaire du ministre de la Défense. Je pense que c'est un modèle pour nous.
Ses missions faites comme réserviste en Bosnie et trois fois en Afghanistan font de lui un exemple pour nous. Comme nous l'avons vu, il aidé à combattre Daech. Nous avons vu les témoignages qu'il a reçus.
Ce que nous devons surtout considérer par rapport au ministre, c'est qu'il s'est servi de son expérience, et qu'il a fait une consultation dans l'ensemble du Canada pour connaître les besoins de nos forces militaires. Les Canadiens ont demandé que nous nous occupions des hommes et des familles pendant leur service et après leur service. Ils veulent que nous veillions à ce que nos militaires soient bien formés et à ce qu'ils aient l'équipement dont ils ont besoin. C'est ce que nous faisons.
Nous avons annoncé que du nouvel équipement allait être acheté. Nous aurons 88 nouveaux chasseurs, ainsi que 15 nouvelles frégates. Contrairement à ce qu'a fait le gouvernement conservateur, cet équipement est financé. Nous serons donc capables de faire nos missions au pays et à l'étranger.
View Cheryl Gallant Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, it is with healthy respect for parliamentary democracy in Canada that I rise on behalf of the women and men of CFB Petawawa located in my riding of Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, which is in the heart of the upper Ottawa Valley.
I rise on behalf of the veterans and serving soldiers in Petawawa, and all the veterans and serving personnel across Canada.
Democracy in Canada is under attack by the Liberal Party. It is a sad day for democracy that it is even necessary to have today's debate, however, no debate in the House of Parliament is more important than the defence of democracy in parliamentary tradition. Not once did the Minister of National Defence try to answer my question when I asked him why he misrepresented his service record.
Today's adjournment debate is all about honour, and in this case, stolen valour. The Minister of National Defence refuses to respect Canadian democratic tradition. Parliamentary tradition demands his resignation.
The Minister of National Defence lost the confidence of the House when he admitted to embellishing his service record. The Minister of National Defence's admission of guilt has lost him the confidence of the people in the ministry of National Defence to whom he was appointed to serve: the men and women in uniform, members of the Canadian Armed Forces.
The Minister of National Defence had the opportunity this summer to earn back the trust of the soldiers. Nothing disgusts Afghanistan veterans more than the $10.5 million payoff to convicted terrorist Omar Khadr. Where was the Minister of National Defence hiding when the Prime Minister announced the multi-million-dollar payoff? His silence during and after the payoff once again demonstrates how little respect he has for our veterans who served in Afghanistan, yet he is quick to steal their valour when it is politically expedient to do so.
The minister betrayed his constituents the first time he misrepresented his record of service to get elected. He betrayed his party, his leader, the House, and his country. He went on to dishonour Canada a second time by repeating this misrepresentation on an international stage. I challenge the Prime Minister's unethical support for a member of his party who fooled voters in the 2015 election concerning his service record, and who continues to confuse Canadians by repeating his false claims when he thinks he can get away with doing so.
Having grossly inflated his role in one of the largest Canadian military operations in recent history, the Minister of National Defence should have resigned. After he failed to do the honourable thing and fall on his sword, the Prime Minister should have fired him. The Prime Minister, by refusing to fire the Minister of National Defence, has lost the confidence of NATO allies. Defence expenditures are now at their lowest level since end the of the Great War.
This is how the Minister of National Defence chose to inaccurately describe his role in Operation Medusa:
On my first deployment to Kandahar in 2006, I was the architect of Operation Medusa where we removed 1,500 Taliban fighters off the battlefield…and I was proudly on the main assault.
Much has been written about this effort to take credit for whatever minor role the minister may or may not have played. What is particularly outrageous for the soldiers actually doing the fighting was the claim by the—
Monsieur le Président, c'est avec le plus profond respect pour la démocratie parlementaire au Canada que je prends la parole au nom des femmes et des hommes de la BFC Petawawa, qui se trouve dans ma circonscription, Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, au coeur de la vallée supérieure de l'Outaouais.
Je prends la parole au nom des anciens combattants et des soldats de Petawawa ainsi que de leurs homologues du reste du Canada.
Le Parti libéral est train de s'en prendre à la démocratie au Canada. Que nous soyons obligés de tenir le présent débat fait d'aujourd'hui un triste jour pour la démocratie. Néanmoins, aucun débat n'est plus important au Parlement que celui de la défense de la démocratie dans la tradition parlementaire. Le ministre de la Défense nationale n'a pas essayé une seule fois de répondre à ma question lorsque je lui ai demandé pourquoi il avait déformé son passé dans les Forces canadiennes.
Le débat sur la motion d'ajournement d'aujourd'hui est une question d'honneur et, plus précisément, une question d'usurpation de hauts faits. Le ministre de la Défense nationale refuse de respecter la tradition démocratique canadienne. La tradition parlementaire exige qu'il démissionne.
Le ministre de la Défense nationale a perdu la confiance de la Chambre lorsqu'il a admis avoir embelli son passé dans les Forces canadiennes. Il a admis sa faute, ce qui lui a valu de perdre la confiance des gens du ministère de la Défense nationale qu'il avait la responsabilité de servir, depuis sa nomination, soit les hommes et les femmes qui portent l'uniforme des Forces armées canadiennes.
Le ministre de la Défense nationale a eu l'occasion de regagner la confiance des soldats pendant l'été. Les vétérans de l'Afghanistan sont dégoûtés au plus haut point des 10,5 millions de dollars versés à Omar Khadr, un homme reconnu coupable de terrorisme. Où était donc le ministre de la Défense nationale lorsque le premier ministre a annoncé cet immense cadeau de plusieurs millions de dollars? Son mutisme avant et après cette annonce montre, une fois de plus, à quel point il ne se soucie guère des vétérans de l'Afghanistan. Pourtant, il n'hésite pas à s'approprier leur bravoure lorsque c'est payant pour sa carrière politique.
Le ministre a trahi les habitants de sa circonscription lorsqu'il a présenté pour la première fois de faux états de service pour se faire élire. Il a trahi son parti, son chef, la Chambre et le pays, mais il ne s'est pas arrêté là. Il a déshonoré le Canada une deuxième fois lorsqu'il a présenté une nouvelle fois ces faux états de service devant un auditoire international. J'exige du premier ministre qu'il donne des explications pour justifier le soutien contraire à l'éthique qu'il accorde à un membre de son parti qui a trompé les Canadiens lors de la campagne électorale de 2015 quant à ses états de service et qui continue d'alimenter la confusion en répétant des faussetés dès qu'il a l'occasion de le faire impunément.
Parce qu'il a grossièrement exagéré son rôle dans l'une des plus importantes opérations militaires canadiennes récentes, le ministre de la Défense nationale aurait dû démissionner. Comme il refusait d'agir en homme d'honneur et de se faire, politiquement parlant, hara-kiri, le premier ministre se devait de le renvoyer. En s'entêtant à conserver le ministre de la Défense nationale, le premier ministre a perdu la confiance des alliés de l'OTAN. Les dépenses en matière de défense sont maintenant à leur plus bas depuis la fin de la Grande Guerre.
Voici le récit inexact qu'a donné le ministre de la Défense nationale de sa participation à l'opération Méduse:
Lors de mon premier déploiement à Kandahar en 2006, j’ai été l’architecte de l’opération MEDUSA, dans le cadre de laquelle nous avons chassé 1 500 combattants talibans hors du champ de bataille, et j’ai participé fièrement à l’assaut principal.
On a beaucoup écrit au sujet de cette tentative du ministre de s'attribuer tout le crédit pour le rôle mineur qu'il aurait peut-être joué dans cette mission. Ce qui choque le plus les soldats qui se sont réellement battus lors de cette opération, c'est la prétention du...
View Jean Rioux Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean Rioux Profile
2017-10-02 18:31 [p.13814]
Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to take this opportunity that my colleague across the way has given me to reiterate that the Minister of National Defence is a proud Canadian with 26 years experience in the Canadian Army Reserve, during which time he served with honour and distinction in four overseas missions.
That distinguished service makes the Minister of National Defence a spokesperson of choice among our allies, whether in Washington, London, or in Europe. He is a worthy representative of Canada and our military and civilian personnel. The minister is proud to have served on an extraordinary team of Canadian, American, and Afghani soldiers who made Operation Medusa a success.
His commanding officer in Afghanistan, General Fraser, considered him to be one of the best intelligence officers he had ever worked with. Chris Vernon, a retired British Army colonel, said that Operation Medusa would not have happened without the Minister of National Defence's critical, major, and pivotal input because they would not have had the intelligence and the tribal picture to put the operation together.
As a former reservist, the minister understands the needs of soldiers and their families perfectly well. During his years of service in Canada or in deployment overseas, he was able to see first-hand how our soldiers are by far our greatest asset. When he took office nearly two years ago, he was well aware of the huge job ahead of him. Every day, he puts his field experience, his expertise, and his energy to work for our men and women in uniform and their families.
He has worked tirelessly to deliver on the long list of priorities that the Prime Minister set out in his mandate letter. The Minister of National Defence intends to ensure that our military personnel are well trained, highly qualified, and properly compensated for the work they do. He intends to ensure that our military personnel and their families have access to the services and support they need in times of trouble. He intends to ensure smooth transitions from civilian to military life and vice versa. He is working to increase recruitment into both the regular and reserve forces. He wants the Canadian Armed Forces to reflect our society. He is a champion for greater diversity, and he is making sure that each and every member of the Canadian Armed Forces is treated with dignity and respect no matter what.
He oversaw the initiation and development of a major consultation process, the largest in 20 years, which resulted in a new credible, realistic, and fully funded defence policy for our armed forces. We put our troops and their families at the heart of this policy by making sure they get the care, support, training, and resources they need to accomplish what we ask of them. The government's new defence policy presents a new vision and a new approach to defence. The government set out an ambitious but realistic plan to ensure that Canada can respond to current and future defence challenges.
Over the next 10 years, annual military spending will rise from $18.9 billion to $32.7 billion. The Minister of National Defence is deeply committed to our troops, and the new defence policy reflects that commitment.
Monsieur le Président, je suis heureux de l'occasion que m'offre ma collègue d'en face pour réitérer que le ministre de la Défense nationale est un fier compatriote qui compte 26 ans d'expérience au sein de la Réserve de l'Armée canadienne, au cours desquelles il a servi avec honneur et distinction dans quatre missions à l'étranger.
Du fait de ces états de service, le ministre de la Défense nationale est un interlocuteur de choix auprès de nos alliés, que ce soit à Washington, à Londres ou en Europe. Il est un digne représentant du Canada et de notre personnel militaire et civil. Le ministre est fier d'avoir servi au sein d'une équipe extraordinaire composée de soldats canadiens, américains et afghans qui ont fait de l'opération Méduse un succès.
Son commandant en Afghanistan, le général Fraser, le considérait comme l'un des meilleurs agents de renseignement avec qui il avait travaillé. Le colonel à la retraite de l'armée britannique, Chris Vernon, a déclaré que l'opération Méduse n'aurait pas vu le jour sans la contribution majeure, essentielle et centrale qu'a apporté le ministre de la Défense nationale, car ils n'auraient pas disposé des renseignements et des données tribales nécessaires à l'opération.
À titre d'ancien réserviste, le ministre comprend parfaitement les besoins des militaires et de leur famille. Au cours de ses années de service au Canada ou en déploiement à l'étranger, il a été en mesure de constater de première main à quel point nos militaires constituent de loin notre plus grand atout. Lorsqu'il est entré en fonction, il y a bientôt deux ans, il était bien conscient de l'immense travail qui l'attendait. Chaque jour, il met son expérience de terrain, son expertise et son énergie au service des hommes et des femmes qui portent l'uniforme, ainsi que de leur famille.
Il a travaillé d'arrache-pied pour mener à terme la longue liste de dossiers que lui a confié le premier ministre dans sa lettre de mandat. Le ministre de la Défense nationale entend veiller à ce que nos militaires soient bien entraînés, qu'ils soient hautement qualifiés et qu'ils soient rémunérés de façon adéquate pour leur travail. Il entend faire en sorte que nos militaires et leur famille aient accès aux services et au soutien dont ils ont besoin en cas de difficulté. Il entend faire en sorte que la transition, tant de la vie civile à la vie militaire que de la vie militaire à la vie civile, se fasse de façon harmonieuse. Il chercher à accroître le recrutement de la force régulière et des réservistes. Il souhaite que les Forces armées canadiennes soient le reflet de notre société. Il milite en faveur d'une plus grande diversité, et il veille à ce que chaque membre des Forces armées canadiennes soit traité avec dignité et respect en toutes circonstances.
Il a présidé au lancement et à l'élaboration d'un grand exercice de consultation, le plus important en 20 ans, qui a mené à l'adoption d'une nouvelle politique de défense crédible, réaliste et pleinement financée pour nos forces armées. Nous avons placé nos militaires et leur famille au coeur de cette politique en assurant qu'ils aient les soins, le soutien, la formation et les ressources dont ils ont besoin pour accomplir ce que nous leur demandons. La nouvelle politique de défense du gouvernement présente une nouvelle vision et une nouvelle approche en matière de défense. Le gouvernement a établi un plan ambitieux, mais réaliste, pour que le Canada puisse répondre aux défis d'aujourd'hui et de demain en matière de défense.
Les dépenses militaires annuelles augmenteront au cours des 10 prochaines années, et elles passeront de 18,9 milliards de dollars à 32,7 milliards de dollars par année. Le ministre de la Défense nationale est très fortement engagé envers nos troupes, et la nouvelle politique de défense en est le reflet.
View Cheryl Gallant Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, what was particularly outrageous to the soldiers who were doing the actual fighting was the claim by the Minister of National Defence to being on the main assault. Claiming to be on the main assault was an insult to every member of Charles Company, 1st Battalion of the Royal Canadian Regiment. Charles Company of 1 RCR is the most decorated, most bloodied company in the serving Canadian Forces. It has earned its reputation by being on the main assault. The decision by the Minister of National Defence, on more than one occasion, to mislead Canadians about something so important as the most significant battle fought by Canadians since the Korean War means that the minister, and by extension the Prime Minister for refusing to fire him, cannot be trusted to do what is right and honourable.
Monsieur le Président, ce qui est particulièrement choquant pour les soldats qui ont livré combat, c'est l'affirmation du ministre de la Défense nationale selon laquelle il avait participé à l’assaut principal. Affirmer qu'il a fait partie de l'offensive principale est une insulte pour chaque membre de la compagnie Charles du premier bataillon du Royal Canadian Regiment. Il s'agit de la compagnie la plus décorée et de celle qui a subi le plus de pertes parmi les membres en service des Forces canadiennes. Ses soldats ont acquis leur réputation par leur présence lors de l'assaut principal. La décision du ministre de la Défense nationale d'induire les Canadiens en erreur, à plus d'une occasion, au sujet de quelque chose d'aussi important que la bataille la plus cruciale à laquelle les Canadiens ont participé depuis la guerre de Corée nous indique que nous ne pouvons pas compter sur le ministre — ni d'ailleurs sur le premier ministre, qui refuse de le renvoyer — pour agir de façon juste et honorable.
View Jean Rioux Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean Rioux Profile
2017-10-02 18:36 [p.13814]
Mr. Speaker, I am very proud to be the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence.
I see the minister as a role model. He is a reservist who served four tours of duty, three in Afghanistan and one in Bosnia, and was honoured for each one. In my eyes, the minister is a person we can all be very proud of.
His experience helped make the new defence policy a success. This policy has been very warmly welcomed, as I have learned from the troops and their families. The men and women of the armed forces and their families are at the core of the policy. It addresses training, equipment, and health and wellness, as well as the transition from military to civilian life.
We recognize the service and sacrifice of our men and women in uniform and their families.
Monsieur le Président, je suis très fier d'être le secrétaire parlementaire du ministre de la Défense nationale.
Je pense que c'est quelqu'un qu'on peut prendre comme modèle, soit un réserviste qui a fait quatre missions, dont trois en Afghanistan et une en Bosnie. À chaque mission, il a été honoré. Je pense que c'est quelqu'un de qui nous pouvons être très fiers.
Son expérience a contribué au succès de la nouvelle politique de défense. J'ai pu constater auprès des troupes et de leur famille à quel point cette politique était appréciée. Elle a mis au coeur de la défense les hommes et les femmes des forces armées et leur famille. On s'occupe de leur formation, de les équiper et d'assurer leur bien-être et leur santé, mais on s'occupe aussi de leur transition de la vie militaire à la vie civile.
On reconnaît le service et les sacrifices des militaires et ceux de leur famille.
View James Bezan Profile
CPC (MB)
Mr. Speaker, I rise to present two petitions today. The first is e-petition 1088, with more than 1,080 signatures, dealing with the comments of the Minister of National Defence about being the architect of Operation Medusa and calling for his resignation.
Monsieur le Président, je souhaite présenter deux pétitions aujourd'hui. La première, la pétition électronique 1088, qui a recueilli plus de 1 080 signatures, réclame la démission du ministre de la Défense nationale parce qu'il a prétendu être l'architecte de l'opération Méduse.
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)

Question No. 618--
Mr. Charlie Angus:
With regard to policing and surveillance activities related to journalists and Indigenous activists since October 31 2015: (a) which security agencies or other government bodies have been involved in tracking Indigenous protest activities relating to (i) Idle No More, (ii) the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls or other Aboriginal public order events, (iii) the Trans Mountain Expansion Project, (iv) the Northern Gateway Pipeline, (v) the Energy East and Eastern Mainline Projects, (vi) the Site C dam, (vii) the Lower Churchill Hydroelectric Generation Project, (viii) Line 9B Reversal and Line 9 Capacity Expansion Project, (ix) other industrial or resource development projects; (b) how many Indigenous individuals have been identified by security agencies as potential threats to public safety or security, broken down by agency and province; (c) which indigenous organizations, and activist groups have been the subject of monitoring by Canadian security services, broken down by agency and province; (d) how many events involving Indigenous activists were noted in Government Operations Centre situation reports, broken down by province and month; (e) have any Canadian government agencies including Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), and the Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) been involved in tracking Canadians travelling to Standing Rock Indian Reservation (North and South Dakota, United States of America); (f) has there been any request by the Canadian government or any of its agencies to the United States government or any of its agencies to share information on the tracking of Canadians citizens engaging in demonstrations at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation; (g) what are the titles and dates of any inter-departmental or inter-agency reports related to indigenous protest activities; (h) how many times have government agencies shared information on indigenous protest activities with private sector companies, and for each instance, which companies received such information, and on what dates; (i) how many meetings have taken place between representatives of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Expansion Project and (i) RCMP personnel, (ii) CSIS personnel; and (j) what are the answers for (a) through (i) for journalists, instead of for Indigenous individuals or organizations, and only if applicable?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 630--
Mr. Matthew Dubé:
With regard to policing and surveillance activities related to Indigenous activists since October 31, 2015: (a) which security agencies or other government bodies have been involved in tracking Indigenous protest activities relating to (i) Idle No More, (ii) the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls or other Aboriginal public order events, (iii) the Trans Mountain Expansion Project, (iv) the Northern Gateway Pipeline, (v) the Energy East and Eastern Mainline Projects, (vi) the Site C dam, (vii) the Lower Churchill Hydroelectric Generation Project, (viii) Line 9B Reversal and Line 9 Capacity Expansion Project, (ix) other industrial or resource development projects; (b) how many Indigenous individuals have been identified by security agencies as potential threats to public safety or security, broken down by agency and province; (c) which indigenous organizations, and activist groups have been the subject of monitoring by Canadian security services, broken down by agency and province; (d) how many events involving Indigenous activists were noted in Government Operations Centre situation reports, broken down by province and month; (e) have any Canadian government agencies, including the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), and the Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) been involved in tracking Canadians travelling to Standing Rock Indian Reservation (North and South Dakota, United States of America); (f) has there been any request by the Canadian government or any of its agencies to the United States government or any of its agencies to share information on the tracking of Canadian citizens engaging in demonstrations at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation; (g) what are the titles and dates of any inter-departmental or inter-agency reports related to indigenous protest activities; (h) how many times have government agencies shared information on indigenous protest activities with private sector companies, and for each instance, which companies received such information, and on what dates; and (i) how many meetings have taken place between representatives of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Expansion Project and (i) RCMP personnel, (ii) CSIS personnel?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1015--
Mr. Tom Kmiec:
With regard to the government forgiving student loans owed: (a) how many student loans have been forgiven since November 4, 2015; (b) what criteria is used to determine eligibility for debt forgiveness; (c) what reasons are laid out within the criteria as acceptable to forgive student debt; and (d) for each of the instances in (c), how many loans were forgiven under each reason since November 4, 2015?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1041--
Mr. Daniel Blaikie:
With respect to the Enhancing RCMP Accountability Act (S.C. 2013, c. 18) and the Treasury Board’s authority to deem civilian members of the RCMP to be public service employees, appointed under the Public Service Employment Act: (a) what is the breakdown and status of civilian units, including the Current Civilian Member classification group, and the Public Service classification group, identifying for each (i) whether they are deemed, (ii) the deeming date, (iii) the assigned union local, (iv) the Collective Agreement; (b) by what process is the deeming and classification happening and, in each case, (i) have civilian members been consulted in said process, (ii) what and who is involved in the decision of classification, (iii) what and who is involved of the assignment of union; and (c) what does the government plan to do regarding discrepancies before and after deeming of civilian members’ (i) salaries, (ii) benefits, (ii) other items in the collective bargaining agreement?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1042--
Mr. Daniel Blaikie:
With respect to funding of the Department of Immigration and Citizenship for the Language Training Sub-Sub-Program (currently 3.1.1.1 in 2017-18 Departmental Performance E-tables - Sub-Programs): (a) for 2015, 2016, and 2017, broken down by year, what is or was the budget; (b) for 2015, 2016, and 2017, broken down by year and province, what is or was the budget for level 1 and level 2 for each province, broken down by level; (c) how are decisions made to change funding for the different levels of training; and (d) what was the rationale for removing funding for level 2 training from organizations in Manitoba?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1043--
Mr. John Brassard:
With regard to the distribution of flags and other items for Canada Day by the Department of Canadian Heritage through offices of Members of Parliament: (a) how many flags have been distributed or does the government intend to distribute, broken down by type, including (i) large flag post nylon Canadian flags (90cm x 180cm), (ii) small desktop nylon Canadian flags (30cm x 15cm) with a plastic stand, (iii) large flag post Canada 125 nylon flags (90cm x 180cm); and (b) of the items in (a), since January 1, 2017, how many have been distributed to (i) individual Liberal Member offices, (ii) individual Conservative Member offices, (iii) individual New Democratic Party Member offices, (iv) individual Bloc Quebecois Member offices, (v) individual Green Party Member offices?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1045--
Mr. Blake Richards:
With regard to sponsored social media posts (Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter) by the government, including those put out by agencies, Crown Corporations, and other government entities, since November 4, 2015: (a) what amount has been spent on sponsored posts; (b) what is the description and purpose of each sponsored post; and (c) for each sponsored post, what are the details, including (i) date, (ii) analytic data, views and reach, (iii) details of demographics targeted?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1046--
Mr. Tony Clement:
With regard to statements made by the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness on May 8, 2017, in particular that “crossing the border in an irregular fashion is no free ticket to Canada”, broken down by month, over the last 12 months: (a) what is the average time between an asylum claimant's arrival in Canada and the Immigration and Refugee Board (IRB) issuing a decision; (b) for each decision in (a), (i) how many were positive, (ii) how many were negative; (c) how many of the asylum seekers referred to in (a) arrived “in an irregular fashion”; (d) how many of the individuals in (c) received a (i) positive IRB decision, (ii) negative IRB decision; (e) for those who received a negative decision from the IRB, what was the average time period between the decision and the time when removal was executed by Canadian Border Services Agency; and (f) what was the average time period for removal for those who arrived “in an irregular fashion”?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1048--
Mrs. Kelly Block:
With regard to VIA Rail’s 2016-2020 corporate report: (a) how many locomotives and cars will be retired in (i) 2017, (ii) 2018, (iii) 2019, (iv) 2020; (b) what impact will these retirements have by 2020 on VIA Rail’s service levels; and (c) what plans are in place to replace the locomotives and wagons?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1049--
Mr. Robert Aubin:
With regard to the decommissioning and sale of Canadian Coast Guard ship (CCGS) Tracy by the Canadian Coast Guard: (a) what were the positions occupied by the managers who planned the decommissioning of CCGS Tracy; (b) was the actual price of CCGS Tracy, including federal investments, set before it was put up for sale and what are the details of this valuation, broken down by (i) assessed value of CCGS Tracy, (ii) value of federal investments in repairs related to CCGS Tracy, made between its acquisition and lay-up, including the names of the repair subcontractors; (c) since the launch of CCGS Tracy until its sale, what was the annual budget, broken down by year, allocated specifically to CCGS Tracy; (d) before CCGS Tracy was decommissioned, was any pre-tender cost planning performed; (e) what are the names of the companies that submitted bids to the government regarding the sale of CCGS Tracy, broken down by (i) company name, (ii) bid price, (iii) bid date; (f) how many meetings took place between the government and the bidding companies, broken down by (i) company name, (ii) meeting date, (iii) departments and titles of government officials attending these meetings, (iv) positions of bidding company officials attending these meetings; (g) how many former crew members of CCGS Tracy left the Canadian Coast Guard once CCGS Tracy was decommissioned, broken down by (i) position, (ii) reassignment to other positions, (iii) pensions and severance packages, (iv) any other benefits over and above the federal pensions they received; (h) before CCGS Tracy was decommissioned, what was the annual operating cost of the buoy work performed by CCGS Tracy; (i) was there a budget allocated directly and only to the vessel’s operations in the Laurentian Region; (j) before CCGS Tracy was decommissioned, did the Canadian Coast Guard plan to tender the buoying operations in order to have them carried out by a private company; (k) what were the buoying operations rates quoted by the bidders; (l) was an additional vessel planned to replace the buoying operations of CCGS Tracy in its area of operations; (m) between November 2016 and March 2017, which Canadian Coast Guard vessel performed buoying operations between Quebec City and Montreal; (n) what was the annual cost of repairs to the air-cushioned vehicle based in Trois-Rivières before CCGS Tracy was decommissioned; (o) were functional limitations issued by the Canadian Coast Guard on the use of air-cushioned vehicles; (p) were letters sent to staff on the functional limitations of air-cushioned vehicles; (q) what was the annual cost of repairs to the air-cushioned vehicle based in Trois-Rivières after CCGS Tracy was decommissioned; (r) after CCGS Tracy was decommissioned, what was the cost of repairs to CCGS Martha L. Black; (s) is CCGS Martha L. Black currently operational; (t) how many months was CCGS Martha L. Black operational and non-operational between January 2010 and March 2017; and (u) what is the rank of the commanding officer of the Central and Arctic Region of the Canadian Coast Guard who made the request to purchase CCGS Tracy after it was decommissioned and the name of the associated shipping company?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1050--
Ms. Rachael Harder:
With regard to the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities’ statement in the House on May 9, 2017, that the government’s spending on infrastructure is to reduce the amount of time people spend being unproductive: (a) what does the government consider to be unproductive time; (b) what is the average weekly impact of unproductive time on the Canadian economy; (c) what is the average weekly amount of unproductive time, per person; (d) how many jobs are not created, on a weekly basis, as a result of unproductive time; (e) what does the government anticipate will be the reduction in the impact of unproductive time on the Canadian economy, specifically as a result of infrastructure spending; and (f) what does the government anticipate will be the reduction on the impact of unproductive time, per person, specifically as a result of infrastructure spending?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1051--
Ms. Rachael Harder:
With regard to the proposed Canada Infrastructure Bank: (a) how many times did the Prime Minister meet with potential investors, including BlackRock and its CEO, between November 4, 2015, and May 1, 2017; (b) how many times did the Prime Minister’s staff meet with potential investors, including BlackRock and its CEO, between November 4, 2015, and May 1, 2017; (c) how many times did any Cabinet Minister or his or her staff meet with potential investors, including BlackRock and its CEO, between November 4, 2015, and May 1, 2017; (d) for each meeting in (a), (b), and (c), what are the details, including the (i) date of meeting, (ii) organization, (iii) name of potential investor, (iv) position or title, (v) specific request or offer of potential investment (in Canadian dollars), (vi) agenda or subject matter discussed at the meeting; (e) does the Prime Minister have any investments that could directly or indirectly benefit from the bank and, if so, has this been disclosed to the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner; (f) if the answer to (e) is affirmative, what was the Commissioner’s response; (g) does any Cabinet Minister have any investment that could directly or indirectly benefit from the bank and, if so, has this been disclosed to the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner; and (h) if the answer to (g) is affirmative, what was the Commissioner’s response?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1053--
Ms. Anne Minh-Thu Quach:
With regard to the Kathryn Spirit, a vessel grounded near Beauharnois: (a) since 2011, what are all the government contracts awarded in connection with the derelict ship, broken down by (i) year, (ii) supplier, (iii) description of the services offered, (iv) contract start date and duration, (v) value of the contract, (vi) sole supplier or call for tenders; (b) with respect to the contract awarded by the government to Groupe Saint-Pierre on November 9, 2016, for the construction of the cofferdam, (i) why did the government choose to proceed with a tender call by mutual agreement (ii) what other companies were contacted by the government for this contract, (iii) what is the list of all other proposals received by the government, (iv) what definitions did the government provide for “exceptional circumstances” and “emergency measures”; (c) with respect to the previous owner of the Kathryn Spirit, Reciclajes Ecológicos Maritimos, how many vessels has the company sent to Canada, broken down by (i) year, (ii) vessel name, (iii) category (bulk carrier, tugboat, etc.), (iv) vessel mission; and (d) for each vessel in (c), how much has the government paid out in public funds, broken down by (i) year, (ii) vessel name, (iii) total costs incurred by the government, (iv) reason justifying such government expenditures (repairs, towing, repatriation of crew, etc.)?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1054--
Mr. Peter Kent:
With regard to the government’s decision to reduce the maximum eligible contribution to a Tax Free Savings Account (TFSA) from $10,000 to $5,500: (a) what is the impact or projected impact on federal revenue on a yearly basis, starting in 2016, as a result of the change; and (b) what total eligible amount did Canadians contribute to TFSAs in the (i) 2015 tax year, (ii) 2016 tax year?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1055--
Mr. John Nater:
With regard to the Prime Minister's nominee for Commissioner of Official Languages, announced on May 15, 2017: (a) on what date did a Cabinet Minister or a representative of a Cabinet Minister inform Madeleine Meilleur that she had been selected as the Prime Minister's likely nominee; (b) how was Madeleine Meilleur informed that she had been selected as the Prime Minister's nominee; (c) who informed Madeleine Meilleur that she had been selected as the Prime Minister's nominee; (d) what communication has the government had with Madeleine Meilleur regarding her appointment to any position within the government since November 4, 2015, including (i) positions discussed, (ii) dates of contact, (iii) methods of communication, (iv) names of Cabinet Ministers and representatives of Cabinet Ministers; and (e) since November 4, 2015, which Cabinet Ministers have put forward Madeleine Meilleur’s name as a potential candidate for a government appointment and what are the details of each such recommendation including (i) date, (ii) recommended position, (iii) other relevant details?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1056--
Mr. Robert Aubin:
With regard to the incident in Yamachiche caused by two-metre waves: (a) on what date did Transport Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada learn of the incident; (b) on what date did Transport Canada launch an investigation; (c) what is the timeframe for the investigation; (d) will the report and the findings of the investigation be available to the public and posted on the Transport Canada website; (e) have inspectors been assigned to the investigation; (f) how many inspectors have been assigned to the investigation, if applicable; (g) what is the mandate of the inspectors; (h) what penalties does Transport Canada provide for; (i) is any compensation available to the victims; (j) what is this compensation; (k) when is compensation expected to be paid to the victims; (l) what are the contents of the investigation files, broken down by file number; (m) how many meetings took place between Transport Canada officials and Fisheries and Oceans Canada officials, broken down by (i) date, (ii) department and titles of government representatives present at the meetings, (iii) subjects discussed at these meetings; and (n) how many meetings took place between officials from Transport Canada and the Corporation of St. Lawrence Pilots Inc., broken down by (i) date, (ii) department and titles of government representatives present at the meetings, (iii) subjects discussed at these meetings?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1057--
Mr. Tom Lukiwski:
With regard to correspondence related to the procurement of fighter jets, since November 4, 2015: (a) what are the details of all correspondence between the Minister of National Defense and Boeing including the (i) date, (ii) title, (iii) recipient, (iv) file number, (v) summary, if available; and (b) what are the details of all correspondence between the Minister of National Defense and Bombardier including the (i) date, (ii) title, (iii) recipient, (iv) file number, (v) summary, if available?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1058--
Ms. Lisa Raitt:
With regard to government action to combat counterfeit art: (a) what is the official position of the government regarding counterfeit art; (b) does the government have any prohibition against using federal funds to rent or purchase counterfeit art; and (c) what actions are taken by the Canada Border Services Agency when counterfeit art or goods are discovered at border crossing or other point of entry?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1059--
Ms. Rachel Blaney:
With regard to the shellfish harvest issue in British Columbia in zones 15 and 16: (a) has the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) observed an increase in harvesting in the last years on local beaches and, if so, has DFO (i) quantified this increase, (ii) determined this increase to be problematic, (iii) recommended measures, (iv) implemented measures; (b) if the answer to (a) is affirmative, what are the measures and what is the status of these recommendations; (c) has DFO observed an increase in illegal harvesting in the last year on local beaches and, if so, has DFO (i) quantified this increase, (ii) determined this increase to be problematic, (iii) recommended measures, (iv) implemented measures; (d) if the answer to (c) is affirmative, what are the measures and what is the status of these recommendations; (e) has DFO identified excess harvesting and, if so, (i) how did DFO make such a determination, (ii) is the government providing measures aimed at restrictions; (f) who has the authority at DFO to request a (i) stock assessment, (ii) management advice or biomass survey; (g) does the government have precise data in terms of biodiversity or biomass of shellfish in British Columbia; (h) does the government have precise data in terms of biodiversity or biomass of shellfish in zones 15 and 16; (i) has there been a reduction biodiversity or biomass of shellfish in zones 15 and 16; (j) in the event that the last biomass survey of the region was conducted more than two years ago, will DFO conduct a biomass survey next summer and, if not, why not; (k) has the government done any studies on quantities and availabilities of shellfish and, (i) if not, why not, (ii) how many studies have been completed and which one is the latest, (iii) what are the conclusions and recommendations of studies in (k)(ii), (iv) what recommendations has the government made with respect to the use and management of this resource, (v) have these recommendations been followed or are there any failures in the implementation of these recommendations; (l) is there any analysis concerning the sustainability of the current harvest and, is so, (i) can the beach sustain the same level of harvest, (ii) can the beach in Powell River sustain the same level of harvest, (iii) can zones 15 and 16 sustain the same level of harvest; (m) is there any assessment determining maximum sustainable harvest rates and, if so, what are the rates; (n) has the government undertaken an analysis in terms of water temperature conditions required for the development of some shellfish and, if so, (i) will the fecundity rate be affected, (ii) what is DFO’s recommendation or management advice, (iii) what is the forecast for the next two years in zones 15 and 16, (iv) is the fecundity annual rate preserved for each species, (v) are assessment made regularly, (vi) what is the threshold in identifying an unsustainable harvest; (o) how many people have been asked for their Tidal Waters Sport Fishing licence by fisheries officers in the last (i) year, (ii) five years, (iii) ten years; (p) of the people in (o), how many were caught without their Tidal Waters Sport Fishing licence and how many circumventions have been inspected in the last (i) year, (ii) five years, (iii) ten years; (q) what kind of sanctions have been handed out; (r) how many warning have been handed out; (s) how many people have been fined in the last ten years, broken down by zone, and (i) what was the average fine amount over the last ten years, broken down by zone, (ii) how many fines per species, (iii) what were the ten most common offences under the Fisheries Act; (t) what where the most common species harvested illegally; (u) what measures does the government have in place to deter people from committing such offences; (v) has the government undertaken an analysis to study the effectiveness of penalties for offences charged under the Fisheries Act and, if so, what were the results of this analysis; (w) has DFO identified the need for more sanctions and, if so (i) what sanction were identified, (ii) what steps were taken, (iii) how often does the government review its policies and procedures regarding fines and penalties for offences charged under the Fisheries Act; (x) has DFO identified the need for more education in order to limit circumventions and, if so, (i) what steps have been taken, (ii) what is the proportion of the DFO budget devoted to this education, (iii) how many staff and officials are involved in education, (iv) how many hours do fisheries officers spend per week and per month on education, (v) where does this education take place, (vi) what kind of tools and means are used for conveying information, (vii) are medias, social networks, daily newspapers and posters used, (viii) what has been the education budget for the last five years; (y) how many calls has DFO received in regard to harvesting shellfish and (i) has this number increased in the last ten years, (ii) what is the follow up associated calls, (iii) how many investigations have occurred in respect to these calls; (z) do the regulations provide for flexibility in specific cases and measures to be adopted concerning exceptional occurrences such as massive tourism flows, chartered tours specializing in harvest and soaring populations and (i) which specific cases do the regulations provide for, (ii) what are the possible solutions envisioned for each specific case, (iii) are special provisions in place in case of excess harvesting; (aa) what are DFO’s plans, in conjunction with other departments and agencies, to address and alleviate tension and racialized problems in regards to shellfish harvest; (bb) how many full-time equivalents (FTE) fisheries officer (i) are assigned in each management areas in the pacific region, (ii) how many were there five years ago, (iii) have the number fisheries officer in charge of onsite control been reduced in the last five years; (cc) what is the government employment outlook of fisheries officer for the next two years; (dd) has the question of over harvesting shellfish been tagged as a priority; (ee) have resource management biologist at DFO raised concerns regarding over harvesting; (ff) have resource management biologist at DFO raised concerns regarding overharvesting in zones 15 and 16; (gg) has the Regional Resource Manager of Invertebrate raised concerns in zones 15 and 16; (hh) how many times has this topic been discussed with the government and has the question been raised with the Minister or Deputy Minister and, if so, has the Minister provided a response and, if so, what was it; (ii) has there been any briefing with detailed information on the matter and for every briefing document or docket prepared, what is (i) the date, (ii) the title and subject matter, (iii) the department’s internal tracking number; (jj) concerning the DFO meeting with representatives from Tla’amin Nation supposed to establish methods to create stock assessments (i) has this meeting taken place, (ii) if not, when will it take place, (iii) if so, what methods were established and what were the results of the meeting, (iv) what are recommendations, (v) what is the timeline for the stock assessment to take place; (kk) does the government anticipate that there will be a meeting organized in order to make locals have more voice in the settlement of local fishery quotas; (ll) does the government anticipate that local staff will have more power in the management of the quotas in (kk); (mm) does the government anticipate that there will be any openness by DFO to set local limits and, if so, (i) when will this happen, (ii) what will be the process, (iii) how can Tla’amin Nation be involved in the process, (iv) what kind of power can Tla’amin Nation have (discretionary power, sanction power); and (nn) how often are the regulations governing recreational harvest reviewed?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1060--
Ms. Rachel Blaney:
With regard to the issue of oil spill at Burdwood Fish Farm: (a) how many square meters of water has the spill affected; (b) is the government capable of determining the amount of oil absorbed by the absorbent pads and, if so, what is the amount; (c) is the government capable of determining the amount of oil on the sea floor and, if so, what is the amount; (d) is the government capable of determining the amount of oil evaporated and, if so, what is the amount; (e) is the government capable to independently determine the amount of oil spilled; (f) how many pads were put (i) in the fish pens, (ii) outside of the pens; (g) was a report or study done on the response rate and, if so, what were the results; (h) how many times has this topic been discussed with the government and has the question been raised with the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard or his Deputy Minister and has the Minister provided a response and, if so, what was it; (i) has there been any briefing with detailed information on the matter and, for every briefing document or docket prepared, what is (i) the date, (ii) the title and subject matter, (iii) the department’s internal tracking number; (j) what are the titles of the responsible parties during the spill response at (i) the Canadian Coast Guard, (ii) the Department of Environment, (iii) the Western Marine Company, (iv) the Department of Transport, (v) the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO); (k) what does the government anticipate will be the long term impact of the oil spill; (l) does the government have precise data in terms of biodiversity or biomass of shellfish in this zone; (m) when was the last time a biomass survey of the region was conducted; (n) in the event that the last biomass survey of the region was conducted more than two years ago, will the DFO conduct a biomass survey this summer and, if not, why not; (o) has DFO identified contamination in the clam or other species and, if so, (i) how did DFO make such a determination, (ii) is the government providing measures aimed at restricting harvest, (iii) what recommendations has the government made with respect to the use and the management of this resource, (iv) have these recommendations been followed or have there been any failures in the implementation of these recommendations; (p) how many studies have been made regarding oil spill and (i) which one is the latest, (ii) what are the details, conclusions and recommendations of these studies; (q) in regard to sampling made following the spill, (i) how many samples were ordered to be taken, (ii) how many samples were taken, (iii) how many samples were analysed; (r) why was there a reduction of the number of samples, (i) who made that decision, (ii) why was this decision taken; (s) what are the results of the samples in (q); (t) how many years does the government anticipate it will take for the clams to be harvested and edible; (u) how many clams bed have died as a result of the spill; (v) what is the impact on the fish in the pens and (i) how many fish were affected, (ii) will the fish at Cermaq be commercialized and, if so, was DFO or other agencies notified of this decision; (w) were the fish pens prioritized in the cleanup and, if so, why; (x) was their pressure to clean up the fish pens first and, if so, by whom; (y) what is the impact on wild fish; (z) what is the impact on the ocean floor; (aa) how does the government anticipate First Nations and other groups will have to monitor and evaluate the area in the future; (bb) what are the resources that allow First Nations to monitor and evaluate the area in the future; (cc) how did the government cooperate with First Nations on the ground; (dd) was there ever a circumstance when First Nations were limited access and, if so, what was the reasoning; (ee) was there an investigation into the cause of the oil spill and, if so, (i) who investigated, (ii) what was the results of the investigation, (iii) was it a lack of diligence or training, (iv) what were the recommendation of this investigation, (v) have these recommendation been implemented; (ff) what additional training has been identified in order to prevent this accident; (gg) what other measures has been identified in order to prevent this accident; (hh) what where the financial costs for (i) the Canadian Coast Guard, (ii) the Department of the Environment, (iii) the Western Marine company, (iv) the Department of Transport, (v) DFO, (vi) all other parties involved; (ii) have the costs in (hh) been reimbursed by Cermaq or any other parties; (jj) what polluter pays principles have been applied as a consequence; (kk) how has the government or Cermaq proposed to rectify the loss of major food source to Kwikwasat’inuxw Haxwa’mis First Nation; (ll) what is the compensation in place or planned for the replacement of income for the First Nation; (mm) has an environmental impact assessment been conducted and, if so, (i) what are the results, (ii) what were the recommendation, (iii) have these recommendation been implemented; (nn) how many times did DFO complete a follow up; (oo) how many more samples does the government anticipate will be performed in the next five years; (pp) does the government anticipate the results of the samples in (oo) will be shared (i) publically, (ii) with First Nations; and (qq) has a schedule been established for the samples in (oo)?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1063--
Mr. Dave MacKenzie:
With regard to the statement from the Minister of Environment and Climate Change on May 18, 2017, that “carbon pricing is the cheapest and most effective way to reduce emissions”: (a) what are the other methods of reducing emissions; (b) for each method referenced in (a), what is the cost, per Canadian citizen; (c) for each method in (a), how was efficacy to reduce emissions measured; and (d) for the government’s chosen carbon tax or price on carbon, what is the cost, per Canadian citizen?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1065--
Mr. Charlie Angus:
With regard to the government’s additional information released in its technical paper on the carbon tax or price on carbon on May 18, 2017: (a) what amount of money will the carbon tax collect through the Canada Revenue Agency, by year and by province; (b) what amount of money does the government anticipate will be sent back to the provinces, by year and by province; (c) for the funds referred to in (b), how will they be sent back to the province (e.g. through a cheque to each province’s resident, through a transfer to the provincial government which will in turn decide what to do with the money, etc); (d) how many new public servants will be hired to administer the new carbon pricing system, broken down by (i) Environment and Climate Change Canada, (ii) Canada Revenue Agency, (iii) Finance Canada, (iv) Privy Council Office, (v) Other government departments; (e) how many current public servants will be transferred to positions to administer the new carbon pricing system, broken down by (i) Environment and Climate Change Canada, (ii) Canada Revenue Agency, (iii) Finance Canada, (iv) Privy Council Office; (v) Other government departments; and (f) how much will it cost to implement the public servants required to administer the carbon pricing system referred to in (d) and (e)?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1066--
Mr. Charlie Angus:
With respect to the Jordan's Principle Child-First Initiative: (a) how many individuals have received services with funds from this initiative; (b) what was the breakdown of the individuals in (a) by region and by category of health service provided?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1067--
Mr. Charlie Angus:
With respect to government spending on Student Support Services within the Elementary and Secondary Education Program within Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada: (a) for each region, and for each fiscal year going back to 1984-1985, what monthly, quarterly or other incremental amounts were allocated per student for student accomodations for students attending off-reserve schools; and (b) for each region, and for each fiscal year going back to 1984-1985, what monthly, quarterly or other incremental amounts were allocated per student for financial assistance allowances for students attending off-reserve schools?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1068--
Mr. Steven Blaney:
With regard to psychometric tests conducted by the government since January 1, 2016: (a) for which positions or appointments does the government require a psychometric test prior to employment or appointment; (b) how many applicants or potential appointees received psychometric testing; (c) how many individuals being considered for the position of Commissioner of Official Languages of Canada received psychometric testing; (d) how was the psychometric testing for the position of Commissioner of Official Languages administered and graded (letter grade, pass fair, recommended for hire, etc); (e) how did Madeleine Meilleur’s psychometric test results compare with that of the other candidates; and (f) what firm or individual conducted the psychometric tests referred to in (d)?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1072--
Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:
With regard to federal spending in the constituency of Nanaimo—Ladysmith in fiscal years 2015-16 and 2016-17: (a) what grants, loans, contributions and contracts were awarded by the government, broken down by (i) department and agency, (ii) municipality, (iii) name of recipient, (iv) amount received, (v) program under which expenditure was allocated, (vi) date; and (b) for the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program, between the program’s launch on January 1, 2015, and May 29, 2017, (i) which proposals from the constituency have been submitted, (ii) which proposals from the constituency have been approved?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1075--
Mr. John Brassard:
With regard to the use of antimalarial drugs in the Canadian Armed Forces, for each year from 2003 to March 9, 2017: (a) which pharmaceutical companies were awarded contracts for antimalarial drugs administered; and (b) what was the unit cost for (i) 250 mg mefloquine, (ii) 100 mg doxycycline, (iii) 250/100 mg atovaquone-proguanil, (iv) 500 mg chloroquine phosphate (300 mg base)?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1077--
Ms. Dianne L. Watts:
With regard to the trip by the Minister of International Trade to the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, and India at the beginning of March 2017: (a) who were the members of the delegation, excluding security and media; (b) what were the titles of the delegation members; (c) what were the contents of the Minister’s itinerary; (d) what are the details of all meetings attended by the Minister on the trip, including (i) date, (ii) summary or description, (iii) attendees, including organizations and the list of individuals representing them, (iv) topics discussed, (v) location; and (e) what are the details of all deals or agreements signed on the trip?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1078--
Ms. Marilyn Gladu:
With regard to expenditures made by the government since February 7, 2017, under government-wide object code 3259 (Miscellaneous expenditures not Elsewhere Classified): what are the details of each expenditure including (i) vendor name, (ii) amount, (iii) date, (iv) description of goods or services provided, (v) file number?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1079--
Mr. Glen Motz:
With regard to government procurement and contracts for the provision of research or speechwriting services to ministers since May 1, 2017: (a) what are the details of contracts, including (i) the start and end dates, (ii) contracting parties, (iii) file number, (iv) nature or description of the work, (v) value of contract; and (b) in the case of a contract for speechwriting, what is the (i) date, (ii) location, (iii) audience or event at which the speech was, or was intended to be, delivered, (iv) number of speeches to be written, (v) cost charged per speech?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1080--
Mr. Phil McColeman:
With regard to materials prepared for ministers since April 10, 2017: for every briefing document, memorandum or docket prepared, what is the (i) date, (ii) title or subject matter, (iii) department's internal tracking number, (iv) recipient?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1081--
Mr. Randall Garrison:
With respect to the periods of service of the Hon. Harjit Singh Sajjan, Minister of National Defence, in the Canadian military in Afghanistan: (a) in terms of Mr. Sajjan’s written terms of employment, terms of deployment, terms of service, terms of engagement or any like conditions of service/ employment, what was or were Mr. Sajjan’s jobs, positons, and functions in Afghanistan throughout the periods in which he served in Afghanistan, including as they may have been modified or otherwise developed over time; (b) is it correct, as Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner Mary Dawson reports in a letter to Mr. Craig Scott of February 27, 2017, that Mr. Sajjan told the Commissioner that he was “deployed as a reservist to Afghanistan where he was responsible for capacity building with local police forces” and, if so, was this the extent and limit of his role or roles; (c) if Mr. Sajjan had a role or roles going beyond what he told the Commissioner, did he deliberately withhold that information from the Commissioner; (d) when or after General David Fraser had Mr. Sajjan transferred from Kabul to Kandahar, what orders, instructions, changed terms of service, or the like, whether written or verbal, were given from time to time by General Fraser to Mr. Sajjan about what his role or roles would entail in Kandahar; (e) what was or were Mr. Sajjan’s role or roles in Afghanistan in relation to liaising with, working with, mentoring, training, advising, assisting, cooperating with or conducting any similar forms of engagement with the Afghan National Police (ANP), the National Directorate of Security (NDS), the Afghan National Army (ANA), the Governor of Kandahar, and any informal or paramilitary organizations working for or with the aforementioned four organizations; (f) how many meetings and on what dates did Mr. Sajjan attend (i) meetings with the Joint Coordination Committee (JCC) in Kandahar and/or (ii) meetings on the same day as JCC meetings that consisted of a sub-section of the attendees of the JCC meeting; (g) what was or were Mr. Sajjan’s role or roles with respect to the JCC and with respect to any other meeting consisting of some but not all members of the JCC, and did his role include facilitating and then reporting on intelligence flows from the National Directorate of Security to the Canadian and/ or allied militaries; (h) is any part of what General David Fraser said in the following report by David Pugliese (“Afghan service puts Defence Minister Sajjan in conflict of interest on detainees, say lawyers,” [June 21, 2016] Ottawa Citizen), namely that “Retired Brig.-Gen. David Fraser has said Sajjan’s work as an intelligence officer and his activities in Afghanistan helped lay the foundation for a military operation that led to the death or capture of more than 1,500 insurgents”, untrue and, if so, why and/or to what extent; (i) is any part of what Sean Maloney reports in his book Fighting for Afghanistan: A Rogue Historian at War (Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 2011) in the following sentence--“Harj [Mr. Sajjan] attended the weekly security meeting and learned that the meeting could become a tool as well. Over time, he developed rapport with all the security ‘players’ in Kandahar.”— untrue and, if so, why and/or to what extent; (j) is any part of what Sean Maloney also reports in his book in the following sentence -- “[Following JCC meetings] Harj was able to send two pages of solid intelligence to TF [Task Force] ORION per week. The quality of the intelligence was awesome.”--untrue and, if so, why and/or to what extent; (k) is any part of what Sean Maloney also reports in his book in the following sentence--“[T]he NDS funneled most of the information into the JCC, so it wasn’t all just coming from OEF systems or resources.”--untrue and, if so, why and/or to what extent; (l) is any part of what Sean Maloney also reports in his book in the following sentence--“[F]rom then on, Harj sent intelligence directly to AEGIS, to ORION, and to the ASIC with his analysis attached.”--untrue and, if so, why and/or to what extent; (m) is any part of what Sean Maloney also reports in his book in the following sentence--“‘My responsibilities were vague at first. General Fraser had me work with [Governor of Kandahar Province] Asadullah Khalid. But I also worked at the PRT [Provincial Reconstruction Team] to assess emergent Afghan policing issues.”--untrue and, if so, why and/or to what extent; (n) when Mr. Sajjan delivered a speech in New Delhi on April 18, 2017, and said from a prepared text--“On my first deployment to Kandahar in 2006, I was the architect of Operation MEDUSA where we removed 1,500 Taliban fighters off the battlefield…”--was he referring, in whole or in part, to his intelligence role for which he was praised by General David Fraser, the commander of Operation MEDUSA, as referenced in (h) above?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1082--
Mr. Pierre Poilievre:
With regard to the statement by the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities in Maclean’s magazine on June 9, 2017, that “My department has approved more than 2,900 projects with a total investment of over $23 billion since our government took office”: (a) what are the details of the 2,900 projects including (i) project description, (ii) amount of federal contribution, (iii) location, (iv) anticipated completion date; (b) how many of the projects referred to in (a) have “broken ground”; and (c) of the projects that have broken ground, what was the date of the ground breaking ceremony or, alternatively, the date when work commenced?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1085--
Mr. Brian Masse:
With regard to the automotive and manufacturing industry in Canada, (a) has the government worked with any global automotive or manufacturing companies to increase existing or to bring in a brand new automotive investment in the form of new factories, products, or jobs, to Canada since 2015, (b) is the government considering greenfield or brownfield investment for the automotive and manufacturing industry in Canada, (c) is the Canadian Automotive Partnership Council considering new investment and greenfield or brownfield investment in the automotive and manufacturing industry in Canada, and (d) if so, what municipal locations were considered?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1086--
Ms. Rachel Blaney:
With regard to the right to housing and the upcoming National Housing Strategy: (a) how many stakeholders brought up or advocated for the right to housing during the “Let’s Talk Housing” consultation; (b) what was the government’s response to such demands mentioned in (a); (c) has the government assessed how a human rights based approach to housing can be recognized and furthered through laws and policies; (d) does the government intend to recognize the right to housing, and if not, why (e) does the National Housing Strategy aim at determining whether our laws, policies and practices are sufficient to prevent (i) homelessness, (ii) forced evictions, (iii) discrimination in having adequate housing; (f) when will be the completion for the examination in (e); (g) which department is responsible for the examination in (e); (h) is the National Housing Strategy based on a human right based approach, and if not, how is the government determining the appropriate framework that ensures (i) accountability, (ii) cohesive outlook beyond the physical structure, (iii) systemic causes of housing insecurity; (i) how many times has the right to housing been discussed or raised with the Minister or Deputy Minister of Families, Children and Social Development and has the Minister provided a response to the right to housing and its inclusion in a National Housing Strategy and, if so, what was it; (j) has there been any briefing with detailed information on the right to housing, and for every briefing document or docket prepared, what is (i) the date, (ii) the title and subject matter, (iii) the department’s internal tracking number; (k) how many times has the parliamentary secretary raised the right to housing with the Minister; (l) what are all of Canada’s international obligations, treaties and other legal instruments that ensure everyone in Canada a right to safe or a secure or adequate or an affordable home; (m) why has Canada never formally incorporated the international covenants on the right to housing; (n) has legislation ever been considered for the purpose mentioned in (m), and if not, why; (o) does the government intend to institute a built-in accountability measure to ensure the National Housing Strategy works for all Canadians without a right to housing; (p) how many times has a report from the UN Special Rapporteur on Adequate Housing been discussed with the government; (q) has the question mentioned in (p) been raised with any Ministers or Deputy Ministers and has they provided a response and, if so, what was it; (r) has there been any briefing with detailed information on the matter mentioned in (p), and for every briefing document or docket prepared, what is (i) the date, (ii) the title and subject matter, (iii) the department’s internal tracking number; (s) how does the government plan on eliminating discrimination in housing programs; (t) how does the government plan on setting measurable goal and timelines to reduce poverty with its National Housing Strategy; (u) what measures or means the government intends to have to account when the right to housing are violated; (v) does the government intend to involve people experiencing housing insecurity and homelessness at every step of the elaboration process of the National Housing Strategy; (w) does the government intend to offer human rights training for those involved with the Strategy?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1087--
Ms. Anne Minh-Thu Quach:
With regard to the Prime Minister’s Youth Council and the Privy Council’s Youth Secretariat: (a) what is the decision-making flow chart for the Prime Minister’s Youth Council, including each of the positions associated with the Council; (b) what is the total amount spent and the total budget of the Youth Council since it was established, broken down by year; (c) what amounts in the Youth Council budget are allocated for salaries, broken down by (i) year, (ii) position, (iii) per diem or any other reimbursement or expense (telecommunications, transportation, office supplies, furniture) offered or attributed to each of the positions mentioned in (a)(ii); (d) what are the dates and the locations of each of the meetings held by the Youth Council since it was established, broken down by (i) in-person meetings, (ii) virtual meetings, (iii) number of participants at each of these meetings; (e) how much did the government spend to hold each of the Youth Council meetings mentioned in (c), broken down by (i) costs associated with renting a room, (ii) costs associated with food and drinks, (iii) costs associated with security, (iv) costs associated with transportation and the nature of this transportation, (v) costs associated with telecommunications; (f) what is the decision-making flow chart for the Privy Council’s Youth Secretariat, including each of the positions associated with the Youth Secretariat; (g) what is the total amount spent and the total budget of the Youth Secretariat since it was established, broken down by year; (h) what amounts in the Youth Secretariat budget are allocated for salaries, broken down by (i) year, (ii) position, (iii) per diem or any other reimbursement or expense (telecommunications, transportation, office supplies, furniture) offered or attributed to each of the positions mentioned in (h)(ii); (i) what is the official mandate of the Youth Secretariat; (j) what is the relationship between the Prime Minister’s Youth Council and the Youth Secretariat (organizational ties, financial ties, logistical support, etc.); (k) is the Youth Secretariat responsible for youth bursaries, services or programs; and (l) if the answer to (k) is affirmative, what amounts were allocated to these bursaries, services or programs since they were established, broken down by (i) the nature of the bursary, service or program funded, (ii) the location of the program, (iii) the start and end date of the bursary, service or program?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1088--
Mr. Dave Van Kesteren:
With regard to spending on “stock” photographs or images by the government since January 1, 2016, broken down by department, agency, crown corporation, and other government entity: (a) what is the total amount spent; (b) what are the details of each contract or expenditure including (i) vendor, (ii) amount, (iii) details and duration of contract, (iv) date, (v) number of photos or images purchased, (vi) where were the photos or images used (internet, billboards, etc.), (vii) description of ad campaign, (viii) file number of contract?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1089--
Mr. Ben Lobb:
With regard to proposed takeovers of Canadian businesses or firms by foreign entities, since January 1, 2016: (a) what is the complete list of such takeovers which had to be approved by the government; (b) what are the details of each transaction, including the (i) date of approval, (ii) value of takeover, (iii) Minister who was responsible for the approval, (iv) name of Canadian business or firm involved, (v) name of foreign entity involved, (vi) country the foreign entity is from; and (c) how many such proposed takeovers have been rejected by the government since January 1, 2016, and what are the details of the rejected proposals?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1090--
Mr. Ben Lobb:
With regard to the financial compensation and salaries of ministerial exempt staff, as of June 14, 2017: (a) without revealing the identity of the individuals, how many current exempt staff members receive a salary higher than the range indicated by the Treasury Board guidelines associated with their position; and (b) how many staff members in the Office of the Prime Minister receive a salary in excess of (i) $125,000, (ii) $200,000?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1091--
Mr. Ben Lobb:
With regard to the Office of the Prime Minister and Minister's offices from April 1, 2016, to June 14, 2017: (a) how much was spent on contracts for (i) temporary employment, (ii) consultants, (iii) advice; (b) what are the names of the individuals and companies that correspond to these amounts; and (c) for each person and company in (b), what were their billing periods and what type of work did they provide?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1092--
Ms. Hélène Laverdière:
With regard to cooperation between the Canadian military and the United States (US) military and intelligence agencies in Afghanistan and Iraq and to findings of the Canadian military Board of Inquiry report of May 4, 2010, on the subject of the “14 June 2006 Afghan Detainee Incident”: (a) when did Canada decide to no longer transfer persons in the care, custody, or control of members of the Canadian military to members of the US military; (b) were there any omissions or exclusions from the scope of this decision at the receiving end, such as US intelligence agencies like the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) or did the decision apply to transfers to any agent or actor acting on behalf of the US government; (c) at the transferring end, did this decision apply to all members of the Canadian military, including special forces and intelligence officials, and if not, to whom did it not apply; (d) for what reasons was this decision taken; (e) was this decision taken after legal advice had been received on whether it would be lawful to continue to transfer to the US and if so, was the government advised that it would be unlawful to continue the transfers; (f) what was the date of the last transfer before the decision came into effect; (g) did this decision apply to persons who would or could be characterized as Persons Under Control (PUC) by the US Army, units within the US Army, or the CIA, considering that this is a term that the Canadian military Board of Inquiry report of May 4, 2010, referred to as an “American Army Term”; (h) were there any instances of this decision not being implemented, and thus of persons being transferred to the US military or another US agency in situations in which members of the Canadian military themselves characterized a person as a PUC, considering that the same Canadian military Board of Inquiry report of May 4, 2010, observed that the term PUC was in “widespread use” within the Canadian military in Afghanistan; (i) is the government aware of any instances in which persons who were determined not to be “detainees” were transferred on the battlefield or elsewhere to Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) personnel, including the Afghan National Police, the Afghan National Army, the National Directorate of Security, and any paramilitary or like organizations working for or alongside the foregoing, to then learn that the person was re-transferred by ANSF personnel to members of the US military, CIA, or private US actors cooperating with the US Army or CIA; (j) is the government aware of any instances in which persons treated by Canada as “detainees” were transferred to ANSF personnel and then re-transferred by ANSF personnel to members of the US military, CIA, etc., especially before the 2007 Transfer Arrangement between Canada and Afghanistan took effect; (k) was this decision conveyed to the US government and if so, what reasons were provided and how did the US government respond; and (l) was this decision ever reversed or revised and if so, on what terms, when, and for what reasons?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1093--
Ms. Hélène Laverdière:
With respect to the characterization of persons in the care, custody or control of the Canadian military as Persons Under Control (PUCs) or use of like categories, whether or not such terms were or are used officially or unofficially: (a) in relation to a statement by Donald P. Wright et al. in A Different Kind of War: The United States Army in Operation--ENDURING FREEDOM (OEF) October 2001-September 2005 (Combat Studies Institute, 2010), at p. 221: “Detainees in Coalition hands in Afghanistan were referred to as persons under control (PUCs) instead of EPWs or detainees,”, does this reference to “Coalition” apply to the Canadian military, including special forces in any part of the 2001-2005 period in question; (b) in relation to a claim by Ahmed Rashid in Descent into Chaos: The United States and the Failure of Nation-Building in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Central Asia (Penguin, 2009), at pp. 304-305: “In spring 2002, …CIA lawyers further twisted legal boundaries by establishing a new category of prisoner: Persons Under Control, or PUC. Anyone held as PUC was automatically denied access to the ICRC, and even his existence was denied...PUCs were flown around the world to different locations on private jets belonging to dummy companies owned by the CIA.”, is the government aware of whether this is an accurate statement of one use to which the category of “PUC” was put by the United States; (c) in relation to an observation in Center for Law and Military Operations (United States Army, Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center and School), Lessons Learned from Afghanistan and Iraq: Volume I - Major Combat Operations (11 September 2001--1 May 2003) (August 1, 2004) [Lessons Learned]: “[P]ersons detained were either classified as ‘persons under control’ (PUCs) or simply as ‘detainees.’… Persons captured on the battlefield were initially brought to the classified location to establish their identity and determine if they met the criteria for potential transfer to Guantanamo. During this phase, detained personnel were classified as ‘PUCs’.”, is the government aware of whether, during such windows of time, CIA agents or persons working for the CIA would sometimes take custody of PUCs from the US Army before they could be officially designated as “detainees” by the Army; (d) in relation to a claim in Chris Mackey and Greg Miller, The Interrogators: Task Force 500 and America’s Secret War Against Al-Qaeda (Back Bay Books, 2004), at pp. 250-251: “In June [2002]…our [US Army] command in Bagram …came up with a whole new prisoner category called “persons under U.S. control”, or PUCs. The whole idea was to create a sort of limbo status, a bureaucratic blank spot where prisoners could reside temporarily without entering any official database or numbering system.”: is the government aware of whether or not this US Army PUC category was created in concert with and used by the CIA as a way to secure custody of PUCs while they were still in a “bureaucratic blank spot”; (e) in relation to the observations in Lessons Learned that “the term ‘PUC’ did not develop until the [US] XVIIIth Airborne Corps arrived in Afghanistan” in 2002, did Canadian Forces, including special forces, ever conduct joint operations with the US’ XVIIIth Airbone Corps in which captives were taken; (f) is the government aware of whether the commanding officer of the US’ XVIIIth Airborne Corps, Lt. Gen. Dan McNeill, was a direct source of, or conduit for, the notion of “PUC” and if so, whether Lt. Gen. Dan McNeill was working in concert or tandem with the CIA in introducing this term into the Afghanistan theatre; (g) after General Walter Natynczyk was seconded to command 35,000 US forces in Iraq during the US’ Operation Iraqi Freedom in Iraq from January 2004 to January 2005, did he bring any knowledge of the use of PUC practices or a PUC system from Iraq to the Canada-Afghanistan context when he became head of the Canadian Forces’ Land Force Doctrine and Training system in 2005 and when he was appointed Vice-Chief of Defence Staff in 2006, and if so, was such practices introduced in any way to this doctrine and training system; (h) prior to August 2015 by which time the first Canadian Forces troops had arrived in Kandahar, were there meetings between Canadian Lt. Gen. Michel Gauthier and US Under-Secretary of Defence for Intelligence Steve Cambone or any other officials in the US Department of Defense or in the Pentagon in which they discussed, inter alia, Canada aligning or otherwise coordinating its policy and practices in Kandahar with those of the US, including in relation to detainees, as a condition of the US agreeing that Canada be assigned Kandahar; (i) prior to August 2015 by which time the first Canadian Forces troops had arrived in Kandahar, were there meetings between Chief of Defence Staff General Rick Hillier and any officials in the US Department of Defense or in the Pentagon in which they discussed, inter alia, Canada aligning or otherwise coordinating its policy and practices in Kandahar with those of the US, including in relation to detainees, as a condition of the US agreeing that Canada be assigned Kandahar; (j) prior to August 2015 by which time the first Canadian Forces troops had arrived in Kandahar, were there meetings between any Canadian Forces officers apart from Generals Gauthier and Hillier in which they discussed, inter alia, Canada aligning or otherwise coordinating its policy and practices in Kandahar with those of the US, including in relation to detainees, as a condition of the US agreeing that Canada be assigned Kandahar; and (k) is the mini-biography of Mr. Gauthier on The Governance Network’s website correct in saying Gauthier “[l]ed Canadian Expeditionary Force Command, responsible for all CF operational missions abroad, the Canadian mission in southern Afghanistan” and if so, did this include authority over policy and decisions related to the transfer of captives to other states?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1094--
Ms. Hélène Laverdière:
With respect to the characterization of persons in the care, custody or control of the Canadian military as “PUCs” and “Persons Under Control”, or use of like categories, whether or not such terms were or are used officially or unofficially: (a) does the government accept the accuracy of the finding of a Canadian military Board of Inquiry (BOI) on the subject of the “14 June 2006 Afghan Detainee Incident” [BOI June 2006 Incident Report], in its report of May 4, 2010, (para 30, part II) that the term “PUC” was in “widespread use” amongst Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan in 2006; (b) in relation to a BOI June 2006 Incident Report observation (para 30, part II), stating that “[T]he B Coy MP [B Company Military Police officer] testified that he was directed during ROTO 1 [rotation/deployment 1] to always use the term “PUC” and to avoid the term “Detainee.””, who directed this Military Police (MP) to systematically use “PUC” and to avoid “detainee” and for what reasons was this MP so directed; (c) in relation to a BOI June 2006 Incident Report finding (para 30, part II), stating that “When made aware of the term the TFA Advisors (LEGAD and PM) endeavoured to remove it [“PUC”] from the tactical reporting lexicon, as it had no legal foundation in detainee policy.”, (i) when and how were the Task Force Afghanistan (TFA) Advisors “made aware of the term”, (ii) for what period did “PUC” appear in tactical reporting, (iii) did its use in tactical reporting end, and if it ended, when did it end and was this the result of the initiative of the TFA Advisors; (d) in relation to the same report finding as in (c), was any person in position of strategic command in the Canadian Forces, including Generals Rick Hillier, Walter Natynzyk, Michel Gauthier and David Fraser, at any time aware of the use of the term “PUC” and if so, what actions did one or more of them take in relation to its use; (e) does the government accept the BOI June 2006 Incident Report finding that persons characterized by Canadian soldiers and commanders during one or more periods in 2006 as “PUCs” were transferred to Afghan authorities without also being characterized as “detainees” with the result that there was no triggering of the record-keeping and reporting (including reporting to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)) connected to official detainee policy and to the 2005 Transfer Arrangement with Afghanistan, and if so, what is the number of such PUCs transferred without record or reporting to the ICRC; (f) in relation to the observation in the BOI June 2006 Incident Report (para 33, Part II), that, in relation to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation published Canadian military reports from the field that 26 persons were “captured” on May 17, 2006, by Task Force ORION, those 26 were transferred to the Afghan National Police without ever being processed as detainees, were those persons treated as PUCs by TF ORION; (g) in relation to question (m) of Order Paper Question Q-1117 (41st Parliament, first session; filed by Craig Scott, MP) that asked the government to set out how 11 captured persons referenced at page 96 of a book by the commanding officer of Task Force ORION, Ian Hope-Dancing with the Dushman: Command Imperatives for the Counter-Insurgency Fight in Afghanistan (Canadian Defence Agency Press, 2008)--were processed, were these 11 persons processed as “detainees” with attendant record-keeping and reporting or were they instead treated as “PUCs” and transferred to Afghan authorities on that basis, with no attendant record-keeping or reporting to the ICRC; (h) in view of the statement in a report by the Directorate of Special Examinations and Inquiries (DESI), in “Directorate of Special Examinations and Inquiries Investigation—Passage of Information, Final Report (14 June 2006 Afghanistan Detainee Incident)”, document number 7045-72-09/26, that it was “of very significant concern …that a number of TF ORION War Diary records for the period 13 May--17 June 2006 could not be located”, have some or all of those war diary records since been located; (i) if some or all of the war diaries referenced in (h) have been located, do they shed light on the use of “PUCs” or like designations as a way to avoid labelling a captive as a “detainee”; (j) in relation to point (o) in Q-1117 (41st Parliament, first session)--“were there persons under the control of Canadian forces who were transferred to Afghanistan, but who were not treated by Canada as covered by the provisions of the 2005 and 2007 Canada-Afghanistan Memorandums of Understanding on detainee transfer and if so, on what basis were transfers of such persons not deemed covered by the agreements?”--that the government did not then answer in the affirmative, would the government now like to change its answer; (k) in relation to point (p) in Q-1117 (41st Parliament, first session)--“were there persons under the control of Canadian forces who were transferred to Afghanistan but whose existence and transfer was not made known to the International Committee of the Red Cross and if so, on what basis was the Red Cross not informed?”--that the government did not then answer in the affirmative, would the government now like to change its answer; (l) in relation to point (n) of Q-1117 (41st Parliament, first session)--“at any period and if so, which periods, [were] there …one or more categories of persons who Canada passed on to either Afghan or American authorities but who were not categorized as detainees, and did such categories have a designation, whether formal or informal?”--why did the government not reveal the existence of “PUCs” as an informal category; (m) in relation to, inter alia, the government answers to points (n), (o), and (p) of Q-1117 (41st Parliament, first session), does the present government consider that the former government deliberately sought to mislead or even deceive the then Member of Parliament who submitted Q-1117 (41st Parliament, first session); (n) inclusive of points (n), (o), and (p) of Q-1117 (41st Parliament, first session), are there any answers to this question that the present government considers were incorrect or untruthful; (o) in relation to a September 19, 2016, letter from Mr. Craig Scott, former MP for Toronto–Danforth, to the current Prime Minister in which Mr. Scott presented reasons as to why he “believe[d] it to be likely that the Department of National Defence crafted its answer to Order Paper Question Q-1117 (41st Parliament, first session) in order to avoid revealing” the existence of persons who were transferred to Afghanistan without being recorded or reported to the ICRC as “detainees”, has that letter resulted in any inquiries by or on behalf of the Prime Minister and if so, of what sort and with what result; (p) when on December 8, 2009, then Member of Parliament the Hon. Ujjal Dosanjh asked a question to former Chief of Defence Staff Walter Natynczyk in the latter’s appearance before the Standing Committee on National Defence in which Mr. Dosanjh quoted from a Globe and Mail article in which a Military Police officer’s field notes used the term “PUC”, did the government conduct any other investigation into why “PUC” had been used apart from the ordering of Board of Inquiry and Chief of Review Services investigations into aspects of the underlying incident and if so, what was the result; and (q) in relation to findings in BOI June 2006 Incident Report (para 12, Part II), stating that “Although BGen [David] Fraser did not become familiar with TSO [Theatre Standing Order] 321A until arriving in Kandahar…, its underlying principle of transferring detainees to ANSF was made clear to him before departing Canada. Direction provided to him verbally by the Chief of the Defence Staff (CDS) [General Rick Hillier] emphasized that Afghan detainees were to be transferred to Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) as far forward in the field and as rapidly as possible; indeed, that their transfer from CF to ANSF custody was to be measured in terms of “minutes to hours.”, does the government consider that this constituted an instruction by General Hillier to circumvent the formal “detainee” system with a “PUC” practice?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1095--
Ms. Hélène Laverdière:
With regard to all operational contexts in which members of the Canadian military have been involved since September 11, 2001, up to the present and with respect to all military orders, directives, instructions, etc., whether binding or non-binding, interim, provisional, or final, related to persons in the care, custody, or control of members of the Canadian military and to all persons with whom members of the Canadian military come into contact but who are judged as being in the care, custody, or control of armed forces, security, and intelligence forces, and police forces of another state: (a) what were the numbers, titles and dates of all Canadian Forces Theatre Standing Orders and the identity of the issuing official; (b) what were the numbers, titles, and dates of all Fragmentary Orders and the identity of the issuing official; (c) what were the numbers, titles, and dates of all International Security Assistance Force orders of a similar nature issued in relation to the conflict in Afghanistan and the name of the issuing official or entity which issued them; and (d) what were the numbers, titles, and dates of any orders of a similar nature issued by American, Iraqi, or other forces, including Kurdish authorities in northern Iraq, that apply in any way, directly or indirectly, to Canadian soldiers who come into contact with detainees while serving in Iraq and the name of the issuing official or entity which issued them?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1098--
Mr. Murray Rankin:
In relation to Canada’s transfer of captives in Afghanistan to the authorities of other states, including the United States and Afghanistan, from 2001 onward: (a) have there been any investigations by any federal agency, including but not limited to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police or the Canadian Armed Forces National Investigation Service, of senior officers in the Canadian Forces up to and including the Chief of Defence Staff for possible criminal conduct in violation of one or more Canadian statutes and/or one or more international legal obligations; (b) if the answer in (a) is affirmative, (i) between what dates, (ii) with respect to what conduct, (iii) with what result; (c) have there been any investigations by any federal agency, including but not limited to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police or the Canadian Armed Forces National Investigation Service, of any Minister of the Crown including the Prime Minister for possible criminal conduct in violation of one or more Canadian statutes and/or one or more international legal obligations; (d) if the answer in (c) is affirmative, (i) between what dates, (ii) with respect to what conduct, (iii) with what result; (e) have there been any investigations by any federal agency, including but not limited to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police or the Canadian Armed Forces National Investigation Service, of any member of the public service for possible criminal conduct in violation of one or more Canadian statutes and/or one or more international legal obligations; (f) if the answer in (e) is affirmative, (i) between what dates, (ii) with respect to what conduct, (iii) with what result; and (g) have there been any investigations by any federal agency, including but not limited to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police or the Canadian Armed Forces National Investigation Service, of any member of the a minister’s political staff including any member of the Prime Minister’s Office for possible criminal conduct in violation of one or more Canadian statutes and/or one or more international legal obligations; (h) if the answer in (g) is affirmative, (i) between what dates, (ii) with respect to what conduct, (iii) with what result?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1100--
Mr. Erin O'Toole:
With regard to the Government’s nomination of a new Clerk of the House of Commons, and its general commitment to “open, transparent and merit-based” selection processes: (a) what process was followed to select the nominee; (b) how many candidates applied for the position; (c) were any tests or assessments administered to the candidates; (d) how many candidates were interviewed; (e) who were the members of the selection board or interview panel; (f) were candidates’ professional and character references checked; (g) how many candidates were psychometrically tested; (h) what was the role of the Prime Minister in the selection process; (i) what was the role of the Prime Minister’s Chief of Staff, Principal Secretary and Director of Appointments in the selection process; (j) what was the role of the Government House Leader in the selection process; (k) what was the role of the Chief of Staff to the Government House Leader in the selection process; (l) what was the role of the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard in the selection process; (m) what was the role of the Chief of Staff to the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard in the selection process; (n) did any ministers or exempt staff, not named in parts (h) to (m), have a role in the selection process; (o) what was the role of the Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet (Results and Delivery) in the selection process; (p) what role was provided or offered to the Speaker of the House of Commons, or any personal representative of him, in the selection process; (q) were executive search firms, consultants, or other contractors retained to support the selection process; (r) if the answer in (q) is affirmative, (i) who was retained, (ii) what services were provided, (iii) what was the value of the services provided; (s) when was the nominee notified he was the government’s choice, and who notified him; (t) were the opposition parties’ House leaders consulted on the choice of nominee, and if so, by whom and when; and (u) was the Speaker of the House of Commons consulted on the choice of nominee, and if so, by whom and when?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1101--
Mr. Blake Richards:
With regard to the most recent Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) compliance test on small businesses with regard to active vs. passive income: (a) what date did the compliance test (i) begin, (ii) end; (b) how many small businesses were (i) assessed in this test, (ii) determined to owe a greater amount to the CRA than initially assessed, (iii) determined to owe a lesser amount than initially assessed; (c) how were these small businesses selected for assessment; (d) how many of the businesses assessed were (i) campgrounds, (ii) self-storage facilities, (iii) from other sectors, as broken down by the North American Industry Classification System; (e) what conclusions, if any, were reached about (i) the CRA’s interpretation of the rules regarding “active” and “passive” income of the small businesses involved, (ii) the application of the CRA’s interpretation of the rules regarding the eligibility of the small businesses involved to receive the small business tax deduction; (f) what other conclusions were reached; and (g) what standards were used to determine whether a small business (i) provided a sufficient number of services for its generated income to be considered active, (ii) engaged or hired a sufficient number of year-round full-time employees for its generated income to be considered active?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1102--
Mr. Pat Kelly:
With regard to the government’s decision to permit the Hytera takeover of Norsat International Incorporated: (a) did the transaction undergo a complete national security review as defined by the Investment Canada Act; (b) if the answer in (a) is affirmative, what are the details, including (i) when did the national security review commence, (ii) when did the review conclude; and (c) when did the government approve the transaction?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question no 618 --
M. Charlie Angus:
En ce qui concerne les activités policières et de surveillance ciblant des journalistes et des militants autochtones depuis le 31 octobre 2015: a) quels organismes de sécurité et autres organismes gouvernementaux ont participé à la surveillance d’activités militantes autochtones relativement: (i) au mouvement Idle No More, (ii) à l’Enquête nationale sur les femmes et les filles autochtones disparues ou assassinées ou à d’autres événements publics autochtones, (iii) au projet d’agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain, (iv) au pipeline Northern Gateway, (v) au projet Énergie Est et au projet de réseau principal Est , (vi) au barrage du site C, (vii) au projet hydroélectrique du Bas-Churchill, (viii) au projet d’inversion de la canalisation 9B et d’accroissement de la capacité de la canalisation 9, (ix) à d’autres projets industriels ou d’exploitation des ressources; b) combien d’Autochtones ont été identifiés par des organismes de sécurité comme menaces potentielles à la sécurité publique, ventilé par organisme et province; c) quelles organisations autochtones et quels groupes militants ont fait l’objet de surveillance par les services de sécurité canadiens, ventilé par organisme et province; d) combien d’activités auxquelles ont participé des militants autochtones ont été consignées dans des rapports de situation du Centre des opérations du gouvernement, ventilé par province et par mois; e) des organismes gouvernementaux canadiens, notamment le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité (SCRS), la Gendarmerie royale du Canada (GRC) et l’Agence des services frontaliers du Canada (ASFC), ont-ils participé à la surveillance de Canadiens s’étant déplacés vers la réserve indienne de Standing Rock (Dakota Nord et Dakota Sud, États-Unis); f) le gouvernement du Canada, ou n’importe lequel de ses organismes, a-t-il demandé au gouvernement des États-Unis, ou à n’importe lequel de ses organismes, de lui communiquer des renseignements sur la surveillance de citoyens canadiens participant à des manifestations à la réserve indienne de Standing Rock; g) quels sont les titres et les dates de tous les rapports produits par divers organismes ou divers ministères sur des activités militantes autochtones; h) combien de fois des organismes du gouvernement ont-ils communiqué de l’information sur des activités militantes autochtones à des entreprises privées et, dans chaque cas, quelles sont les entreprises qui ont obtenu l’information, et à quelles dates; i) combien de réunions ont eu lieu entre les représentants de Kinder Morgan pour le projet d’agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain et (i) le personnel de la GRC, (ii) le personnel du SCRS; j) quelles sont les réponses aux éléments a) à i) pour les journalistes, plutôt que pour les Autochtones et organismes autochtones, le cas échéant?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 630 --
M. Matthew Dubé:
En ce qui concerne les activités policières et de surveillance ciblant des militants autochtones depuis le 31 octobre 2015: a) quels organismes de sécurité et autres organismes gouvernementaux ont participé à la surveillance d’activités militantes autochtones relativement (i) au mouvement Idle No More, (ii) à l’Enquête nationale sur les femmes et les filles autochtones disparues ou assassinées ou à d’autres événements publics autochtones, (iii) au projet d’agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain, (iv) au pipeline Northern Gateway, (v) au projet Énergie Est et au projet de réseau principal Est, (vi) au barrage du site C, (vii) au projet hydroélectrique du Bas-Churchill, (viii) au projet d’inversion de la canalisation 9B et d’accroissement de la capacité de la canalisation 9, (ix) à d’autres projets industriels ou d’exploitation des ressources; b) combien d’Autochtones ont été identifiés par des organismes de sécurité comme menaces potentielles à la sécurité publique, ventilé par organisme et province; c) quelles organisations autochtones et quels groupes militants ont fait l’objet de surveillance par les services de sécurité canadiens, ventilé par organisme et province; d) combien d’activités auxquelles ont participé des militants autochtones ont été consignées dans des rapports de situation du Centre des opérations du gouvernement, ventilé par province et par mois; e) des organismes gouvernementaux canadiens, notamment le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité (SCRS), la Gendarmerie royale du Canada (GRC) et l’Agence des services frontaliers du Canada (ASFC), ont-ils participé à la surveillance de Canadiens s’étant déplacés vers la réserve indienne de Standing Rock (Dakota Nord et Dakota Sud, États-Unis); f) le gouvernement du Canada, ou n’importe lequel de ses organismes, a-t-il demandé au gouvernement des États-Unis, ou à n’importe lequel de ses organismes, de lui communiquer des renseignements sur la surveillance de citoyens canadiens participant à des manifestations à la réserve indienne de Standing Rock; g) quels sont les titres et les dates de tous les rapports produits par divers organismes ou divers ministères sur des activités militantes autochtones; h) combien de fois des organismes du gouvernement ont-ils communiqué de l’information sur des activités militantes autochtones à des entreprises privées et, dans chaque cas, quelles sont les entreprises qui ont obtenu l’information, et à quelles dates; i) combien de réunions ont eu lieu entre les représentants de Kinder Morgan pour le projet d’agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain et (i) le personnel de la GRC, (ii) le personnel du SCRS?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1015 --
M. Tom Kmiec:
En ce qui concerne l’exonération de remboursement de prêts d’études accordée par le gouvernement: a) combien de prêts d’études ont été exonérés depuis le 4 novembre 2015; b) quels sont les critères employés pour déterminer l’admissibilité à une exonération; c) quelles sont les raisons considérées dans les critères comme étant acceptables pour l’exonération d’un prêt d’études; d) pour chaque cas en c), combien de prêts ont-ils été exonérés pour chaque raison depuis le 4 novembre 2015?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1041 --
M. Daniel Blaikie:
En ce qui concerne la Loi visant à accroître la responsabilité de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada (L.C. 2013, ch. 18) et le pouvoir du Conseil du Trésor de considérer les membres civils de la GRC comme des fonctionnaires nommés aux termes de la Loi sur l’emploi dans la fonction publique: a) quel est le détail et le statut des unités civiles, y compris le groupe de classification de membre civil actuel et le groupe de classification de la fonction publique, en indiquant pour chacune (i) si elle est considérée, (ii) la date de considération, (iii) la section locale attribuée, (iv) la convention collective; b) quel processus régit la considération et la classification et, dans chaque cas, (i) des membres civils ont-ils été consultés au cours dudit processus, (ii) que comporte la décision de classification et qui y participe, (iii) que comporte l’attribution de la section locale et qui y participe; c) qu’entend faire le gouvernement relativement aux écarts avant et après la considération des membres civils en ce qui concerne leurs (i) salaires, (ii) avantages sociaux, (ii) autres éléments de l’analyse coût-avantage?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1042 --
M. Daniel Blaikie:
En ce qui concerne le financement pour le sous-sous-programme de formation linguistique du ministère de l’Immigration, des Réfugiés et de la Citoyenneté (3.1.1.1 des tableaux électroniques du PM -- sous-programmes): a) pour 2015, 2016 et 2017, ventilé par année, quel est ou était le budget; b) pour 2015, 2016 et 2017, ventilé par année et province, quel est ou était le budget pour le niveau 1 et le niveau 2 pour chaque province, ventilé par niveau; c) comment sont prises les décisions quant au changement du financement pour les divers niveaux en matière de formation; d) quels ont été les motifs de la suppression du financement de la formation de niveau 2 pour les organismes au Manitoba?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1043 --
M. John Brassard:
En ce qui concerne la distribution de drapeaux et d’articles divers pour la Fête du Canada par le ministère du Patrimoine canadien par l’entremise des bureaux des députés: a) combien de drapeaux ont été distribués ou le seront selon les intentions du gouvernement, ventilés selon leur type, y compris (i) de grands drapeaux du Canada en nylon pour mât porte-drapeau (90 cm x 180 cm), (ii) de petits drapeaux du Canada en nylon pour dessus de bureau (30 cm x 15 cm) dotés d’un support plastique, (iii) de grands drapeaux en nylon du 125e anniversaire du Canada pour mât porte-drapeau (90 cm x 180 cm); b) parmi les éléments en a), depuis le 1er janvier 2017, combien ont été remis (i) à chaque bureau de député libéral, (ii) à chaque bureau de député conservateur, (iii) à chaque bureau de député néo-démocrate, (iv) à chaque bureau de député du Bloc québécois, (v) à chaque bureau de député du Parti vert?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1045 --
M. Blake Richards:
En ce qui concerne les publications commanditées par le gouvernement sur les médias sociaux (Facebook, Instagram et Twitter), y compris celles qui sont publiées par des organismes fédéraux, des sociétés d’État et d’autres entités gouvernementales depuis le 4 novembre 2015: a) quel est le montant d’argent dépensé pour ces publications; b) quelle est la description et quel est l’objectif de chaque publication commanditée; c) pour chaque publication commanditée, quels sont les détails, notamment (i) la date, (ii) les données analytiques, le nombre de visionnements et la portée, (iii) les détails concernant la tranche d’âge visée?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1046 --
M. Tony Clement:
En ce qui concerne les déclarations du ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile le 8 mai 2017, et plus particulièrement qu’« un passage irrégulier à la frontière n’est pas un laissez-passer pour le Canada », ventilé par mois, au cours des 12 derniers mois: a) quel est le délai moyen entre l’arrivée d’un demandeur d’asile au Canada et le rendu de la décision de la Commission de l’immigration et du statut de réfugié (CISR); b) pour chacune des décisions en a), (i) combien d’entre elles étaient positives, (ii) combien d’entre elles étaient négatives; c) parmi les demandeurs d’asile mentionnés en a), combien d’entre eux sont arrivés en suivant « un passage irrégulier »; d) combien des personnes mentionnées en c) ont reçu une (i) décision positive de la CISR, (ii) décision négative de la CISR; e) parmi les personnes qui ont reçu une réponse négative de la CISR, quel était le délai moyen entre le rendu de la décision et le moment de l’exécution du renvoi par l’Agence canadienne des services frontaliers; f) quel était le délai moyen avant le renvoi des personnes arrivées en suivant « un passage irrégulier »?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1048 --
Mme Kelly Block:
En ce qui concerne le plan d’entreprise 2016-2020 de VIA Rail: a) combien de locomotives et de wagons seront mis hors service en (i) 2017, (ii) 2018, (iii) 2019, (iv) 2020; b) quel effet ces mises hors service auront-elles d’ici 2020 sur les niveaux de service de VIA Rail; c) quels plans ont été mis en place en vue du remplacement des locomotives et des wagons?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1049 --
M. Robert Aubin:
En ce qui concerne l’arrêt et la vente du navire de la Garde côtière canadienne (NGCC) Tracy par la Garde côtière canadienne: a) quels étaient les postes occupés par les gestionnaires qui ont planifié l'arrêt du NGCC Tracy; b) est-ce que le prix réel du NGCC Tracy, incluant les investissements du gouvernement fédéral, a été établi avant sa mise en vente et quels sont les détails de cette évaluation, ventilés par (i) valeur évaluée du NGCC Tracy, (ii) valeur des investissements du gouvernement fédéral dans des réparations liées au NGCC Tracy, effectuées entre son acquisition et sa mise en rade, incluant le nom des sous-traitants aux réparations; c) depuis le début du fonctionnement du NGCC Tracy jusqu’à sa vente, quel a été le budget annuel, ventilé par année, attribué spécifiquement au NGCC Tracy; d) avant l’arrêt du NGCC Tracy, est-ce qu’une planification du coût de l’appel d’offres a été effectuée; e) quel est le nom des compagnies soumissionnaires à l’appel d’offres du gouvernement concernant la vente du NGCC Tracy, ventilé par (i) noms des compagnies, (ii) prix de l’offre, (iii) date de la soumission de l’offre; f) combien de rencontres ont eu lieu entre le gouvernement et les compagnies soumissionnaires à l’appel d’offres, ventilé par (i) noms des compagnies, (ii) date de la rencontre, (iii) départements et titres des représentants du gouvernement présents lors de ces rencontres, (iv) postes des représentants des compagnies soumissionnaires présents lors de ces rencontres; g) combien d’anciens membres de l’équipage du NGCC Tracy ont quitté la Garde côtière canadienne après l’arrêt du NGCC Tracy, ventilé par (i) postes, (ii) relocalisation dans d’autres postes, (iii) pensions ainsi que l'énoncé des indemnités de départ, (iv) tout autres avantages supplémentaires à la pension fédérale qu'ils ont reçus; h) avant l’arrêt du NGCC Tracy, quel était le coût de fonctionnement annuel des opérations de balisage réalisées par le NGCC Tracy; i) y avait-il un budget alloué directement et uniquement aux opérations du navire dans la planification financière de la région des Laurentides; j) avant l’arrêt du NGCC Tracy, est-ce que la Garde côtière canadienne avait prévu un appel d’offres afin que les opérations de balisage soient effectuées par une entreprise privée; k) quel était le prix des opérations de balisage exigé par les soumissionnaires à l’appel d’offres; l) est-ce qu’un navire supplémentaire avait été prévu afin de remplacer les opérations de balisage du NGCC Tracy dans son secteur d'opération; m) entre novembre 2016 et mars 2017, quel navire de la Garde côtière canadienne a réalisé les opérations de balisage entre Québec et Montréal; n) quel était le coût annuel des frais de réparation des aéroglisseurs basés à Trois-Rivières avant l’arrêt du NGCC Tracy; o) est-ce que des limitations fonctionnelles avaient été émises par la Garde côtière canadienne sur l’utilisation des aéroglisseurs; p) est-ce que des lettres avaient été transmises au personnel sur les limitations fonctionnelles des aéroglisseurs; q) quel était le coût annuel des frais de réparation des aéroglisseurs basés à Trois-Rivières après l’arrêt du NGCC Tracy; r) après l’arrêt du NGCC Tracy, quel a été le coût des réparations du NGCC Martha L. Black; s) est-ce que le NGCC Martha L. Black est actuellement opérationnel; t) combien de mois le NGCC Martha L. Black a-t-il été opérationnel et non opérationnel entre janvier 2010 et mars 2017; u) quel est le rang du commandant de la région du Centre et de l’Arctique de la Garde côtière canadienne qui a fait la demande d'acheter le NGCC Tracy après son arrêt et le nom de la compagnie maritime associée?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1050 --
Mme Rachael Harder:
En ce qui concerne la déclaration du ministre de l’Infrastructure et des Collectivités faite en Chambre le 9 mai 2017 selon laquelle les investissements du gouvernement en infrastructure visent à réduire le temps pendant lequel la population n’est pas productive: a) qu’est-ce que le gouvernement considère comme du temps non productif; b) quelles sont les répercussions hebdomadaires moyennes du temps non productif sur l’économie canadienne; c) quelle est la quantité hebdomadaire moyenne de temps non productif, par personne; d) combien d’emplois ne sont pas créés, sur une base hebdomadaire, en raison du temps non productif; e) quelle sera la réduction des répercussions du temps non productif sur l’économie canadienne le gouvernement prévoit-il, particulièrement à l’issue des dépenses en infrastructure; f) quelle sera la réduction des répercussions du temps non productif, par personne le gouvernement prévoit-il, particulièrement à l’issue des dépenses en infrastructure?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1051 --
Mme Rachael Harder:
En ce qui concerne la Banque de l’infrastructure du Canada proposée: a) à combien de reprises le premier ministre a-t-il rencontré des investisseurs potentiels, dont BlackRock et son président-directeur général, entre le 4 novembre 2015 et le 1er mai 2017; b) à combien de reprises le personnel du premier ministre a-t-il rencontré des investisseurs potentiels, dont BlackRock et son président-directeur général, entre le 4 novembre 2015 et le 1er mai 2017; c) à combien de reprises les ministres du Cabinet ou leurs employés ont-ils rencontré des investisseurs potentiels, dont BlackRock et son président-directeur général, entre le 4 novembre 2015 et le 1er mai 2017; d) pour chaque rencontre en a), b), et c), quels sont les détails concernant (i) la date de la rencontre, (ii) le nom de l’organisation, (iii) le nom de l’investisseur potentiel, (iv) son poste ou son titre, (v) la demande précise ou l’offre d’investissement potentiel (en dollars canadiens), (vi) l’ordre du jour de la réunion ou les sujets abordés lors de celle-ci; e) le premier ministre détient-il des investissements qui pourraient être avantagés directement ou indirectement par la banque et, le cas échéant, ceux-ci ont-ils été divulgués au commissaire aux conflits d’intérêts et à l’éthique; f) si la réponse en e) est affirmative, quelle a été la réponse du commissaire; g) des ministres du Cabinet détiennent-ils des investissements qui pourraient être avantagés directement ou indirectement par la banque et, le cas échéant, ceux-ci ont-ils été divulgués au commissaire aux conflits d’intérêts et à l’éthique; h) si la réponse en g) est affirmative, quelle a été la réponse du commissaire?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1053 --
Mme Anne Minh-Thu Quach:
En ce qui concerne le Kathryn Spirit, navire échoué à Beauharnois: a) depuis 2011, quels sont tous les contrats liés à l’épave octroyés par le gouvernement, ventilés par (i) année, (ii) nom du fournisseur, (iii) description des services offerts, (iv) date de début et durée du contrat, (v) valeur du contrat, (vi) fournisseur unique ou appel d’offres; b) par rapport au contrat accordé au Groupe Saint-Pierre par le gouvernement le 9 novembre 2016 pour la construction du batardeau, (i) pourquoi le gouvernement a-t-il choisi de procéder avec un appel d’offres de gré à gré, (ii) quelles autres entreprises ont été contactées pour ce contrat par le gouvernement, (iii) quelle est la liste de toutes les autres propositions reçues par le gouvernement, (iv) quelle est la définition offerte par le gouvernement pour expliquer des « circonstances exceptionnelles » ou des « mesures d’urgence »; c) par rapport à l’ancien propriétaire du Kathryn Spirit, la compagnie Reciclajes Ecológicos Maritimos, combien de bateaux la compagnie a-t-elle envoyés au Canada, ventilés par (i) année, (ii) nom du navire, (iii) catégorie (vraquier, remorqueur, etc.), (iv) mission du navire; d) pour chaque bateau en c), combien le gouvernement a-t-il dû débourser des fonds publics, ventilé par (i) année, (ii) nom du navire, (iii) total des frais encourus par le gouvernement, (iv) raison justifiant ces dépenses du gouvernement (réparations, remorquage, rapatriement d’équipage, etc.)?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1054 --
M. Peter Kent:
En ce qui concerne la décision du gouvernement de ramener de 10 000 $ à 5 500 $ le montant maximum des cotisations admissibles à un compte d’épargne libre d’impôt (CELI): a) quelle est l’incidence ou l’incidence projetée de ce changement sur les recettes fédérales annuelles à compter de 2016; b) quel est le montant admissible total que les Canadiens ont cotisé à un CELI au cours de (i) l’année d’imposition 2015, (ii) l’année d’imposition 2016?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1055 --
M. John Nater:
En ce qui concerne la candidate retenue par le premier ministre pour le poste de commissaire aux langues officielles, dont l’annonce de la nomination a été faite le 15 mai 2017: a) à quelle date un ministre ou le représentant d’un ministre a-t-il informé Madeleine Meilleur qu’elle serait probablement la candidate retenue par le premier ministre; b) comment Madeleine Meilleur a-t-elle été informée qu’elle était la candidate retenue par le premier ministre; c) qui a fait savoir à Madeleine Meilleur qu’elle était la candidate retenue par le premier ministre; d) quels sont les détails des échanges que le gouvernement a eus avec Madeleine Meilleur au sujet de sa nomination à tout poste au sein du gouvernement depuis le 4 novembre 2015, y compris (i) les postes dont il a été question, (ii) les dates des échanges, (iii) les modes de communication, (iv) les noms des ministres et des représentants de ministre concernés; e) depuis le 4 novembre 2015, quels ministres ont recommandé la candidature de Madeleine Meilleur en vue d’une éventuelle nomination au sein du gouvernement et quels sont les détails de chacune de ces recommandations, y compris (i) la date, (ii) le poste recommandé, (iii) tout autre détail pertinent?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1056 --
M. Robert Aubin:
En ce qui concerne l’incident occasionné par le déclenchement des vagues de deux mètres à Yamachiche: a) à quelle date Transports Canada et Pêches et Océans Canada ont pris connaissance de l’incident; b) à quelle date Transports Canada a-t-il déclenché une enquête; c) quel est l’échéancier de l’enquête; d) est-ce que le rapport et les résultats de l’enquête seront accessibles au public et publiés sur le site web de Transports Canada; e) est-ce que des inspecteurs sont affectés à l’enquête; f) dans le cas échéant, quel est le nombre d’inspecteurs affectés à l’enquête; g) quel est le mandat assigné aux inspecteurs; h) quelles sont les sanctions prévues par Transports Canada; i) est-ce que des indemnisations sont prévues pour les victimes; j) quelles sont les indemnisations prévues pour les victimes; k) à partir de quelle date les indemnisations sont prévues d’être versées aux victimes; l) quelles sont les pièces des dossiers de l’enquête ventilées par numéro de dossier; m) combien de rencontres ont eu lieu entre les fonctionnaires de Transports Canada et les fonctionnaires de Pêches et Océans Canada, ventilées par (i) dates, (ii) départements et titres des représentants du gouvernement présents lors de ces rencontres, (iii) sujets discutés lors de ces rencontres; n) combien de rencontres ont eu lieu entre les fonctionnaires de Transport Canada et la corporation des Pilotes du St-Laurent Central, ventilées par (i) dates, (ii) départements et titres des représentants du gouvernement présents lors de ces rencontres, (iii) sujets discutés lors de ces rencontres?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1057 --
M. Tom Lukiwski:
En ce qui concerne la correspondance relative à l’achat de chasseurs à réaction, depuis le 4 novembre 2015: a) quels sont les détails de toute la correspondance entre le ministre de la Défense nationale et Boeing, y compris (i) la date, (ii) le titre, (iii) le destinataire, (iv) le numéro de dossier, (v) le résumé, si possible; b) quels sont les détails de toute la correspondance entre le ministre de la Défense nationale et Bombardier, y compris (i) la date, (ii) le titre, (iii) le destinataire, (iv) le numéro de dossier, (v) le résumé, si possible?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1058 --
Mme Lisa Raitt:
En ce qui concerne la lutte du gouvernement contre la contrefaçon d’œuvres d’art: a) quelle est la position officielle du gouvernement concernant la contrefaçon d’œuvres d’art; b) le gouvernement a-t-il adopté des règles interdisant l’utilisation de fonds fédéraux pour louer ou acheter des œuvres d’art contrefaites; c) que fait l’Agence des services frontaliers du Canada lorsqu’elle découvre des œuvres d’art ou d’autres biens contrefaits à un poste frontalier ou à un autre point d’entrée?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1059 --
Mme Rachel Blaney:
En ce qui concerne le problème de la récolte des mollusques dans les zones 15 et 16 de la Colombie-Britannique: a) le ministère des Pêches et des Océans a-t-il constaté ces dernières années une hausse de la récolte sur les plages locales et, dans l’affirmative, a-t-il (i) quantifié cette hausse, (ii) déterminé si celle-ci était problématique, (iii) recommandé des mesures, (iv) appliqué ces mesures; b) si la réponse en a) est affirmative, quels sont le libellé et le statut de ces recommandations; c) le Ministère a-t-il observé une hausse de la récolte illégale sur les plages locales l’an dernier et, dans l’affirmative, a-t-il (i) quantifié cette hausse, (ii) déterminé si celle-ci était problématique, (iii) recommandé des mesures, (iv) appliqué ces mesures; d) si la réponse en c) est affirmative, quels sont le libellé et le statut de ces recommandations; e) le Ministère a-t-il recensé une récolte excessive et, dans l’affirmative, (i) comment en est-il arrivé à cette conclusion, (ii) le gouvernement fournit-il des mesures de contingentement; f) qui détient l’autorité au Ministère de demander (i) une évaluation des stocks, (ii) un avis de gestion ou un relevé de la biomasse; g) le gouvernement possède-t-il des données précises sur la biodiversité ou la biomasse des mollusques en Colombie-Britannique; h) le gouvernement possède-t-il des données précises sur la biodiversité ou la biomasse des mollusques dans les zones 15 et 16; i) y a-t-il eu une réduction de la biodiversité ou de la biomasse des mollusques dans les zones 15 et 16; j) si le dernier relevé de la biomasse dans la région remonte à plus de deux ans, le Ministère en mènera-t-il un autre l’été prochain et, dans la négative, pour quelles raisons; k) le gouvernement a-t-il conduit des études sur la quantité et la disponibilité des mollusques et, (i) dans la négative, pour quelles raisons, (ii) combien d’études ont été effectuées et laquelle d’entre elles est la plus récente, (iii) quelles sont les conclusions et recommandations des études en k)(ii), (iv) quelles recommandations le gouvernement a-t-il formulées à l’égard de l’utilisation et de la gestion de cette ressource, (v) ces recommandations ont-elles été suivies et y a-t-il eu des difficultés dans l’application de ces recommandations; l) a-t-on mené une analyse sur la durabilité de la récolte actuelle et, dans l’affirmative, (i) la plage peut-elle soutenir le même niveau de récolte, (ii) la plage de Powell River peut-elle soutenir le même niveau de récolte, (iii) les zones 15 et 16 peuvent-elles soutenir le même niveau de récolte; m) existe-t-il une évaluation qui détermine les niveaux soutenables de récolte maximaux et, dans l’affirmative, quels sont-ils; n) le gouvernement a-t-il entrepris une analyse sur les conditions de température de l’eau nécessaires au développement de certains mollusques et, dans l’affirmative, (i) le taux de fécondité sera-t-il affecté, (ii) quelle recommandation ou quel avis de gestion le Ministère a-t-il formulé, (iii) quelle prévision a-t-on faite pour les deux prochaines années concernant les zones 15 et 16, (iv) le taux de fécondité annuel de chaque espèce est-il recensé, (v) des évaluations sont-elles menées régulièrement, (vi) à combien est fixé le seuil pour qualifier une récolte d’insoutenable; o) combien de personnes ont demandé leur permis de pêche en eaux à marées auprès des agents (i) l’an dernier, (ii) les cinq dernières années, (iii) les dix dernières années; p) parmi les personnes en o), combien ont été prises sans leur permis de pêche en eaux à marées et combien de contournements ont été inspectés (i) l’an dernier, (ii) les cinq dernières années, (iii) les dix dernières années; q) quels types de sanctions ont été imposées; r) combien d’avertissements ont été émis; s) combien de personnes ont reçu une amende ces dix dernières années, ventilé par zone, (i) à combien s’élève l’amende moyenne au cours des dix dernières années, ventilé par zone, (ii) combien d’amendes par espèce a-t-on infligées, (iii) quelles sont les dix infractions à la Loi sur les pêches les plus courantes; t) quelles sont les espèces les plus récoltées illégalement; u) de quelles mesures le gouvernement dispose-t-il pour décourager les gens de commettre de telles infractions; v) le gouvernement a-t-il entrepris une analyse pour étudier l’efficacité des peines infligées pour les infractions aux termes de la Loi sur les pêches et, dans l’affirmative, quels sont les résultats de cette analyse; w) le Ministère a-t-il établi la nécessité d’autres sanctions et, dans l’affirmative, (i) de quelles sanctions s’agit-il, (ii) quelles mesures ont été prises, (iii) à quelle fréquence le gouvernement revoit-il ses politiques et procédures concernant les amendes et les peines infligées pour les infractions aux termes de la Loi sur les pêches; x) le Ministère a-t-il établi la nécessité de prévoir plus d’éducation pour limiter les contournements et, dans l’affirmative, (i) quelles mesures ont été prises, (ii) quelle est la proportion du budget du Ministère consacré à cette éducation, (iii) combien d’employés et de responsables sont impliqués dans l’éducation, (iv) combien d’heures les agents des pêches consacrent-ils par semaine et par mois à l’éducation, (v) où donne-t-on cette éducation, (vi) quels genres d’outils et de moyens sont utilisés pour transmettre l’information, (vii) utilise-t-on les médias, les réseaux sociaux, les quotidiens et des affiches, (viii) quel a été le budget pour l’éducation au cours des cinq dernières années; y) combien d’appels le Ministère a-t-il reçus concernant la récolte de mollusques et (i) ce nombre a-t-il augmenté dans les dix dernières années, (ii) quel est le suivi associé à ces appels, (iii) combien d’enquêtes ont découlé de ces appels; z) les règlements prévoient-ils de la souplesse dans des cas précis et des mesures devant être adoptées concernant des situations exceptionnelles comme d’importants afflux de touristes, des excursions spécialisées dans la récolte et l’augmentation des populations et (i) quels cas précis les règlements couvrent-ils, (ii) quelles sont les solutions possibles envisagées pour chaque cas précis, (iii) des dispositions spéciales sont-elles en place en cas de récolte excessive; aa) quels sont les plans du Ministère, en collaboration avec d’autres ministères et organismes, pour aborder et atténuer la tension et les problèmes raciaux en ce qui concerne la récolte des mollusques; bb) combien y a-t-il d’équivalents temps plein (ETP) d’agents des pêches (i) affectés à chaque zone de gestion dans la région du Pacifique, (ii) combien y en avait-il il y a cinq ans, (iii) a-t-on réduit le nombre d’agents des pêches en charge du contrôle sur place au cours des cinq dernières années; cc) quelles sont les perspectives d’emploi du gouvernement pour les agents des pêches pour les deux prochaines années; dd) la question de la récolte excessive de mollusques est-elle une priorité; ee) les biologistes en gestion des ressources au Ministère ont-ils soulevé des préoccupations concernant la récolte excessive; ff) les biologistes en gestion des ressources au Ministère ont-ils soulevé des préoccupations concernant la récolte excessive dans les zones 15 et 16; gg) le gestionnaire régional des ressources responsables des invertébrés a-t-il soulevé des préoccupations dans les zones 15 et 16; hh) combien de fois a-t-on discuté de cette question avec le gouvernement et la question a-t-elle été soulevée auprès du Ministre ou du sous-ministre et, dans l’affirmative, le Ministre a-t-il fourni une réponse et, dans l’affirmative, quelle était cette réponse; ii) y a-t-il eu des séances d’information qui donnaient des renseignements détaillés sur la question et pour chaque document ou dossier d’information qui a été préparé quelle est (i) la date, (ii) le titre et le sujet abordé, (iii) le numéro de référence interne du Ministère; jj) en ce qui concerne la réunion du Ministère avec les représentants de la Nation des Tla’amin qui devait servir à établir les méthodes d’évaluation des stocks (i) la réunion a-t-elle eu lieu, (ii) dans la négative, quand aura-t-elle lieu, (iii) dans l’affirmative, quelles méthodes ont été établies et quels ont été les résultats de la réunion, (iv) quelles sont les recommandations, (v) quel est l’échéancier pour procéder à l’évaluation des stocks; kk) le gouvernement prévoit-il qu'il y aura une réunion pour donner plus de voix aux locaux dans le règlement des quotas locaux de pêche; ll) le gouvernement prévoit-il que le personnel local aura plus de pouvoir dans la gestion des quotas en kk); mm) le gouvernement prévoit-il y aura-t-il une ouverture de la part du Ministère pour l’établissement de limites locales et, dans l’affirmative, (i) quand cela se produira-t-il, (ii) quel sera le processus, (iii) comment la Nation des Tla’amin pourra-t-elle participer au processus, (iv) quel genre de pouvoir la Nation des Tla’amin peut-elle avoir (pouvoir discrétionnaire, pouvoir de sanction); nn) à quelle fréquence la réglementation régissant la récolte récréative est-elle passée en revue?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1060 --
Mme Rachel Blaney:
En ce qui concerne le déversement d’hydrocarbures à la pisciculture Burdwood Fish Farm: a) combien de mètres carrés d’eau ont été touchés par le déversement; b) le gouvernement est-il en mesure de déterminer la quantité d’hydrocarbures absorbés par les matelas absorbants et, dans l’affirmative, quelle est cette quantité; c) le gouvernement est-il en mesure de déterminer la quantité d’hydrocarbures sur le plancher océanique et, dans l’affirmative, quelle est cette quantité; d) le gouvernement est-il en mesure de déterminer la quantité d’hydrocarbures qui se sont évaporés et, dans l’affirmative, quelle est cette quantité; e) le gouvernement est-il en mesure de déterminer lui-même la quantité d’hydrocarbures déversés; f) combien de matelas ont été placés (i) dans les enclos d’élevage, (ii) à l’extérieur des enclos; g) est-ce qu’un rapport a été produit ou une étude réalisée sur l’intervention et, dans l’affirmative, quels en sont les résultats; h) combien de fois cette question a-t-elle été abordée avec le gouvernement, et la question a-t-elle été soulevée auprès du ministre des Pêches, des Océans et de la Garde côtière canadienne ou de son sous-ministre et, dans l’affirmative, le Ministre a-t-il fourni une réponse et, le cas échéant, quelle a été cette réponse; i) l’incident a-t-il fait l’objet de documents d’information détaillés et, pour chaque document d’information ou dossier produit, quels sont (i) la date, (ii) le titre et le sujet, (iii) le numéro de suivi interne du Ministère; j) quels sont les noms des responsables de l’intervention sur le lieu du déversement (i) à la Garde côtière canadienne, (ii) au ministère de l’Environnement, (iii) à la Western Marine Company, (iv) au ministère des Transports, (v) au ministère des Pêches et des Océans (MPO); k) quelles seront, d’après le gouvernement, les conséquences à long terme du déversement d’hydrocarbures; l) le gouvernement dispose-t-il de données précises concernant la biodiversité ou la biomasse des mollusques et crustacés dans cette zone; m) à quand remonte le dernier relevé de biomasse dans le secteur; n) si le dernier relevé de biomasse dans le secteur date de plus de deux ans, le MPO effectuera-t-il un tel relevé cet été et, dans le cas contraire, pourquoi pas; o) le MPO a-t-il constaté une contamination des palourdes ou autres espèces et, dans l’affirmative, (i) comment le MPO a-t-il effectué ce constat, (ii) le gouvernement prend-il des mesures en vue de restreindre la récolte, (iii) quelles sont les recommandations que le gouvernement a formulées à l’égard de l’exploitation et de la gestion de cette ressource, (iv) ces recommandations ont-elles été suivies, ou des manquements ont-ils eu lieu dans leur application; p) combien d’études ont été réalisées au sujet du déversement et (i) laquelle est la plus récente, (ii) quels sont les détails, les conclusions et les recommandations de ces études; q) en ce qui a trait au prélèvement d’échantillons après le déversement, (i) combien d’échantillons a-t-on demandé de prélever, (ii) combien d’échantillons ont été prélevés, (iii) combien d’échantillons ont été analysés; r) pourquoi le nombre d’échantillons a-t-il été réduit, (i) qui a pris cette décision, (ii) pourquoi cette décision a-t-elle été prise; s) quels sont les résultats des échantillons en q); t) dans combien d’années le gouvernement croit-il qu’il sera possible de récolter et de consommer les palourdes; u) combien de palourdes ont péri à cause du déversement; v) quelles sont les répercussions du déversement sur les poissons dans les enclos et (i) combien de poissons ont été touchés, (ii) les poissons de Cermaq seront-ils mis en marché et, dans l’affirmative, le MPO ou d’autres organismes ont-ils été avisés de cette décision; w) les enclos à poissons ont-ils été priorisés pendant le nettoyage et, dans l’affirmative, pour quelle raison; x) des pressions ont-elles été exercées pour que les enclos à poissons soient nettoyés en premier et, dans l’affirmative, par qui; y) quelles sont les conséquences du déversement sur les poissons sauvages; z) quelles en sont les conséquences sur le plancher océanique; aa) comment le gouvernement pense-t-il que les Premières Nations et d’autres groupes devront surveiller et évaluer le secteur à l’avenir; bb) quelles sont les ressources à l’aide desquelles les Première Nations pourront surveiller et évaluer le secteur à l’avenir; cc) de quelle façon le gouvernement a-t-il collaboré avec les Premières Nations sur le terrain; dd) est-il arrivé que les Premières Nations se soient vu restreindre l’accès et, dans l’affirmative, quelle en était la justification; ee) une enquête a-t-elle été menée sur la cause du déversement et, dans l’affirmative, (i) qui a mené l’enquête, (ii) quels ont été les résultats de l’enquête, (iii) s’agissait-il d’un manque de diligence ou de formation, (iv) quelles ont été les recommandations de cette enquête, (v) ces recommandations ont-elles été mises en œuvre; ff) quelle formation complémentaire a-t-on prévue afin de prévenir un tel accident; gg) quelles autres mesures ont été prévues afin de prévenir un tel accident; hh) quels ont été les coûts financiers pour (i) la Garde côtière canadienne, (ii) le ministère de l’Environnement, (iii) la Western Marine Company, (iv) le ministère des Transports, (v) le MPO, (vi) toute autre partie; ii) les coûts en hh) ont-ils été remboursés par Cermaq ou par quelque autre partie; jj) quels principes du pollueur payeur ont été appliqués par voie de conséquence; kk) comment le gouvernement ou Cermaq ont-ils proposé de remédier à la perte d’une importante source de nourriture pour la Première Nation Kwikwasat’inuxw Haxwa’mis; ll) quelle indemnisation a été mise en place ou prévue pour remplacer le revenu perdu par la Première Nation; mm) une évaluation des impacts environnementaux a-t-elle été effectuée et, dans l’affirmative, (i) quels en sont les résultats, (ii) quelles en sont les recommandations, (iii) ces recommandations ont-elles été mises en œuvre; nn) combien de suivis le MPO a-t-il effectués; oo) combien d’échantillons supplémentaires seront prélevés au cours des cinq prochaines années, d’après les projections du gouvernement; pp) le gouvernement s’attend-il à ce que les échantillons en oo) soient communiqués (i) publiquement, (ii) aux Premières Nations; qq) un calendrier a-t-il été établi pour le prélèvement des échantillons en oo)?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1063 --
M. Saroya (Markham—Unionville):
En ce qui concerne la déclaration faite par la ministre de l’Environnement et du Changement climatique le 18 mai 2017, soit que la tarification du carbone est la façon la plus économique et la plus efficace de réduire les émissions: a) quels sont les autres moyens de réduire les émissions; b) pour chaque moyen en a), quel est le coût par citoyen canadien; c) pour chaque moyen en a), comment a-t-on mesuré l’efficacité à réduire les émissions; d) pour ce qui est de la taxe sur le carbone ou de la tarification du carbone retenue par le gouvernement, quel est le coût par citoyen canadien?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1065 --
M. Dave MacKenzie:
En ce qui concerne les informations supplémentaires publiées dans le document technique relatif à la taxe sur le carbone ou à la tarification du carbone le 18 mai 2017: a) quel montant d'argent lié à la taxe sur le carbone sera recueilli par l’Agence du revenu du Canada, par année et par province; b) selon les projections du gouvernement, quel montant d’argent sera redistribué aux provinces, par année et par province; c) par rapport aux fonds en b), comment seront-ils redistribués aux provinces (p. ex. chèque envoyé à chacun des résidents de la province, transfert au gouvernement provincial qui pourra décider de la façon dont le montant est investi, etc.); d) combien de fonctionnaires seront embauchés pour administrer le nouveau système de tarification du carbone dans les ministères suivants: (i) Environnement et Changement climatique Canada, (ii) Agence du revenu du Canada, (iii) Finances Canada, (iv) Bureau du Conseil Privé, (v) autres ministères fédéraux; e) combien de fonctionnaires actuels seront transférés à des postes visant à administrer le nouveau système de tarification du carbone dans les ministères suivants : (i) Environnement et Changement climatique Canada, (ii) Agence du revenu du Canada, (iii) Finances Canada, (iv) Bureau du Conseil Privé; (v) autres ministères fédéraux; f) combien coûtera la mise en place des fonctionnaires requis pour administrer le système de tarification du carbone mentionnés en d) et e)?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1066 --
M. Charlie Angus:
En ce qui concerne l’initiative « l’enfant d’abord » du principe de Jordan: a) combien de personnes ont reçu des services avec les fonds de cette initiative; b) quels sont les détails relatifs aux personnes en a), ventilés par région et par catégories de services de santé offerts?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1067 --
M. Charlie Angus:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses du gouvernement aux fins des Services d’aide aux élèves du Programme d’enseignement primaire et secondaire d’Affaires autochtones et du Nord Canada: a) pour chaque région et pour chaque exercice depuis 1984-1985, quels montants mensuels, trimestriels ou autres montants périodiques ont été attribués, par élève, pour le logement des élèves fréquentant des écoles hors réserves; b) pour chaque région et pour chaque exercice depuis 1984-1985, quels montants mensuels, trimestriels ou autres montants périodiques ont été attribués, par élève, au titre des allocations d’aide financière aux élèves fréquentant des écoles hors réserves?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1068 --
M. Steven Blaney:
En ce qui concerne les tests psychométriques effectués par le gouvernement depuis le 1er janvier 2016: a) pour quels postes ou nominations le gouvernement exige-t-il un test psychométrique avant l’embauche ou la nomination; b) combien de postulants ou de candidats possibles ont reçu des tests psychométriques; c) combien de candidats au poste de commissaire aux langues officielles du Canada ont reçu des tests psychométriques; d) comment les tests psychométriques pour le poste de commissaire aux langues officielles ont-ils été administrés et notés (note alphabétique, note de passage, embauche recommandée, etc.); e) comment les résultats des tests psychométriques de Madeleine Meilleur se comparent-ils à ceux d’autres candidats; f) quelle entreprise ou personne a procédé aux tests psychométriques mentionnés en d)?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1072 --
Mme Sheila Malcolmson:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses fédérales dans la circonscription de Nanaimo—Ladysmith, au cours des exercices 2015-2016 et 2016-2017: a) quelle est la liste des subventions, prêts, contributions et contrats accordés par le gouvernement, ventilée par (i) ministère et organisme, (ii) municipalité, (iii) nom du bénéficiaire, (iv) montant reçu, (v) programme dans le cadre duquel la dépense a été effectuée, (vi) date; b) pour ce qui est du Programme d’infrastructure communautaire de Canada 150, entre le lancement du Programme le 1er janvier 2015 et le 29 mai 2017, (i) quelles propositions provenant de la circonscription ont été présentées, (ii) quelles propositions provenant de la circonscription ont été approuvées?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1075 --
M. John Brassard:
En ce qui concerne l’utilisation de médicaments antipaludiques dans les Forces armées canadiennes, chaque année de 2003 au 9 mars 2017: a) quelles compagnies pharmaceutiques ont obtenu des contrats pour les médicaments antipaludiques administrés; b) quel était le coût unitaire de (i) 250 mg de méfloquine, (ii) 100 mg de doxycycline, (iii) 250/100 mg d’atovaquone-proguanil, (iv) 500 mg de phosphate de chloroquine (300 mg base)?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1077 --
Mme Dianne L. Watts:
En ce qui concerne le voyage du ministre du Commerce international aux Émirats arabes unis, au Qatar et en Inde au début de mars 2017: a) de qui était composée la délégation, à l’exclusion des journalistes et du personnel de la sécurité; b) quel était le titre de chaque membre de la délégation; c) quel était le contenu de l’itinéraire du Ministre; d) quels sont les détails de chaque réunion à laquelle le ministre a participé pendant ce voyage, notamment (i) la date, (ii) le résumé ou la description, (iii) les personnes présentes, y compris les organisations et la liste de leurs représentants, (iv) les sujets abordés, (v) le lieu; e) quels sont les détails de toutes les ententes ou de tous les accords signés pendant ce voyage?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1078 --
Mme Marilyn Gladu:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses du gouvernement depuis le 7 février 2017, sous le code d’article à l’échelle du gouvernement 3259 (Dépenses diverses, non classées ailleurs): quels sont les détails de chaque dépense, y compris (i) le nom du fournisseur, (ii) le montant, (iii) la date, (iv) la description des biens ou des services, (v) le numéro de dossier?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1079 --
M. Glen Motz:
En ce qui concerne les achats et les contrats du gouvernement liés à la prestation de services de recherche ou de rédaction de discours pour les ministres depuis le 1er mai 2017: a) quels sont les détails de chacun des contrats, y compris (i) la date de début et de fin, (ii) les parties contractantes, (iii) le numéro de dossier, (iv) la nature ou la description du travail, (v) le montant du contrat; b) quels sont, dans le cas d’un contrat de rédaction de discours, (i) la date, (ii) le lieu, (iii) l’auditoire ou l’événement auquel le discours était destiné, (iv) le nombre de discours à rédiger, (v) le prix facturé pour chaque discours?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1080 --
M. Phil McColeman:
En ce qui concerne le matériel préparé pour les ministres depuis le 10 avril 2017: pour chaque document d’information, mémoire ou dossier préparé, quels sont (i) la date, (ii) le titre ou l’objet, (iii) le numéro de suivi interne au ministère, (iv) le destinataire?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1081 --
M. Randall Garrison:
En ce qui concerne les périodes de service de l’honorable Harjit Singh Sajjan, ministre de la Défense nationale, dans l’armée canadienne en Afghanistan: a) à propos de ses conditions écrites d’emploi, de déploiement, de service, d’engagement ou toute autre condition de service ou d’emploi, quels emplois, postes ou fonctions M. Sajjan occupait-il pendant les périodes passées en Afghanistan, y compris s’ils ont été modifiés ou s’ils ont autrement évolué avec le temps; b) est-il exact, comme la commissaire aux conflits d’intérêts et à l’éthique, Mary Dawson, l’a signalé dans une lettre à M. Craig Scott le 27 février 2017 que M. Sajjan a dit à la commissaire qu’il avait été déployé comme réserviste en Afghanistan, où il était responsable de la formation des forces policières locales et, le cas échéant, son rôle se limitait-il à cela; c) si le rôle de M. Sajjan dépassait ce qu’il a dit à la commissaire, a-t il délibérément omis d’en faire part à la commissaire; d) lorsque le général David Fraser a fait transférer M. Sajjan de Kaboul à Kandahar, ou par la suite, quels ordres, instructions, nouvelles conditions de service ou autres, écrits ou verbaux, ont été donnés par le général Fraser à M. Sajjan à propos de son rôle à Kandahar; e) quels étaient les rôles de M. Sajjan en Afghanistan en ce qui concerne la communication, la collaboration, le mentorat, la formation, la prestation de conseils, l’aide, la coopération, ou toutes autres formes de rapports semblables auprès de la police nationale afghane (PNA), de la Direction nationale de la sécurité (DNS), de l’Armée nationale afghane (ANA), du gouverneur de Kandahar ou de toutes organisations informelles ou paramilitaires travaillant pour ou avec les quatre organismes susmentionnés; f) en combien d’occasions et à quelles dates M. Sajjan a-t-il assisté (i) à des réunions avec le Comité mixte de coordination (CMC) à Kandahar, ou (ii) à des réunions tenues le même jour que les réunions du CMC, auxquelles prenaient part une partie des personnes ayant aussi assisté aux réunions du CMC; g) quels étaient les rôles de M. Sajjan en ce qui concerne le CMC et toute autre réunion d’une partie des membres du CMC, et ces rôles consistaient-ils notamment à faciliter la circulation du renseignement de la Direction nationale de la sécurité aux militaires canadiens ou alliés, puis d’en faire rapport; h) parmi les propos du général David Fraser rapportés par David Pugliese (« Afghan service puts Defence Minister Sajjan in conflict of interest on detainees, say lawyers », [21 juin 2016] Ottawa Citizen), à savoir que « le brigadier général à la retraite David Fraser a déclaré que le travail de M. Sajjan à titre d’officier du renseignement ainsi que ses activités en Afghanistan ont aidé à jeter les bases d’une opération militaire ayant abouti à la mort ou la capture de plus de 1 500 insurgés », certains sont-ils faux et, si tel est le cas, pourquoi ou dans quelle mesure; i) parmi les propos tenus par Sean Maloney dans son livre « Fighting for Afghanistan: A Rogue Historian at War (Annapolis, MD, Naval Institute Press, 2011) dans l’extrait suivant: « Harj Sajjan a assisté à réunion de sécurité hebdomadaire et a appris que la réunion pouvait aussi devenir un outil. Au fil du temps, il a développé des liens avec tous les ‘acteurs’ de la sécurité à Kandahar », certains sont-ils faux et, si tel est le cas, pourquoi ou dans quelle mesure; j) parmi les propos que tient Sean Maloney dans l’extrait suivant de son livre: « À la suite des réunions avec le CMC, Harj a été en mesure de transmettre deux pages de renseignement de qualité à la Force opérationnelle ORION chaque semaine. Le renseignement était de la plus haute qualité », certains sont-ils faux et, si tel est le cas, pourquoi ou dans quelle mesure; k) parmi les propos que tient Sean Maloney dans l’extrait suivant de son livre : « La DNS canalisait la majeure partie de l’information vers le CMC; elle ne provenait donc pas uniquement des systèmes ou des ressources de l’OEF », certains sont-ils faux et, si tel est le cas, pourquoi ou dans quelle mesure; l) parmi les propos que tient Sean Maloney dans l’extrait suivant de son livre : « À partir de ce moment, Harj a transmis le renseignement directement aux forces opérationnelles AEGIS et ORION ainsi qu’au CRTS, accompagné de son analyse », certains sont-ils faux et, si tel est le cas, pourquoi ou dans quelle mesure; m) parmi les propos que tient Sean Maloney dans l’extrait suivant de son livre: « Mes responsabilités étaient vagues au départ. Le général Fraser m’a fait travailler avec Asadullah Khalid, gouverneur de la province de Kandahar. Mais j’ai aussi travaillé avec l’équipe de reconstruction provinciale afin de nous attaquer aux nouveaux problèmes de la police afghane », certains sont-ils faux et, si tel est le cas, pourquoi ou dans quelle mesure; n) Quand, dans un discours prononcé à New Delhi, le 18 avril 2017, M. Sajjan a déclaré, à partir d’un texte rédigé d’avance: « Pour ma première mission à Kandahar en 2006, j’ai été l’architecte de l’opération MEDUSA, qui a permis le retrait du champ de bataille de 1 500 combattants talibans », faisait-il allusion, en tout ou en partie, à son rôle de renseignement, qu’a salué le général David Fraser, commandant de l’Opération MEDUSA, tel qu’indiqué ci-dessus en h)?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1082 --
M. Pierre Poilievre:
En ce qui concerne la déclaration suivante du ministre de l’Infrastructure et des Collectivités au magazine Maclean’s, le 9 juin 2017: « Mon Ministère a approuvé plus de 2 900 projets représentant des investissements totaux de plus de 23 milliards de dollars depuis que notre gouvernement est entrée en fonction »: a) quels sont les détails des 2 900 projets, y compris (i) la description du projet, (ii) le montant de la contribution fédérale, (iii) l’endroit, (iv) la date d’achèvement prévue; b) parmi les projets indiqués en (a) combien ont concrètement débuté sur le terrain; c) parmi les projets ayant concrètement débuté sur le terrain, quelle a été la date de la cérémonie d’inauguration des travaux, ou la date du début des travaux?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1085 --
M. Brian Masse:
En ce qui concerne l'industrie automobile et manufacturière au Canada, a) le gouvernement a-t-il travaillé avec des entreprises internationales de cette industrie pour accroître l’investissement actuel dans l'industrie automobile ou en attirer de nouveaux sous la forme de nouvelles usines, de nouveaux produits ou de nouveaux emplois au Canada depuis 2015; b) le gouvernement envisage-t-il un investissement dans des installations nouvelles ou des friches industrielles dans l'industrie automobile et manufacturière au Canada; c) le Conseil du Partenariat pour le secteur canadien de l'automobile envisage-t-il un nouvel investissement et un investissement dans des installations nouvelles ou des friches industrielles dans l'industrie automobile et manufacturière au Canada; d) dans l’affirmative, quelles municipalités ont été envisagées?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1086 --
Mme Rachel Blaney:
En ce qui concerne le droit au logement et la nouvelle Stratégie nationale sur le logement: a) combien d’intervenants ont abordé ou défendu la question du droit au logement durant la campagne de consultation « Parlons logement »; b) quelle a été la réponse du gouvernement aux demandes mentionnées en a); c) le gouvernement a-t-il évalué comment une démarche du logement fondée sur les droits de la personne peut être reconnue et renforcée par le biais de lois et de politiques; d) le gouvernement a-t-il l’intention de reconnaître le droit au logement, et dans le cas contraire, pourquoi e) la Stratégie nationale sur le logement vise-t-elle à déterminer si nos lois, nos politiques et nos pratiques suffisent à prévenir (i) l’itinérance, (ii) les évictions forcées, (iii) la discrimination quant à la possession d’un logement adéquat; f) à quel moment l’examen indiqué en e) sera-t-il terminé; g) de quel ministère l’examen indiqué en e) relève-t-il; h) la Stratégie nationale sur le logement repose-t-elle sur une démarche fondée sur les droits de la personne, et dans le cas contraire, comment le gouvernement détermine-t-il le cadre approprié quant à (i) la responsabilisation, (ii) à une perspective cohérente allant au-delà des bâtiments, (iii) aux causes systémiques de l’insécurité en matière de logement; i) à combien de reprises a-t-on abordé la question du droit au logement avec le ministre ou le sous-ministre de la Famille, des Enfants et du Développement social, et le Ministre a-t-il fourni une réponse quant au droit au logement et son inclusion dans une Stratégie nationale sur le logement et, le cas échéant, quelle était cette réponse; j) a-t-on organisé des séances d’information détaillées sur le droit au logement et, pour chaque document ou dossier d’information préparé, quels en sont (i) la date, (ii) le titre et le sujet, (iii) le numéro de suivi interne du ministère; k) à combien de reprises le secrétaire parlementaire a-t-il soulevé la question du droit au logement auprès du Ministre; l) quels sont les obligations, les traités et autres instruments juridiques internationaux du Canada garantissant à tous les Canadiens le droit à un logement sûr ou sécuritaire ou adéquat ou abordable; m) pourquoi le Canada n’a-t-il jamais officiellement intégré les conventions internationales relatives au droit au logement; n) a-t-on jamais envisagé d’adopter une loi aux fins mentionnées en m), et dans le cas contraire, pourquoi; o) le gouvernement entend-il instituer une mesure de responsabilisation intégrée pour veiller à ce que la Stratégie nationale sur le logement réponde aux besoins de tous les Canadiens dépourvus d’un droit au logement; p) à combien de reprises un rapport du rapporteur spécial de l’ONU sur le logement convenable a-t-il fait l’objet de discussions avec le gouvernement; q) la question mentionnée en p) a-t-elle été soulevée auprès d’un ministre ou d’un sous-ministre, et ces personnes ont-elles fourni une réponse et, le cas échéant, quelle était-elle; r) a-t-on déjà donné une séance d’information détaillée sur le sujet mentionné en p) et, pour chaque document ou dossier d’information préparé, quels en sont (i) la date, (ii) le titre et le sujet, (iii) le numéro de suivi interne du ministère; s) comment le gouvernement prévoit-il éliminer la discrimination dans les programmes de logement; t) comment le gouvernement prévoit-il fixer des objectifs et des échéances mesurables en vue de réduire la pauvreté avec sa Stratégie nationale sur le logement; u) de quelles mesures ou de quels moyens le gouvernement entend-il se munir pour faire état des atteintes au droit au logement; v) le gouvernement entend-il faire participer les gens en situation de précarité de logement et d’itinérance aux différents stades du processus d’élaboration de la Stratégie nationale sur le logement; w) le gouvernement entend-il offrir de la formation sur les droits de la personne aux gens qui participent à la Stratégie?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1087 --
Mme Anne Minh-Thu Quach:
En ce qui concerne le Conseil Jeunesse du premier ministre et le Secrétariat Jeunesse du Conseil privé: a) quel est l’organigramme décisionnel du Conseil Jeunesse du premier ministre, incluant chacun des postes associés au Conseil; b) quel est le montant total des dépenses et du budget du Conseil Jeunesse depuis sa création, ventilé par années; c) quels sont les montants du budget du Conseil Jeunesse alloués aux salaires, ventilés par (i) année, (ii) postes, (iii) per diem ou toutes autres compensations ou dépenses (télécommunications, transports, matériel de bureau, mobilier) offertes ou attribuées à chacun des postes mentionnés en a)(ii); d) quelles sont les dates et les lieux de chacune des rencontres organisées par le Conseil Jeunesse depuis sa création, ventilés par (i) rencontre en personne, (ii) rencontre virtuelle, (iii) nombre de participants à chacune de ces rencontres; e) quel est le montant des dépenses du gouvernement pour l’organisation de chacune des rencontres du Conseil Jeunesse mentionnées en c), ventilé par (i) coûts associés à la location d’une salle, (ii) coûts associés à la nourriture et aux breuvages, (iii) coûts associés à la sécurité, (iv) coûts associés aux transports et la nature de ces transports, (v) coûts associés aux télécommunications; f) quel est l’organigramme décisionnel du Secrétariat Jeunesse du Conseil privé, incluant chacun des postes associés au Secrétariat Jeunesse; g) quel est le montant total des dépenses et du budget du Secrétariat Jeunesse depuis sa création, ventilé par année; h) quel sont les montants du budget du Secrétariat Jeunesse alloués aux salaires, ventilé par (i) année, (ii) postes, (iii) per diem ou toutes autres compensations ou dépenses (télécommunications, transports, matériel de bureau, mobilier) offertes ou attribuées à chacun des postes mentionnés en h)(ii); i) quel est le mandat officiel du Secrétariat Jeunesse; j) quels sont les liens entre le Conseil Jeunesse du premier ministre et le Secrétariat Jeunesse (liens organisationnels, liens financiers, appui logistique, etc.); k) le Secrétariat jeunesse est-il responsable des bourses, services ou programmes dédiés à la jeunesse; l) si la réponse en k) est affirmative, quels sont les montants qui ont été attribués pour ces bourses, services ou programme, depuis leur création, ventilés par (i) nature de la bourse, du service ou du programme financé, (ii) lieu du programme, (iii) date du début et de fin de la bourse, du service ou du programme ?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1088 --
M. Dave Van Kesteren:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses visant des images ou des photographies de photothèques par le gouvernement depuis le 1er janvier 2016, ventilées par ministère, agence, société d’État et autre entité gouvernementale: a) quel est le montant total des dépenses; b) quels sont les détails de chaque contrat ou dépense, y compris (i) le fournisseur, (ii) le montant, (iii) les détails et la durée du contrat, (iv) la date, (v) le nombre de photos ou d’images achetées, (vi) où les photos ou images ont été utilisées (Internet, babillards, etc.), (vii) la description de la campagne publicitaire, (viii) le numéro de dossier du contrat?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1089 --
M. Ben Lobb:
En ce qui concerne les propositions d’acquisition d’entreprises canadiennes par des entités étrangères, depuis le 1er janvier 2016: a) quelle est la liste complète des acquisitions de ce type qui nécessitaient l’approbation du gouvernement; b) quels sont les détails de chaque opération, y compris (i) la date d’approbation, (ii) la valeur de l’acquisition, (iii) le ministre qui était responsable de l’approbation, (iv) le nom de l’entreprise canadienne concernée, (v) le nom de l’entité étrangère concernée, (vi) le pays d’origine de l’entité étrangère; c) combien d’acquisitions de ce type le gouvernement a-t-il rejetées depuis le 1er janvier 2016, et quels sont les détails des propositions rejetées?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1090 --
M. Ben Lobb:
En ce qui concerne la rémunération du personnel ministériel exonéré, au 14 juin 2017: a) sans révéler l’identité des membres actuels du personnel exonéré, combien d’entre eux touchent un salaire supérieur à l’échelle prévue dans les lignes directrices du Conseil du Trésor pour leur poste; b) combien de membres du personnel du Cabinet du premier ministre touchent un salaire supérieur à (i) 125 000 $, (ii) 200 000 $?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1091 --
M. Ben Lobb:
En ce qui concerne le Cabinet du premier ministre et les cabinets des ministres du 1er avril 2016 au 14 juin 2017: a) quelle somme a été dépensée pour des contrats relatifs à (i) des emplois temporaires, (ii) des emplois de consultant, (iii) des services de conseil; b) quels sont les noms des personnes et des entreprises associés à ces montants; c) pour chacune des personnes et entreprises en b), quelles étaient les périodes de facturation et quel type de travail a été fourni?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1092 --
Mme Hélène Laverdière:
En ce qui concerne la collaboration en Afghanistan et en Iraq entre l’Armée canadienne d’une part et l’Armée et les agences de renseignements des États-Unis d’autre part, ainsi que les constatations du rapport publié le 4 mai 2010 par la Commission d’enquête des Forces armées canadiennes concernant « l’incident du 14 juin 2006 du détenu afghan »: a) quand le Canada a-t-il décidé de ne plus transférer de personnes sous la garde et le contrôle de membres de l’Armée canadienne à des membres de l’Armée américaine; b) y a-t-il eu des omissions ou des exclusions de la portée de cette décision du côté des parties réceptrices, comme les agences de renseignement des États-Unis telles que la Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), ou la décision s’appliquait-elle aux transferts aux mains de n’importe quel agent ou acteur agissant pour le compte du gouvernement des États-Unis; c) du côté des parties qui transfèrent, la décision s’appliquait-elle à tous les membres de l’Armée canadienne, y compris aux forces spéciales et aux agents du renseignement et, dans la négative, à qui ne s’appliquait-elle pas; d) pour quelles raisons a-t-on pris cette décision; e) a-t-on pris cette décision après avoir reçu des conseils juridiques pour savoir s’il serait légal de continuer les transferts aux mains des États-Unis et, dans l’affirmative, le gouvernement s’est-il fait dire qu’il serait illégal de continuer les transferts; f) à quelle date le dernier transfert a-t-il eu lieu avant l’entrée en vigueur de la décision; g) la décision s’appliquait-elle aux personnes qui seraient qualifiées ou qui pouvaient être qualifiées de « personnes sous contrôle (PUC) » par l’Armée des États-Unis, des unités de l’Armée des États-Unis ou la CIA, compte tenu que la Commission d’enquête des Forces armées canadiennes dit, dans son rapport du 4 mai 2010, qu’il s’agit d’un « terme de l’Armée américaine »; h) y a-t-il eu des cas où cette décision n’a pas été appliquée, et donc où des personnes ont été transférées aux mains de l’Armée des États-Unis ou d’une autre agence américaine dans des situations où les membres de l’Armée canadienne eux-mêmes qualifiaient une personne de PUC, compte tenu que la Commission d’enquête des Forces armées canadiennes dit, dans ce même rapport du 4 mai 2010, que le terme PUC était amplement utilisé par les militaires canadiens en Afghanistan; i) le gouvernement sait-il si des personnes dont on a estimé qu’elles n’étaient pas des « détenus » ont été transférées sur le champ de bataille ou ailleurs aux mains du personnel de la Force de sécurité nationale afghane (FSNA), dont la Police nationale afghane, l’Armée nationale afghane, la Direction nationale de la sécurité et des organisations paramilitaires ou semblables travaillant pour les entités précitées ou à leurs côtés, pour ensuite apprendre que ces personnes ont été re-transférées par le personnel de la FSNA aux membres de l’Armée des États-Unis, à la CIA ou à des acteurs américains privés collaborant avec l’Armée des États-Unis ou la CIA; j) le gouvernement sait-il si des personnes considérées par le Canada comme des « détenus » ont été transférées au personnel de la FSNA puis re-transférées par le personnel de la FSNA aux membres de l’Armée des États-Unis, à la CIA, etc., en particulier avant l’entrée en vigueur de l’entente de 2007 sur le transfert des détenus entre le Canada et l’Afghanistan; k) cette décision a-t-elle été communiquée au gouvernement des États-Unis et, dans l’affirmative, quelles raisons lui a-t-on données et qu’a-t-il répondu; l) a-t-on jamais renversé ou révisé cette décision et, dans l’affirmative, à quelles conditions, quand et pour quelles raisons?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1093 --
Mme Hélène Laverdière:
En ce qui concerne le fait de qualifier les personnes sous le soin, la garde ou le contrôle des forces militaires canadiennes de « personnes sous contrôle » (PUC), ou d’employer des catégories semblables, et ce, que ces termes soient des désignations officielles ou non : a) relativement à une déclaration de Donald P. Wright et coll. dans A Different Kind of War: The United States Army in Operation -- ENDURING FREEDOM (OEF) October 2001-September 2005 (Combat Studies Institute, 2010), en p. 221: « Les détenus aux mains de la Coalition en Afghanistan étaient appelés des personnes sous contrôle (PUC), plutôt que des prisonniers de guerre ennemis ou des détenus », cette mention de « Coalition » s’applique-t-elle aux forces militaires canadiennes, y compris les forces spéciales, au cours de quelque partie que ce soit de la période de 2001 à 2005 en question; b) relativement à une affirmation faite par Ahmed Rashid dans Descent into Chaos: The United States and the Failure of Nation-Building in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Central Asia (Penguin, 2009), en p. 304-305 : « Au printemps de 2002, […] les avocats de la CIA ont tordu davantage les limites juridiques en établissant une nouvelle catégorie de prisonnier : les personnes sous contrôle, ou PUC. Quiconque était détenu à titre de PUC était d’emblée privé de l’accès au CICR [Comité international de la Croix-Rouge], et on niait jusqu’à son existence. [...] Les PUC étaient transportés ailleurs dans le monde à bord de jets privés appartenant à des entreprises fictives créées par la CIA. », le gouvernement sait-il s’il s’agit d’une description exacte d’un des usages faits par les États-Unis de la catégorie de « PUC »; c) relativement à une observation dans Center for Law and Military Operations (Armée des États-Unis, centre et école juridiques du juge-avocat général), Lessons Learned from Afghanistan and Iraq: Volume I -- Major Combat Operations (11 September 2001 -- 1 May 2003) (1er août 2004) [Lessons Learned]: « Les personnes détenues étaient qualifiées de “personnes sous contrôle” (PUC) ou simplement appelées “détenus” […] Les personnes capturées sur le champ de bataille étaient d’abord amenées à l’endroit classifié, où l’on pouvait établir leur identité et déterminer si elles répondaient aux critères pour être transférées à Guantanamo. Pendant cette phase, les personnes détenues étaient considérées comme des PUC. », le gouvernement sait-il si, pendant ces intervalles, des agents de la CIA ou des personnes au service de la CIA prenaient parfois sous leur garde des PUC détenus par l’Armée des États-Unis avant que celle-ci ne puisse les désigner officiellement à titre de « détenus »; d) relativement à une affirmation dans Chris Mackey et Greg Miller, The Interrogators: Task Force 500 and America’s Secret War Against Al-Qaeda (Back Bay Books, 2004), en p. 250-251: « En juin [2002] […] notre commandement [celui de l’Armée des États-Unis] à Bagram […] a conçu une catégorie de prisonniers entièrement nouvelle, celle des “personnes sous contrôles” ou PUC. L’idée était de créer une sorte de statut flou ou de vide bureaucratique où les prisonniers pourraient résider provisoirement sans être inscrits dans une base de données ou un système de numérotation quelconque. »: le gouvernement sait-il si cette catégorie américaine de PUC avait été créée de concert avec la CIA, et si elle a été utilisée par cette agence, comme moyen d’obtenir la garde de PUC pendant qu’ils se trouvaient encore dans un « vide bureaucratique »; e) relativement aux observations dans Lessons Learned selon lesquelles « le terme “PUC” n’est apparu qu’à l’arrivée en Afghanistan du XVIIIth Airborne Corps [des États-Unis] », en 2002, les Forces canadiennes, y compris les forces spéciales, ont-elles mené des opérations conjointes avec le XVIIIth Airbone Corps des États-Unis au cours desquelles des prisonniers ont été capturés; f) le gouvernement sait-il si le commandant du XVIIIth Airborne Corps, le Lgén Dan McNeill, était la source directe ou intermédiaire de la notion de « PUC » et, dans l’affirmative, s’il travaillait de concert ou en tandem avec la CIA en vue d’introduire ce terme sur le théâtre afghan; g) après que le général Walter Natynczyk a été affecté au commandement de 35 000 membres des forces des États-Unis en Irak pendant l’opération Iraqi Freedom des États-Unis, de janvier 2004 à janvier 2005, a-t-il ramené d’Irak au contexte de l’engagement du Canada en Afghanistan la connaissance de l’emploi de pratiques liées aux PUC ou un système de PUC, quand il a pris la tête du Système de la doctrine et de l’instruction de la Force terrestre en 2005 et quand il a été nommé vice-chef d’état-major de la Défense en 2006, et, dans l’affirmative, de telles pratiques ont-elles été intégrées de quelque manière que ce soit dans ce système de la doctrine et de l’instruction; h) avant août 2015, alors que les premières troupes des Forces canadiennes étaient arrivées à Kandahar, y avait-il eu des réunions entre le Lgén canadien Michel Gauthier et le sous-secrétaire américain de la Défense au renseignement Steve Cambone, ou tout autre responsable du département de la Défense des États-Unis ou du Pentagone, pendant lesquelles ils auraient discuté, entre autres, de l’harmonisation ou de la coordination de la politique et des pratiques du Canada avec celles des États-Unis, notamment à l’égard des détenus, comme condition de l’acceptation par les États-Unis que le Canada assume le commandement à Kandahar; i) avant août 2015, alors que les premières troupes des Forces canadiennes étaient arrivées à Kandahar, y avait-il eu des réunions entre le chef d’état-major de la Défense, le général Rick Hillier, et tout responsable du département de la Défense des États-Unis ou du Pentagone, pendant lesquelles ils auraient discuté, entre autres, de l’harmonisation ou de la coordination de la politique et des pratiques du Canada avec celles des États-Unis, notamment à l’égard des détenus, comme condition de l’acceptation par les États-Unis que le Canada assume le commandement à Kandahar; j) avant août 2015, alors que les premières troupes des Forces canadiennes étaient arrivées à Kandahar, y avait-il eu des réunions avec des officiers des Forces canadiennes, à part les généraux Gauthier et Hillier, pendant lesquelles il aurait été question, entre autres, de l’harmonisation ou de la coordination de la politique et des pratiques du Canada avec celles des États-Unis, notamment à l’égard des détenus, comme condition de l’acceptation par les États-Unis que le Canada assume le commandement à Kandahar; k) est-ce que la courte notice biographique de M. Gauthier sur le site Web du Governance Network est exacte en ce qui a trait au rôle de M. Gauthier à la tête du Commandement de la Force expéditionnaire du Canada, responsable de l’ensemble des missions opérationnelles des Forces canadiennes à l’étranger et de la mission canadienne dans le Sud de l’Afghanistan, et, dans l’affirmative, était-il responsable à ce titre de la politique et des décisions relatives au transfert de prisonniers à d’autres États?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1094 --
Mme Hélène Laverdière:
En ce qui concerne la désignation, sous le sigle PUC (personnes sous contrôle), des personnes placées sous la garde, le contrôle ou la responsabilité de militaires canadiens, ou l’utilisation de catégories du genre, peu importe que de telles expressions étaient ou sont utilisées de manière officielle ou non: a) le gouvernement juge-t-il exacte la conclusion d’une commission d’enquête militaire canadienne au sujet de l’« incident concernant un détenu afghan survenu le 14 juin 2006 » [Rapport d’incident de juin 2006 de la Commission d’enquête], dans son rapport du 4 mai 2010 (paragr. 30, part II), à savoir que l’expression « personne sous contrôle » (PUC) « est entrée dans le vocabulaire » des soldats canadiens en Afghanistan en 2006; b) en ce qui concerne l’observation formulée dans le Rapport de la commission d’enquête sur l’incident de juin 2006 (paragr. 30, partie II) selon laquelle « le Grand prévôt de la Cie B a affirmé qu’on lui avait ordonné durant la ROTO 1 [rotation/déploiement 1]de toujours employer l’expression "prisonnier sous contrôle" et d’éviter le terme "détenu", qui a ordonné à cette police militaire (PM) d’utiliser systématiquement le terme « PUC » et d’éviter le terme « détenu » et pour quelles raisons lui a-t-on ordonné de le faire; c) en ce qui concerne la conclusion du Rapport d’incident de juin 2006 de la Commission d’enquête (paragr. 30, partie II) selon laquelle « [l]orsque les conseillers (CJ et GP) de la FOA ont appris cette expression, ils ont incité à la faire supprimer du vocabulaire dans l’établissement des rapports tactiques parce qu’elle n’avait aucun fondement juridique dans les politiques relatives aux détenus »,(i) quand et comment les conseillers de la force opérationnelle en Afghanistan (FOA) ont-ils « appris cette expression », (ii) quelle est la période pendant laquelle l’expression « PUC » s’est retrouvée dans les rapports tactiques, (iii) a-t-on cessé de l’utiliser dans les rapports tactiques et, dans l’affirmative, quand a t-on cessé de l’utiliser et quel a été le résultat de l’initiative des conseillers de la FOA; d) en ce qui concerne la conclusion du rapport énoncée au point c), est-ce qu’une personne occupant un poste de commandement stratégique dans les Forces canadiennes, incluant les généraux Rick Hillier, Walter Natynzyk, Michel Gauthier et David Fraser, était au courant, à un certain moment, de l’emploi du terme « PUC » et, dans l’affirmative, quelles mesures ont été prises à cet égard; e) le gouvernement accepte-t-il la conclusion du Rapport d’incident de juin 2006 de la Commission d’enquête selon laquelle les personnes désignées comme PUC par des soldats et commandants canadiens au cours d’une ou de plusieurs périodes en 2006 ont été transférées aux autorités afghanes sans être également désignées comme « détenus », d’où l’absence de dossiers et de rapports (incluant des rapports destinés au Comité international de la Croix-Rouge (CICR)) pouvant être reliés à la politique officielle sur les détenus ou à l’Entente sur le transfert des détenus conclue avec l’Afghanistan et, dans l’affirmative, quel est le nombre de ces PUC transférées sans qu’aucun dossier ou rapport n’ait été communiqué au CICR; f) en ce qui concerne le Rapport d’incident de juin 2006 de la Commission d’enquête (paragr. 33, partie II), à savoir que, pour ce qui est de la diffusion du reportage de CBC dans lequel il est indiqué que 26 personnes avaient été « capturées » le 17 mai 2006 par la FO ORION, puis transférées à la Police nationale afghane sans jamais être traitées comme des détenus, est ce que ces personnes ont été traitées comme des PUC par la FO ORION; g) en ce qui concerne le point m) de la question Q-1117 inscrite au Feuilleton (41e législature, 1re session), présentée par le député Craig Scott et demandant au gouvernement d’expliquer comment les 11 personnes capturées dont il est question à la page 96 du livre publié par Ian Hope, commandant de la FO ORION, et ayant pour titre Dancing with the Dushman: Command Imperatives for the Counter-Insurgency Fight in Afghanistan (Canadian Defence Agency Press, 2008) ont été traitées, ces personnes ont-elles été traitées en tant que « détenus » et fait l’objet de rapports ou ont-elles été traitées comme PUC et, partant, transférées aux autorités afghanes sans qu’aucun dossier ni rapport ne soit envoyé au CICR; h) en ce qui concerne la déclaration figurant au rapport de la Direction des enquêtes et des examens spéciaux, soit « Enquête de la Direction - Enquêtes et examens spéciaux -- Communication d'information, Rapport final (Incident du 14 juin 2006 concernant un détenu en Afghanistan) », numéro de document 7045 72 09/26, selon laquelle « fait très préoccupant, un certain nombre de dossiers du Journal de guerre de la FO ORION couvrant la période du 13 mai au 17 juin 2006 n’ont pas été trouvés », est ce qu’une partie ou l’ensemble de ces dossiers ont été trouvés depuis; i) si une partie ou l’ensemble des dossiers du Journal de guerre dont il est question à (h) ont été trouvés, permettent-ils d’éclairer l’utilisation de l’expression PUC ou de termes similaires comme moyens d’éviter d’appeler une personne capturée un « détenu »; j) en ce qui concerne le point o) de Q 1117 (41e législature, 1re session) -- « des personnes sous le contrôle des forces canadiennes transférées à l’Afghanistan ont-elles été traitées par le Canada de manière non conforme aux dispositions des protocoles d’entente de 2005 et de 2007 entre le Canada et l’Afghanistan sur le transfert des détenus et, dans l’affirmative, pour quels motifs a-t-on décidé que le transfert de ces personnes n’était pas assujetti aux protocoles d’entente? » -- auquel le gouvernement n’a pas répondu par l’affirmative, le gouvernement souhaiterait il maintenant modifier sa réponse; k) en ce qui a trait au point p) de Q 1117 (41e législature, 1re session) -- « des personnes sous le contrôle des forces canadiennes ont-elles été transférés à l’Afghanistan sans que leur existence et leur transfert ne soient portés à l’attention du Comité international de la Croix-Rouge et, dans l’affirmative, pour quels motifs la Croix-Rouge n’a-t-elle pas été informée? » -- auquel le gouvernement n’a pas répondu par l’affirmative, le gouvernement souhaiterait il maintenant modifier sa réponse; l) en ce qui a trait au point (n) de Q 1117 (41e législature, 1re session) -- « y a-t-il eu des périodes et, dans l’affirmative, quelles sont ces périodes, pendant lesquelles le gouvernement canadien considère qu’il y avait une ou plusieurs catégories de personnes que le Canada transférait aux autorités afghanes ou américaines, mais qui n’étaient pas considérées comme des détenus, et ces catégories avaient-ils [sic] une désignation, officielle ou officieuse? » -- pourquoi le gouvernement n’a t il pas révélé l’existence de PUC à titre de catégorie informelle; (m) en ce qui concerne, entre autres choses, les réponses du gouvernement aux points n), o) et p) de Q 1117 (41e législature, 1re session), le gouvernement actuel pense t il que l’ancien gouvernement a délibérément cherché à induire en erreur ou même à tromper le député d’alors qui avait présenté Q 1117 (41e législature, 1re session); (n) en incluant les points n), o) et (p) de Q 1117 (41e législature, 1re session), y a t il des réponses à la question que le gouvernement actuel considère incorrectes ou trompeuses; o) en ce qui concerne la lettre du 19 septembre 2016 de M. Craig Scott, ancien député de Toronto–Danforth, au premier ministre actuel, dans laquelle M. Scott présentait les motifs qui l’incitaient à penser qu’il était probable que le ministère de la Défense nationale ait formulé sa réponse à la question Q 1117 du Feuilleton (41e législature, 1re session) dans le but d’éviter de révéler l’existence de personnes ayant été transférées en Afghanistan sans jamais avoir été signalées ou inscrites au CICR comme « détenus », la lettre a t elle abouti à une enquête de la part ou au nom du premier ministre et, le cas échéant, quels ont été les résultats et de quelle nature sont ces résultats; p) le 8 décembre 2009, lorsque le député d’alors, l’honorable Ujjal Dosanjh, a posé une question à l’ancien Chef d’état-major Walter Natynczyk lors de la comparution de ce dernier devant le Comité permanent de la défense nationale, question pour laquelle M. Dosanjh a cité un article du Globe and Mail qui rapportant qu’une police militaire utilisait, dans ses notes, l’expression « PUC », le gouvernement a t il mené une enquête pour déterminer pourquoi l’expression PUC avait été utilisée outre le fait d’avoir ordonné une commission d’enquête et un examen par le chef du Service d’examen sur des aspects de l’incident et, le cas échéant, quels ont été les résultats; et q) en ce qui concerne les conclusions du rapport d’incident de juin 2006 du BRI (paragr. 12, partie II), établissant que « [m]ême si le Bgén [David] Fraser ne connaissait pas l’OPT [ordre permanent du théâtre] 321A avant son arrivée à Kandahar […] le principe sous jacent de cet ordre quant au transfert de détenu aux FSNA lui a été clairement communiqué avant son départ du Canada. Le Chef d’état major de la Défense (CEMD) [le général Rick Hillier] lui a donné l’instruction verbale et claire de transférer les détenus afghans aux FSNA le plus avant possible sur le terrain et le plus rapidement possible, ce transfert des FC à la garde des FSNA devant se compter en minutes ou en heures », le gouvernement considère t il qu’il s’agit de l’instruction, par le général Hillier de contourner le système officiel des « détenus » par l’utilisation de l’expression PUC?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1095 --
Mme Hélène Laverdière:
En ce qui concerne tous les contextes opérationnels auxquels les militaires canadiens ont participé du 11 septembre 2001 jusqu’à aujourd’hui, de même que l’ensemble des ordres, des directives et des instructions militaires, entre autres, qu’ils soient exécutoires ou non, intérimaires, provisoires ou définitifs, touchant les personnes sous la garde des militaires canadiens ou détenues par ces derniers ainsi que toutes les personnes avec qui les militaires canadiens entrent en contact, mais qui sont réputées être sous la garde de forces armées, de forces de sécurité ou de services de renseignement d’un autre pays ou détenues par ces derniers: a) quels étaient les numéros, les titres et les dates de tous les ordres permanents du théâtre des Forces canadiennes et les noms des responsables qui les ont donnés; b) quels étaient les numéros, les titres et les dates de tous les ordres fragmentaires et les noms des responsables qui les ont donnés; c) quels étaient les numéros, les titres et les dates de tous les ordres de la Force internationale d’assistance à la sécurité de nature similaire donnés relativement au conflit en Afghanistan et les noms des responsables ou des entités qui les ont donnés; d) quels étaient les numéros, les titres et les dates de tous les ordres de même nature donnés par les forces des États Unis, de l’Irak ou d’un autre pays, y compris les autorités kurdes du nord de l’Irak, qui s’appliquent d’une quelconque façon, directement ou indirectement, aux soldats canadiens qui entrent en contact avec des détenus pendant leur service en Iraq, et les noms des responsables ou des entités qui ont donné ces ordres?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1098 --
M. Murray Rankin:
En ce qui concerne le transfert par le Canada de détenus afghans aux autorités d’autres États, y compris les États-Unis et l’Afghanistan, à compter de 2001: a) y a-t-il eu enquête de la part d’organismes fédéraux, y compris, sans s’y limiter, la Gendarmerie royale du Canada ou le Service national des enquêtes des Forces armées canadiennes, sur les éventuels comportements criminels, en violation d’une ou de plusieurs lois canadiennes ou obligations juridiques internationales, d’officiers supérieurs des Forces canadiennes jusqu’au chef d'état major de la défense; b) si la réponse en a) est affirmative, (i) entre quelles dates, (ii) au sujet de quel comportement, (iii) et avec quel résultat; c) y a-t-il eu enquête de la part d’organismes fédéraux, y compris, sans s’y limiter, la Gendarmerie royale du Canada ou le Service national des enquêtes des Forces armées canadiennes, sur les éventuels comportements criminels, en violation d’une ou de plusieurs lois canadiennes ou obligations juridiques internationales, de tout ministre de la Couronne jusqu’au premier ministre; d) si la réponse à c) est affirmative, (i) entre quelles dates, (ii) au sujet de quel comportement, (iii) et avec quel résultat; e) y a-t-il eu enquête de la part d’organismes fédéraux, y compris, sans s’y limiter, la Gendarmerie royale du Canada ou le Service national des enquêtes des Forces armées canadiennes, sur les éventuels comportements criminels, en violation d’une ou de plusieurs lois canadiennes ou obligations juridiques internationales, de tout membre de la fonction publique; f) si la réponse à e) est affirmative, (i) entre quelles dates, (ii) au sujet de quel comportement, (iii) et avec quel résultat; g) y a t-il eu enquête de la part d’organismes fédéraux, y compris, sans s’y limiter, la Gendarmerie royale du Canada ou le Service national des enquêtes des Forces armées canadiennes, sur les éventuels comportements criminels, en violation d’une ou de plusieurs lois canadiennes ou obligations juridiques internationales, de tout membre du personnel politique d’un ministre, y compris le personnel du Cabinet du premier ministre; h) si la réponse à g) est affirmative, (i) entre quelles dates, (ii) au sujet de quel comportement, (iii) et avec quel résultat?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1100 --
M. Erin O'Toole:
En ce qui concerne la nomination, par le gouvernement, du nouveau Greffier de la Chambre des communes, et de son engagement général à suivre des processus de sélection « ouverts, transparents et fondés sur le mérite »: a) quel processus a-t-on utilisé pour sélectionner la personne nommée; b) combien de personnes ont présenté leur candidature; c) les candidats ont-ils dû passer des tests ou des évaluations; d) combien de candidats ont passé une entrevue; e) qui faisait partie du jury de sélection ou du comité d’entrevue; f) les qualifications professionnelles et les références morales des candidats ont-elles été vérifiées; g) combien de candidats ont passé des tests psychométriques; h) quel rôle le premier ministre a-t-il joué dans le processus de sélection; i) quel rôle le chef de cabinet, le secrétaire principal et le directeur des nominations au cabinet du premier ministre ont-ils joué dans le processus de sélection; j) quel rôle le leader du gouvernement à la Chambre a-t-il joué dans le processus de sélection; k) quel rôle le chef de cabinet du leader du gouvernement à la Chambre a-t-il joué dans le processus de sélection; l) quel rôle le ministre des Pêches, des Océans et de la Garde côtière canadienne a-t-il joué dans le processus de sélection; m) quel rôle le chef de cabinet du ministre des Pêches, des Océans et de la Garde côtière canadienne a-t-il joué dans le processus de sélection; n) des ministres ou du personnel exonéré non désignés entre les points h) et m) ont-ils joué un rôle dans le processus de sélection; o) quel rôle le sous secrétaire du Cabinet (Résultats et livraison) a-t-il joué dans le processus de sélection; p) quel rôle a été confié ou offert au Président de la Chambre des communes ou à tout représentant personnel de ce dernier dans le cadre du processus de sélection; q) des firmes de recrutement de cadres, des consultants ou d’autres fournisseurs de services ont-ils été embauchés pour appuyer le processus de sélection; r) si la réponse en q) est affirmative, (i) qui a été embauché, (ii) quels services ont été fournis, (iii) à combien sont évalués les services fournis; s) quand la personne nommée a-t-elle été informée qu’elle avait été choisie par le gouvernement, et qui l’a informée; t) les chefs des partis d’opposition à la Chambre ont-ils été consultés sur le choix du candidat, et si c’est le cas, par qui et quand; u) le Président de la Chambre des communes a-t-il été consulté sur le choix du candidat, et si c’est le cas, par qui et quand?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1101 --
M. Blake Richards:
En ce qui concerne la plus récente évaluation de conformité menée par l’Agence du revenu du Canada (ARC) auprès des petites entreprises relativement à leur revenu actif par rapport à leur revenu passif: a) à quelle date l’évaluation de conformité a-t-elle (i) commencé, (ii) terminé; b) combien de petites entreprises (i) ont été évaluées dans le cadre de cette initiative, (ii) devaient à l’ARC un montant supérieur à celui évalué au départ, (iii) devaient à l’ARC un montant inférieur à celui évalué au départ; c) comment ces petites entreprises ont-elles été sélectionnées pour l’évaluation; d) combien de ces entreprises étaient (i) des terrains de camping, (ii) des établissements de stockage en libre-service, (iii) d’autres secteurs, de la manière dont elles ont été réparties par le Système de classification des industries de l’Amérique du Nord; e) quelles conclusions, le cas échéant, ont été tirées à propos (i) de l’interprétation de l’ARC des règles à propos du revenu « actif » et « passif » des petites entreprises visées, (ii) de l’application de l’interprétation de l’ARC quant aux règles liées à l’admissibilité des petites entreprises visées à recevoir la déduction fiscale accordée aux petites entreprises; f) quelles autres conclusions ont été tirées; g) quelles normes ont été utilisées pour déterminer si les petites entreprises (i) offraient un nombre suffisant de services pour que le revenu qu’elles génèrent soit considéré comme actif, (ii) ont embauché un nombre suffisant d'employés à temps complet à l’année pour que leur revenu soit considéré comme actif?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1102 --
M. Pat Kelly:
En ce qui concerne la décision du gouvernement d’autoriser l’acquisition de Norsat International Incorporated par Hytera: a) la transaction a-t-elle fait l’objet d’un examen complet de la sécurité nationale conformément à la Loi sur Investissement Canada; b) si la réponse en a) est affirmative, quels en sont les détails, y compris (i) quand l’examen de sécurité nationale a-t-il été entrepris, (ii) quand l’examen a-t-il pris fin; c) quand le gouvernement a-t-il approuvé la transaction?
Response
(Le document est déposé)
8555-421-1015-01 Forgiving student loans owed8555-421-1041 Enhancing RCMP Accountabil ...8555-421-1042 Language Training Sub-Sub- ...8555-421-1043 Distribution of flags for ...8555-421-1045 Sponsored social media posts8555-421-1046 Statements made by the Min ...8555-421-1048 VIA Rail's 2016-2020 corpo ...8555-421-1049 Decommissioning and sale o ...8555-421-1050 Government's spending on i ...8555-421-1051 Proposed Canada Infrastruc ...8555-421-1053 Kathryn Spirit ...Show all topics
View James Bezan Profile
CPC (MB)
Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise tonight to revisit a question I raised on May 4. I asked the Minister of National Defence why the Liberals were taking away the danger pay from our troops that were currently deployed in the fight against ISIS and were stationed in Kuwait at Camp Arifjan. We had already established that the Minister of National Defence had a very casual relationship with the troops.
We heard from veterans not only on the minister's embellishment of his service record, but also the feeling of service members and their families on the impact it had on their moral state of mind, as they served in the Canadian Armed Forces, knowing the government was trying to undermine their danger pay.
A 27-year veteran stated, “The Defence Minister cannot continue to lead the men and women of the Canadian Armed Forces, having lost the and respect and trust in this way.”
I acknowledge that the danger pay issue was resolved. After opposition members and Canadians put so much pressure on the government, it had to backtrack. The government was forced to accept a motion I brought forward in the House to restore the danger pay for all troops that were in the fight against ISIS, including those that were stationed in Kuwait, particularly at Camp Arifjan. We know the embarrassment was so much that the Liberals had to insert it into the defence policy review.
Today I want to deal with the track record of the Minister of National Defence over the past year. We have heard from members of the Canadian Armed Forces, as well as veterans, who took great offence with the minister's comments that he was the architect of Operation Medusa. This was not a slip of the tongue. This was something he said from prepared notes in a speech he delivered in India on April 18. He said that on his first appointment to Kandahar in 2006, he was the architect of Operation Medusa. He said it in 2015 as a Liberal candidate.
To show how it impacted upon our veterans and our troops, retired Lieutenant-Colonel Shane Schreiber said that the minister, as a soldier, probably would not have said that, however, the minister the politician thought he could get away with it. He said, “When you are careless with your words as a politician, that can haunt you.” He went on to say, “Any good soldier would not try to steal another soldier's honour.” This is often referred to as stolen valour.
The minister has apologized for that statement, but he has undermined his own credibility because of this statement, which was deliberately misleading not only the House but Canadians and the people he spoke to in India.
We also know he has misled the House on a number of other occasions.
He also said that the pulling our CF-18s from Operation Impact in the war against ISIS was accepted by our allies. He said in December, 2015 that he had not had one discussion about the CF-18s. However, emails sent by officials, which we acquired through an access to information request, showed that the Iraqi minister of defence was clearly focused on Canada's decision to withdraw its CF-18s from the coalition air strikes, asking the minister to reconsider this decision on numerous occasions.
We also know that on numerous occasions, Kurdish officials stated that they wanted to have our CF-18s left in the fight against ISIS, but the Liberal Minister of National Defence brought them home.
We also know that over the past year, the minister has also dealt with this whole issue of—
Monsieur le Président, je suis heureux de prendre la parole aujourd'hui pour revenir sur une question que j'ai soulevée le 4 mai dernier. J'ai demandé au ministre de la Défense nationale d'expliquer pourquoi les libéraux avaient décidé de supprimer la prime de danger à laquelle avaient droit les troupes canadiennes qui se trouvaient à ce moment-là au Koweït, au camp Arifjan, pour lutter contre le groupe armé État islamique. Nous avions déjà établi que le ministre de la Défense nationale avait une relation très particulière avec les troupes.
Nous avons entendu ce qu'avaient à dire les anciens combattants. Ils nous ont dit ce qu'ils pensaient non seulement du fait que le ministre avait embelli ses états de service, mais également du fait que le moral des militaires en cours de déploiement et de leur famille avait été miné par l'idée que le gouvernement tentait de s'en prendre à leur prime de danger.
Un militaire avec 27 ans d'expérience a déclaré: « Le ministre de la Défense ne peut plus rester à la tête des hommes et des femmes des Forces armées canadiennes après avoir ainsi perdu leur confiance et leur respect. »
Je reconnais que le problème de la prime de danger a été réglé. Le gouvernement a été obligé de faire marche arrière en raison de la pression que les députés de l'opposition et les Canadiens ont exercée contre lui. Le gouvernement a été obligé d'accepter une motion que j'ai proposée à la Chambre dans le but de rétablir la prime de danger pour tous les soldats qui participaient à la lutte contre le groupe armé État islamique, y compris ceux qui étaient déployés au Koweït, surtout au camp Arifjan. On sait que les libéraux ont eu tellement honte qu'ils l'ont incluse dans l'examen de la politique de défense.
Aujourd'hui, je voudrais parler du bilan de la dernière année du ministre de la Défense nationale. Des membres des Forces armées canadiennes et des anciens combattants nous ont dit qu'ils avaient été offusqués que le ministre ait dit qu'il avait été l'architecte de l'opération Méduse. Ce n'était pas un lapsus. C'était écrit dans ses notes d'allocution pour un discours en Inde, le 18 avril. Il a dit qu'il avait été l'architecte de l'opération Méduse la première fois qu'il avait été nommé à Kandahar, en 2006. Il l'a aussi dit en 2015 en tant que candidat libéral.
Pour décrire les effets de cette déclaration sur les anciens combattants et les troupes, le lieutenant-colonel à la retraite Shane Schreiber a affirmé que le ministre, en tant que soldat, n'aurait probablement pas dit une telle chose, mais que le ministre, en tant que politicien, a pensé qu'il pourrait s'en tirer. Il a dit: « Lorsqu'un politicien ne pèse pas ses mots, ses paroles peuvent venir le hanter. » Il a ajouté: « Aucun bon soldat ne tenterait de s'approprier les honneurs qui reviennent à un frère d'armes. » C'est ce qu'on appelle couramment l'usurpation de hauts faits.
Le ministre a présenté ses excuses à ce sujet, mais il a miné sa crédibilité parce que la déclaration induisait délibérément en erreur la Chambre, les Canadiens et les gens qui l'écoutaient en Inde.
Nous savons également qu'il a induit la Chambre en erreur à diverses autres occasions.
Il a ainsi affirmé que le retrait des CF-18 de l'opération Impact dans le cadre de la guerre contre le groupe État islamique était accepté par nos alliés. Il a dit en décembre 2015 qu'il n'avait pas discuté une seule fois des CF-18. Toutefois, dans des courriels envoyés par de hauts fonctionnaires — que nous avons obtenus au moyen d'une demande d'accès à l'information —, on peut lire que le ministre irakien de la Défense s'est montré clairement préoccupé par la décision du Canada d'ordonner le retrait de ses chasseurs CF-18 et de ne plus participer aux frappes aériennes de la coalition. Il a d'ailleurs demandé à plusieurs reprises au ministre de la Défense de reconsidérer cette décision.
Nous savons également que, à de nombreuses reprises, des porte-parole kurdes ont affirmé vouloir que nos CF-18 soient maintenus dans la lutte contre le groupe État islamique, mais le ministre de la Défense nationale libéral les a rapatriés.
Nous savons en outre que, au cours de la dernière année, le ministre s’est occupé de toute la question de…
View Jean Rioux Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean Rioux Profile
2017-06-20 22:58 [p.13061]
Mr. Speaker, my colleague's original question had to do with pay for our troops who are deployed to Kuwait to fight against Daesh as part of Operation Impact. The member opposite also mentioned the Minister of National Defence in his speech.
I am pleased that he has given me an opportunity to reiterate that the minister is a former reservist who has an excellent understanding of the needs of soldiers and their families and who believes that our troops are by far our greatest asset. He is a minister who puts his experience on the ground, his expertise, and his energy into serving our men and women in uniform every day. He is a minister who ensures that our soldiers have the resources, training, equipment, and support they need to successfully carry out the missions and operations assigned to them.
Like the minister, our entire government is determined to ensure that the members of the Canadian Armed Forces get all the benefits they need to take care of their families here in Canada, particularly when they are sent on missions abroad.
That is why we supported the motion moved by the member opposite last March regarding tax relief for military personnel sent to Kuwait. That motion was debated on March 9, 2017, and was adopted unanimously in the House.
The Minister of National Defence became personally engaged in this file in February 2016. On May 18, the Minister of National Defence announced that we would be offering tax relief to all Canadian Armed Forces members who take part in international chief of the defence staff named operations, up to the highest rank of lieutenant-colonel. This change is retroactive to January 2017. In addition, this measure does not affect the hardship allowance, risk allowance, or deployment allowance set out in the National Defence military foreign service instructions. Those payments will continue.
Our women and men in uniform who take part in overseas operations are doing a tremendous job. They are highly skilled and very well trained, and are the pride of Canadians from coast to coast to coast. They represent Canada with professionalism and courage, and we are very grateful to them.
Our new policy includes several measures to ensure that our troops get the support they need whether they are transitioning from civilian to military life or back to civilian life at the end of their career.
We put our troops and their families at the heart of this policy by making sure they get the care, support, training, and resources they need to accomplish what we ask of them. The government's new defence policy includes a new vision and a new approach to defence. We provided a clear direction on defence priorities over a 20-year horizon and provided matching long-term investments to fully fund the implementation of our new policy.
The government set out an ambitious but realistic plan to ensure that Canada can respond to current and future defence challenges. Over the next 10 years, annual military spending will rise from $18.9 billion to $32.7 billion. The size of the regular force will grow by 3,500, and the reserve force will be increased by 1,500. We will also invest to grow, maintain, and upgrade Canadian Armed Forces capabilities.
The Minister of National Defence is deeply committed to our troops, and the new defence policy reflects that commitment.
Monsieur le Président, la question initiale de mon collègue concernait notamment la rémunération des troupes qui sont déployées au Koweït pour lutter contre Daech dans le cadre de l'opération Impact. Le député d'en face a aussi fait allusion au ministre de la Défense nationale dans son allocution.
Je suis heureux qu'il me donne l'occasion de réaffirmer que le ministre est un ancien réserviste qui comprend parfaitement les besoins des militaires et de leurs familles et qui estime que nos militaires constituent de loin notre plus grand atout. C'est un ministre qui, chaque jour, met son expérience de terrain, son expertise et son énergie au service des hommes et des femmes qui portent l'uniforme. C'est un ministre qui veille à ce que les militaires disposent des ressources, de la formation, de l'équipement et du soutien dont ils ont besoin pour mener à bien les missions et les opérations qui leur sont confiées.
Tout comme le ministre, l'ensemble de notre gouvernement est déterminé à faire en sorte que les membres des Forces armées canadiennes bénéficient de toutes les prestations nécessaires pour s'occuper de leurs familles ici, au Canada, en particulier lorsqu'ils sont envoyés en mission à l'étranger.
C'est pourquoi nous avons appuyé la motion déposée par le député d'en face en mars dernier concernant les allégements fiscaux en vigueur pour les militaires envoyés au Koweït. Cette motion a été débattue le 9 mars dernier et a été adoptée à l'unanimité à la Chambre.
Le ministre de la Défense nationale s'est personnellement engagé dans ce dossier dès février 2016. Le 18 mai, le ministre de la Défense nationale a annoncé que nous offririons un allégement fiscal à tous les membres des Forces armées canadiennes qui participent aux opérations internationales nommées par le chef d'état-major de la Défense, jusqu'au taux de solde le plus élevé de lieutenant-colonel. Ce changement est rétroactif à janvier 2017. De plus, cette mesure n'affecte pas les indemnités de difficulté, de risque ou d'opération qui sont prévues dans les Directives sur le service militaire à l'étranger et dont le versement se poursuivra.
Nos femmes et nos hommes en uniforme qui participent à des opérations à l'étranger accomplissent un travail extraordinaire. Ils sont bien entraînés et hautement qualifiés et font la fierté de tous les Canadiens d'un océan à l'autre. Ils représentent le Canada avec professionnalisme et courage, et nous leur en sommes très reconnaissants.
Ainsi, notre nouvelle politique comprend plusieurs mesures qui feront en sorte que nos troupes seront prises en charge de façon adéquate, tant lors de leur transition de la vie civile à la vie militaire que lors de leur transition à la vie civile au terme de leur carrière.
Nous avons placé nos militaires et leurs familles au coeur de cette politique en nous assurant qu'ils ont les soins, le soutien, la formation et les ressources dont ils ont besoin pour accomplir ce que nous leur demandons. La nouvelle politique de défense du gouvernement comporte une nouvelle vision et une nouvelle approche en matière de défense. Nous avons fourni une orientation claire concernant les priorités en matière de défense pour les 20 prochaines années, et nous avons fait correspondre à cette orientation des investissements à long terme pour financer pleinement la mise en oeuvre de notre nouvelle politique.
Le gouvernement a établi un plan ambitieux, mais réaliste, pour que le Canada puisse répondre aux défis d'aujourd'hui et de demain en matière de défense. Les dépense militaires annuelles augmenteront au cours des 10 prochaines années et passeront de 18,9 milliards de dollars à 32,7 milliards de dollars par année. Les effectifs de la Force régulière augmenteront de 3 500 membres, tandis que ceux de la Force de réserve augmenteront de 1 500 membres. Nous ferons également des investissements pour acquérir, maintenir et actualiser les capacités des Forces armées canadiennes.
Le ministre de la Défense nationale a beaucoup à coeur les troupes, et la nouvelle politique de défense en est le reflet.
View James Bezan Profile
CPC (MB)
Mr. Speaker, we are not questioning the minister's record. We are questioning his trustworthiness. Case in point, the sole-sourcing for 18 Super Hornets where the capability gap is imaginary. We already know that 88% of defence experts and 13 former Royal Canadian Air Force commanders have said there is no capability gap.
We have already seen $12 billion worth of cuts in two budgets under this minister. The government has done a defence policy review, but there is no money to actually resource it. If there is no money to resource it, then it is a book of empty promises.
The minister has been out there doing his tour. Canadians and members of the Canadian Armed Forces are hoping it is his farewell tour, because this is a minister who has gone out, and tried to sell something when we know the money is not in the budget. The Minister of Finance has said that currently the Canadian Armed Forces are properly provisioned. I can tell the House the money is not there to do the things the government says it is going to do.
Monsieur le Président, nous ne remettons pas en question le bilan du ministre. Nous nous demandons s’il est digne de confiance. Par exemple, on s’est adressé à un fournisseur unique pour l’acquisition de 18 Super-Hornet alors que le déficit de capacité dans ce secteur est imaginaire. Nous savons déjà que 88 % des experts en matière de défense et 13 anciens commandants de l’Aviation royale du Canada ont déclaré qu’il n’y avait pas de déficit de capacité.
Sous ce ministre, on a déjà constaté des compressions de l'ordre de 12 milliards de dollars en deux budgets. Le gouvernement a procédé à un examen de la politique de défense, mais aucun budget n’est prévu pour l’étayer. S’il n’y a pas de budget, tout ce qu’il contient ce sont des promesses creuses.
Le ministre fait sa tournée. Les Canadiens et les membres des Forces armées canadiennes espèrent que ce sera sa tournée d’adieu parce qu’il s’agit d’un ministre qui a essayé de mousser une idée qui n'est pas financée. Le ministre des Finances a déclaré que les Forces armées canadiennes sont actuellement bien équipées. Je peux dire à la Chambre qu’il n’y a pas d’argent pour financer les mesures annoncées par le gouvernement.
View Jean Rioux Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean Rioux Profile
2017-06-20 23:03 [p.13062]
Mr. Speaker, in a context of complex and unpredictable international security, Canada has to anticipate new threats and new challenges, adapt to the changing context, and act with decisive military capability.
I want to point out that the minister chaired the most important consultation in years in order to develop Canada's new defence policy. His unwavering passion contributed to the plan for Canada's protection, North America's security, and the commitment related to maintaining stability in a constantly changing world for the next 20 years.
As the Chief of the Defence Staff said when the new defence policy was unveiled, this is a good day for people in uniform. Canadian Armed Forces members are happy with the Minister of National Defence and they respect him. That is abundantly clear on the ground. I have seen it many times.
Monsieur le Président, dans un contexte de sécurité internationale complexe et imprévisible, le Canada se doit d'anticiper les nouvelles menaces et les nouveaux défis, de s'adapter à l'évolution du contexte et d'agir avec des capacités militaires décisives.
Je tiens à souligner que le ministre a présidé à la plus importante consultation des dernières années en vue de l'élaboration de la nouvelle politique de défense du Canada. Sa passion indéfectible a permis de planifier pour les 20 prochaines années la protection du Canada, la sécurité de l'Amérique du Nord et l'engagement lié au maintien de la stabilité dans un monde en constante évolution.
Comme le chef d'état-major de la Défense l'a mentionné lors du dévoilement de la nouvelle politique de défense, c'est une bonne journée pour les gens en uniforme. La satisfaction et le respect que portent les membres des Forces armées canadiennes à l'égard du ministre de la Défense nationale sont très manifestes sur le terrain, et j'en ai maintes fois été témoin.
View Thomas Mulcair Profile
NDP (QC)
View Thomas Mulcair Profile
2017-06-14 14:31 [p.12648]
Mr. Speaker, the question is whether we are going to get it through before the end of term, and we do not have an answer to that.
The Prime Minister said he stood by his defence minister's account of the role he played in Afghanistan and that there was no conflict when he blocked an inquiry into the detainee scandal. The Ethics Commissioner has just reported that the defence minister “downplayed” his role in the transfer of detainees.
What consequences will the minister face for having misled the Ethics Commissioner, or is the Prime Minister just fine with hiding things from Mary Dawson?
Monsieur le Président, la question est de savoir si nous allons faire adopter le projet de loi avant la fin de la session. Nous n'avons pas de réponse à cette question.
Le premier ministre a dit qu'il s'en tient à l'explication du ministre de la Défense concernant le rôle de celui-ci en Afghanistan, et qu'il n'y a pas eu de conflit d'intérêts lorsque le ministre a bloqué une enquête sur le scandale des prisonniers afghans. La commissaire à l'éthique a indiqué récemment que le ministre de la Défense a minimisé son rôle dans le transfert des détenus.
Quelles conséquences le ministre devra-t-il subir pour avoir induit en erreur la commissaire à l'éthique? Le premier ministre trouve-t-il cela acceptable de cacher des choses à Mary Dawson?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Justin Trudeau Profile
2017-06-14 14:31 [p.12648]
Mr. Speaker, the issue of Afghan detainees is one we take very seriously in this House. That is why there have been no fewer than six investigations into that issue, including one that is ongoing. Indeed, when we were offered, as NDP and Liberals, the opportunity to go through 40,000 documents directly pertaining to that, the NDP refused to do it.
We engaged with that. We take very seriously those responsibilities. We will continue to take very seriously what Canadians expect from this government and from this party.
Monsieur le Président, la question des détenus afghans en est une que nous prenons très au sérieux à la Chambre. Voilà pourquoi il y a eu pas moins de six enquêtes sur cette situation, y compris une enquête toujours en cours. En fait, lorsqu'on nous a offert — aux néo-démocrates et aux libéraux — d'examiner les 40 000 documents concernant directement cette question, les néo-démocrates ont refusé de le faire.
La question nous tient à coeur. Nous prenons très au sérieux nos responsabilités. Nous continuerons de prendre très au sérieux le travail auquel s'attendent les Canadiens de la part du gouvernement et du Parti libéral.
View James Bezan Profile
CPC (MB)
Mr. Chair, we are looking forward to tonight's committee of the whole as we raise a number of questions and issues surrounding the defence budget and where the government is taking our Canadian Armed Forces and Department of National Defence.
I want to also welcome the support the minister has here tonight, with the deputy minister, the vice-chief of the defence staff, and those in ADM positions. I thank them for supporting the minister tonight and for the work they do in supporting our men and women in uniform.
This has been a rough session for the minister. He has misled Canadians on a number of occasions now. There was the issue of danger pay on Operation Impact for everybody who was stationed in Kuwait. It took our efforts as the opposition to bring to light that some members in the fight against ISIS were being treated unfairly. The government instead doubled down and then embarrassed itself and ultimately had to correct the problem.
We also know the capability gap surrounding our CF-18s is an imaginary one. We are going to dive into that more completely.
We also want to talk about the continued stand-down by the government in pulling resources out of Iraq and Kuwait that were in support of our troops who are fighting ISIS and in support of our allies, and of course about how the minister has misled the House in saying our allies were happy when we pulled our CF-18s out of the fight.
We also have that situation again, with the government pulling our Auroras out of the fight against ISIS and leaving the heavy lifting to our NATO allies, who have had to move in AWACs.
We have the famous architect issue. That report came up over Operation Medusa, and the minister has apologized for it.
This budget is nothing to celebrate either. There have been $12 billion in cuts made in two consecutive budgets by the government. The finance minister has said that the Department of National Defence is appropriately provisioned, but the minister himself has said that there need to be significant investments going forward in the DPR.
The budget cuts that we are seeing right now are decreasing the amount of training that our troops can do and the amount that they can do in maintaining readiness to do the jobs that we call upon them to do.
I am going to first talk about the defence policy review. It is being rolled out, but it is much delayed. Originally the minister said that we would have the defence policy review in front of us by the end of last year; here we are, six months down the road, and we still have not seen it. The government has said that it will be released on June 8, and we are going to be looking at it.
I want to dive into that a bit, because we have already seen a number of shell games going on with the budget. In the cuts in this budget, the government has taken $8.5 billion and punted it down the road for up to 20 years. We were able to find in the budget that there was some re-profiling, as the minister likes to call it, or stuff that lines up better with our fiscal framework, but there is still $5.6 billion of shifted funds that are not accounted for, and we need to find out where those funds are going. We know there is some deferred spending coming from LAV modernization and some funding for the fixed-wing search and rescue planes that was moved down to better fit when the planes are being delivered, but we want to know if the shell games are going to continue.
We want to know whether or not there is going to be adequate funding in the budget to support the defence policy review or if the minister is going to defer all of that funding until after the next election. One thing of which the defence minister is the architect is the defence policy review, but can he guarantee us that the funding is going to be there, or is it going to be, as Dave Perry said, underfunded and under-ambitious?
Monsieur le président, ce soir, nous sommes ravis d'avoir l'occasion de nous constituer en comité plénier pour soulever un certain nombre de questions et d'enjeux associés au budget de la défense et à la voie dans laquelle le gouvernement mène les Forces armées canadiennes et le ministère de la Défense nationale.
Je tiens aussi à souhaiter la bienvenue aux personnes qui sont venues appuyer le ministre ce soir, notamment le sous-ministre, le vice-chef d'état-major de la Défense et les sous-ministres adjoints. Je les remercie du soutien offert au ministre ce soir et de leur travail à l'appui des militaires.
Cette session a été difficile pour le ministre. Il a maintenant induit les Canadiens en erreur à de nombreuses reprises. Il y a eu la question des primes de danger pour tous les militaires participant à l'opération Impact qui étaient déployés au Koweït. Grâce aux efforts de l'opposition, la lumière a été faite sur le traitement injuste à l'égard de certains membres, dans la lutte contre le groupe État islamique. Après que la situation ait été dévoilée, le gouvernement a renchéri, ce qui l'a mis dans l'embarras, et il a finalement dû corriger le problème.
Nous savons aussi que le déficit de capacité associé aux CF-18 est fictif. Nous allons nous pencher plus en détail sur le sujet.
Nous voulons aussi parler de l'inactivité continue du gouvernement, qui a retiré les ressources de l'Irak et du Koweït qui appuyaient nos militaires combattant le groupe armé État islamique et qui appuyaient nos alliés, et, bien sûr, de la façon avec laquelle le ministre a induit la Chambre en erreur en déclarant que nos alliés étaient heureux lorsque nous avons retiré les CF-18 du combat.
La même situation se reproduit une fois de plus, puisque le gouvernement retire les appareils Aurora du combat contre le groupe État islamique et qu'il laisse nos alliés de l'OTAN faire le gros du travail avec des appareils AWACS.
Nous avons le fameux problème de « l'architecte ». Le rapport sur l'opération Méduse est paru, et le ministre a présenté ses excuses.
Le budget n'a rien de réjouissant non plus. Dans le cadre de deux budgets consécutifs du gouvernement, il y a eu des compressions budgétaires de l'ordre de 12 milliards de dollars. Le ministre des Finances a déclaré que le ministère de la Défense nationale était adéquatement approvisionné, mais, dans le cadre de l'Examen de la politique de défense, le ministre a lui-même affirmé que des investissements considérables devaient être faits pour aller de l'avant.
Les compressions budgétaires auxquelles nous assistons actuellement réduisent la formation que peuvent recevoir les troupes et les mesures qu'elles peuvent prendre pour maintenir la disponibilité opérationnelle nécessaire pour accomplir le travail que nous leur demandons de faire.
Je vais commencer par parler de l'examen de la politique de défense. Il est lancé, mais avec beaucoup de retard. À l'origine, le ministre avait dit que l'examen de la politique de défense serait terminé avant la fin de l'année dernière. Nous voici six mois plus tard, et nous n'en avons toujours pas vu les résultats. Le gouvernement a dit qu'ils seront rendus publics le 8 juin et que nous les examinerons.
Je veux en parler un peu parce que nous avons déjà été témoins d'un certain nombre de tours de passe-passe concernant le budget. Dans ses compressions budgétaires, le gouvernement a repoussé des investissements de 8,5 milliards de dollars pour une période pouvant aller jusqu'à 20 ans. Nous avons découvert dans le budget qu'il y avait des reports, comme le ministre les appelle; des choses qui s'alignent mieux avec le cadre financier. Cependant, il reste 5,6 milliards de dollars de fonds transférés qui ne sont pas comptabilisés. Il faut découvrir où sont affectés ces fonds. Nous savons qu'il y a des dépenses reportées qui proviennent de la modernisation des véhicules blindés légers et que certains fonds destinés aux aéronefs de recherche et de sauvetage à voilure fixe ont été reportés afin de mieux correspondre à la livraison des aéronefs. Cependant, nous voulons savoir si les tours de passe-passe vont continuer.
Nous voulons savoir s'il y aura suffisamment de fonds dans le budget pour l'examen de la politique de défense ou si le ministre va reporter la totalité du financement au-delà des prochaines élections. Il y a une chose dont le ministre est l'architecte et c'est l'examen de la politique de défense, mais peut-il nous garantir que l'argent sera là ou la politique sera-t-elle, comme Dave Perry l'a dit, insuffisamment financée et insuffisamment ambitieuse?
View Geoff Regan Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Geoff Regan Profile
2017-05-18 10:18 [p.11388]
I am now prepared to rule on the question of privilege raised on April 4, 2017, by the honourable member for Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman concerning allegedly misleading statements made by the Minister of National Defence.
I would like to thank the member for Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman for having raised this matter, as well as the Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons for his contribution.
In presenting his case, the member for Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman explained that the answer to written Question No. 600, tabled in the House on January 30, 2017, and signed by the Minister of National Defence, stated that all members of the Canadian Armed Forces deployed in Operation Impact in Kuwait and Iraq were granted tax relief benefits by the previous government. In later submissions, on May 3 and 16, 2017, the member added that a press release issued by the minister on April 19, 2017, a briefing note prepared for the minister obtained through an access to information request, and a ministerial order issued by the President of the Treasury Board on April 17, 2017, further supported this assertion.
The member argued that the minister misled the House when, in answers to oral questions on March 8 and 21, 2017, he stated that members of the Canadian Armed Forces were sent by the previous government to Iraq and Kuwait without the tax-free allowance at the time of their deployment.
The member for Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman alleged that these two seemingly contradictory versions of events were misleading the House and therefore constituted a prima facie question of privilege since, as he stated, “Only one of these statements can be true.” In one of his submissions, the member presented evidence to support his contention that, and I quote:
...the Minister of National Defence has misled, fabricated, and embellished other issues on numerous occasions in addition to my original question of privilege.
For his part, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons explained that, as the tax relief in question was applied retroactively, the minister had in fact provided the very same information when responding to Order Paper Question No. 600 and to oral questions asked in the House. Thus, he characterized the matter as a dispute as to facts and not a question of privilege
Members have a right to request and obtain trustworthy information in order to carry out their parliamentary duties. This reliance on access to accurate information is the cornerstone of their ability to hold the government to account. As a result, the Chair has often been called upon to rule on the quality, completeness, and internal coherence of information provided in responses to questions, whether oral or written.
As members will know, the exchange of information in this place is constantly subject to varying and, yes, contradictory views and perceptions. This, of course, heightens the risk that, inadvertently, a member making a statement may be mistaken, or, in turn, that a member listening may misunderstand what another has stated.
This, in large part, is why strong, even indisputable evidence is needed for the Chair to reach the very serious conclusion that the House has been deliberately misled and that therefore a prima facie question of privilege exists.
To aid in this arduous task, the Chair is guided by three clear and well-established conditions, which my predecessor outlined in his ruling of April 29, 2015, when he stated at page 13197 of Debates:
…first, the statement needs to be misleading. Second, the member making the statement has to know that the statement was incorrect when it was made. Finally, it needs to be proven that the member intended to mislead the House by making the statement.
These criteria are meant to protect members as they freely express views that can be at odds with the views of other members.
Without evidence meeting these conditions, when faced with this type of allegation, the Chair has consistently concluded that the House has not, in fact, been deliberately misled, but rather that the matter can only be viewed as a disagreement on the interpretation of facts.
Thus, while the member for Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman may be in disagreement with the statements made by the Minister of National Defence, there was no evidence presented that would suggest that the three necessary conditions existed in this case or that the Chair has cause, exceptionally, to overlook the long-standing practice of taking members at their word when the accuracy of their statements is called into question.
As stated at page 145 of House of Commons Procedure and Practice, second edition:
If the question of privilege involves a disagreement between two (or more) Members as to facts, the Speaker typically rules that such a dispute does not prevent Members from fulfilling their parliamentary functions nor does such a disagreement breach the collective privileges of the House.
As such, the Chair concludes that no prima facie case of privilege exists in this case.
I thank hon. members for their attention.
Je suis maintenant prêt à rendre ma décision sur la question de privilège soulevée le 4 avril 2017 par l'honorable député de Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman au sujet de déclarations trompeuses qu'aurait faites le ministre de la Défense nationale.
Je remercie le député de Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman d'avoir soulever cette question, de même que le secrétaire parlementaire de la leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes de ses observations.
Lorsqu'il a soulevé la question, le député de Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman a affirmé que le ministre de la Défense nationale, dans une réponse à la question écrite Q-600, déposée à la Chambre le 30 janvier 2017 et signée par lui, avait déclaré que tous les membres des Forces armées canadiennes déployés lors de l'Opération IMPACT au Koweït et en Irak s'étaient vu accorder un allègement fiscal par le gouvernement précédent. Dans des interventions subséquentes, les 3 et 16 mai 2017, le député a ajouté qu'un communiqué de presse diffusé par le ministre le 19 avril 2017, une note d'information préparée pour le ministre et obtenue par une demande d'accès à l'information ainsi qu'un arrêté ministériel pris le 17 avril 2017 par le président du Conseil du Trésor venaient appuyer cette assertion.
Le député a soutenu que le ministre avait induit la Chambre en erreur lorsque, en répondant à des questions orales les 8 et 21 mars 2017, il avait déclaré que le gouvernement précédent avait envoyé les membres des Forces armées canadiennes au Koweït et en Irak sans leur accorder d'indemnité non imposable au moment de leur déploiement.
Le député de Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman a affirmé que ces deux versions des faits apparemment contradictoires avaient induit la Chambre en erreur et que, par conséquent, elles constituaient à première vue une atteinte au privilège puisque, comme il l'a affirmé, « seulement l'une des deux versions peut être vraie. » Lors d'une de ses interventions, il a présenté d'autres preuves à l'appui de son affirmation selon laquelle:
[...] le ministre de la Défense nationale a induit les Canadiens en erreur. [il] a inventé des faits et [il] a embelli la vérité à maintes reprises, sur le dossier visé par ma question de privilège initiale et sur d'autres dossiers.
De son côté, le secrétaire parlementaire de la leader du gouvernement à la Chambre a expliqué que, étant donné que l'allégement fiscal en question avait été appliqué de façon rétroactive, le ministre avait en fait donné exactement la même information dans sa réponse à la période des questions que dans sa réponse à la question no 600 inscrite au Feuilleton. Il a donc fait valoir qu'il s'agissait d'un désaccord quant aux faits et non pas d'une question de privilège.
Les députés ont le droit de demander et d'obtenir de l'information fiable afin d'exercer leurs fonctions parlementaires. S'ils ne pouvaient avoir accès à des renseignements exacts, les députés seraient dans l'impossibilité de demander des comptes au gouvernement. En conséquence, la présidence a souvent été appelée à se prononcer sur la qualité, l'exhaustivité et la cohérence de l'information fournie en réponse à des questions, qu'elles soient orales ou écrites.
Comme les députés le savent, l'échange de renseignements à la Chambre se fait inévitablement par le prisme de perceptions et de points de vue divergents et, il va de soi, contradictoires. De ce fait, il existe bien sûr un risque élevé que, sans le vouloir, un député commette une erreur dans ses déclarations ou que, de son côté, le député qui écoute l'intervention comprenne mal ce qui a été dit.
Cela explique en grande partie pourquoi la présidence a besoin d'une preuve forte, voire incontestable, pour tirer la conclusion très grave que la Chambre a été délibérément induite en erreur et qu'il y a par conséquent, à première vue, matière à question de privilège.
Pour s'aider dans cette tâche difficile, la présidence s'appuie sur trois conditions bien établies, que mon prédécesseur a mises en évidence dans la décision qu'il a rendue le 29 avril 2015, à la page 13197 des Débats, lorsqu'il a déclaré:
[...] tout d'abord, la déclaration doit être trompeuse. Ensuite, le député ayant fait la déclaration devait savoir, au moment où il l'a faite, que celle-ci était inexacte. Enfin, il faut prouver que le député avait l'intention d'induire la Chambre en erreur.
Ces conditions existent pour protéger les députés, afin qu’ils puissent librement exprimer des opinions que ne partagent pas nécessairement d’autres députés.
Lorsqu’elle a dû se prononcer sur ce type d’allégations, la présidence, en l’absence de preuve démontrant que les trois conditions étaient remplies, a systématiquement conclu que la Chambre n’avait pas été délibérément induite en erreur et que l’affaire devait être considérée comme un désaccord quant à l’interprétation des faits.
Donc, bien que le député de Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman puisse ne pas être d’accord avec les déclarations faites par le ministre de la Défense nationale, rien ne prouve que les trois conditions sont remplies en l’espèce ou que la présidence, à titre exceptionnel, aurait des motifs de ne pas suivre la pratique de longue date consistant à croire les députés sur parole lorsque l’exactitude de leurs déclarations est mise en doute.
Il est écrit, à la page 145 de la deuxième édition de La procédure et les usages de la Chambre, ce qui suit:
Si la question de privilège concerne un désaccord entre deux députés (ou plus) quant à des faits, le Président statue habituellement qu'un tel différend ne compromet pas leur capacité de s'acquitter de leurs fonctions parlementaires et qu'il ne porte pas atteinte aux privilèges collectifs de la Chambre.
Par conséquent, la présidence ne peut conclure qu’il y a, à première vue, matière à question de privilège.
Je remercie les honorables députés de leur attention.
View James Bezan Profile
CPC (MB)
Mr. Speaker, I rise again today to provide an addendum to the submission I made on May 3 to my original question of privilege raised on April 4, 2017.
As you will recall, and the record will show, my original question of privilege concerned statements made by the Minister of National Defence in this House concerning the hardship benefits, danger pay, and the tax relief status of members of the Canadian Armed Forces stationed in Kuwait on Operation Impact.
The additional information and evidence supporting my question of privilege comes from a briefing note provided to the Minister of National Defence and obtained through the Access to Information Act by my office on Friday, as well as a ministerial order issued by the President of the Treasury Board on April 17, 2017. The briefing note reads in part:
The initial assessments for the Op IMPACT (Kuwait) locations were conducted on 11 June 2015 (with an effective date of 5 October 2014, the start of the operation) and established a Risk Level of 2.13. In accordance with the Income Tax Act, the Minister of National Defence requested that the Minister of Finance designate Op IMPACT (Kuwait) locations for Tax Relief. The Minister of Finance concurred with the request and designated Op IMPACT (Kuwait) for Tax Relief.
Therefore, under the previous Conservative government, all members of the Canadian Armed Forces deployed to Operation Impact in Kuwait were provided with a tax relief status on their hardship and risk pay effective October 5, 2014. This was able to occur because former defence minister Jason Kenney took the initiative to request that then finance minister Joe Oliver designate Operation Impact, Kuwait location, for tax relief. The request was approved without question simply because it was the right thing to do.
The solution to this problem is rather simple and should have never reached this point. The briefing note goes on to say that the tax relief status was re-evaluated on March 31, 2016, under the current Liberal government. The result of this re-evaluation was that our troops stationed at Camp Arifjan in Kuwait could no longer receive the benefit, effective September 1, 2016.
According to the briefing note that was prepared by the Minister of National Defence on November 24, 2016, all troops stationed in Kuwait on Operation Impact were receiving the benefit effective the first day of the operation, October 5, 2014, until September 1, 2016. The minister and his office were aware of this.
However, the Minister of National Defence said in the House on March 21, 2017, “the previous government was the one that actually sent our troops to Iraq without the tax-free benefit.” In question period on March 8, he said, “I would also like to correct the member in terms of the previous government's actions on this. It actually sent troops into Kuwait without the tax-free allowance”. On March 9, during a debate on this very issue, the minister said, “Our troops did not have tax-free status when they were actually deployed for that operation. It was in February 2016, after my visit to Kuwait.” During that debate, he also said, “I cannot change reality. When I visited the troops, they did not have a tax-free allowance.”
The minister has already apologized once for his attempt to change reality. I hope he does so again, and this time actually takes responsibility for his wrongdoings. The Minister of National Defence's first visit to Kuwait was in November 2015. As I read in my original question of privilege and the addendum, the tax relief status was effective from October 2014 until September 2016. Therefore, while the minister was visiting troops in November 2015 in Kuwait, the tax relief status was still in place.
We now have several documents in our possession that prove all soldiers deployed to Kuwait on Operation Impact were receiving tax-free status on their hardship and risk pay effective from the date that the operation began, October 5, 2014, until September 1, 2016, including a briefing note prepared specifically for the minister and a response to an Order Paper question with the minister's signature.
Furthermore, due to the government's lack of willingness to take action to correct the mistake of cancelling the tax-free status for the soldiers in Kuwait in Operation Impact, I had to table a motion on March 9, 2017, on behalf of the official opposition which reads:
That the House call on the government to show support and appreciation for the brave men and women serving in the Canadian Armed Forces by reversing its decision to take away from the soldiers fighting against ISIS the tax benefit which provides them with $1,500 to $1,800 per month for the hardship and risk associated with their deployment, and to retroactively provide the payment to members stationed at Camp Arifjan whose tax relief was cancelled as of September 1, 2016.
The motion was passed unanimously. The minister told this House, “We support the motion related to Canadian Forces members at Camp Arifjan, who were deployed when the risk level was adjusted.”
However, on April 17, 2017, the President of the Treasury Board issued a ministerial directive to provide personnel at Ali Al Salem Air Base tax exempt status until August 16, 2017, while those at Camp Arifjan, a mere 40 kilometres away, were only provided the tax exempt status until December 18, 2016.
Furthermore, the access to information request I referenced also notes that the chief of the defence staff provided direction to evaluate the Kuwait region as a whole rather than each base separately. This direction was ignored, which is evidenced by the ministerial order that extended the tax exemption for Ali Salem Air Base to August 2017, while Camp Arifjan had its benefit cut as of December 2016. I hope the government is not being vindictive and penalizing our troops at Camp Arifjan for speaking out about this unfair situation.
Therefore, the government did not reverse its decision to take away the tax benefit. It only provided retroactive payments for three and a half months, leaving soldiers deployed for up to eight months without the tax exemption.
To summarize, on multiple occasions in this House, the Minister of National Defence accused the previous government of deploying troops to Kuwait and Iraq without the tax exemption. We now have a response to Order Paper Question No. 600 with the minister's signature, multiple access to information requests, and a quote from the minister in an April 19 press release from DND that say otherwise.
Furthermore, by supporting the Conservative motion on March 21, 2017, the minister agreed to retroactively pay the tax relief benefit to soldiers at Camp Arifjan. However, a ministerial directive issued by the President of the Treasury Board on April 17, 2017, and a press release issued by DND on April 19, 2017, state that those troops will only be receiving retroactive payments for three and half months and not for their full deployment.
The Minister of National Defence has a clear, intentional, and repetitive pattern of making misleading statements.
Finally, Mr. Speaker, I submit, for your consideration, the following documents: the access to information request I just referred to; the ministerial order from the President of the Treasury Board issued on April 17, 2017; the response to Order Paper Question No. 600, signed by the Minister of National Defence; and the press release issued by the Department of National Defence on April 19, 2017, confirming the ministerial order and that troops deployed to Kuwait for Operation Impact had the tax exempt status effective on the first date of their deployment.
I look forward to the ruling on my question of privilege.
Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais aujourd'hui ajouter quelques mots à mon intervention du 3 mai concernant la question de privilège soulevée le 4 avril 2017.
Comme vous vous le rappelez sans doute, et comme le montre le hansard, la question de privilège que j'ai soulevée porte sur les déclarations du ministre de la Défense nationale concernant les indemnités de difficulté, la prime au danger et l'allégement fiscal accordé aux membres des Forces armées canadiennes qui prennent part à l'opération Impact et qui sont stationnées au Koweït.
Les renseignements supplémentaires et les éléments de preuve à l'appui de ma question de privilège proviennent d'une note d'information qui a été envoyée au ministre de la Défense nationale et que mon bureau a réussi à obtenir vendredi grâce à une demande d'accès à l'information, ainsi que d'un arrêté ministériel pris le 17 avril 2017 par le président du Conseil du Trésor. Voici un extrait de la note d'information:
Les premières évaluations des emplacements de l'opération IMPACT au Koweït ont eu lieu le 11 juin 2015 (et remontaient jusqu'au début de l'opération, soit au 5 octobre 2014) et ont établi le niveau de risque à 2.13. Conformément à la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu, le ministre de la Défense nationale a demandé au ministre des Finances de désigner les emplacements de l'opération IMPACT au Koweït aux fins d'allégement fiscal. Le ministre des Finances a acquiescé à la demande.
Ainsi, lorsque l'ancien gouvernement conservateur était au pouvoir, les membres des Forces armées canadiennes déployés au Koweït dans le cadre de l'opération Impact ont tous bénéficié d'un allégement fiscal applicable aux indemnités de difficulté et de risque, et ce, à partir du 5 octobre 2014. Cet allégement a été possible parce que, à l'époque, le ministre de la Défense, Jason Kenney, a pris l'initiative de demander au ministre des Finances, Joe Oliver, de désigner les emplacements de l'opération Impact au Koweït comme admissibles à l'allégement fiscal. La demande a été acceptée sans difficulté parce qu'elle allait de soi.
Il existe une solution relativement simple au problème actuel, un problème qui n'aurait jamais dû survenir. La note d'information indique plus loin que l'admissibilité des militaires à l'allégement fiscal a été réévaluée le 31 mars 2016, alors que l'actuel gouvernement libéral était déjà au pouvoir. Cette réévaluation a eu pour conséquence que les militaires déployés au camp Arifjan, au Koweït, ont cessé d'être admissibles à l'allégement fiscal le 1er septembre 2016.
D'après la note d'information rédigée par le ministre de la Défense nationale le 24 novembre 2016, tous les militaires participant à l'opération Impact au Koweït ont bénéficié de l'allégement fiscal à partir du début de l'opération, le 5 octobre 2014, jusqu'au 1er septembre 2016. Le ministre et son bureau le savaient.
Cependant, le ministre de la Défense nationale a dit à la Chambre, le 21 mars 2017: « C'est le gouvernement précédent qui a envoyé nos militaires en Irak sans leur offrir d'avantages non imposables. » À la période des questions du 8 mars, il a déclaré: « Je tiens également à rectifier les observations de la députée au sujet des gestes posés par l'ancien gouvernement conservateur. En fait, l'ancien gouvernement a envoyé des militaires au Koweït sans leur accorder d'indemnité non imposable. » Le lendemain, au cours d'un débat sur cette même question, le ministre a affirmé: « Les soldats canadiens ne bénéficiaient pas de l'exonération fiscale lorsqu'ils ont été déployés dans le cadre de cette mission. Elle ne leur a été accordée qu'en février 2016, après ma visite au Koweït. » Au cours de ce même débat, il a également affirmé: « je ne peux pas changer la réalité. Lorsque j’ai rendu visite à nos soldats, ils n’avaient pas droit à une indemnité non imposable. »
Le ministre s'est déjà excusé une fois pour sa tentative de changer la réalité. J'espère qu'il le fera encore et, cette fois-ci, qu'il assumera finalement la responsabilité de ses méfaits. La première visite du ministre de la Défense nationale au Koweït a été en novembre 2015. Comme je l'ai lu dans ma question de privilège d'origine et dans l'addendum, allégement fiscal a été en vigueur à partir du mois d'octobre 2014 jusqu'en septembre 2016. Donc, lorsque le ministre s'est rendu auprès des troupes en novembre 2015 au Koweït, allégement fiscal était encore en vigueur.
Nous avons maintenant en notre possession plusieurs documents qui prouvent que tous les soldats déployés dans le cadre de l'opération Impact ont reçu une prime de difficulté et de risque exempte d'impôt depuis le début de la mission, soit du 4 octobre 2014 jusqu'au 1er septembre 2016, dont une note d'information à l'intention du ministre ainsi qu'une réponse à une question inscrite au Feuilleton signée par le ministre.
En outre, le 9 mars 2017, devant la réticence du gouvernement à corriger l'erreur qu'il a commise en annulant les avantages fiscaux accordés aux soldats participant à l'opération Impact au Koweït, je n'ai eu d'autre choix que de présenter une motion au nom de l'opposition officielle, que voici:
Que la Chambre demande au gouvernement de faire preuve de soutien et de reconnaissance à l'égard des hommes et des femmes qui servent avec bravoure dans les Forces armées canadiennes, en annulant sa décision de retirer aux soldats qui combattent le groupe armé État islamique l'avantage fiscal qui leur donne de 1 500 $ à 1 800 $ par mois à l'égard de l'adversité et des risques associés à leur déploiement, et de verser rétroactivement aux membres stationnés au Camp Arifjan allégement fiscal qui a été annulé le 1er septembre 2016.
La motion a été adoptée à l'unanimité. Le ministre a fait la déclaration suivante à la Chambre: « Nous appuyons la motion concernant les membres des Forces canadiennes qui ont été déployés au camp Arifjan lorsque le niveau de risque a été ajusté. »
Toutefois, le 17 avril 2017, le président du Conseil du Trésor a émis une directive ministérielle qui demandait d'accorder au personnel de la base aérienne Ali Al Salem le statut d'exonération fiscale jusqu'au 16 août 2017 alors que les soldats du camp Arifjan, situé seulement quelque 40 kilomètres plus loin, se voyaient retirer le même statut dès le 18 décembre 2016.
De plus, grâce à la demande d'accès à l'information dont j'ai parlé, nous savons également que le chef d'état-major de la Défense a demandé d'évaluer le Koweït comme une région plutôt que de se pencher sur chaque base séparément. La consigne a été ignorée comme le prouve la directive ministérielle qui prolongeait l'exonération fiscale pour la base aérienne Ali Al Salem jusqu'en août 2017 alors que l'avantage des soldats du camp Arifjan a été retiré en décembre 2016. J'espère que le gouvernement n'exerce pas une forme de vengeance et qu'il ne pénalise pas les troupes du camp Arifjan parce qu'elles ont dénoncé une situation inéquitable.
Ainsi, le gouvernement n'est pas revenu sur sa décision de retirer l'avantage fiscal. Il s'est contenté de verser des paiements rétroactifs pour trois mois et demi, laissant les soldats en mission jusqu'à huit mois sans exonération fiscale.
En résumé, à de multiples occasions à la Chambre, le ministre de la Défense nationale a accusé le gouvernement précédent d'avoir déployé les troupes au Koweït et en Irak sans exonération fiscale. Nous avons maintenant en main la réponse à la question au Feuilleton no 600 signée par le ministre, de multiples demandes d'accès à l'information et une citation du ministre dans un communiqué de presse du ministère de la Défense nationale daté du 19 avril, qui indiquent toutes le contraire.
De surcroît?, lorsqu'il a exprimé son appui à la motion conservatrice le 21 mars 2017, le ministre a accepté d'accorder rétroactivement l'allégement fiscal aux soldats du camp Arifjan. Or, selon une directive ministérielle émise par le président du Conseil du Trésor le 17 avril 2017 ainsi qu'un communiqué de presse publié le 19 avril 2017 par le ministère de la Défense nationale, ces soldats recevront seulement des paiements rétroactifs pour une période de trois mois et demi, et non pour la totalité de leur déploiement.
Le ministre de la Défense nationale a manifestement tendance à faire sciemment des déclarations trompeuses.
Finalement, monsieur le Président, je soumets à votre examen les documents suivants: la demande d'accès à l'information dont je viens de parler; l'arrêté ministériel pris le 17 avril 2017 par le président du Conseil du Trésor; la réponse à la question no 600 inscrite au Feuilleton, qui est signée par le ministre de la Défense nationale; et le communiqué de presse publié le 19 avril 2017 par le ministère de la Défense nationale, qui confirme l'arrêté ministériel et prouve que les soldats déployés au Koweït dans le cadre de l'opération Impact ont bénéficié de l'allégement fiscal dès le premier jour de leur déploiement.
Je suis impatient d'entendre votre décision sur ma question de privilège.
View Geoff Regan Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Geoff Regan Profile
2017-05-16 10:31 [p.11231]
I thank the hon. member for Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman for his additional arguments. I will take the matter under advisement. Assuming there are no further arguments on this question of privilege, I look forward to bringing a ruling in due course.
Je remercie le député de Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman des nouveaux arguments qu'il a fait valoir. Je vais prendre la question en délibéré. S'il n'y a pas d'autres arguments concernant cette question de privilège, je ferai connaître ma décision à la Chambre en temps opportun.
View Cheryl Gallant Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, on May 3, on behalf of the women and men who serve their country in uniform as members of the Canadian Armed Forces, I asked the Prime Minister a question. I asked him how many more times the Minister of National Defence has to mislead Canadians before the Prime Minister will force him to resign. The response I received on behalf of our women and men in uniform was an insult to the service they provide to our country. It is time for the Prime Minister to understand that Canadians expect him to do more than just show up for question period one day a week and endlessly repeat mindless talking points prepared for him by his handler, Gerald Butts—the same mindless talking points, I might add, that I should not have to expect to hear during this adjournment debate.
I challenge the Prime Minister's unethical support for a member of his party who misled voters in the 2015 election concerning his service record and who continues to mislead Canadians by repeating false claims when he thinks he can get away with doing so.
Having grossly inflated his role in one of the largest Canadian military operations in recent history, the Minister of National Defence should have resigned. After he failed to do the honourable thing and fall on his sword, the Prime Minister should have fired him.
The Minister of National Defence has lost the confidence of the women and men he was appointed to serve. The Prime Minister, by refusing to fire the Minister of National Defence, has lost the confidence of our NATO allies. Defence expenditures are now at their lowest level since the end of the last great war.
These are the facts.
As the member of Parliament for Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, I have Garrison Petawawa in my riding. Petawawa is home to the 1st Battalion of the Royal Canadian Regiment. During operation Medusa, in the war in Afghanistan, it was the Royal Canadian Regiment that bore the brunt of the fighting. Members of 1st Battalion of the Royal Canadian Regiment were honoured with the Commander-in-Chief Unit Commendation, which is only awarded for extraordinary deeds or activities restricted to war or warlike conditions in an active theatre of operations.
Out in the field during operation Medusa, the battle group was commanded by then major general Omer Lavoie, the commander of the 1st Battalion, the Royal Canadian Regiment.
The Canadian component of his force comprised the 1RCR, a complement of 2 Combat Engineer Regiment, 2nd Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, medics from 2 Field Ambulance, all from Petawawa, and various support staff in undetermined roles, including the self-proclaimed architect of the operation, a reservist with no military training, with an assigned rank, for a total of about 1,050 Canadians.
What is known for sure is that five soldiers in that fight received Canada's third-highest award for bravery, the Medal of Military Valour, while another, Corporal Sean Teal, received the Star of Military Valour, Canada's second-highest award, just beneath the Victoria Cross. One other soldier was mentioned in the dispatches.
This is how the Minister of National Defence chose to inaccurately describe his role in Operation Medusa: “On my first deployment to Kandahar in 2006, I was...the architect of...Operation Medusa where we removed...1,500 Taliban fighters off the battlefield. And I was [proudly] on the main assault....”
Much has been written about this effort to take credit for whatever minor role the minister may or may not have played; however, what is particularly outrageous for the soldiers doing the actual fighting was the claim by the Minister of National Defence to being on the main assault.
Claiming to be on the main assault is an insult to every member of Charlie Company, 1st Battalion of the Royal Canadian Regiment. Charlie Company of 1RCR is the most decorated, most bloodied company in the serving Canadian Forces. They earned their reputation by being on the main assault.
Monsieur le Président, le 3 mai, j'ai posé une question au premier ministre au nom des hommes et des femmes qui servent leur pays au sein des Forces armées canadiennes. Je lui ai demandé combien de fois encore le ministre de la Défense nationale devra induire les Canadiens en erreur avant qu'il l'oblige à démissionner. La réponse que j'ai reçue est un affront pour les militaires et les services qu'ils rendent au Canada. Il est grand temps que le premier ministre comprenne que les Canadiens s'attendent à ce qu'il fasse plus que se présenter à la période des questions une fois par semaine et répéter benoîtement les réponses prémâchées que lui prépare son grand manitou, Gerald Butts, les mêmes réponses prémâchées, oserais-je dire, que celles auxquelles je devrais pouvoir espérer échapper pendant le débat d'ajournement de ce soir.
Je trouve aberrant que le premier ministre manque d'éthique au point d'appuyer un membre de son parti qui a induit les électeurs en erreur pendant la campagne électorale en embellissant ses états de service et qui continue d'induire les Canadiens en erreur en répétant les mêmes faussetés parce qu'il est convaincu de pouvoir s'en tirer sans être inquiété.
Après avoir exagéré aussi grossièrement le rôle qu'il a joué dans l'une des plus grandes opérations militaires canadiennes de l'histoire récente, le ministre de la Défense nationale aurait dû démissionner. En voyant que son ministre refusait de prendre ses responsabilités et de se faire harakiri, le premier ministre aurait dû lui montrer la porte.
Le ministre de la Défense nationale a perdu la confiance des soldats qu'il avait pour mandat de servir. En refusant de renvoyer le ministre de la Défense nationale, le premier ministre a perdu la confiance des nos alliés de l'OTAN. Les dépenses de la défense sont maintenant à leur plus bas niveau depuis la fin de la dernière grande guerre.
Voici les faits.
Dans ma circonscription, Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, se trouve la garnison de Petawawa, dont fait partie le 1er Bataillon du Royal Canadian Regiment. Lors de l'opération Méduse, menée dans le cadre de la guerre en Afghanistan, c'est le Royal Canadian Regiment qui a mené l'essentiel des combats. Les membres du 1er Bataillon du Royal Canadian Regiment ont eu l'honneur de recevoir la Mention élogieuse du commandant en chef, qui n'est décernée qu'en reconnaissance d'un acte ou d'un exploit extraordinaire accompli en temps de guerre ou dans un théâtre opérationnel qui ressemble à l'état de guerre.
Pendant l'opération Méduse, le groupe de combat sur le terrain était alors sous le commandement du major-général Omer Lavoie, commandant du 1er Bataillon du Royal Canadian Regiment.
Dans son groupe de combat, les effectifs canadiens, dont le nombre s'élevait à environ 1 050 personnes, se composaient de membres du 1er Bataillon du Royal Canadian Regiment, d'effectifs complémentaires du 2e Régiment du génie de combat et du 2e Régiment de la Royal Canadian Horse Artillery ainsi que de personnel infirmier de la 2e Ambulance de campagne, tous basés à Petawawa, auxquels s'ajoutaient divers effectifs de soutien qui occupaient des fonctions indéterminées, y compris l'architecte autoproclamé de l'opération, un réserviste sans formation militaire à qui on avait attribué un grade.
Ce qui est certain, c'est que cinq soldats ayant pris part à ce combat ont reçu la troisième décoration canadienne pour acte de bravoure en importance, la Médaille de la vaillance militaire, et qu'un autre, le caporal Sean Teal a reçu l'Étoile de la vaillance militaire, la deuxième décoration en importance, juste après la Croix de Victoria. Un autre soldat a été mentionné dans les dépêches.
Voici comment le ministre de la Défense nationale a choisi de décrire de façon inexacte son rôle dans l'opération Méduse: « Lors de mon premier déploiement à Kandahar en 2006, j'ai été [...] l'architecte de [...] l'opération Méduse, dans le cadre de laquelle nous avons chassé [...] 1 500 combattants talibans hors du champ de bataille. Et j'ai participé [fièrement] à l'assaut principal [...]. »
On a écrit beaucoup de choses au sujet de cette tentative du ministre de s'attribuer le mérite du travail des autres, indépendamment de l'importance du rôle qu'il a pu jouer; cela dit, ce qui est particulièrement choquant pour les soldats qui ont livré combat, c'est l'affirmation du ministre de la Défense nationale selon laquelle il a participé à l'assaut principal.
Affirmer qu'il a fait partie de l'offensive principale est une insulte pour chaque membre de la compagnie Charles du 1er bataillon du Royal Canadian Regiment. Il s'agit de la compagnie la plus décorée et de celle qui a subi le plus de pertes parmi les membres en service des Forces canadiennes. Ses soldats ont acquis leur réputation par leur présence lors de l'assaut principal.
View Jean Rioux Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean Rioux Profile
2017-05-16 19:45 [p.11302]
Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for her question.
As I had the opportunity to emphasize Monday, May 8, 2017, in the House, I have spent the past few months working with the Minister of National Defence, and I have been a privileged witness to his integrity and the determination with which he discharges his mandate.
The primary responsibility of the minister, and of our government, is to ensure that the Canadian Armed Forces have the training, equipment, and support they need to carry out the missions they are assigned here in Canada and around the world.
Over the last year and a half, our minister has sought to achieve this very objective. It is what he strives to do every day. The Minister of National Defence is working to discharge that mandate with the greatest respect for our men and women in uniform.
That being said, the member opposite is questioning his expertise and his role during Operation Medusa. The minister has admitted that he made a mistake in describing his role. He retracted that statement and apologized in the House.
The minister's comments were in no way meant to diminish the role of his former senior officers and comrades-in-arms. He gave them a heartfelt apology. The minister is proud to have served as part of an extraordinary team of Canadian, American, and Afghan soldiers who successfully carried out Operation Medusa. His commanding officer in Afghanistan, General Fraser, considered him to be one of the best intelligence officers he ever worked with.
He said:
He was the best single Canadian intelligence asset in theatre, and his hard work, personal bravery, and dogged determination undoubtedly saved a multitude of Coalition lives. Through his courage and dedication, [the minister] has single-handedly changed the face of intelligence gathering and analysis in Afghanistan.
He went on to say:
He tirelessly and selflessly devoted himself to piecing together the ground truth on tribal and Taliban networks in the Kandahar area, and his analysis was so compelling that it drove a number of large scale theatre-resourced efforts, including Operation Medusa...
Retired Colonel Chris Vernon of the British army said:
You know, without [the minister's] input as a critical player, major player, a pivotal player I'd say, Medusa wouldn't have happened. We wouldn't have the intelligence and the tribal picture to put the thing together.
The Minister of National Defence made a tremendous contribution in his deployments to Afghanistan and is currently making an even greater contribution within our government.
Over the past 18 months, he has contributed to significantly changing our mission in Iraq, and this mission is producing solid results. He launched the most ambitious defence policy review in the past 20 years. He established solid and effective ties with all our allies, including within NATO and especially with our American neighbours, our most important military and economic partner.
With the help of his cabinet colleagues, he made major improvements to the procurement process.
I am proud of what he has accomplished and I am happy to work by his side. With the help of the minister's vision, leadership, and hard work, I am confident that our government will ensure that the Canadian Armed Forces have the tools and funding they need.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie la députée de sa question.
Comme j'ai eu l'occasion de le faire valoir le lundi 8 mai dernier à la Chambre, j'ai passé les derniers mois à travailler auprès du ministre de la Défense nationale, et je suis un témoin privilégié de son intégrité et de la détermination qu'il emploie dans la mise en oeuvre de son mandat.
La responsabilité première du ministre et celle de notre gouvernement est de veiller à ce que les Forces armées canadiennes disposent de la formation, de l'équipement et du soutien nécessaires pour mener à bien les missions qui leur sont confiées ici au Canada et ailleurs dans le monde.
Depuis un an et demi, c'est exactement l'objectif que s'est donné le ministre de la Défense et c'est ce qu'il s'efforce de faire chaque jour. Ce mandat, le ministre de la Défense nationale s'applique à le réaliser dans le plus grand respect des hommes et des femmes en uniforme.
Cela étant dit, la députée d'en face a mis en doute ses compétences et son rôle dans le cadre de l'opération Méduse. Le ministre a admis qu'il avait commis une erreur en décrivant son rôle, il s'est rétracté et il s'est excusé à la Chambre.
Les commentaires émis par le ministre n'avaient aucunement pour but de diminuer le rôle de ses anciens supérieurs ni de ses compagnons d'armes. Il s'est excusé auprès d'eux de la façon la plus sincère. Le ministre est fier d'avoir servi au sein d'une équipe extraordinaire composée de soldats canadiens, américains et afghans qui ont fait de l'opération Méduse un succès. Son commandant en Afghanistan, le général Fraser, le considérait comme l'un des meilleurs agents de renseignement avec qui il ait jamais travaillé.
Il a dit de lui:
[...] en matière de renseignement, il était le meilleur atout du Canada sur le théâtre des opérations. Son ardeur au travail, son courage et sa détermination farouches ont sans aucun doute contribué à sauver une multitude de vies au sein de la Coalition. Par son dévouement et son courage, le ministre a réussi à modifier à lui seul la manière de recueillir et d'analyser le renseignement en Afghanistan.
Il a, de plus, ajouté:
Il a travaillé sans relâche, sans jamais penser à lui, pour assembler les pièces du puzzle et faire la lumière sur les réseaux tribaux et talibans dans la région de Kandahar, et son analyse était tellement convaincante qu'elle a donné lieu à un certain nombre d'efforts de grande envergure mettant en cause les ressources sur le théâtre des opérations, dont l'opération Méduse.
Le colonel à la retraite de l'armée britannique Chris Vernon a déclaré:
L'opération Méduse n'aurait pas vu le jour sans la contribution majeure, essentielle et centrale qu'a apportée le ministre. Nous n'aurions pas disposé des renseignements et des données tribales nécessaires à l'opération.
Le ministre de la Défense nationale a apporté une grande contribution dans ses déploiements en Afghanistan, et il est en train d'apporter une contribution encore plus grande au sein de notre gouvernement.
Au cours des 18 derniers mois, il a contribué à modifier de façon significative notre mission en Irak, et cette mission donne des résultats concrets. Il a lancé la plus ambitieuse révision de la politique de défense des 20 dernières années. Il a établi des liens solides et efficaces avec tous nos alliés, notamment au sein de l'OTAN et en particulier avec nos voisins américains, notre plus important partenaire sur le plan militaire et économique.
Avec l'aide de ses collègues au sein du Cabinet, il a apporté de grandes améliorations au processus d'approvisionnement.
Je suis fier de ce qu'il a accompli, je suis heureux de travailler à ses côtés et je suis convaincu que grâce à sa vision, à son leadership et à son travail acharné, notre gouvernement va faire en sorte que les Forces armées canadiennes aient les outils et le financement nécessaires.
View Cheryl Gallant Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, it is also an insult to Bravo Company, which joined the main assault after Charlie Company was nearly decimated. The Minister of National Defence's claim of being on the main assault is an insult also to the five members of Charlie Company who lost their lives, and the 40 wounded comrades.
What is clear is that the decision by the Minister of National Defence, on more than one occasion, to mislead Canadians about something so important as the most significant battle fought by Canadians since the Korean War means the minister, and by extension the Prime Minister for refusing to fire him, cannot be trusted to do what is right and honourable. When the minister makes another public pronouncement, how will Canadians know whether he is telling the truth or merely making a mistake?
On behalf of all Canadians, the House deserves real answers to the questions Canadians would like to have answers for and not for the mindless talking points that characterize the Prime Minister's question period.
Monsieur le Président, c'est également une insulte à l'endroit de la Compagnie Bravo, qui s'est jointe à l'assaut principal après que la Compagnie Charlie fut presque entièrement décimée. Le fait que le ministre de la Défense nationale prétende avoir participé à l'assaut principal est aussi une insulte aux 5 membres de la Compagnie Charlie qui ont perdu la vie et aux 40 autres qui ont été blessés.
Ce qui est clair, c'est que la décision du ministre de la Défense nationale d'induire en erreur, à plus d'une occasion, les Canadiens au sujet de quelque chose d'aussi important que la bataille la plus importante à laquelle les Canadiens ont participé depuis la guerre de Corée nous indique que nous ne pouvons compter sur le ministre, ni d'ailleurs sur le premier ministre — parce qu'il refuse de renvoyer le ministre —, pour agir de façon juste et honorable. La prochaine fois que le ministre s'adressera aux Canadiens, comment pourront-ils savoir s'il dit la vérité ou s'il est en train de se tromper?
Au nom de tous les Canadiens, la Chambre mérite de vraies réponses aux questions que les Canadiens se posent, pas les réponses préparées abrutissantes auxquelles nous a habitués le premier ministre pendant la période des questions.
View Jean Rioux Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean Rioux Profile
2017-05-16 19:50 [p.11302]
Mr. Speaker, the minister apologized in the House for what he said, but I get the distinct impression that, even if he apologized 10 or 100 times, it would never be enough for the members opposite.
As I mentioned earlier, I have the privilege of working with the minister on a regular, if not daily, basis. Last Friday, I had the opportunity to accompany him on an extended tour of Quebec's flooded areas. I saw him talk with many members of our Canadian Armed Forces. Everywhere we went, the minister was greeted by our troops with respect and enthusiasm. The connection between them was obvious.
I know that the minister has a good understanding of the needs of our troops and the challenges they face. I also know that the members of our military trust him because they know that, like them, he served our country. They know that they can always count on him to help them better carry out their missions.
The minister has the support of our troops, his colleagues, and the Prime Minister, and he has promised to do great things for our country and the armed forces.
Monsieur le Président, le ministre a présenté ses excuses à la Chambre pour les propos qu'il a tenus, mais j'ai la nette impression que, même s'il devait s'excuser 10 fois ou 100 fois, ce ne serait jamais suffisant pour les gens d'en face.
Comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, j'ai le privilège de côtoyer le ministre sur une base régulière, pour ne pas dire quotidienne. Vendredi dernier, j'ai eu la chance d'accompagner le ministre lors d'une grande tournée des sites inondés au Québec. J'ai été témoin de nombreuses rencontres avec nos militaires. Partout où nous sommes allés, le ministre a été accueilli avec respect et enthousiasme par nos troupes. J'ai vu que le courant passait entre lui et les troupes.
Je sais que le ministre comprend bien les besoins de nos troupes et les défis auxquels elles sont confrontées. En retour, je sais que les militaires lui font confiance, car ils savent qu'il a servi notre pays, comme eux et elles le font. Ils savent qu'ils peuvent compter sur lui pour les aider à toujours mieux remplir les missions qui leur sont confiées.
Le ministre a l'appui des militaires, de ses collègues et du premier ministre, et il est promis à faire de grandes choses pour notre pays et les forces armées.
View Hélène Laverdière Profile
NDP (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I have two very simple questions for the Minister of National Defence.
Did he decide against holding a public inquiry into the Afghan detainee situation knowing there would be conflict of interest because of his role as liaison and intelligence officer in Afghanistan? If this was not his decision, did he recuse himself from the discussions since he would have been an important witness during a possible inquiry?
Monsieur le Président, j'ai deux questions très simples à l'intention du ministre de la Défense nationale.
A-t-il pris lui-même la décision de ne pas tenir d'enquête publique dans le dossier des détenus afghans, sachant qu'il y aurait conflit d'intérêts à cause de son rôle d'agent de liaison et de renseignement en Afghanistan? S'il n'a pas pris la décision lui-même, est-ce qu'il s'est retiré des discussions puisqu'il aurait été un témoin important lors d'une éventuelle enquête?
View Jean Rioux Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean Rioux Profile
2017-05-09 14:37 [p.10964]
Mr. Speaker, Canada is proud of the work of the honourable men and women in uniform, as well as the civilians who served in Afghanistan. Throughout its military operations in Afghanistan, Canada committed to ensuring that every person detained by the Canadian Armed Forces was tried, transferred, or released in accordance with its legal obligations. Canada's policies and procedures on detainees have already undergone various reviews, including by the Federal Court of Canada and under CAF internal mechanisms.
Monsieur le Président, le Canada est fier du travail honorable des hommes et des femmes en uniforme, ainsi que des civils qui ont servi en Afghanistan. Tout au long de ses opérations militaires en Afghanistan, le Canada s'est engagé à faire en sorte que toutes les personnes détenues par les Forces armées canadiennes soient traitées, transférées ou libérées en conformité avec ses obligations légales. Les politiques et les procédures du Canada concernant les détenus ont déjà fait l'objet de divers examens, y compris par la Cour fédérale du Canada et en vertu des mécanismes internes des Forces armées canadiennes.
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
Mr. Speaker, Canadians deserve clear answers about this decision not to hold a public inquiry into the transfer of detainees.
In the absence of a real answer to that question, let me ask the obvious follow-up. Did the Minister of National Defence inform the Conflict of Interest Commissioner of his role as an intelligence and liaison officer with local Afghan authorities, who were known torturers, when she inquired about his possible conflict of interest in quashing an inquiry into the transfer of Afghan detainees? If not, what alternative facts did he convey to the commissioner?
Monsieur le Président, les Canadiens méritent des réponses claires concernant la décision de ne pas tenir une enquête publique sur le transfert des détenus.
En l'absence de véritable réponse, je pose la question complémentaire qui va de soi. Le ministre de la Défense nationale a-t-il informé la commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts de son rôle en tant qu'agent de liaison et du renseignement auprès des autorités locales afghanes, des tortionnaires reconnus, lorsque cette dernière lui a posé des questions sur le possible conflit d'intérêt entourant son refus de tenir une enquête publique sur le transfert des détenus afghans? Sinon, quelle vérité déformée a-t-il communiquée à la commissaire?
View Jean Rioux Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean Rioux Profile
2017-05-09 14:39 [p.10964]
Mr. Speaker, we agree that transparency was lacking on this file under the former government.
As the hon. member knows, every opposition party under the previous government had the chance to go over 40,000 documents related to the issue. The NDP chose not to. Over the course of 10 years, the Afghan detainee issue received significant attention. No less than six investigations were held by the appropriate agencies, including one that is ongoing.
We look forward to going over the findings of the investigations.
Monsieur le Président, nous sommes d'accord que, sous l'ancien gouvernement, la transparence dans ce dossier a été déficiente.
Comme le sait le député, tous les partis de l'opposition sous le gouvernement précédent ont eu l'occasion de passer en revue 40 000 documents relatifs à la question. Le NPD a choisi de ne pas y participer. Au cours des 10 dernières années, la question des détenus afghans a fait l'objet d'une attention significative. En effet, pas moins de six enquêtes ont été menées par des organismes compétents, dont l'une est en cours.
Nous sommes impatients d'examiner ces résultats.
View James Bezan Profile
CPC (MB)
Mr. Speaker, the parliamentary secretary got that wrong, completely. Veterans and Canadians are calling on the defence minister to resign for habitually using alternative facts. There is a motion before this House calling on the defence minister to step aside.
Demonstrating complete disrespect for our brave men and women in uniform during the debate on this motion, the defence minister refused to acknowledge his wrongdoing. When will the defence minister do the right thing and resign?
Monsieur le Président, le secrétaire parlementaire se trompe complètement. Les anciens combattants et les Canadiens demandent la démission du ministre de la Défense parce qu'il fait une habitude de déformer la réalité. Une motion à l'étude à la Chambre demande sa démission.
Preuve de son manque de respect total à l'égard des courageux militaires canadiens, le ministre de la Défense a refusé de reconnaître ses torts pendant le débat sur la motion. Quand le ministre de la Défense fera-t-il ce qui s'impose et démissionnera-t-il?
View Jean Rioux Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean Rioux Profile
2017-05-09 14:40 [p.10964]
Mr. Speaker, the Minister of National Defence is a former reservist. He will always hold in high regard the service of Canadian Armed Forces members, both those he served with during his missions and those who served under other commanders or at other times.
Today, it is the minister's responsibility to ensure that the members of the Canadian Armed Forces have all the equipment, training, and care they need to carry out their missions, abroad and in Canada. This policy will ensure that there is adequate funding for the Canadian Armed Forces for the next 20 years.
Monsieur le Président, le ministre de la Défense nationale est un ancien réserviste. Il tiendra toujours en haute estime le service des militaires des Forces armées canadiennes, tant ceux et celles qu'il a côtoyés lors de ses missions que ceux et celles qui ont servi sous d'autres commandements ou à une autre époque.
Aujourd'hui, il incombe au ministre et au gouvernement de veiller à ce que les membres des Forces armées canadiennes disposent de tout l'équipement nécessaire pour mener à bien leur mission et de tout le soutien nécessaire à leur bien-être. Cette politique permettra d'assurer le financement adéquat des Forces armées canadiennes pour les 20 prochaines années.
View James Bezan Profile
CPC (MB)
Mr. Speaker, we thank the Minister of National Defence for his service as a veteran, but his service as a minister has been deplorable. The minister has taken away danger pay from our troops. He fabricated a capability gap for our fighter jets. He made misleading comments about our mission in Iraq, and he has embellished his service record.
The defence minister just cannot keep the facts straight. This is a massive problem when he is tasked with our national security and entrusted with the care of our deployed armed forces around the world.
How can the families of the brave men and women of the Canadian Armed Forces trust this defence minister with the lives of their loved ones when he so blatantly misleads Canadians?
Monsieur le Président, nous remercions le ministre de la Défense nationale de son service en tant qu'ancien combattant. Toutefois, son service en tant que ministre est déplorable. Le ministre a retiré aux militaires leur prime de risque. Il a inventé un déficit de capacité pour les avions de chasse. Il a fait des déclarations trompeuses concernant la mission canadienne en Irak, et il a embelli son bilan de service militaire.
Le ministre de la Défense n'arrive tout simplement pas à s'en tenir à la vérité. C'est un problème énorme puisqu'il est responsable de la sécurité nationale et qu'on lui confie le soin des membres des Forces armées déployés à l'étranger.
Comment les familles des membres des Forces armées canadiennes peuvent-elles avoir confiance en ce ministre de la Défense pour prendre soin de la vie de leur être cher alors qu'il induit les Canadiens en erreur de manière aussi flagrante?
View Jean Rioux Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean Rioux Profile
2017-05-09 14:41 [p.10965]
Mr. Speaker, we will make sure that our troops have all the necessary benefits to carry out their duties. This government was quick to retroactively address the inequity for the soldiers who lost their tax-free status in Operation Impact.
Our government is working hard to review the compensation rules and find a long-term solution to fix the mess we inherited and to ensure a fair and equitable process for all.
Monsieur le Président, nous verrons à ce que les militaires canadiens aient tous les avantages voulus pour s'acquitter de leur tâche. Le gouvernement actuel s'est empressé de remédier rétroactivement à l'iniquité frappant les soldats qui ont perdu leurs exonérations fiscales dans le cadre de l'opération Impact.
Notre gouvernement s'emploie activement à examiner les règles de rémunération et à trouver une solution à long terme pour remédier au gâchis qu'il a hérité et pour assurer un processus juste et équitable pour tous.
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I would like my colleague to listen carefully to my question so that he can give me the right answer.
Yesterday, the Minister of National Defence did not respond to the questions about his integrity, so I am going to try again. The minister violated the Canadian Forces code of values and ethics.
With regard to integrity, the code says that being a person of integrity calls for honesty, the avoidance of deception, and adherence to high ethical standards. That is exactly what the minister is not doing. It is important that leaders and commanders demonstrate integrity, because their example has an effect on their peers and subordinates.
The minister no longer has any integrity. When will he resign?
Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais que mon collègue écoute bien ma question pour me donner la bonne réponse.
Hier, le ministre de la Défense nationale n'a pas répondu aux questions sur son intégrité. Je reviens donc à la charge. Le ministre a violé le code d'éthique et les valeurs des Forces canadiennes.
Au sujet de l'intégrité, le code dit que pour être honnête, on doit éviter les supercheries et respecter des normes éthiques élevées. C'est exactement ce que le ministre ne fait pas. L'intégrité doit se manifester chez les chefs et les commandants, en raison de leur influence sur les pairs.
Le ministre n'a plus aucune intégrité. Quand va-t-il démissionner?
View Jean Rioux Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean Rioux Profile
2017-05-09 14:42 [p.10965]
Mr. Speaker, yesterday in the House, the minister pointed out that his primary responsibility and that of our government is to to look after our troops and ensure that they have the support, training, and equipment needed to carry out the missions they are assigned. That has been the minister's objective for the past year and a half, and that is what he strives to do every day.
One of the key elements of his mandate is to put together a new defence policy for Canada. We will ensure that this policy is adequately funded and rigorously costed for the next 20 years.
Monsieur le Président, le ministre a souligné, hier, à la Chambre, que sa responsabilité première et celle de notre gouvernement est de veiller aux intérêts de nos troupes et de faire en sorte qu'elles disposent du soutien, de la formation et de l'équipement nécessaires pour mener à bien les diverses missions qui leur sont confiées. Depuis un an et demi, c'est cet objectif que s'est donné le ministre, et c'est ce qu'il s'efforce de faire chaque jour.
L'un des éléments clés de son mandat consiste à donner à notre pays une nouvelle politique de défense. Nous veillons à ce que cette politique soit financée adéquatement et que les coûts en soient rigoureusement établis pour les 20 prochaines années.
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, since becoming a Liberal, the Minister of National Defence has lost his way when it comes to the truth. He has become a master of “alternative facts”. This is a problem considering he is in charge of the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston, whose motto is “Truth, Duty, Valour”.
He is no longer in a position to set an example for recruits. If he still has a shred of dignity or honour, he must resign because he is the laughingstock of the Canadian Forces. This is too bad for him, but he has gone from hero to zero.
Monsieur le Président, depuis qu'il est devenu libéral, le ministre de la Défense nationale a perdu ses repères concernant la vérité. Il est devenu un maître des « faits alternatifs ». C'est préoccupant, vu qu'on sait qu'il est à la tête du Collège militaire royal du Canada de Kingston, dont la devise est « Vérité, Devoir, Vaillance ».
Il ne peut plus donner l'exemple à suivre aux recrues. S'il lui reste une once de dignité et d'honneur, son devoir est de démissionner, car il est la risée des Forces canadiennes. C'est triste pour lui, mais il est passé de « héros » à « zéro ».
View Jean Rioux Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean Rioux Profile
2017-05-09 14:43 [p.10965]
Mr. Speaker, the minister of defence was given a substantial mandate, and he is following through on it. He will soon be unveiling a new defence policy that includes making sure military personnel have the right equipment and everything they need when they are deployed.
Over the past year, we have been listening to Canadians across the country. We have done a thorough analysis to ensure that our approach meets the needs of our military personnel.
Monsieur le Président, le ministre de la Défense a reçu un vaste mandat qu'il est en train de mener à terme. Il sera bientôt en mesure de dévoiler une nouvelle politique de la défense qui fera en sorte que les militaires disposeront de l'équipement approprié et de tout ce dont ils ont besoin lorsqu'ils sont envoyés en mission.
Au cours de la dernière année, nous avons été à l'écoute des Canadiens de partout au pays. Nous avons procédé à une analyse approfondie pour nous assurer d'avoir un modèle qui répond aux besoins de nos militaires.
View Geoff Regan Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Geoff Regan Profile
2017-05-09 15:16 [p.10971]
I declare the motion lost.
I wish to inform the House that because of the deferred recorded division, Government Orders will be extended by eight minutes, which when added to the 30-minute extension from proceedings on the time allocation motion this morning makes a total of 38 minutes.
Je déclare la motion rejetée.
Je désire informer la Chambre que, en raison du vote par appel nominal différé, l'étude des initiatives ministérielles sera prolongée de 8 minutes. Si on ajoute ce temps à la prolongation de 30 minutes de ce matin pour les délibérations sur la motion d'attribution de temps, cela fait un total de 38 minutes.
View James Bezan Profile
CPC (MB)
moved:
That the House has lost confidence in the Minister of National Defence's ability to carry out his responsibilities on behalf of the government since, on multiple occasions, the Minister misrepresented his military service and provided misleading information to the House.
He said: Mr. Speaker, usually I rise and say that it is an honour to get up and speak, but today is unfortunate in that we have to debate this motion to discuss the comments made by the Minister of National Defence and some of his other misleading comments. There is also a question of privilege that I have already raised in the House on another matter.
Today, opposition members will make the case that the Minister of National Defence has had only a casual relationship with the truth, that he has continually misled the House and Canadians, and that his behaviour is demoralizing our troops and has caused our veterans to be incredibly angry. We also know that our allies are going to have trouble taking him seriously. There is a credibility issue here. We know that the minister's reputation is now damaged beyond repair, and it is a sad state that we have had to come to this point, where a motion is required in the House to ask the minister to resign.
I expect that the Minister of National Defence will get up today and offer an apology. I expect that he will factually state what his service record is. None of us disputes his actual service record. He has served honourably in three tours in Afghanistan and one tour in Bosnia. He was a lieutenant-colonel in the reserve force, and he has always been commended for his service and for the efforts he has put in on behalf of Canada.
The minister will go on to talk about other issues. He is going to try to change the channel so that we are not talking about his comments and his embellishment of history. He is going to start talking about the defence policy review and all the great things the government is going to do, but it is really unfortunate that we cannot talk about those things, because nobody trusts the defence minister at this time.
We will be the voice for those veterans and military members who were first disappointed and then outraged, and are now in dismay and despair over the minister's conduct. It is actually demoralizing our front-line soldiers. Not only are we going to talk about the role of the minister in Operation Medusa, but we will also come to the question of privilege that I have in the House over his misleading comments and the facts revolving around our troops who are in the fight against ISIS at Camp Arifjan and having those danger pay benefits taken away and not returned in their entirety.
We will also talk about the so-called capability gap in our fighter jets and how that does not match up to what members as well as past commanders of the Royal Canadian Air Force have said. We will also touch on the minister's comments in the past that pulling our CF-18s out of the fight against ISIS was something that he never received any commentary on, even though the facts, through an access to information request, prove otherwise.
We know that under the leadership of the Minister of National Defence we have seen budget cuts in two successive budgets by the Liberals, which have reduced the spending and future investments in our military by $12 billion. Now with the minister's credibility completely undermined, by himself, I might add, there is no way that our military trusts him to actually deliver anything in the future for them.
Finally, it comes back to whether or not he has the strength at the cabinet table to get things done, to stand up for our troops, and to deliver the equipment and the budgets that they need to go forward.
One of the best comments that capsulize why our Minister of National Defence would embellish his service record in Operation Medusa comes from retired Lieutenant-General William Carr, who is the father of today's modern air force in Canada, someone we could actually call an architect. He said in a letter to the editor:
Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan's search for recognition is a national embarrassment.
To the sailors, soldiers and airmen in the Department of National Defence, his image is, at best, one of an insecure veteran in a field he professes to know. For the good of the Canadian Forces, his departure would be a relief.
That sums up the calls, emails, letters, and social media posts that have inundated my office.
It is critical that we look at the code of conduct the minister is subjected to, both formerly as a serving member of the Canadian Armed Forces and now as the Minister of National Defence. The definition of “integrity” from the Department of National Defence and Canadian Armed Forces Code of Values and Ethics states:
To have integrity is to have unconditional and steadfast commitment to a principled approach to meeting your obligations while being responsible and accountable for your actions. Accordingly, being a person of integrity calls for honesty, the avoidance of deception and adherence to high ethical standards. Integrity insists that your actions be consistent with established codes of conduct and institutional values. It specifically requires transparency in actions, speaking and acting with honesty and candour, the pursuit of truth regardless of personal consequences, and a dedication to fairness and justice. Integrity must especially be manifested in leaders and commanders because of the powerful effect of their personal example on peers and subordinates.
That is there for all to see online. There are tables that actually lay this all out. Table 2 clearly states that it is applicable to all DND employees and all members of the Canadian Armed Forces. People are expected to act above the law, to be transparent and ethical, and to have integrity.
If someone did what the minister did, under the code that both the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces have, that person would show a lack of integrity. Those in service can be court-martialled. Those are the guidelines that are applicable in the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces.
As the Minister of National Defence, as the leader of the entire armed forces as well as all employees, the minister has to be held to the highest standard and has to meet that high bar each and every day. Anything below it is a failure.
The Prime Minister's “Open and Accountable Government” document, which lays out the code of conduct and ethical behaviour of ministers and parliamentary secretaries, says:
Ministers and Parliamentary Secretaries must act with honesty and must uphold the highest ethical standards so that public confidence and trust in the integrity and impartiality of government are maintained and enhanced.
This reflects on the Prime Minister. He has laid out in this code of conduct that he expects open and accountable government, and yet the Minister of National Defence has failed to live up to that code.
Everyone is wondering, and I hope that today the minister will explain why he felt he needed to embellish his story on Operation Medusa. This was not just a misspeaking. Video evidence shows that he first said this in 2015, when he was campaigning as the Liberal candidate to become the member of Parliament for Vancouver South. He said it quite openly. We do not know how many times it has been repeated behind closed doors or in meetings where he claimed to be “the architect” of Operation Medusa.
On April 18, in a speech in Delhi, the minister clearly stated it. Again, it was not just him speaking. He actually inserted it himself into his speaking notes. People can get the speech online. It has been checked against delivery, meaning that it has gone through the proper processes of being reviewed by the department and by the minister's own staff. The National Post reported on April 30, “It was [the minister] who personally inserted 'the line about Medusa' into the speech, his spokeswoman Jordan Owens said Sunday.” This was not a misspeaking. This was not an accident. This was intentional, and that is very disturbing.
It has been called all sorts of things in the media. We know that people are outraged. We understand that, because everyone expects the minister to be held to the highest ethical standards. Everybody expects that he will act with honesty and avoid deception. His story, his embellishment, his over-exaggeration of his role in Operation Medusa as the architect has also been described as stolen valour.
I received correspondence from retired Major Catherine Campbell, who served 27 years in the Canadian Armed Forces. She also served 18 years as an employee at DND. She sent a letter to the Minister of National Defence. She wrote: “I have to say that I have great respect for what you did in Afghanistan. I don't know why that wasn't honour enough for you. Apparently, it wasn't because on at least two occasions you misinformed us. You claim to have been the architect of Operation Medusa when, as a major working in intelligence, you had nothing to do with the battle plan. That honour belongs to other soldiers, your superior officers. Now, everyone knows that. Worst of all, everyone in the Canadian Armed Forces knows it and they have lost all respect for you. You know enough of the military to know that you cannot continue to lead the men and women of the Canadian Armed Forces, having lost the respect and trust in this way.
Her letter continued: “I listened to your answers in question period and it was painful. Your response, perhaps drafted by the PMO, was that you made a mistake. A mistake? No, you did not make a mistake. You deliberately and intentionally misled everyone on at least two occasions. You don't get to say, 'I made a mistake and now I'm sorry.' No, I'm afraid there's only one thing for you to do under these circumstances, and that is to resign and make a heartfelt apology to the men and women of the Canadian Armed Forces for having misled them and having been untruthful about the worst thing that a service member or an officer can be untruthful about in the Canadian Armed Forces.
She wrote: “I imagine you've read the manual Duty with Honour: The Profession of Arms in Canada. I recommend that the minister read it again and perhaps then he will understand what he has to do.”
That comes from one of our veterans. Long-serving members who have been there alongside the minister, serving this great country and doing what needs to be done are so disappointed.
Today's soldiers, today's troops, are also being impacted by the actions of the Minister of National Defence. One parent contacted me and asked that I not use his name because he wants to protect his family member who is currently serving. He said: “This morning, I spoke to my son about the matter stolen valour by the Minister of Defence. I have to tell you first-hand that, without any doubt, this is a matter that has directly affected the morale and confidence of Canada's front-line infantry soldiers. There is no greater betrayal to the trust and confidence of soldiers than stolen valour. The minister, by fabricating his role to his country for his own personal gain and profile, has undermined and betrayed the trust of the men and women he is supposed to represent. I wanted you to know this. As the father of a young soldier that would give his life to this country, that this deception has shaken the Canadian Forces, from the minister's office right down to the infantry soldier. If the minister has any remnant of a military officer left in his conscience, he will do the right and honourable thing and remove himself from office.”
That capsulizes what people are feeling about the minister's comments on Operation Medusa.
We also have to go to the question of privilege that I raised in this House over the minister's misleading comments on tax relief and danger pay benefits provided to our soldiers at Camp Arifjan in Kuwait, and how it also applies to others. If members will recall, I have been raising this in the House for some time. It started with bringing it to the minister's attention privately. Then we brought it up at committee. Then we asked questions here in the House. He continued to say that he was going to take care of it and did not.
There actually had to be a motion brought in from the Conservative side, which received unanimous support, to reinstate the danger pay benefits to all our troops who are fighting ISIS. The answer to my Question No. 600 on the Order Paper, under the minister's own signature, clearly states that it was the Liberals in September 2016 who took away the danger pay of already deployed troops, who went there under the understanding that they were going to receive upwards of $9,000 in benefits, which have been removed. The minister continued to say it was the Conservatives who took away these benefits.
The Conservatives were not in government in September 2016. The Liberals were. The minister's answer, dated January 30, proved that the benefits were there, effective October 5, 2014, when the Conservatives were still in power, to September 1, 2016, when the Liberals took them away. The minister actually put out a press release saying that they restored them, but they did not. They only restored half of them.
We received letters from various soldiers who are serving over there. They sent a letter and there was a blast out to everyone here in the House. It said that our troops in Kuwait right now are feeling despair at this point because they do not feel valued or recognized for the risks they are facing and the hardship placed on their families here at home while they are deployed.
There is another issue I would like to raise. This information was received through an access to information request. It has to do with when the Minister of National Defence ordered our CF-18s to return home from the fight against ISIS, that we stop bombing ISIS terrorists, and that we bring them home.
The minister was over in Iraq meeting with the Iraqi defence minister and other government officials on December 20. On December 21, he met with the Kurdistan regional government. He said in an interview in The Globe and Mail on December 21, 2015, “I haven't had one discussion about the CF-18s”, not one, and yet, our access to information request clearly stated, in a wire that was sent home on December 22, in writing a summary for December 20 about Canada's Minister of National Defence, “the Iraqi minister of defence was clearly focused on Canada's decision to withdraw its CF-18 fighter jets from the coalition air strikes, asking the [Minister of National Defence] to reconsider this decision on numerous occasions”. On December 21, he said it was never once brought to his attention.
We know he was going to Erbil to meet with the Kurdistan regional government, but we know on October 21, 2015 that the chief of staff to the Kurdistan regional government said, “It was bad news for us.” Then on November 22, the foreign affairs minister of the Kurdistan regional government said, “We'd like to keep the air strikes.” This is all public information on the discussions that they had with our Minister of National Defence. He keeps saying that our allies were ecstatic about our pulling out our CF-18s. Again, it is misrepresenting the facts, misleading Canadians, and undermining his own credibility.
Finally, I want to come back to this issue of a capability gap of our fighter jets. We know that it is a fabricated issue that the minister invented to try to make commentary on why we need to sole-source Super Hornets. Lieutenant-General Michael Hood, the commander of the Royal Canadian Air Force, said in committee that there is “sufficient capacity to support a transition to a replacement fighter capability based on the ongoing projects and planned life extension to 2025 for the CF-18." He also stated on November 28, “We were comfortable as an armed forces in meeting those”—NORAD and NATO commitments—“with our extant fleet. That policy has changed with a requirement to be able to meet both of those concurrently, as opposed to managing them together,”—which we've always done as a nation—“thus the requirement to increase the number of fighters available.”
Finally, we had 13 former commanders of the Royal Canadian Air Force who have written that purchasing the Super Hornets is ill-advised, costly, and unnecessary because there is no capability gap.
As members can see, the Minister of National Defence has a long track record of misleading this House and misleading Canadians, to the point that now Canadians do not believe him. We know that our troops no longer trust him and are demoralized. Our veterans are outraged that he is no longer taken seriously by our allies.
propose:
Que la Chambre n'a plus confiance en l'habileté du ministre de la Défense nationale à exercer ses fonctions au nom du gouvernement puisqu'il a présenté plusieurs fois son service militaire sous un faux jour et induit la Chambre en erreur.
-- Monsieur le Président, j'ai l'habitude de dire que c'est un honneur de prendre la parole, mais, aujourd'hui, il est malheureux que nous ayons à débattre de la motion à l'étude, qui porte sur les propos du ministre de la Défense nationale, lequel a émis des commentaires trompeurs. Il y a aussi une question de privilège que j'ai soulevée par rapport à un autre sujet.
Aujourd'hui, les députés de l'opposition vont démontrer que le ministre de la Défense nationale a une conception particulière de la vérité, qu'il a continuellement induit la Chambre et les Canadiens en erreur, et que sa conduite démoralise les troupes et fait enrager les anciens combattants. Par ailleurs, nous savons que nos alliés auront de la difficulté à le prendre au sérieux. C'est une question de crédibilité. Nous savons que la réputation du ministre est irrémédiablement ternie. Il est déplorable que nous en soyons au point où il faut présenter une motion à la Chambre pour demander la démission du ministre.
Je m'attends à ce que le ministre de la Défense nationale prenne la parole aujourd'hui pour s'excuser. Je m'attends à ce qu'il indique, de façon factuelle, ses états de service. Personne ne conteste ses états de service réels. Il a servi avec honneur dans le cadre de trois missions en Afghanistan et d'une mission en Bosnie. Il a été lieutenant-colonel dans la Force de réserve et il a toujours été félicité pour son service et tout ce qu'il a fait au nom du Canada.
Le ministre abordera d'autres questions. Il essaiera de changer de sujet pour éviter de parler de ses commentaires et du fait qu'il a embelli l'histoire. Il parlera de l'examen de la politique de défense et de toutes les belles choses que le gouvernement fera. C'est vraiment regrettable de ne pas pouvoir discuter de ces points parce que personne ne fait confiance au ministre de la Défense en ce moment.
Nous serons la voix des anciens combattants et des militaires qui ont d'abord été déçus, puis outrés, et qui sont maintenant consternés et découragés de la conduite du ministre. En fait, c'est démoralisan