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Results: 1 - 11 of 11
View T.J. Harvey Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I'm going to start off with Alex for a quick question.
At the beginning of your remarks, you referenced the Canadianization of our oil sands developers. Would you like to comment on your thoughts surrounding that, positive and negative, what you see as the opportunities, what you see as the concerns?
View T.J. Harvey Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
First, for Mr. Thorsen and Ms. McQuade, with this type of SAGD process that you use—and I recognize that it's proprietary, so there are variations in the process from company to company—what percentage of the industry that uses in situ technology in Alberta would use this process or a process similar to this now, and what do you feel the overall development potential is for this type of process in Alberta as a percentage of the total industry?
View T.J. Harvey Profile
Lib. (NB)
We're running out of time and I appreciate your time, but just to close, yes or no, do you support the idea of utilizing existing refining capacity within Canada to help drive innovation within the existing oil sands development and the proposed projects that could come along in the future?
View T.J. Harvey Profile
Lib. (NB)
In a recent op-ed, Mr. Beatty, your president and CEO, suggested that Canada's review process of energy infrastructure projects, namely pipeline projects, has been inefficient, unpredictable, uncertain, and over-politicized. Do the environmental assessment reforms increase efficiency and predictability, specifically in regard to pipelines and energy east? What else could government do to streamline that process and make it more robust for industry? What role can industry play in this?
View T.J. Harvey Profile
Lib. (NB)
View T.J. Harvey Profile
Lib. (NB)
I think so.
Within that context, what else can industry do to further that process?
View T.J. Harvey Profile
Lib. (NB)
I only have two minutes left in my slot.
We talked about the five principles of the new interim assessment process. When we talk about energy development in this country, I think it's really important that we look at projects, whether they're traditional development projects or new and emerging technologies, whether it's solar, wind, tidal energy, and we should really classify those—this is just my opinion of course—in the short term, medium term, and long term within the two individual pillars. With that in mind, recognizing that over a period of time it's definitely going to be necessary to get our resources to market and recognizing that the oil and gas sector has been very innovative and forward-thinking over the past years—and I think that everybody on all sides of government recognizes that—do you believe that those five interim principles are not in fact barriers to project and resource development, but just a continuation of the type of growth within that sector that we've seen over the past number of years—5, 10, 15 years—and a continuation of where we need to see that trend go, whether it's first nations' consultation, looking at the total scope of greenhouse gas emissions, or usage of science and technology? How we can use those principles to move this sector forward? Do you not believe that those five principles are going to be of benefit to the sector over the short, medium, and long term?
View T.J. Harvey Profile
Lib. (NB)
Right, and I don't disagree with the ideals behind a price on carbon, that's for sure. But one thing I will say is that I grew up in agriculture, and my father always said that a lot of time hardship fosters innovation and technological growth within any sector, agriculture specifically then. Do you not believe that the sector will benefit from looking at greenhouse gas emissions and how it affects the entire sector?
View T.J. Harvey Profile
Lib. (NB)
First of all, I'd like to thank you for giving us your presentation today. I have the utmost respect for what you do in your organization.
I wonder if you could elaborate on what COSIA's priorities are for the coming year. Even more extensively, does COSIA develop a long-term framework within the pipeline structure of innovation to target what the priorities are and where you'd like to see the innovation go over 1, 5, 10, or 20 years? If so, how does this help drive innovation in environmental change, particularly in respect of climate change and greenhouse gas emissions?
View T.J. Harvey Profile
Lib. (NB)
Okay. I have another quick question.
You have 39 associate members and you identified three key hubs earlier in your presentation. I want to touch on two of them.
Sustainable Development Technology Canada is an organization I have a lot of respect for. I've watched the work they've done in the past. The other organization is Carbon Management Canada.
With regard to those two companies and the role they play within COSIA in helping to foster development technology, could you touch on what their role is currently and how they could play a greater role in the future?
Results: 1 - 11 of 11

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