Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-06-12 18:20 [p.29068]
Madam Speaker, it gives me great pleasure to rise in the House. As usual, I want to say hello to all the residents of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching right now. I had the honour of meeting thousands of them last weekend at the Grand bazar du Vieux-Limoilou, where I had a booth, as the local member of Parliament. It was a fantastic outdoor party, and the weather co-operated beautifully.
Before I discuss the motion, I just want the people of Beauport—Limoilou to know that we will have plenty of opportunities to meet this summer at all the events and festivals being held in Beauport and Limoilou. As usual, I will be holding my annual summer party in August, where thousands of people come to meet me. We often eat hot dogs, chips and popcorn from Île d'Orléans together. It is a chance for me to get to know my constituents, talk about the issues affecting the riding, and share information about the services that my office can provide to Canadians dealing with the federal government.
I also want to say that this may be the last speech I give in the House during the 42nd Parliament. It was a huge honour to be here, and I hope to again have that honour after election day, October 21.
I plan to run in the upcoming election and I hope to represent my constituents for a long time to come. I am extremely proud of the work I have done over the past four years, including the work I did in my riding, on my portfolio, Canada's official languages, and during debates.
I am asking my constituents to do me a favour and put their trust in me for another four years. I will be here every day to serve them.
Today we are debating Motion No. 227, a Liberal motion to conduct a study in committee. It is commendable to do a study at the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities. This is a very important House of Commons committee. A Liberal Party MP is proposing to conduct a study on labour shortages in the skilled trades in Canada.
As soon as I saw that I wanted to say a few words about this motion. Whether it be in Quebec City, Regina, Nanaimo, or elsewhere in Canada, there is a crisis right now. The labour shortage will affect us quite quickly.
We have heard that, a few years from now, the greater Quebec City area will need an additional 150,000 workers. This remarkable shortage will be the result of baby boomers retiring. Baby boomers, including my parents, will enjoy a well-deserved retirement. This is a very important issue, and we must address it.
I would like to remind the House that, in January, February and March, I asked the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour about the serious labour shortage problem in Canada. Each time, she made a mockery of my question by saying that the Liberals had created 600,000 new jobs. Today, they say one million.
I am glad that this motion was moved, but it is more or less an exercise in virtue signalling. Actually, it is more of an exercise in public communications, although I am not questioning my colleague's sincere wish to look into the issue. In six or seven days, the 42nd Parliament will be dissolved. Well, the House will adjourn. Parliament will be dissolved in a few months, before the election.
My colleague's committee will not be able to study the motion. My colleagues and I on the Standing Committee on Official Languages are finishing our study of the modernization of the Official Languages Act. We decided that we would finalize our recommendations tomorrow at noon, to ensure that we are able to table the report from the Standing Committee on Official Languages in the House.
In essence, this is a public communications exercise, since the committee will not be able to study the issue. However, I think it would be good to talk about the labour shortages in the skilled trades with the Canadians who are watching us. What are skilled trades? We are talking about hairdressers, landscapers, cabinetmakers, electricians, machinists, mechanics, and crane or other equipment operators. Skilled trades also include painters, plumbers, welders and technicians.
I will explain why the labour shortage in the skilled trades is worrisome. When people take a good look around they soon realize that these trades are very important. Skilled tradespeople build everything around us, such as highways, overpasses, waterworks, subways, transportation systems like the future Quebec streetcar line that we have talked about a lot lately, the railroads that cross the country, skyscrapers in major cities like Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver, factories in rural areas, tractors, equipment and the canals of the St. Lawrence Seaway, which were built in the 1950s.
China, India and the United States are making huge investments in infrastructure. For example, in recent years, the U.S. government did not flinch at investing $5 billion to improve the infrastructure of the Port of New York and New Jersey, which was built by men and women in the trades. In Quebec, we are still waiting for the Liberals to approve a small $60-million envelope for the Beauport 2020 project, now called the Laurentia project, which will ensure the shipping competitiveness of the St. Lawrence for years to come.
There has been a lack of infrastructure investment in Canada. The Liberals like to say that their infrastructure Canada plan is historic, but only $14 billion of the $190 billion announced have actually been allocated. That is not all. Even if the Liberals were releasing the funds and making massive investments to surpass other G20 and G7 countries, the world's largest economies, they would not be able to deliver on their incredible projects without skilled labour. Consider this: even Nigeria, with a population of 200 million, is catching up with us when it comes to infrastructure investments.
It is about time that we, as legislators, dealt with this issue, but clearly that is not what the Liberals have been doing over the past few years, although I have heard some members talk about a few initiatives here and there in some provinces. The announcement of this study is late in coming.
I would also remind the House that this is a provincial jurisdiction, given that provincial regulations govern the training of skilled workers. That said, the federal government can still be helpful by implementing various measures through federal transfers, such as apprenticeship grants and loans, tax credits and job training programs. This all requires a smooth, harmonious relationship between the provinces and the federal government. Not only do the political players have to get along well, but so do the politicians themselves.
If, God forbid, the Liberals get another four-year term in office, taxes will increase dramatically, since they will want to make up for the huge deficits they racked up over the past four years. In 2016, they imposed conditions on health transfers. Then, they rushed ahead with the legalization of marijuana even though the provinces wanted more time. Then, they imposed the carbon tax on provinces like New Brunswick, which had already closed a number of coal-fired plants and significantly reduced its greenhouse gas emissions. The Liberals said that they still considered the province to be an offender and imposed the Liberal carbon tax. Finally, today, they are rushing through the study of Bill C-69, which seeks to implement regulations that are far too rigid and that will interfere with the development of natural resources in various provinces, even though six premiers have stated that this bill will stifle their local economies.
How can we hope that this government will collaborate to come to an agreement seeking to address skilled trades shortages when it has such a poor track record on intergovernmental relations?
Madame la Présidente, je suis très heureux de prendre la parole à la Chambre. Comme d’habitude, j’aimerais saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent présentement. Nous avons eu l’honneur de nous rencontrer, par milliers, en fin de semaine, au Grand bazar du Vieux-Limoilou, où j'avais un kiosque, en tant que député. C’était une très belle fête à l’extérieur, et le beau temps était présent.
Avant de discuter de la motion, j’aimerais dire aux citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou que nous pourrons nous rencontrer tout au long de l'été, lors des activités ou des festivals qui se tiendront à Beauport ou à Limoilou. Comme chaque année, je vais tenir, au mois d’août, la Fête de l’été du député, où plusieurs milliers de personnes viennent me rencontrer. Souvent, nous dégustons ensemble des hot dogs, des croustilles et du blé d’Inde de l’île d’Orléans. C’est pour nous une chance de nous rencontrer, de discuter des enjeux de la circonscription et de faire part des services que mon bureau peut donner en ce qui a trait au gouvernement fédéral.
J’aimerais dire qu'il s'agit peut-être du dernier discours que je prononcerai à la Chambre lors de la 42e législature. Ce fut un honneur incroyable d'être ici, et je voudrais voir cet honneur renouvelé le 21 octobre prochain, le jour de l'élection.
J’ai l’intention de présenter ma candidature lors des prochaines élections, et j'espère représenter mes concitoyens encore très longtemps. Je suis extrêmement fier du travail que j’ai fait au cours des quatre dernières années, que ce soit le travail que j'ai fait dans ma circonscription, le travail relatif à mon portefeuille, les langues officielles du Canada, ou le travail que j'ai fait lors des débats.
Je demande donc à mes concitoyens de me faire une faveur, soit celle de me faire confiance pour quatre autres années. Je serai présent tous les jours pour les servir.
Aujourd’hui, nous débattons de la motion M-227, une tentative libérale visant à faire une étude en comité. C’est quand même louable de faire une étude au Comité permanent des ressources humaines, du développement des compétences, du développement social et de la condition des personnes handicapées. Il s'agit d'un comité fort important de la Chambre des communes. Un député du Parti libéral propose de mener une étude sur la pénurie de main-d’œuvre relative aux métiers spécialisés au Canada.
Dès que j’ai vu cela, j’ai voulu parler un peu de cette motion. Que ce soit à Québec, à Regina, à Nanaimo ou ailleurs au Canada, il y a une crise en ce moment. La pénurie de main-d’œuvre nous touchera assez rapidement.
On dit que, d’ici quelques années, il manquera 150 000 travailleurs dans la grande région de Québec. Cela est dû à un phénomène assez incroyable: les baby-boomers ont pris leur retraite. En effet, les baby-boomers, y compris mes parents, partent à la retraite, une retraite bien méritée. C’est donc un enjeu très important, et il faut s’y attarder.
D’ailleurs, j’aimerais rappeler que, en janvier, en février et en mars, j’ai posé quelques questions à la ministre de l’Emploi, du Développement de la main-d’œuvre et du Travail. Je lui disais qu’il y avait un grave problème de pénurie de main-d’œuvre au Canada. Chaque fois, elle tournait ma question en dérision en disant que les libéraux avaient créé 600 000 emplois. Aujourd’hui, ils disent en avoir créé 1 million.
Je suis content que la motion ait été déposée, mais il s'agit davantage d'un geste vertueux que d’autre chose. En fait, il s'agit davantage d'un exercice public de communication, bien que je ne remette pas en question le fait que mon collègue souhaite vraiment aborder le problème. Dans six ou sept jours, la 42e législature sera dissoute. En fait, la Chambre va s'ajourner. Pour ce qui est de la dissolution, elle aura lieu dans quelques mois, lors des élections.
Le comité auquel siège mon collègue ne pourra pas faire l'étude de la motion. Nous, les députés qui siégeons au Comité permanent des langues officielles, terminons notre étude sur la modernisation de la Loi sur les langues officielles. Nous nous sommes dit que nous terminerions nos recommandations demain, à midi, pour nous assurer de pouvoir déposer à la Chambre le rapport du Comité permanent des langues officielles.
Bref, il s'agit d'un exercice de communication publique, car le comité ne pourra pas se pencher sur la question. Toutefois, je trouve que ce serait bien de parler de la pénurie de main-d’œuvre relative aux métiers spécialisés aux Canadiens qui nous écoutent. Que sont les métiers spécialisés? Il s’agit du coiffeur, du paysagiste, de l’ébéniste, de l’électricien, du machiniste, du mécanicien, de l’opérateur d’équipement, comme les grues. Ce dernier est un emploi incroyable. Ce n’est pas facile d'obtenir un emploi d’opérateur de grue. Il s'agit aussi du peintre, du plombier, du soudeur et du technicien.
Je vais expliquer pourquoi la pénurie de main-d’œuvre dans les métiers spécialisés est inquiétante. Si les citoyens regardent autour d'eux, ils réaliseront que ces métiers sont essentiels. Ce sont ces travailleurs qui font tout ce qui nous entoure: les autoroutes, les viaducs, les aqueducs, les métros, les réseaux de transport structurants, comme le futur tramway de Québec, dont nous parlons beaucoup dernièrement, les chemins de fer qui traversent le pays, les gratte-ciels dans les grandes villes comme Montréal, Toronto et Vancouver, les usines en région rurale, les tracteurs, les machines, les canaux de la voie maritime du Saint-Laurent, qui ont été construits dans les années 1950, etc.
En Chine, en Inde et aux États-Unis, les investissements en infrastructure sont énormes. Par exemple, dans les dernières années, le gouvernement américain n'a pas rechigné une seconde à investir 5 milliards de dollars pour améliorer les infrastructures du port de New York et du New Jersey, qui a été construit par des hommes et des femmes des corps de métiers spécialisés. De notre côté, à Québec, nous attendons toujours que les libéraux confirment une petite enveloppe de 60 millions de dollars pour le projet Beauport 2020, qui s'appelle aujourd'hui le projet Laurentia et qui vise à assurer la compétitivité maritime du fleuve Saint-Laurent dans les années à venir.
Il y a donc un manque d'investissement dans les infrastructures canadiennes. Les libéraux aiment dire que le projet d'Infrastructure Canada est historique, mais seulement 14 milliards des 190 milliards de dollars annoncés ont été dégagés. Cependant, ce n'est pas tout. Même si les libéraux débloquaient l'argent et faisaient des investissements massifs pour dépasser les autres pays du G20 et du G7, les grandes économies mondiales, ils ne pourraient pas concrétiser leurs projets incroyables sans main-d’œuvre spécialisée. D'ailleurs, au chapitre des investissements en infrastructure, même le Nigeria, qui a 200 millions d'habitants, est en train de nous rattraper.
Il est donc temps que nous, les législateurs, nous attardions à cette question, mais de toute évidence, ce n'est pas ce que les libéraux ont fait au cours des dernières années, même si j'ai entendu parler de certaines mesures saupoudrées d'une province à l'autre. L'annonce de cette étude est tardive.
Par ailleurs, rappelons que cette question relève de la compétence provinciale, puisque c'est la réglementation provinciale qui encadre la formation de la main-d’œuvre spécialisée. Cela dit, le gouvernement fédéral peut quand même être utile en mettant en place différentes mesures par l'entremise des transferts fédéraux, comme des subventions et des prêts aux apprentis, des crédits d'impôt et des programmes de formation de la main-d’œuvre. Tout cela nécessite une relation harmonieuse entre les provinces et le gouvernement fédéral. Non seulement les acteurs politiques doivent bien s'entendre, mais les politiciens eux-mêmes aussi.
Si, par grand malheur, les libéraux obtiennent un autre mandat de quatre ans, les impôts et les taxes vont augmenter considérablement, puisqu'ils voudront combler les grands déficits qu'ils ont accumulés depuis quatre ans. En 2016, ils ont imposé des conditions concernant les transferts en santé. Ensuite, ils ont précipité la légalisation de la marijuana, alors que les provinces voulaient plus de temps. Puis, ils ont imposé la taxe sur le carbone à des provinces comme le Nouveau-Brunswick, qui avait fermé plusieurs centrales au charbon et qui avait réduit ses émissions de gaz à effet de serre substantiellement. Les libéraux lui ont dit qu'ils le considéraient toujours comme un délinquant et qu'il lui imposait la taxe libérale sur le carbone. Finalement, aujourd'hui, ils précipitent l'étude du projet de loi C-69, qui vise à mettre en œuvre une réglementation beaucoup trop rigide qui empêchera l'exploitation des ressources naturelles dans différentes provinces, alors que six premiers ministres ont affirmé que cela suffoquerait leur économie locale.
Comment peut-on espérer que ce gouvernement collabore pour arriver à une entente afin de pallier la pénurie de main-d'œuvre dans les métiers spécialisés, lorsqu'on constate que son bilan en matière de relations intergouvernementales est complètement médiocre?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, this Liberal government is more centralist, paternalistic and, quite simply, arrogant than any other Liberal government in the history of our federation.
For the past four years, the government has repeatedly shown that it is out of touch with the spirit of federalism. It refuses to honour the tradition of appointing a political lieutenant for Quebec and instead made a minister from Toronto responsible for the economic development of our province. It is imposing political conditions on federal transfers. It refuses to give Quebec greater powers in the area of immigration. It refuses to respond favourably to the National Assembly's request for a single tax return, something all Quebeckers want.
I could go on and on. Following in the footsteps of founding fathers Cartier and MacDonald, we the Conservatives will continue to properly honour federalism. In 2008, we recognized that Quebeckers form a nation within a united Canada.
In 2019, when we form the government, we will respond favourably to the demands of Quebeckers and Quebec.
Monsieur le Président, le gouvernement libéral, plus que tout autre dans l'histoire de notre fédération, est centralisateur, paternaliste et tout simplement arrogant.
Depuis quatre ans, le gouvernement a démontré à maintes reprises qu'il n'est pas au diapason de l'esprit du fédéralisme. Il refuse de faire honneur à la tradition en nommant un lieutenant politique pour le Québec, et il a nommé un ministre de Toronto responsable du développement économique de notre province. Il impose des conditions politiques à ses transferts fédéraux. Il refuse de donner plus de pouvoirs au Québec en matière d'immigration. Il refuse de répondre favorablement à la demande de l'Assemblée nationale relativement à la déclaration de revenus unique, une demande de tous les Québécois.
La liste est encore longue. Nous, les conservateurs, dans la lignée des pères fondateurs Cartier et MacDonald, allons continuer d'honorer le fédéralisme en bonne et due forme. En 2008, nous avons reconnu que les Québécois forment une nation au sein du Canada-Uni.
En 2019, lorsque nous formerons le gouvernement, nous allons répondre favorablement aux demandes des Québécois et du Québec.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, everyone remembers the huge mistake the Minister of Official Languages made two years ago when she concluded an agreement with Netflix that did not guarantee any French-language cultural production. Quebeckers and francophones across the country were so frustrated that the Prime Minister removed her from that position and she lost the heritage portfolio.
Here is what she is telling us today. She made a plan for tourism two weeks ago. It contains no guarantees, no investments for the francophone minority communities across Canada. She just made an announcement today and, once again, there is nothing for francophones.
Was this an oversight on the part of the minister or does this government just not take official languages seriously?
Monsieur le Président, tout le monde se rappelle de la gaffe énorme que la ministre des Langues officielles a faite, il y a deux ans, lorsqu’elle a fait, avec Netflix, une entente qui ne prévoyait aucune garantie de production culturelle francophone. Les Québécois et les francophones étaient tellement frustrés partout au pays que le premier ministre l’a démise de ses fonctions et qu'elle a perdu le ministère du Patrimoine canadien.
Voyons ce qu’elle nous dit aujourd’hui. Elle a fait un plan de tourisme, il y a deux semaines. Il n’y a aucune garantie, aucun investissement pour les communautés minoritaires francophones partout au pays. Elle vient de faire une annonce aujourd’hui, et, encore une fois, il n’y a rien pour les francophones.
Est-ce que c’est un oubli de la ministre ou est-ce que tout simplement ce gouvernement ne prend pas au sérieux les langues officielles?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-30 14:57 [p.28342]
Mr. Speaker, in 2015, the Prime Minister, surrounded by Liberal candidates, including the member for Orléans and the Minister of National Defence, who are both veterans themselves, made a solemn promise that under his leadership, veterans would never, ever have to go to court to get their due. He broke that promise.
He also promised to restore the pension for life option in the proper way. That was another broken promise. We are not the ones saying so. It is veterans themselves, the ones who are the most affected by this affair, who are saying that the money is just not there for the pension for life option.
Why?
Monsieur le Président, en 2015, le premier ministre, la main sur le cœur et entouré de candidats libéraux, dont le député d'Orléans et le ministre de la Défense nationale, eux-mêmes des vétérans, a promis que jamais, au grand jamais, sous sa gouverne, les anciens combattants n'allaient devoir se battre en justice pour obtenir gain de cause. Il a brisé cette promesse.
Il avait également promis de rétablir l'option de la pension à vie en bonne et due forme. C'est encore une promesse brisée. Ce n'est pas nous qui le disons, ce sont les vétérans eux-mêmes, ceux qui sont les plus concernés par cette histoire, qui disent que l'argent n'est pas au rendez-vous en ce qui concerne l'option de la pension à vie.
Pourquoi?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-29 14:48 [p.28261]
Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister is the head of the government. He has many roles and responsibilities, but his primary duty consists of two fundamental objectives. First of all, he must ensure our great federation is politically united. Second, he must ensure that the government is there for our military personnel, and that includes giving them the honours they deserve.
Did the Prime Minister share the profound disappointment felt by Canadians and by our troops when they learned that the families of fallen Afghanistan war soldiers were excluded from the war memorial event?
Monsieur le Président, le premier ministre est le chef du gouvernement. Parmi ses fonctions, il a plusieurs responsabilités, mais son devoir premier est composé de deux objectifs fondamentaux. Premièrement, il doit assurer l'unité politique de notre grande fédération. Deuxièmement, il doit s'assurer que l'État est présent pour nos militaires, notamment en leur rendant les honneurs qu'ils méritent.
Le premier ministre a-t-il éprouvé la profonde déception des Canadiens et de nos militaires lorsqu'il a appris que les familles des défunts de l'Afghanistan ont été exclues d'une cérémonie de commémoration de cette guerre?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-28 14:55 [p.28186]
Mr. Speaker, it is inconceivable that the Liberal government, the Canadian government, did not invite the families of fallen soldiers to a memorial here in Canada.
This is highly disrespectful, not only to our fallen soldiers, but also to their families and loved ones.
The minister was there and he was aware of the event details. When did he learn that the families would not be there? He is the minister. He is the boss. He is a veteran.
Why did did he approve this completely disrespectful decision?
Monsieur le Président, c'est tellement inconcevable de constater que le gouvernement libéral, le gouvernement canadien, a osé exclure des familles de militaires morts au combat d'une cérémonie de commémoration, ici, au Canada.
C'est non seulement déshonorant pour nos militaires qui sont tombés au combat, mais c'est irrespectueux au plus haut point pour les familles et leurs proches.
Le ministre était sur place et il connaissait tous les détails de l'événement. Quand a-t-il appris que les familles ne seraient pas présentes? Il est le ministre. C'est le boss. C'est un ancien militaire.
Pourquoi a-t-il approuvé cette décision totalement irrespectueuse?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-28 17:25 [p.28203]
Mr. Speaker, it is always an honour to rise in the House. I would like to begin by saying that I will be sharing my time with my colleague from Mégantic—L'Érable.
I would also like to acknowledge the many residents of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching this afternoon's proceedings as usual. I would like to thank them for a wonderful riding week last week. I met with several hundred of my constituents, many of whom attended the 17th Beauport business network breakfast. The network is doing very well. We will soon be holding a local press conference to announce that the network is going to have its own independent board of directors. That will give Beauport's business people a strong voice for dialogue with their elected representatives. Back home, I often joke that I am getting my own opposition up and running.
All joking aside, following the three “Alupa à l'écoute” public consultations that I held, I want to tell those watching us today that I will hold a press conference in a few weeks to announce the public policy that I am going to introduce with my leader when we form the government in October. This policy will help seniors return to the labour market, if they so wish, and alleviate the labour shortage.
This evening we are debating the motion moved barely 24 hours ago by the government, which would have us sit until midnight every evening from Monday to Thursday, starting next Monday. The government feels compelled to make up for its complacency over the past few months. It was caught up in several scandals that made the headlines, such as the SNC-Lavalin scandal. It is waking up and realizing that time is passing and it only has 20 days to complete its legislative agenda. There is a sense of panic. Above all, when the session comes to an end, they do not want to be known as the government with the poor legislative track record.
I would like to quickly talk about the government's bills. My colleague from Rivière-des-Mille-Îles talked about the number of bills the government has passed so far. This time three and a half years ago, in the final weeks of the Conservative term under Mr. Harper, we had more than 82 bills that received royal assent, and five or six other bills on the Order Paper. So far, the Liberals have passed only 48 government bills that have received royal assent, and 17 are still on the agenda. They do not have very many bills on their legislative record.
For three and a half years we have heard their grand patriotic speeches and all the rhetoric that entails. During the election campaign, their slogan was “Real change”, but with so few bills on their legislative record, their slogan rings hollow. What is more, their bills are flawed. Every time their bills are referred to committee, the government has to propose dozens of amendments through its own members, something that is rarely done for government bills.
Next, let us talk about electoral partisanship. The Liberals made big promises to minority groups in Canada. Three and a half years ago, the Prime Minister boasted about wanting to advance reconciliation with indigenous peoples. However, the Liberals waited until just a month before the end of the 42nd Parliament to introduce Bill C-91, an act respecting indigenous languages, in the House. Even though the Liberals are always saying that the government's most important relationship is the one it has with first nations, they waited over three and a half years before introducing a government bill on the protection of indigenous languages. I would like to remind members that there are over 77 indigenous languages in Canada. Once again, we see that the Liberals are in a rush and stressed out. They want to placate all of the interest groups that believe in them before October.
What about the leadership of the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons? From the start, three and a half years ago, she said that her approach was the exact opposite of the previous government's, which she claimed was harmful. Nevertheless, she forced sixty-some time allocation motions on us. When it came to reforming the rules and procedures, she wanted to significantly reduce the opposition's power.
We want to stand before Canadians and ask questions and bring to light the reason why debates will go until midnight. The reason is that the Liberals were unable to properly complete their legislative agenda and move forward as they should have.
Monsieur le Président, c'est toujours un honneur de prendre la parole à la Chambre. J'aimerais d'abord dire que je vais partager mon temps de parole avec mon collègue de Mégantic—L'Érable.
J'aimerais également saluer tous les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre, comme toujours. J'aimerais les remercier, car la semaine dernière, nous avons eu une très belle semaine dans ma circonscription. J'ai rencontré plusieurs centaines d'entre eux, notamment à l'occasion du 17 déjeuner du réseau des gens d'affaires de Beauport, un réseau qui va très bien. Très bientôt, nous aurons l'occasion d'annoncer, lors d'une conférence de presse locale, que ce réseau se dotera d'un conseil d'administration indépendant. Cela permettra aux entrepreneurs de Beauport d'avoir une réelle voix auprès de leurs élus. Comme je le dis souvent à la blague dans ma circonscription, je suis en train de mettre en branle ma propre opposition.
Blague à part, à la suite des trois consultations publiques que j'ai tenues, une tournée intitulée « Alupa à l'écoute », je tiens à dire aux citoyens et aux citoyennes qui nous écoutent que, dans quelques semaines, je vais faire une conférence de presse pour leur annoncer la politique publique que je tenterai de mettre en avant avec mon chef lorsque nous formerons le gouvernement en octobre. Cette politique aura pour but d'aider les aînés à réintégrer le marché du travail, lorsqu'ils le veulent, et de pallier la pénurie de main-d'œuvre.
Ce soir, nous discutons de la motion présentée il y a à peine 24 heures par le gouvernement. Celle-ci vise à ce que nous siégions jusqu'à minuit tous les soirs, du lundi au jeudi, à compter de lundi prochain. Le gouvernement sent la nécessité de compenser le laisser-aller des derniers mois. Il a été pris dans plusieurs scandales qui ont fait les manchettes, comme celui de SNC-Lavalin. Il se réveille et constate que, plus que jamais, le temps passe et les jours avancent, alors qu'il lui reste à peine 20 jours pour conclure son bilan législatif. Il y a donc une odeur de panique. Il ne veut surtout pas terminer cette session avec l'image d'un gouvernement qui n'a pas très bien réussi sur le plan législatif.
J'aimerais parler rapidement des projets de loi du gouvernement. Ma collègue de Rivière-des-Mille-Îles parlait du nombre de projets de loi qu'il a fait adopter à ce jour. Il y a trois et demi, au cours des dernières semaines du mandat des conservateurs de M. Harper, au même moment, nous avions conclu plus de 82 projets de loi ayant obtenu la sanction royale, et 5 ou 6 autres projets de loi étaient à l'ordre du jour. À ce jour, les libéraux ont seulement conclu 48 projets de loi gouvernementaux ayant obtenu la sanction royale, et 17 projets de loi sont en attente. Ils ont donc un nombre restreint de projets de loi inscrits à leur bilan législatif.
Depuis trois ans et demi, on les voit faire de grands discours très patriotiques avec toutes sortes de rhétorique. De plus, lors de la campagne électorale, leur slogan était « Le vrai changement ». Or, puisqu'ils n'ont pas un bilan législatif comprenant un nombre intéressant de projets de loi, on ne peut pas vraiment dire que ce slogan se soit avéré. De plus, leurs projets de loi sont mal ficelés. Chaque fois que ses projets de loi sont renvoyés en comité, le gouvernement doit déposer des dizaines d'amendements par l'entremise de ses propres députés, ce qui est normalement très rare dans le cas des projets de loi gouvernementaux.
Ensuite, parlons de la partisanerie électorale. Les libéraux avaient fait des promesses très importantes à des groupes minoritaires au Canada. Il y a trois ans et demi, le premier ministre s'est targué de vouloir faire avancer la réconciliation avec les Autochtones. Pourtant, c'est seulement un mois avant la fin de la 42 législature que les libéraux ont déposé à la Chambre le projet de loi C-91, Loi concernant les langues autochtones. Alors qu'ils ne cessent de dire que la relation la plus importante du gouvernement est celle qu'il a avec les Premières Nations, les libéraux ont attendu plus de trois ans et demi avant de déposer un projet de loi gouvernemental sur la protection des langues autochtones. Je rappelle qu'il y en a plus de 77 au pays. Encore une fois, on voit que les libéraux sont pressés et stressés. Ils veulent absolument satisfaire tous les groupes d'intérêt qui croient en eux avant le mois d'octobre.
Qu'en est-il du leadership de la leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes? Dès le départ, il y a trois ans et demi, elle disait que son approche était complètement opposée à celle de l'ancien gouvernement, qu'elle disait dommageable. Pourtant, elle nous a imposé une soixantaine de motions d'attribution de temps, et lors des réformes des règles et des procédures, elle a voulu amoindrir substantiellement les pouvoirs de l'opposition.
Devant les Canadiens, nous voulons poser des questions et mettre en lumière la raison pour laquelle des débats se tiendront jusqu’à minuit: c’est parce qu’ils n’ont pas été capables d’avoir un bilan législatif en bonne et due forme et d’aller de l’avant comme ils auraient dû le faire.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-27 14:32 [p.28092]
Mr. Speaker, the commemoration of the Second World War is tinged with sadness every year, and planning the event itself is stressful. Our cousins in Bernières-sur-Mer, France, where thousands of Canadians landed on June 6, 1944, including some of our very own ancestors, learned in the news that the 40 veterans would simply not be attending the event. This news came just days in advance.
Do we not believe that a more dignified and honourable approach would have been for the minister to call the mayor himself to inform him and then the veterans of the decision?
Monsieur le Président, comme chaque année, les commémorations de la Seconde Guerre mondiale comportent toujours un élément de tristesse, mais également de stress sur le plan de l'organisation des événements. Nos cousins de France à Bernières-sur-Mer, là où des milliers de Canadiens ont débarqué le 6 juin 1944, dont plusieurs de nos aïeux ici même, ont appris par l'entremise de la presse que, cette année, la venue de 40 vétérans était tout simplement annulée. Ils l'ont su seulement à quelques jours d'avis.
Ne pensons-nous pas que le ministre aurait dû, avec plus de dignité et de manière plus honorable, contacter par lui-même le maire de la municipalité afin de l'informer de la décision et d'informer les vétérans eux-mêmes?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-16 14:43 [p.27990]
Mr. Speaker, real federalism is what we did. We recognized Quebec as a nation in 2008, something the Liberals never would have done.
Not only that, but we have seen since 2015 that they are anything but transparent. They hide tax hikes and bury objectionable provisions in huge omnibus bills. Surprise, surprise, what do we see? The Liberals refused to properly fund the Office of the Auditor General this year.
Why are they withholding that funding, which the Auditor General needs in order to perform audits to hold this government accountable to Canadians?
Monsieur le Président, le vrai fédéralisme, c'est ce que nous avons fait. Nous avons reconnu la nation québécoise en 2008, ce qu'eux n'auraient jamais fait.
Non seulement cela, mais depuis 2015, on a vu qu'ils sont tout sauf transparents. Ils cachent des augmentations de taxes et, à l'intérieur de grands projets de loi omnibus, ils mettent des dispositions très discutables. Surprise, qu'est-ce qu'on voit? Les libéraux ont refusé cette année de financer convenablement le bureau du vérificateur général.
Pourquoi retiennent-ils ces fonds qui sont très importants pour que le bureau du vérificateur général fasse des audits, pour que ce gouvernement soit responsable devant les Canadiens?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-15 17:17 [p.27900]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to say hello to the many constituents of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching. Today, it is my pleasure to debate Motion No. 170, which reads as follows:
That, in the opinion of the House, a special committee, chaired by the Speaker of the House, should be established at the beginning of each new Parliament, in order to select all Officers of Parliament.
Before I begin, I would like to recognize with all due respect that the motion was moved by the member for Hamilton Centre, who is with the NDP and has been in Parliament for quite a while, but will not seek re-election. If he is listening right now, I would like to acknowledge him and thank him for his work and decades of public service. The member for Hamilton Centre was once an MPP in Ontario, as well, and worked hard on all sorts of causes that were important to his constituents. I would like to congratulate him on his service.
Moreover, he is more than just a good parliamentarian. I remember hearing one of his speeches at the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates, if I remember correctly. I took note of his delivery, because he is a fine public speaker with good rhetorical skills. I have always had a great deal of respect for my colleagues with vast parliamentary experience. I try to learn from the best.
I am sure the member for Hamilton Centre wants to leave his mark on Canadian democracy. I too want to improve Canada's Westminster-style parliamentary democracy. Our role as MPs is the cornerstone of parliamentary democracy. It is fundamental. MPs must play a leading role in the workings of Canadian democracy, which includes the selection and appointment of officers of Parliament. That is what this motion is about.
Officers of Parliament are individuals jointly appointed by the House of Commons and the Senate to look into matters on our behalf and help us carry out our duties and responsibilities. For example, Canada has a Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, a position created by Mr. Harper and the Conservative Party.
There is also the Information Commissioner, who ensures that Canadians are able to have access to all government information so that they can get to the bottom of things. Then, there is the Commissioner of Lobbying. We heard a lot about her because of the Prime Minister's trip to the Aga Khan's island. Then there is the Commissioner of Official Languages. I am the official languages critic and I worked on the appointment of the new commissioner, Mr. Théberge. There is also the Auditor General. That position is currently vacant because the former auditor general passed away just a few months ago. God rest his soul. I send my best wishes to his family. Finally, there is the Chief Electoral Officer and the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner.
There are other officers of Parliament, but the ones I mentioned are the main commissioners who have been mandated by Parliament to conduct investigations in order to ensure proper accountability in the Canadian democratic process.
The member for Hamilton Centre wants to improve and strengthen parliamentary democracy with respect to the process for appointing commissioners and other officers of Parliament. Here is why.
During the last election campaign, the Prime Minister made some promises that he mostly did not keep. He promised to make the process for appointing commissioners more democratic. Under the Conservative government, from 2006 to 2015, the process for appointing commissioners was much more democratic from the perspective of a Westminster-style parliamentary system. It was also much more transparent than what we have seen over the past few years with the Prime Minister and the Liberal government.
When the Prime Minister chose the Official Languages Commissioner a year and a half ago, I am sure that the member for Hamilton Centre noticed, as we all did, that the process for appointing officers of Parliament was anything but open and transparent. Note that I am not in any way trying to target the individual who was selected and who currently holds that position.
This was done differently before 2015. For example, the Standing Committee on Official Languages used to send the Prime Minister of Canada a list of potential candidates for the position of Commissioner of Official Languages. The Prime Minister, with help from his advisors and cabinet, selected one of the candidates suggested. That is far more transparent and democratic than what the Prime Minister and member for Papineau is doing.
What has the Prime Minister done these past few years? Instead of having committees with oversight and the necessary skills for selecting commissioners, such as the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics or the Standing Committee on Official Languages, the Prime Minister is no longer relying on committees to send him a list of names of people or experts in the field. They are no longer able to send a list to the Prime Minister. He said to trust him, that he had set up a system involving people in his own office who send him lists of candidates with absolutely no partisan connections or any connections whatsoever to the Liberal list, candidates who were found by virtue of their expertise.
What actually happened? We saw one clearly terrible case with Ms. Meilleur. Far be it from me to badmouth her, but unfortunately, she was part of this undemocratic process. Ms. Meilleur had been a Liberal MPP in Ontario. She donated money to the Liberal Party of Canada, and less than a year later, she was nominated for the position of official languages commissioner. The Prime Minister did not send a list of candidates' names to the opposition parties. He did not start a discussion with the other party leaders to ask who they thought the best candidate was. He sent a single name to the leader of the official opposition and to the then NDP leader, saying that this was his pick and asking if they agreed.
Not only did the committees have no input under the current Liberal Prime Minister, but the Prime Minister actually only sent one name to the opposition leader.
What the member for Hamilton Centre wants to do is set up a process whereby candidates are selected by a committee, which would be chaired by you, Mr. Speaker, amazingly enough. First off, the idea suggested by my colleague, the member for Hamilton Centre, could not be implemented before the session ends. We have only a few weeks left, and I gather that an NDP member will be proposing an amendment to the motion in a few minutes. We will see what happens then.
Personally, I would say we need to go even further than the motion moved by the member for Hamilton Centre. I will speak to my colleagues about this once we are in government, as of October.
Why not be even bolder and give parliamentary committees not just the power to refer candidates to the Prime Minister for him to decide, but also the power to appoint officers of Parliament? I want to point out that I am speaking only for myself here. I began reflecting on this a year and a half ago, after what happened with Ms. Meilleur and the current commissioner.
I have been a member of the Standing Committee on Official Languages for two years now, and I humbly believe that I have learned a lot about official languages issues. I am familiar with the key players on the ground and I am beginning to understand who the real experts are, who the stakeholders are and who might make a good commissioner. I have to wonder why we would not go even further than what my colleague from Hamilton Centre is proposing, and perhaps even give the real power to the committees.
Imagine the legitimacy the process would have if parliamentary committees could one day choose officers of Parliament. These appointments should still be confirmed by both chambers, as is always the case.
Careful reflection is still needed. What is certain is that we are too close to the end of the current parliamentary session for the motion moved by the member for Hamilton Centre to become a reality. This is even less likely to happen under the current Liberal government, which made many promises to please the Canadian left, including a promise for democratic emancipation. All those promises have been broken.
I wish the hon. member for Hamilton Centre continued success.
Monsieur le Président, comme d'habitude, j'aimerais saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre. J'ai le plaisir de débattre aujourd'hui de la motion M-170, qui se lit comme suit:
Que, de l'avis de la Chambre, un comité spécial présidé par le Président de la Chambre devrait être constitué au début de chaque législature afin de sélectionner tous les agents du Parlement.
Avant de commencer, j'aimerais reconnaître, avec honneur et justesse, que la motion a été déposée par le député d'Hamilton-Centre, un député du NPD qui siège ici depuis assez longtemps. Il a mentionné qu'il ne se représenterait pas aux prochaines élections, alors s'il nous écoute, j'aimerais le saluer et le remercier pour son travail et ses décennies de service public. Le député d'Hamilton-Centre a également été député provincial de l'Ontario et il a œuvré pour toutes sortes de causes importantes pour ses concitoyens. J'aimerais donc le féliciter.
D'ailleurs, il n'est pas seulement un bon parlementaire. Je l'ai déjà vu faire un discours au Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires, si je me rappelle bien, et j'ai noté sa façon de faire, car il est un bon orateur qui a une bonne rhétorique. J'ai toujours beaucoup d'estime pour mes collègues qui ont une très grande expérience parlementaire, et j'essaie d'en tirer les meilleures leçons.
Le député d'Hamilton-Centre veut certainement laisser sa marque sur la démocratie canadienne. Je partage sa volonté d'améliorer la démocratie parlementaire de type Westminster, soit celle que nous avons ici, au Canada. Effectivement, le rôle des députés est à la base même de la démocratie parlementaire. Il est fondamental. Les députés doivent avoir un rôle prépondérant dans l'exercice de la démocratie canadienne, notamment en ce qui a trait à la sélection et à la nomination des agents du Parlement. C'est ce dont il est question dans la motion.
Les agents du Parlement sont des individus que la Chambre des communes et le Sénat nomment conjointement pour qu'ils fassent des vérifications à notre place dans le but de nous aider dans le cadre de nos fonctions et de nos responsabilités. Par exemple, au Canada, nous avons un commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique. D'ailleurs, ce commissariat a été mis en branle par M. Harper et le Parti conservateur.
Il y a aussi le commissaire à l'information, qui s'assure que les Canadiens peuvent avoir accès à toutes les informations du gouvernement pour aller au fond des choses. Ensuite, il y a le commissaire au lobbying. On a souvent entendu parler de lui en raison du voyage du premier ministre à l'île de l'Aga Khan. Puis, il y a le commissaire aux langues officielles. Je suis d'ailleurs porte-parole en matière de langues officielles. J'ai moi-même travaillé sur le dossier de la nomination du nouveau commissaire, M. Théberge. En outre, il y a le vérificateur général. Ce poste est actuellement vacant, puisque l'ancien vérificateur général — que Dieu ait son âme — est décédé il y a quelques mois. Je tiens à saluer toute sa famille. Finalement, mentionnons le commissaire aux élections et le commissaire à l'intégrité du secteur public.
Il y a d'autres agents du Parlement, mais ceux que j'ai nommés sont les commissaires principaux que le Parlement a chargés de mener des enquêtes dans le but d'assurer une reddition de comptes adéquate dans le cadre de l'exercice de la démocratie canadienne.
Le député d'Hamilton-Centre veut améliorer et renforcer la démocratie parlementaire en ce qui a trait au processus de nomination des commissaires et des autres agents du Parlement. Voici pourquoi il veut faire cela.
Lors de la dernière campagne électorale, le premier ministre a fait quelques promesses, qu'il n'a pas tenues pour la plupart. Il avait notamment promis de rendre le processus de sélection des commissaires plus démocratique. Sous le gouvernement conservateur, de 2006 à 2015, le processus de nomination des commissaires était beaucoup plus démocratique du point de vue du système parlementaire de type Westminster, et beaucoup plus transparent que ce qu'on a vu au cours des dernières années avec le premier ministre et le gouvernement libéral.
Lorsque le commissaire aux langues officielles a été choisi par le premier ministre, il y a de cela un an et demi, je suis certain que le député d'Hamilton-Centre a constaté, comme nous tous, que le processus de nomination des agents du Parlement était tout le contraire d'un processus ouvert et transparent. Ici, je ne vise pas du tout l'individu qui a été choisi et qui occupe le poste actuellement.
Avant 2015, cela fonctionnait différemment. Par exemple, c'était le Comité permanent des langues officielles qui envoyait au premier ministre du Canada une liste de candidats potentiels au poste de commissaire aux langues officielles. Le premier ministre, avec l'aide de ses conseillers et de son Cabinet, choisissait une candidature parmi celles qui avaient été suggérées. On voit déjà que c'était beaucoup plus transparent et démocratique que ce que fait le premier ministre et député de Papineau.
Qu'a fait le premier ministre au cours des dernières années? Au lieu d'avoir des comités qui ont un droit de regard et des compétences certaines quant à la sélection de commissaires, par exemple le Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique ou le Comité permanent des langues officielles, les comités ne peuvent plus aujourd'hui envoyer au premier ministre une liste de noms de gens ou d'experts dans le domaine. Ils n'ont plus la possibilité d'envoyer une liste au premier ministre. Ce dernier a dit de lui faire confiance, qu'il avait installé, dans son propre bureau, un système où les gens lui envoient des listes de candidats qui ne sont aucunement reliés à la partisanerie, qui ne sont aucunement reliés à la liste libérale et qui sont des gens qui ont été découverts grâce à leur expertise.
Or qu'est-ce qu'on a vu? On a assisté à un cas patent terrible: celui de Mme Meilleur. Je n'ai pas du tout envie de parler contre cette personne, mais, malheureusement, elle a fait partie de cet exercice non démocratique. Mme Meilleur avait été députée libérale en Ontario. Elle était une donatrice du Parti libéral du Canada, et ce, moins d'un an avant d'avoir été choisie pour être commissaire aux langues officielles. Le premier ministre n'a pas envoyé de liste aux partis d'opposition. Il n'a pas ouvert une discussion avec les autres chefs de parti pour connaître leur opinion concernant la meilleure candidature. Il a envoyé un seul nom au chef de l'opposition officielle, au chef du NPD de l'époque, et lui a dit que c'était la candidature qu'il avait retenue. Puis, il lui a demandé s'il était d'accord.
Non seulement les comités n'avaient pas de droit de regard, sous le premier ministre libéral actuel, mais, en plus, ce dernier envoyait une seule candidature au chef de l'opposition.
Ce que veut faire le député d'Hamilton-Centre, c'est faire en sorte qu'il y ait un comité — présidé par vous-même, monsieur le Président, n'est-ce pas incroyable? — qui choisirait des candidatures. Premièrement, l'idée de mon collègue le député d'Hamilton-Centre ne pourra pas être achevée avant la fin des travaux parlementaires. Il ne nous reste que quelques semaines, et je crois avoir compris qu'un député du NPD va proposer un amendement à la motion dans les minutes qui vont suivre. On verra alors ce qui arrivera.
Personnellement, je dirais qu'il faut aller encore plus loin que la motion présentée par le député d'Hamilton-Centre. Je vais en parler à mes collègues lorsque nous allons former le gouvernement, en octobre prochain.
Pourquoi ne redonnerions-nous pas non seulement le pouvoir aux comités parlementaires d'envoyer des candidatures au premier ministre pour qu'il choisisse, mais également — soyons encore plus audacieux — le pouvoir de nomination des agents parlementaires? Je tiens à dire que je parle ici en mon nom. J'ai entamé cette réflexion personnelle il y a un an et demi, à la suite de ce qui s'est passé avec Mme Meilleur et le commissaire actuel.
Cela fait deux ans que je siège au Comité permanent des langues officielles, et je pense humblement que j'ai acquis une certaine connaissance des questions touchant les langues officielles. Je connais les acteurs présents sur place et je commence à avoir une bonne idée de qui sont les experts, de qui sont les personnes intéressées et de qui pourraient être de bons commissaires. Je me demande pourquoi nous n'irions pas encore plus loin que ce que mon collègue d'Hamilton-Centre dit et peut-être même donner le vrai pouvoir aux comités.
Imaginons la légitimité que cela donnerait si, un jour, les comités parlementaires pouvaient choisir les agents du Parlement. Cette nomination devrait quand même être confirmée par les deux Chambres, comme c'est toujours le cas.
Plusieurs réflexions doivent avoir lieu. Chose certaine, nous sommes trop près de la fin de l'actuelle session parlementaire pour que le projet du député d'Hamilton-Centre soit réalisable. C'est encore moins possible que ce soit réalisable sous le gouvernement libéral actuel, qui a fait une multitude de promesses pour plaire à la gauche canadienne, dont des promesses d'émancipation démocratique. Ces promesses ont toutes été rompues.
Je souhaite une bonne continuation au très cher député d'Hamilton-Centre.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-09 15:27 [p.27635]
Mr. Speaker, as always, I would like to salute all the people of Beauport—Limoilou tuning in this afternoon. I would also like to salute my colleague from Saint Boniface—Saint Vital, who just gave a speech on Bill C-91. We worked together for a time on the Standing Committee on Official Languages. I know languages in general are important to him. I also know that, as a Métis person, his personal and family history have a lot to do with his interest in advocating for indigenous languages. That is very honourable of him.
For those watching who are not familiar with Bill C-91, it is a bill on indigenous languages. Enacted in 1969, Canada's Official Languages Act is now 50 years old. That makes this a big year for official languages, and the introduction of this bill on indigenous languages, which is now at third reading, is just and fitting. That is why my colleague from Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo, the Conservative Party's indigenous affairs critic, said she would support the bill when it was introduced back in February. Nevertheless, we do have some criticisms, which I will lay out shortly.
The bill's purpose is twofold. Its primary purpose is to protect indigenous languages and ensure their survival. Did you know that there are 70 indigenous languages spoken in Canada? The problem is that while some languages are still spoken more or less routinely, others are disappearing. Beyond ensuring their survival, this bill seeks to promote the development of indigenous languages that have all but disappeared for the many reasons we are discussing.
The second purpose of the bill, which is just as commendable, is to directly support reconciliation between our founding peoples and first nations, or in other words, reconciliation between federal institutions and indigenous peoples. As the bill says, the purpose is to support and promote the use of indigenous languages, including indigenous sign languages. It seeks to support the efforts of indigenous peoples to reclaim, revitalize, maintain and strengthen indigenous languages, especially the more commonly-spoken ones.
Canada's official opposition obviously decided to support the principles of this bill right from the beginning for four main reasons. The first involves the Conservative Party's record on indigenous matters. Our record may not have been the same in the 19th century, and the same could be said of all parties, but during our 10 years in power, Prime Minister Harper recognized the profound tragedy and grave error of the residential schools. He offered an official apology in 2008.
I want to share a quote from Prime Minister Harper, taken from the speech by my colleague from Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo:
The government now recognizes that the...Indian residential schools policy...has had a lasting and damaging impact on aboriginal culture, heritage and language.
That is why my colleague from Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo said:
We acknowledged in 2008 that [the Canadian government at the time was] part of the destruction of these languages and cultures. Therefore, the government must be part of the solution in terms of helping to bring the languages [and culture] back, and part of that is Bill C-91.
This is why I said that reconciliation is one of the objectives of this bill, beyond the more tangible objective. That is the first reason the Conservatives will support this bill on indigenous languages.
The second reason is that, under Mr. Harper's fantastic tenure, we created the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. It was an important and highly enlightening process.
There were some very sad moments. Members of indigenous nations came to talk about their background and share their stories. They put their cards on the table for all to see. They bared their souls and told the Canadian government what they go through today and what their ancestors went through in the 19th century. Not only did the Conservatives offer a formal apology in 2008, but they also created the Truth and Reconciliation Commission to promote reconciliation between indigenous peoples and the Government of Canada and all Canadians. Our legacy is a testament to our sincere belief in reconciliation. I am sure that is true for all MPs and all Canadians.
Now I will move on to the third reason we support this bill. I am the critic for Canada's official languages, French and English. That is one of the reasons I am speaking today. When I first saw Bill C-91 on the legislative agenda, I considered the issue and then read the Official Languages Act of 1969. The final paragraph of the preamble to the Official Languages Act states that the act:
...recognizes the importance of preserving and enhancing the use of languages other than English and French while strengthening the status and use of the official languages....
When members examine constitutional or legislative matters in committee or in debates such as this one, we need to take the intent of the legislators into consideration. When the Official Languages Act was introduced and passed in 1969, the legislators had already clearly indicated that they intended the protection of official languages to one day include the promotion, enhancement and maintenance of every other language in Canada, including the 70 indigenous languages. Clearly that took some time. That was 50 years ago.
Those are the first three reasons why we support this bill.
The fourth reason goes without saying. We have a duty to make amends for past actions. Those who are familiar with Canada's history know that both French and English colonizers lived in relative harmony with indigenous peoples for the first two or three centuries after Jacques Cartier's arrival in the Gaspé in 1534 and Samuel de Champlain's arrival in Quebec City in 1608. Indigenous peoples are the ones who helped us survive the first winters, plain and simple. They helped us to clear the land and grow crops. Unfortunately, in the late 19th century, when we were able to thrive without the help of indigenous peoples, we began implementing policies of cultural alienation and residential schools. All of that happened in an international context involving cultural theories that have since been debunked and are now considered preposterous.
Yes, we need to make amends for Canada's history and what for what the founding peoples, our francophone and anglophone ancestors, did. It is a matter of justice. The main goal of Bill C-91 is to ensure the development of indigenous languages in Canada, to keep them alive and to prevent them from disappearing.
In closing, for the benefit of Canadians watching us this afternoon, I would like to summarize what Bill C-91 would ultimately achieve. Part of it is about recognition. The bill provides that:
(a) the Government of Canada recognizes that the rights of Indigenous people recognized and affirmed by section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982 include rights related to Indigenous languages.
This is a bit like what happened with the Official Languages Act, which, thanks to its section 82, takes precedence over other acts. It is also related to section 23 on school boards and the protection of anglophone and francophone linguistic minorities across the country. This bill would create the same situation with respect to section 35 and indigenous laws in Canada.
The legislation also states that the government may enter into agreements to protect languages. The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Multiculturalism may enter into different types of agreements or arrangements in respect of indigenous languages with indigenous governments or other indigenous governing bodies or indigenous organizations, taking into account the unique circumstances and needs of indigenous groups, communities and peoples.
Lastly, the bill would ensure the availability of translation and interpretation services like those available for official languages, but probably not to the same degree. Federal institutions can cause documents to be translated into an indigenous language or provide interpretation services to facilitate the use of an indigenous language.
Canadians listening to us should note one important point. I myself do not speak any indigenous languages, but for the past year, anyone, especially indigenous members, can speak in indigenous languages in the House. Members simply need to give translators 24- or 48-hour notice. That aspect of the bill is about providing translation and interpretation services, but those services will not be offered to the same standard as services provided under the Official Languages Act. However, it is patently clear that an effort is being made to encourage the development of indigenous languages, not only on the ground or in communities where indigenous people live, but also within federal institutions.
I would also point out that the bill provides for a commissioner's office. I find that a little strange. As my colleague from Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo said, for the past four years, the Liberals have been telling us that their most important relationship is the one they have with indigenous peoples. I understand that as a policy statement, but I think it would be more commendable for a government to say that its most important relationship is the one it has with all Canadians.
Now I will talk briefly about the current Commissioner of Official Languages. Many will understand the link I am trying to make with the new indigenous languages commissioner position that will be created. Right when all official language minority communities across the country are talking about the need to modernize the act, today the Commissioner of Official Languages released his annual report and his report on modernizing the act. Most Canadians want bilingualism that is even more vibrant and more wide-spread across Canada. At the same time, there are clearly important gaps in terms of implementing the Official Languages Act across the entire government apparatus.
I have a some examples. A few months ago, the National Energy Board published a report in English only in violation of the OLA. At the time, the Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie said that was unacceptable. The government's job is not to simply say so, however. She should have taken action to ensure that the National Energy Board complies with the Official Languages Act. Then, there were the websites showing calls for tender by Public Services and Procurement Canada that are often riddled with mistakes, grammatical, syntax, and translation errors and misinterpretation. Again, the Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie told us that this was unacceptable.
There is also the Canada Infrastructure Bank, in Toronto. The Conservatives oppose such an institution. We do not believe it will produce the desired results. In its first year, the Canada Infrastructure Bank struggled to serve Canadians in both official languages. Again, the minister stated that this is unacceptable.
These problems keep arising because of cabinet's reckless approach to implementing, as well as ensuring compliance with and enforcement of, the Official Languages Act across the government apparatus. It has taken its duties lightly. The minister responsible is not showing any leadership within cabinet.
When cabinet is not stepping up, we should be able to count on the commissioner. I met with the Commissioner of Official Languages, Mr. Théberge, yesterday, and he gave me a summary of the report he released this morning. He said that he had a lot of investigative powers, including the power to subpoena. However, he said that he has no coercive power. This is one of the main issues with enforcement. For example, the majority of Canadians abide by the Criminal Code because police officers exercise coercive powers, ensuring that everyone complies with Canadian laws and the Criminal Code.
The many flaws and shortcomings in the implementation of the Official Languages Act are due not only to a lack of leadership in cabinet, but also to the commissioner not having adequate coercive power. The Conservatives will examine this issue very carefully to determine whether the commissioner should have coercive power.
The provisions of Bill C-91, an act respecting indigenous languages, dealing with the establishment of the office of the commissioner of indigenous languages are quite vague. Not only will the commissioner not have any coercive power, but he or she will also not have any well-established investigative powers.
The Liberals waited until the end of their four-year term to bring this bill forward, even though they spent those four years telling us that the relationship with indigenous peoples is their most important relationship. Furthermore, in committee, they frantically rushed to table 20-odd amendments to their own bill, as my colleague from Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo pointed out.
How can the Liberals say their most important relationship is their relationship with indigenous peoples when they waited four years to table this bill? What is more, not only did they table the bill in a slapdash way, but they had to get their own members to propose amendments to improve it. It is not unusual for members to propose amendments, but the Liberals had to table a whole stack of them because the bill had all kinds of flaws.
In closing, I think this bill is a good step towards reconciliation, but there are no tangible measures for the commissioner. For instance, if members have their speeches to the House translated into an indigenous language and the translation is bad, what can the commissioner do? If an indigenous community signs an agreement with the federal government and then feels that the agreement was not implemented properly, who can challenge the government on their behalf?
There is still a lot of work to be done, but we need to pass this bill as quickly as possible, despite all of its flaws, because the end of this Parliament is approaching. Once again, the government has shown its lack of seriousness, as it has with many other bills. To end on a positive note, I would like to say that this bill is a step toward reconciliation between indigenous peoples and the founding peoples, which is very commendable and necessary.
Monsieur le Président, comme d’habitude, j’aimerais saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent. J’aimerais également saluer mon collègue de Saint-Boniface—Saint-Vital, qui vient de faire un discours sur le projet de loi C-91. Nous avons siégé ensemble au Comité permanent des langues officielles. Je sais que les langues sont importantes pour lui en général. Je sais aussi qu'en tant que Métis, son histoire familiale et personnelle contribue énormément à cet intérêt qu'il porte à la défense des langues autochtones. C’est très honorable de sa part.
Pour les citoyens qui nous écoutent et qui ne connaissent pas le projet de loi C-91, il s’agit d'un projet de loi sur les langues autochtones. Au Canada, nous avons une loi sur les langues officielles depuis 1969. Cette année, c’est le 50 anniversaire de la Loi sur les langues officielles. C’est donc une grande année pour les langues officielles, et le dépôt de ce projet de loi sur les langues autochtones, qui en est à la troisième lecture, est de bon aloi et juste. C’est pourquoi ma collègue de Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo, qui est porte-parole du Parti conservateur en matière d'affaires autochtones, a mentionné qu'elle appuierait le projet de loi dès qu'il a été déposé, en février. Cependant, nous avons quelques critiques, que je vais mentionner un peu plus tard.
L'objectif du projet de loi est double. Il s’agit d’abord de protéger les langues autochtones et d’assurer leur survie. Sait-on qu’il y a 70 langues autochtones parlées? Le problème, c’est que, tandis que certaines d'entre elles sont plus ou moins parlées, voire courantes, d'autres sont en voie de disparition. Ce projet de loi vise non seulement à assurer la protection et la survie de toutes ces langues qui existent, mais aussi à favoriser l'épanouissement des langues autochtones qui, pour de nombreuses raisons dont nous discuterons, sont presque disparues.
Le deuxième objectif du projet de loi, qui est tout aussi louable, c'est de contribuer directement à la réconciliation entre les peuples fondateurs et les Premières Nations. En d'autres mots, il s'agit de la réconciliation entre les institutions qui forment le gouvernement fédéral et les Autochtones. Comme le projet de loi le dit, l'objectif est de soutenir et de promouvoir l’usage des langues autochtones, y compris les langues des signes autochtones. Par ailleurs, il veut soutenir les peuples autochtones dans leurs efforts visant à se réapproprier les langues autochtones, à les revitaliser, à les maintenir et à les renforcer, notamment ceux qui visent une utilisation courante.
De toute évidence, dès le départ, l’opposition officielle du Canada a décidé d’appuyer tous les principes énoncés dans ce projet de loi, pour quatre raisons principales. D’abord, il s'agit du bilan du Parti conservateur du Canada en ce qui concerne les Autochtones. Ce bilan n'était peut-être pas le même au XIXe siècle — on pourrait en dire autant de tous les partis —, mais lors de nos 10 dernières années au pouvoir, le premier ministre Harper a reconnu la grande tragédie et la grave erreur des pensionnats autochtones. Il a donné des excuses officielles en 2008.
Voici une citation du premier ministre Harper tirée du discours de ma collègue de Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo:
Le gouvernement reconnaît [...] que cette politique [c'est-à-dire les pensionnats autochtones] a causé des dommages durables à la culture, au patrimoine et à la langue autochtones.
C'est pourquoi ma collègue de Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo a dit:
En 2008, nous avons reconnu que nous avions participé à la destruction de ces langues et cultures [elle parle du gouvernement canadien de l’époque]. Par conséquent, le gouvernement doit faire partie de la solution pour aider à les raviver [c’est-à-dire les langues et la culture autochtones]. Le projet de loi C-91 est une partie de la solution.
Voilà pourquoi j’ai dit que l'un des objectifs de ce projet de loi, au-delà de ce qu’il tente de faire de manière tangible et palpable, est la réconciliation. C’est la première raison pour laquelle nous, les conservateurs, appuierons le projet de loi sur les langues autochtones.
La deuxième raison, c’est que sous le règne formidable de M. Harper, nous avons mis en place la Commission de vérité et réconciliation. Cela a été un exercice non seulement important, mais très révélateur.
Il y a eu des moments extrêmement tristes. Des individus des nations autochtones se sont présentés pour raconter leur parcours et leur histoire. Ils ont publiquement mis cartes sur table. Ils se sont vidé le coeur et ont expliqué au gouvernement canadien ce qu'ils avaient vécu en ces temps modernes et ce qu'avaient vécu leurs aïeux au XIXe siècle. Non seulement les conservateurs ont-ils offert des excuses en 2008, mais ils ont également mis sur pied la Commission de vérité et réconciliation, entre les peuples autochtones et le gouvernement du Canada et tous les Canadiens. La marque que nous avons laissée témoigne de notre bonne foi envers la réconciliation. C'est également le cas de tous les députés et de tous les Canadiens, j'en suis certain.
Je vais parler de la troisième raison pour laquelle nous appuyons ce projet de loi. Je suis porte-parole des langues officielles du Canada, le français et l'anglais. C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles je prends la parole aujourd'hui. Lorsque j'ai vu pour la première fois le projet de loi C-91 inscrit à l'ordre du jour législatif, j'ai réfléchi et j'ai lu la Loi sur les langues officielles de 1969. Dans le dernier paragraphe du préambule de la Loi sur les langues officielles, on dit que la Loi:
[...] reconnaît l’importance, parallèlement à l’affirmation du statut des langues officielles et à l’élargissement de leur usage, de maintenir et de valoriser l’usage des autres langues [...]
Quand les députés étudient des questions constitutionnelles ou législatives, en comité ou lors de débats comme celui-ci, il est important de prendre en considération l'intention des législateurs. Quand la Loi sur les langues officielles a été déposée et votée, en 1969, les législateurs avaient déjà clairement exprimé leur intention que la protection des langues officielles inclue, un jour ou l'autre, la promotion, la valorisation et le maintien de toutes les autres langues qui existent au Canada, dont les 70 langues autochtones. On s'entend que cela a pris du temps. Cela se fait 50 ans plus tard.
Ce sont donc les trois premières raisons pour lesquelles nous appuyons ce projet de loi.
Je dirais que la quatrième raison va de soi. Il s'agit du devoir que nous avons de réparer l'histoire. Quand on lit l'histoire canadienne, on constate, dans les cas de Jacques Cartier, qui est arrivé en 1534 en Gaspésie, et de Samuel de Champlain, qui est arrivé à Québec en 1608, que, dans les deux ou trois premiers siècles de coexistence entre les peuples autochtones et les colonisateurs français ou anglais, il y avait quand même une harmonie. Ce sont les Autochtones qui nous ont aidés à survivre aux premiers hivers, ni plus ni moins. Ce sont les Autochtones qui nous ont aidés à cultiver et à défricher la terre. Bien malheureusement, à la fin du XIXe siècle, lorsque nous étions à même de nous épanouir sans l'aide des Autochtones, nous avons commencé à mettre en place des politiques d'aliénation culturelle et des pensionnats autochtones. Tout cela s'est passé dans la foulée d'un contexte international où des théories culturelles n'avaient aucun sens et qui sont aujourd'hui complètement contredites.
Oui, il faut réparer l'histoire du Canada et ce qu'ont fait les peuples fondateurs, nos aïeux francophones et anglophones. C'est une question de justice. Le projet de loi C-91 vise d'abord et avant tout à garantir l'épanouissement des langues autochtones au Canada et à maintenir leur existence pour ne pas qu'elles disparaissent.
En terminant, j'aimerais indiquer de manière sommaire aux Canadiens qui nous écoutent ce que le projet de loi C-91 fera au bout du compte. D'abord, il y a un aspect de reconnaissance. De par ce projet de loi:
a) le gouvernement du Canada reconnaît que les droits des peuples autochtones reconnus et confirmés par l’article 35 de la Loi constitutionnelle de 1982 comportent des droits relatifs aux langues autochtones;
C'est un peu comme ce qui est arrivé dans le cas de la Loi sur les langues officielles, qui, grâce à son article 82, prime sur les autres lois. De plus, elle est reliée à l'article 23 sur les commissions scolaires et la protection des minorités linguistiques francophones et anglophones de partout au pays. Ce projet de loi vise à créer la même situation en ce qui a trait à l'article 35 et aux lois autochtones au Canada.
La loi prévoit également que le gouvernement peut faire des accords pour protéger les langues. Le ministre du Patrimoine canadien et du Multiculturalisme peut conclure divers types d'accords concernant les langues autochtones avec des gouvernements autochtones, d'autres dirigeants autochtones et des organismes autochtones, tout en tenant compte de la situation et des besoins propres aux groupes, aux collectivités et aux peuples autochtones.
Finalement, le projet de loi prévoit offrir des services de traduction et d'interprétation, comme c'est le cas pour les langues officielles, mais sûrement pas au même niveau que celles-ci. Les institutions fédérales peuvent veiller à ce que les documents soient traduits dans une langue autochtone et à ce que des services d'interprétation soient offerts afin de faciliter l'usage d'une telle langue.
Les Canadiens et les Canadiennes qui nous écoutent devraient noter un fait important. Personnellement, je ne parle aucune langue autochtone, mais depuis un an, n'importe qui, et surtout les députés autochtones, peut s'exprimer en langue autochtone à la Chambre. Le député n'a qu'à envoyer un avis de 24 ou de 48 heures aux traducteurs. Cet élément du projet de loi prévoit offrir des services de traduction et d'interprétation, mais ils ne seront pas au même niveau que ceux prévus par la Loi sur les langues officielles. Cependant, on voit de manière très nette qu'il y a une tentative de permettre l'épanouissement des langues autochtones, pas seulement sur le terrain ou dans les communautés où vivent les Autochtones, mais également au sein des institutions fédérales.
De plus, on peut constater que le projet de loi prévoit un bureau de commissaire. Je trouve cela un peu particulier. Comme ma collègue de Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo le disait, depuis quatre ans, les libéraux nous disent que leur relation la plus importante est celle qu'ils entretiennent avec les peuples autochtones. Je peux comprendre cet énoncé politique, mais je pense qu'il serait plus louable de dire que la relation la plus importante du gouvernement est celle qu'il entretient avec tous les Canadiens.
Maintenant, je vais parler brièvement du commissaire aux langues officielles actuel. On pourra comprendre le lien que je tente de faire avec le nouveau commissariat aux langues autochtones qui sera créé. Au moment où l'ensemble des communautés linguistiques officielles en situation minoritaire, d'un océan à l'autre, discute de l'importance de moderniser la loi, le commissaire aux langues officielles a déposé aujourd'hui son rapport annuel ainsi que son rapport sur la modernisation de la loi. De plus, la plupart des Canadiens ont la volonté de voir un bilinguisme plus vivant et plus répandu partout au Canada. Au même moment, on constate qu'il y a des lacunes importantes en ce qui concerne la mise en œuvre de la Loi sur les langues officielles au sein de l'appareil gouvernemental.
Je vais donner quelques exemples. Il y a quelques mois, l'Office national de l'énergie a publié un rapport uniquement en anglais, ce qui va à l'encontre de la Loi. À l'époque, la ministre du Tourisme, des Langues officielles et de la Francophoniea dit que c'était inacceptable. Cependant, il ne revient pas au gouvernement de dire cela. Elle aurait dû agir et s'assurer que l'Office national de l'énergie applique la Loi sur les langues officielles. On a aussi vu que les sites Internet sur lesquels sont publiés les appels d'offres de Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada sont plus souvent qu'autrement truffés d'erreurs, de fautes grammaticales et de syntaxe et d'erreurs de traduction et d'interprétation. Encore une fois, la ministre du Tourisme, des langues officielles et de la Francophonie nous a dit que cela était inacceptable.
Il y a aussi la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada, à Toronto. Nous, les conservateurs, sommes contre ce type d'institution. Nous pensons qu'elle ne donnera pas les résultats escomptés. Dans sa première année d'existence, la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada a eu peine à servir dans les deux langues officielles les Canadiens qui la contactaient. Encore une fois, la ministre a dit que cela était inacceptable.
Ces problèmes surviennent constamment parce que le Cabinet, dans un contexte délétère, ne prend pas au sérieux la mise en œuvre, le respect et l'application de la Loi sur les langues officielles au sein de l'appareil gouvernemental. La ministre qui est en poste n'applique pas son leadership au sein du Cabinet.
Quand cette réalité n'existe pas au sein du Cabinet, on voudrait pouvoir compter sur le commissaire. J'ai rencontré le commissaire aux langues officielles, M. Théberge, hier, et il m'a fait le compte rendu du rapport qu'il a déposé ce matin. Il a dit qu'il possédait une tonne de pouvoirs d'enquête, dont celui d'émettre une citation à comparaître. Il peut donc forcer des gens à comparaître dans le cadre d'une enquête. Cependant, il a dit qu'il n'avait aucun pouvoir coercitif. C'est l'un des gros problèmes en ce qui a trait à l'application d'une loi. Par exemple, si le Code criminel est respecté par la majorité des Canadiens, c'est bien parce qu'il y a un pouvoir coercitif, c'est-à-dire les forces policières, qui assurent le respect du droit canadien et du Code criminel.
Si on observe autant de manquements et de lacunes en ce qui concerne la mise en œuvre de la Loi sur les langues officielles, c'est non seulement à cause d'un manque de leadership au sein du Cabinet, mais également parce que le commissaire n'a pas de pouvoir coercitif adéquat. Nous, les conservateurs, allons nous pencher très sérieusement sur cette question afin d'évaluer si le commissaire devrait avoir un pouvoir coercitif.
Quand je lis la partie du projet de loi C-91, Loi concernant les langues autochtones, qui porte sur la mise en place du Bureau du commissaire aux langues autochtones, je constate qu'il y a très peu de détails. Non seulement il n'aura pas de pouvoir coercitif, mais il n'aura pas non plus de pouvoirs d'enquête bien établis.
Les libéraux ont attendu jusqu'à la fin de leur mandat de quatre ans pour déposer ce projet de loi, alors qu'ils nous disent depuis autant d'années que la relation avec les peuples autochtones est la relation la plus importante qu'ils entretiennent. De plus, en comité, ils ont déposé à la hâte et d'une manière chaotique une vingtaine d'amendements à leur propre projet de loi, comme ma collègue de Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo l'a si bien dit.
Alors, comment est-ce possible que la relation la plus importante des libéraux soit celle qu'ils entretiennent avec les Autochtones, alors qu'ils ont attendu quatre ans pour déposer ce projet de loi? De plus, non seulement ils ont déposé le projet de loi de façon chaotique, mais ils ont dû dire eux-mêmes à leurs députés de déposer des amendements afin de renforcer le projet de loi. Il est normal que des députés proposent des amendements, mais les libéraux ont dû en déposer une multitude, parce que le projet de loi avait toutes sortes de lacunes.
En terminant, je trouve que ce projet de loi est un bon pas vers la réconciliation, mais il n'y a aucune mesure tangible pour le commissaire. Par exemple, si des députés font traduire leur discours en langue autochtone à la Chambre et que le travail est mal fait, qu'est-ce que le commissaire va pouvoir dire? Si jamais des communautés autochtones concluent des accords avec le gouvernement fédéral et qu'ils ne sont pas mis en place convenablement, qui pourra se battre contre le gouvernement en leur nom?
Il restait donc encore beaucoup de travail à faire, mais nous allons devoir adopter ce projet de loi le plus rapidement possible, malgré toutes ses lacunes, puisque la fin de la législature approche. Encore une fois, le gouvernement a fait preuve d'un manque de sérieux, comme dans le cas de plusieurs projets de loi. Pour terminer sur une bonne note, je dirai que ce projet de loi contribue effectivement à la réconciliation entre les peuples autochtones et les peuples fondateurs, ce qui est très louable et nécessaire.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-09 15:48 [p.27637]
Mr. Speaker, the member is right. We are celebrating 50 years of having two official languages in Canada. They are official languages in terms of status and institutionalization of the facts, because historically, there were two languages three centuries ago. They were part of our identity in Canada, and they are still part of it.
There are a few ways to ensure that the Commissioner of Official Languages has more powers. As legislators, we have to do our due diligence and look at this carefully. Specialists have said that we should have pecuniary and administrative sanctions. For example, some governmental agencies and private enterprises go against the law. Only one private enterprise in Canada is under the law, which is Air Canada. Some of them constantly go against the law in their behaviour and actions, on a monthly basis sometimes. Although the commissioner is constantly making recommendations, 20% of his recommendations are never followed, as was said this morning. Why? It is because he does not have the power to tell organizations to stop or they will pay a fine.
Another option is to have an executory deal. It is less coercive. The governmental agency or private enterprise could be asked to make a deal, such as being in accordance with the law within five months.
If my colleague is interested, he can look into how it is done in Wales, England. It has a commissioner who has huge coercive powers.
Monsieur le Président, le député a raison. Nous célébrons les 50 ans de l'établissement des deux langues officielles au Canada. Ce sont des langues officielles pour ce qui est de leur statut et de leur institutionnalisation; en effet, elles étaient également présentes il y a de cela trois siècles. Elles faisaient et font toujours partie de notre identité canadienne.
Il y a plusieurs façons de faire en sorte que le commissaire aux langues officielles ait un pouvoir accru. En tant que législateurs, nous devons faire preuve de diligence raisonnable et examiner la question attentivement. Les spécialistes ont dit que nous devrions prévoir des sanctions pécuniaires et administratives. Par exemple, certains organismes gouvernementaux et certaines entreprises privées — et il y en a une seule au Canada qui est assujettie à la loi, soit Air Canada —, vont à l'encontre de la loi. Ils enfreignent constamment la loi dans leur comportement et leurs actions, et ce, parfois sur une base mensuelle. Malgré les recommandations constantes du commissaire, 20 % de celles-ci ne sont pas suivies, comme on l'a dit ce matin. Pourquoi? Parce qu'il n'a pas le pouvoir de dire aux organismes d'arrêter sous peine de devoir payer une amende.
Une autre option est de conclure un accord exécutoire, ce qui est moins coercitif. L'entreprise privée ou l'organisme gouvernemental pourrait être invité à conclure un accord, par exemple d'accepter de se conformer à la loi dans un délai de cinq mois.
Si mon collègue est intéressé, il peut se renseigner sur la façon de faire au pays de Galles, en Angleterre, où se trouve un commissaire qui détient un énorme pouvoir de coercition.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-09 15:51 [p.27638]
Mr. Speaker, if I correctly understood what the member said, there is, in fact, a part at the beginning of the law that speaks about the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, UNDRIP, which does not bind the government to this law, and maybe she finds that unfortunate. However, I voted against UNDRIP.
There were some indigenous people in my riding who came to my office, and with courage and pride I sat in front of them and explained to them why it was actually a courageous act as a legislator in 2018 to vote against the ratification of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples by Canada. Why? It is because most constitutionalists would say that it goes against some of our own constitutional conventions and laws, and I think that a courageous legislator must tell the truth to Canadians.
Although we might like UNDRIP, it is not in accordance with Canadian law. What is most important for a legislator is not to protect United Nations accords; it is to protect the Canadian law. I explained that to my constituent, who was an indigenous person, and I think we had huge respect for each other. Although he did not agree with me, I understand why he could not agree with me, which was because of the history he had with us and the founding people. Maybe that is why UNDRIP is not so clearly enshrined in this law.
Monsieur le Président, si j'ai bien compris la députée, il y a une partie au début du projet de loi qui porte sur la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones. Cependant, cette partie n'a pas force exécutoire, ce que la députée trouve peut-être regrettable. J'ai toutefois voté contre la Déclaration.
Quelques Autochtones de ma circonscription sont venus à mon bureau, et je leur ai expliqué fièrement et courageusement pourquoi il était courageux pour un législateur de voter contre la ratification de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones par le Canada en 2018. Pourquoi? C'est parce que la plupart des constitutionnalistes estiment que la Déclaration va à l'encontre de certaines de nos propres conventions et lois constitutionnelles, et je pense qu'un législateur courageux doit dire la vérité aux Canadiens.
Bien que nous puissions aimer la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, elle n'est pas conforme au droit canadien. Il est plus important pour un législateur de protéger les lois canadiennes que de protéger les accords des Nations unies. J'ai expliqué cette réalité à mon concitoyen autochtone et je pense que nous avions énormément de respect l'un pour l'autre. Il n'était pas d'accord avec moi, mais je comprends pourquoi il ne pouvait pas l'être. C'est en raison de son passé par rapport à nous et aux peuples fondateurs. C'est peut-être pour cette raison que la Déclaration n'est pas si clairement inscrite dans le projet de loi.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-09 15:54 [p.27638]
Mr. Speaker, to the first question on the importance of language, I know what it means, because I am a Quebecker. I am a French Canadian, and I am able to speak in French in this institution, but I like to show respect and answer in English when someone talks to me in English. My father is an anglophone, by the way.
When my daughter was born five years ago, I intended to speak to her in English, and I told my wife that she could speak to her in French, but I could not do it, because when I speak in English to my daughter, it is not from my heart. I do not feel the connection. Therefore, yes, a language is fundamental to a person's identity. It is fundamental to carry the culture we are from. It is impossible for me to speak to my kids in English. I do not see them that much, because I am here, but when I speak to my kids, I want my heart to be speaking.
Second, it is obvious that there were a lot of mistakes in the bill, because the government had to present more than 20 amendments. We should be afraid that there are other mistakes in the bill, which we did not have time to discuss or analyze correctly. I think that could be something troublesome that the next government, which will be Conservative, will have to repair.
Monsieur le Président, pour ce qui est de la première question, concernant l'importance de la langue, je sais ce que cela veut dire parce que je suis Québécois. Je suis un Canadien français et je peux m'exprimer en français dans cette institution, mais, par respect, je réponds en anglais lorsque quelqu'un m'adresse la parole en anglais. Mon père est anglophone, en passant.
Lorsque ma fille est née, il y a cinq ans, j'avais l'intention de lui parler en anglais et j'ai dit à ma femme qu'elle pourrait lui parler en français. Cependant, je n'y suis pas arrivé parce que lorsque je parlais à ma fille en anglais, ce n'était pas aussi senti que lorsque je lui parle en français. Je ne ressentais pas de connexion. Une langue est donc effectivement fondamentale dans l'identité d'une personne. Porter la culture dont nous sommes issus est fondamental. Je suis simplement incapable de parler à mes enfants en anglais. Je ne les vois pas très souvent parce que je suis ici, mais lorsque je parle à mes enfants, je veux que cela vienne du coeur.
Ensuite, il est évident que le projet de loi comportait de nombreuses erreurs parce que le gouvernement a dû présenter plus de 20 amendements. On est en droit de craindre qu'il y ait d'autres erreurs, que nous n'aurons pas le temps d'aborder et d'analyser comme il se doit. Je crois qu'il s'agira d'un problème que le prochain gouvernement — qui sera conservateur — devra régler.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-07 16:09 [p.27531]
Mr. Speaker, as always, I am very honoured to rise in the House today. I would like to say hello to the many people of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching. I saw them late last week at the Grand bazar du Vieux-Limoilou, the Patro Roc-Amadour community centre and the 52nd Salon de Mai craft fair, which was held at Promenades Beauport mall. Congratulations to the organizers.
I would also like to say that we are all very sad to hear that our colleague from Langley—Aldergrove is fighting a serious cancer. He just gave a powerful speech that reminded us how fragile life is. I even spoke to my wife and children to tell them that I love them. Our colleague gave a very poignant speech about that. I thank him for his years of service to Canada and to the House of Commons, and for all the future years that he will devote himself to his community.
Before I say anything about the Conservative Party motion now before us, I would like to say a quick word about what U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said yesterday. At a meeting of the Arctic Council in Finland, he had the gall to say that Canada’s claim of sovereignty over the Northwest Passage is illegitimate. He even compared us to Russia and China, referring to their behaviour and their propensity to annex territories, like Russia did in Ukraine. Personally, I find that shameful.
I would like to remind the U.S. government that we have been their allies for a long time. President Reagan and Prime Minister Mulroney reached an agreement, which both parties signed, and which stipulated that Canada indeed has sovereignty over the Northwest Passage. In the 19th century, we launched a number of expeditions and explorations supported by the British Crown, and Canadian sovereignty over the Northwest Passage and in the Arctic Archipelago is entirely legitimate.
Today we are discussing the importance of the oil industry and the importance of climate change. These two issues go hand in hand. They are key issues today and will continue to be in the future. Of course, I believe that the environment is extremely important. It is important for all Conservatives and for all Canadians. I remember collecting all sorts of bottles and cans along the roadside as a boy. I often did that with my father. He is an example for me in that respect. Throughout my life, I have always wanted to be a part of community organizations where people pick up garbage.
I am also very proud of most Canadian governments' environmental record. They have always endeavoured to meet the expectations of Canadians, for whom the environment is extremely important. Most of the time, the Liberals try to paint the Conservatives as anti-environment. I can assure my colleagues that I have never seen anything to support that in the Conservative Party. On the contrary, under Mr. Harper, we took important steps to lower greenhouse gas emissions in Canada by 2.2% between 2006 and 2015. I will come back to that later.
There are two approaches being proposed in the current debate on climate change. This applies to several western countries. I say western countries because those are the countries affected, given that our industrial era has been well established for two centuries. There are some industries that have been polluting rather significantly for a long time. We have reached a point in our history where we realize that greenhouse gas emissions from human activity are playing a very significant role in climate change.
Yes, we must act, but there are two possible approaches. One is the Liberal Party approach of taxing Canadians even more. The Liberals are asking Canadians to bear the burden of reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Canada. The approach the Conservatives prefer is not to create a new tax or to tax the fuel that Canadians put in their cars to go to work every day.
Our approach is rather to help Canadians in their everyday lives and to help the provinces implement their respective environmental plans.
For example, I always like to remind the Canadians listening to us, as well as all environmentalists, that we set up the Canada ecotrust in 2007-08. This $1.3-billion program was meant to allocate funds to the provinces so that they could deal in their own way with the major concerns associated with climate change and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. That is a fine example of how we want to help people.
Jean Charest was premier of Quebec at the time. We provided $300 million to help Quebec implement its GHG emissions reduction plan. Mr. Harper and Mr. Charest gave a joint press conference, and even Mr. Guilbeault from Greenpeace said that the Canada ecotrust was a significant, important program.
We did the same thing for Ontario, British Columbia and all the other provinces that wanted to join the ecotrust. It is very likely that the program allowed the Government of Ontario to implement its own program and close its coal-fired power plants.
As a result, under the Harper government, GHG emissions in Canada dropped by 2.2%. It bears repeating, since that is the approach we will adopt with our current leader, the hon. member for Regina—Qu'Appelle. In a few weeks, we will announce our environmental plan, which has been keenly anticipated by all Canadians, and especially by the Liberal government. It will be a serious plan. It will include environmental targets that will allow Canada and Canadians to excel in the fight against climate change. In particular, we will maintain our sound approach, which is to help the provinces. By contrast, the government prefers to start constitutional squabbles with them by imposing taxes on Canadians, overstepping its jurisdiction in the process, since environmental matters fall under provincial jurisdiction.
I would like to use Quebec as an example, as my colleague from Louis-Saint-Laurent did this morning. I have here a report on Quebec's inventory of greenhouse gas emissions in 2016 and their evolution since 1990. It was tabled by the new CAQ government last November, and it is very interesting. In 2016, greenhouse gas emissions increased in Quebec, despite the fact that the carbon exchange made its debut in 2013. That is ironic. Despite the implementation of a fuel tax to cut down on fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, emissions actually went up.
The same report also indicates that between 1990 and 2015, greenhouse gas emissions in Quebec decreased even though the carbon exchange had not been fully implemented. The conclusion explains how this happened:
The decrease in GHG emissions from 1990 to 2016 is mainly due to the industrial sector. The decrease observed in this sector resulted from technical improvements in certain processes, increased energy efficiency and the substitution of certain fuels.
That is exactly what we, the Conservatives, want to do. Instead of imposing a new tax on Canadians, we want to maintain a decentralized federal approach. We want to help the provinces adopt greener energy sources to stimulate even greener economic growth and the deindustrialization of certain sectors, create new technologies and increase innovation in the Canadian economy. That is the objective of a Conservative approach to the environment.
The objective of the Conservative approach to the environment is not to come down hard on the provinces and impose new taxes on Canadians. As we saw with Quebec, that did not have the desired effect. Our objective is to provide assistance while ensuring that our oil industry can grow in a healthy way. That is what Norway did. If I had 10 more minutes, I could talk more about that wonderful country, which has increased its oil production and exports and is one of the fairest and greenest countries in the world.
Monsieur le Président, comme toujours, je suis très honoré de prendre la parole à la Chambre. J'aimerais dire bonjour à tous les citoyens et citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre actuellement. Je les ai rencontrés la fin de semaine dernière, que ce soit au Grand bazar du Vieux-Limoilou, au Patro Roc-Amadour ou au 52e Salon de Mai, qui a eu lieu aux Promenades Beauport. Félicitations aux organisateurs!
J'aimerais également souligner le fait que nous ressentons tous une grande tristesse à l'égard de notre collègue de Langley—Aldergrove, qui combat un cancer très important. Il vient de faire un discours percutant qui nous a rappelé à quel point la vie est fragile. J'ai moi-même contacté ma femme et mes enfants pour leur dire que je les aimais. La mort nous guette tous, un jour ou l'autre. Notre collègue a prononcé un discours très poignant à cet égard. Je le remercie pour toutes ses années de service envers le Canada et la Chambre des communes, et pour toutes les années futures au cours desquelles il pourra s'investir dans sa communauté.
Avant de parler de la motion actuelle, qui a été mise en avant par le Parti conservateur, j'aimerais rapidement revenir sur les propos de Mike Pompeo, le secrétaire d'État américain. Hier, lors d'une réunion du Conseil de l'Arctique en Finlande, il a osé dire que la revendication de la souveraineté canadienne sur le passage du Nord-Ouest était illégitime. Il nous a même comparés à la Russie et à la Chine, en faisant référence à leurs comportements et aux annexions de territoires, comme on a vu la Russie le faire en Ukraine. Personnellement, j'ai trouvé cela honteux.
J'aimerais rappeler à l'administration américaine que nous sommes leurs alliés depuis très longtemps. Une entente a été établie entre le président Reagan et le premier ministre Mulroney. Une convention avait été signée et elle stipulait que le passage du Nord-Ouest était bel et bien sous la souveraineté canadienne. Au XIXe siècle, on a fait plusieurs expéditions et explorations soutenues par la Couronne britannique, ce qui fait que la souveraineté canadienne dans le passage du Nord-Ouest et dans l'archipel Arctique est tout à fait légitime.
Nous discutons aujourd'hui de l'importance de l'industrie pétrolière et de l'importance des changements climatiques. Ce sont deux enjeux qui vont de pair. Ce sont deux choses qui sont structurantes aujourd'hui et qui vont demeurer comme telles. Bien entendu, je crois que l'environnement est extrêmement important, et ce l'est aussi pour tous les conservateurs et pour tous les citoyens du Canada. Je me rappelle avoir participé, dès mon jeune âge, à des ramassages de bouteilles et de cannettes de toutes sortes aux abords des routes et des autoroutes. Je faisais souvent cela avec mon père; il est un exemple pour moi à cet égard. Tout au long de ma vie, j'ai toujours voulu faire partie d'organisations communautaires où les gens ramassent les déchets.
Je suis également très fier du bilan de la majorité des gouvernements canadiens en matière d'environnement. Ils ont toujours voulu répondre aux attentes des Canadiens pour qui l'environnement est important. Les libéraux tentent, la plupart du temps, de dépeindre les conservateurs comme étant un groupe anti-environnement. Je peux assurer à mes collègues que je n'ai jamais perçu cela en côtoyant mes collègues du Parti conservateur. Bien au contraire, sous M. Harper, on a pris des mesures très intéressantes qui nous ont permis de faire baisser les émissions de gaz à effet de serre au Canada de 2,2 % entre 2006 et 2015. J'en reparlerai plus tard.
En fait, il y a deux approches proposées dans le débat actuel sur les changements climatiques. C'est vrai pour plusieurs pays occidentaux. Je parle des pays occidentaux parce que ce sont ces pays qui sont concernés, vu que notre ère industrielle est bien installée depuis deux siècles. Il y a des industries qui polluent de manière assez substantielle depuis longtemps. Nous sommes arrivés à un moment de notre histoire où nous avons pris acte du fait que l'humain, en raison de son apport de gaz à effet de serre dans le monde, a un rôle très important dans les changements climatiques.
Oui, il faut agir, mais il y a deux approches. Une de ces approches provient du Parti libéral. Elle vise à taxer davantage les Canadiens. En fait, les libéraux tentent de mettre sur les épaules des Canadiens le poids d'en arriver à une baisse des émissions de gaz à effet de serre au Canada. L'approche que privilégient les conservateurs n'est pas de créer une nouvelle taxe ou de taxer davantage l'essence que les Canadiens mettent à la pompe tous les jours pour aller au travail en voiture.
Notre approche vise plutôt à aider les Canadiens dans leur vie de tous les jours et à aider les provinces à mettre en oeuvre leurs plans environnementaux respectifs.
À titre d'exemple, j'aime toujours rappeler aux Canadiens et aux Canadiennes qui nous écoutent et à tous les écologistes qu'en 2007-2008, nous avons mis en place l'ÉcoFiducie. Ce programme d'environ 1,3 milliard de dollars visait à envoyer des enveloppes budgétaires à toutes les provinces pour qu'elles puissent répondre, chacune à leur façon, aux grandes préoccupations liées aux changements climatiques et diminuer leurs émissions de gaz à effet de serre. Voilà un bel exemple qui démontre que nous voulons aider les gens.
À l'époque, le premier ministre du Québec était M. Charest. Nous avions octroyé une enveloppe budgétaire de 300 millions de dollars au Québec pour l'aider à mettre en oeuvre son plan de diminution des GES. Il y avait eu une conférence de presse conjointe avec M. Harper et M. Charest, et même M. Guilbeault, de Greenpeace, avait dit que l'ÉcoFiducie était un programme substantiel et important.
Nous avons fait la même chose pour l'Ontario, la Colombie-Britannique et toutes les provinces qui voulaient souscrire à l'ÉcoFiducie. Il est fort probable que ce programme ait permis au gouvernement de l'Ontario de mettre en place son propre programme. Il a d'ailleurs eu la possibilité de fermer des centrales électriques au charbon.
Grâce à tout cela, sous le gouvernement de M. Harper, les GES ont diminué de 2,2 % au Canada. Il faut le répéter, puisque c'est l'approche que nous adopterons avec notre chef, le député de Regina—Qu'Appelle. Dans quelques semaines, nous allons annoncer notre plan environnemental, qui est très attendu par tous les Canadiens et, surtout, par le gouvernement libéral. Notre plan sera très sérieux. Il comprendra des cibles environnementales visant à ce que le Canada et les Canadiens excellent en matière de lutte contre les changements climatiques. Surtout, nous allons maintenir notre approche saine qui consiste à aider les provinces plutôt qu'à commencer des bagarres constitutionnelles avec celles-ci en imposant aux Canadiens des taxes, ce qui va à l'encontre du partage des champs de compétence, puisque les questions environnementales relèvent des provinces.
J'aimerais prendre l'exemple du Québec, comme mon collègue de Louis-Saint-Laurent l'a fait ce matin. J'ai entre les mains un rapport qui s'intitule « Inventaire québécois des émissions de gaz à effet de serre en 2016 et leur évolution depuis 1990 ». Celui-ci a été déposé par le nouveau gouvernement de la CAQ en novembre dernier, et il est fort intéressant. En 2016, les émissions de gaz à effet de serre ont augmenté au Québec. Pourtant, la bourse du carbone a été instaurée en 2013 au Québec. C'est paradoxal. Malgré la mise en place d'une taxe sur l'essence pour réduire la consommation d'essence et les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, celles-ci ont augmenté.
Le même rapport indique aussi qu'entre 1990 et 2015, les émissions de gaz à effet de serre au Québec ont diminué, alors qu'il n'y avait pas de bourse du carbone totalement en vigueur. Dans la conclusion, on nous explique pourquoi:
La diminution des émissions de GES de 1990 à 2016 est principalement attribuable au secteur industriel. La baisse observée dans ce secteur provient de l'amélioration technique de certains procédés, de l'amélioration de l'efficacité énergétique et de la substitution de certains combustibles. 
C'est exactement ce vers quoi nous, les conservateurs, voulons tendre. Au lieu d'imposer une nouvelle taxe aux Canadiens, nous voulons maintenir une approche fédérale décentralisatrice. Nous voulons octroyer de l'aide aux provinces, que ce soit pour aller vers des énergies plus vertes, pour stimuler une croissance économique plus verte, pour stimuler la désindustrialisation de certains secteurs, pour créer de nouvelles technologies ou pour faire croître l'innovation dans l'économie canadienne. Voilà l'objectif d'une approche conservatrice en environnement.
L'objectif d'une approche conservatrice en environnement n'est pas de taper sur les provinces et d'imposer de nouvelles taxes aux Canadiens. Comme on l'a vu dans le cas du Québec, cela n'a pas eu l'effet escompté. Notre objectif est d'apporter de l'aide, tout en faisant en sorte que notre industrie pétrolière puisse croître de manière saine. C'est ce que fait la Norvège, d'ailleurs. Si j'avais eu 10 minutes de plus, j'aurais pu parler davantage de ce merveilleux pays, qui, tout en augmentant sa production et son exportation de pétrole, est l'une des sociétés les plus équitables et les plus vertes au monde.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-07 16:21 [p.27532]
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague from Châteauguay—Lacolle for her question. I sat with her on the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates. I have a great deal of respect for her.
Yes, the carbon exchange is a market-based approach. However, as we have seen, Quebec has not achieved the desired results. The purpose of the Canada ecotrust program created under Mr. Harper was to give the provinces a budget and allow them to come up with their own plans to tackle climate change. Canada's greenhouse gas emissions then dropped by 2.2%, a concrete and historic reduction.
What I find unfortunate is that the carbon tax is currently priced at $20 a tonne. It will go up to $50 a tonne by 2020. It seems likely that the Liberals will want to raise it even further if they stay in power in a few months.
What is even more unfortunate is that this tax will not apply to Canada's major emitters, big industries like cement, concrete and coal. They will pay only 8% of the total revenue from the carbon tax, while families and small businesses will have to pay the remaining 92%.
It has been said that it will not apply in Quebec because Quebec already has a carbon tax. However, as we have seen in recent weeks, the price of gas has gone up across Canada, including in Quebec and British Columbia, which already have carbon exchanges.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie de sa question ma collègue de Châteauguay—Lacolle, avec qui j'ai siégé au Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires. J'ai beaucoup de respect pour elle.
Effectivement, la bourse du carbone est une approche du marché. Par contre, on a vu que, au Québec, cela n'a pas donné le résultat escompté, justement. Le programme Éco-Fiducie Canada, créé sous M. Harper, avait pour objectif de permettre aux provinces d'avoir des enveloppes budgétaires et de mettre en avant elles-mêmes leurs propres plans pour répondre aux changements climatiques. On a alors remarqué au Canada une baisse réelle et historique des GES de 2,2 %.
Ce que je trouve dommage, c'est que, actuellement, la taxe sur le carbone est de 20 $ la tonne. Elle va atteindre 50 $ la tonne d'ici 2022. On peut penser que les libéraux voudront fort probablement l'augmenter encore une fois s'ils gardent le pouvoir dans quelques mois.
Ce qui est encore plus malheureux, c'est que les grands émetteurs, les grandes industries de ciment, de béton et de charbon au Canada ne seront pas touchées par cette taxe. Elles ne paieront que 8 % des revenus totaux découlant de la taxe sur le carbone, alors que les familles et les petites entreprises devront payer 92 % de l'augmentation relative à cette taxe.
On disait que cela ne s'appliquerait pas au Québec parce qu'il a déjà une taxe sur le carbone. Or on a vu, au cours des dernières semaines, que les prix de l'essence ont augmenté dans tout le Canada, incluant le Québec et la Colombie-Britannique, qui ont déjà des bourses sur le carbone.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-07 16:24 [p.27533]
Mr. Speaker, what my colleague said about energy east is totally false. Energy east is dead and buried. However, he did say that the commissioner of the environment suggested the results might be due to the provinces' efforts. That is exactly how the Conservatives want to approach this. We think the provinces are in the best position to set standards for their industrial sectors and make appropriate changes based on their population, their industries and the environment.
That is exactly what we did. Under the ecotrust program, we transferred funds to the provinces so they could finance certain portions of their climate change programs. My colleague was right when he said the provinces did the work, but it is important to acknowledge that the federal government helped by doing exactly what the founding fathers intended back in 1867.
Monsieur le Président, ce que mon collègue a dit au sujet d'Énergie Est est totalement faux. Énergie Est est mort et n'existera plus jamais. Par contre, il a dit que la commissaire à l’environnement avait suggéré que les résultats étaient attribuables aux efforts des provinces. Or c'est justement cela, l'approche des conservateurs. Nous estimons que les provinces sont les mieux placées pour baliser leur secteur industriel et faire les changements adéquats en ce qui concerne leur population, leurs industries et le secteur environnemental.
C’est exactement ce que nous avons fait. Au moyen du programme ÉcoFiducie, nous avons alloué des enveloppes aux provinces leur permettant de financer, à certains taux, leurs programmes de lutte contre les changements climatiques. Mon collègue a donc raison lorsqu'il dit que ce sont les provinces qui ont fait des efforts, mais il faut aussi reconnaître la belle collaboration du fédéral, qui a agi comme l'auraient voulu les pères fondateurs de 1867.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-03 12:03 [p.27383]
Mr. Speaker, every year, of the forty recruits trained at the RCMP academy only one is trained solely in French. I did say one. Now, there will be none, because the RCMP is launching a pilot project that will put an end to training in French only. Clearly, this decision goes against the spirit and the letter of the Official Languages Act. The Minister of Public Safety and the Minister of Official Languages must absolutely overturn this decision immediately.
What are they waiting for?
Monsieur le Président, chaque année, sur une quarantaine de troupes qui sont formées à l'école de la GRC, seulement une est formée uniquement en français. J'ai bien dit une. Or, maintenant, cela va être zéro, parce que la GRC met en place un projet-pilote qui met fin à la seule formation uniquement en français. Clairement, cette décision va à l'encontre de l'esprit et de la lettre de la Loi sur les langues officielles. Les ministres de la Sécurité publique et des Langues officielles doivent absolument infirmer cette décision dès maintenant.
Qu'attendent-ils pour le faire?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-04-29 13:17 [p.27131]
Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to rise today to speak to the NDP motion. I would first like to say hello to the many people of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching us live or who will watch later on social media.
I just spent two weeks in my riding, where I met thousands of my constituents at events and activities organized by different organizations. Last Thursday, the Corporation de développement communautaire de Beauport, or CDCB, held a unique and innovative event. For the first time, all elected municipal, provincial and federal officials in the riding attended a breakfast meet and greet for constituents and representatives of organizations. It was a type of round table with elected members from all levels of government. It was an exemplary exercise in good democratic practices for our country. We had some great conversations. I would like to congratulate the CDCB for this very interesting event, which I hope will become an annual tradition.
I also want to mention that my beautiful Quebec is experiencing serious flooding across the province. When I left Quebec City this morning around six  o'clock I could see damage all along the road between Trois-Rivières and Montreal and in the Maskinongé area. There is always a little water there in the spring, but there is a lot of water this year. When I got to the Gatineau-Ottawa area I saw houses flooded. Nearly 8,000 people, men, women and families, have been displaced. These are tough times, and I want them to know that my heart is with them. I wish them much strength. I am pleased to see that the Government of Quebec has announced assistance, as has the federal government, of course.
The NDP's motion is an interesting one. It addresses the fact that the current Prime Minister of Canada tried to influence the course of justice a couple of ways, in particular with the SNC-Lavalin matter, which has had a lot of media coverage in the past three months.
The NDP also raised the issue of drug prices. Conservatives know that, in NAFTA 2.0, which has not yet been ratified by any of the countries involved, the Liberals sadly gave in to pressure from President Trump to extend drug patents. If the agreement is ratified, Canadians will pay more for prescription drugs. People are also wondering when the Liberals will initiate serious talks about the steel and aluminum tariffs and when they will bring NAFTA ratification to the House for debate.
The NDP motion also mentions Loblaws' lobbying activities. People thought it was some kind of joke. They could not believe their eyes or their ears. The government gave Loblaws, a super-rich company, $12 million to replace its fridges. The mind boggles.
The NDP also talks about banking practices in Canada. Conservatives know that banks are important, but we think some of them, especially those run by the government, are unnecessary. As NDP members often point out, for good reason, the Canada Infrastructure Bank is designed to help big interest groups, but Canadians should not have to finance private infrastructure projects.
We could also talk about the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, which is totally ridiculous. Canada sends nearly $250 million offshore to finance infrastructure projects, when right here at home, the federal government's $187-billion infrastructure plan is barely functioning. Over the past three years, only $14 billion of that $187 billion has been spent. It is deplorable, considering how great the needs are in that area. The issue of banking practices mentioned in the NDP's motion is therefore interesting to me.
Another thing that really bothers me as a citizen is tax evasion. Combatting tax evasion should really begin with education in our schools. Unfortunately, that is more of a provincial responsibility. We need to put patriotism back on the agenda. Many wealthy Canadians shamelessly and unscrupulously evade taxes because they have no sense of patriotism. They have no love for their country.
Schools and people in positions of authority should have instilled this notion at a very young age by teaching them that patriotism includes making sure that Canadian money stays in Canada for Canadians, for our social programs, our companies, our roads and our communities.
In my opinion, a lack of love for one's country is one of the main causes of tax evasion. Young people must be taught that they should not be complaining about our democratic system, but rather participating in it. They should be taught to love Canada.
That is my opinion piece for today.
It is difficult for us to support the NDP's fine motion, however, because, as usual, it includes a direct attack against the Canadian oil industry and all oil-related jobs.
Canadian oil is the most ethical oil in the world. Of course, in the past, there were some concerns about how the oil sands were processed, but I think a lot of effort has been made in recent years to find amazing technologies to capture the carbon released in the oil sands production process.
Since the government's mandate is almost at an end, I would like to take this opportunity to mention that this motion reminded me of some of the rather troubling ethical problems that the Liberal government has had over the past few years.
First the Prime Minister, the member for Papineau took a trip to a private island that belongs to our beloved and popular Aga Khan. The trip was not permissible under Canadian law, under our justice system. For the first time in Canadian history, a prime minister of Canada was found guilty of several charges under federal law because he took a private family vacation that had nothing to do with state interests and was largely paid by the Aga Khan. It was all very questionable, because at the very same time he was making this trip to the Aga Khan's private island, the Prime Minister was involved in dealings with the Aga Khan's office regarding certain investments.
Next we have the fascinating tale of the Minister of Finance, who brought forward a reform aimed at small and medium-sized businesses, a reform that was supposed to be robust and rigorous, when all the while he was hiding shares of his former family business, Morneau Shepell, in numbered companies in Alberta. On top of that, he forgot to tell the Ethics Commissioner about a villa he owned in France.
The young people watching us must find it rather unbelievable that someone could forget to tell the Ethics Commissioner about a wonderful villa on the Mediterranean in France, on some kind of lake or the sea, I assume.
Then there is the clam scandal as well. The former minister of fisheries and oceans is in my thoughts since he is now fighting cancer. It is sad, but that does not excuse his deplorable ethics behaviour two years ago when he tried to influence a bidding process for clam harvesters in order to award a clam fishing quota to a company with ties to his family.
SNC-Lavalin is another case. It seems clear that there were several ethics problems all along. What I find rather unbelievable is that the Liberals are still trying to claim that there was absolutely nothing fishy going on. I am sorry, but when two ministers resign, when the Prime Minister's principal secretary resigns, and when the Clerk of the Privy Council resigns, something fishy is going on.
I want to close with a word on ethics and recent media reports about judicial appointments. There is something called the “Liberalist”, a word I find a bit strange. It is a list of everyone who has donated to the Liberal Party of Canada. Of course, all political parties have lists of their members, but the Liberals use their list to vet candidates and identify potential judicial appointees.
In other words, those who want the Prime Minister and member for Papineau to give them a seat on the bench would be well advised to donate to the Liberal Party of Canada so their name appears on the Liberalist. If not, they can forget about it because actual legal skills are not a factor in gaining access to the highest court in the land and other superior federal courts.
When it comes to lobbying, I just cannot believe how often the Liberals have bowed down to constant pressure from big business, like they did with Loblaws. It is a shame. Unfortunately, the NDP motion is once again attacking the people who work in our oil industry.
Monsieur le Président, je suis très heureux de prendre la parole aujourd'hui au sujet de la motion du NPD. J'aimerais d'abord saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre et ceux qui le feront plus tard en regardant la rediffusion sur les médias sociaux.
Je viens de passer deux semaines dans ma circonscription et j'ai rencontré plusieurs milliers de mes concitoyens lors de divers événements et activités organisés par différents organismes. Jeudi dernier, la Corporation de développement communautaire de Beauport, la CDCB, a tenu un événement tout à fait audacieux et unique en son genre. Pour la première fois, tous les élus de la circonscription, soit les élus municipal, provincial et fédéral, étaient réunis lors d'un déjeuner afin de rencontrer des citoyens et des représentants d'organismes. C'était une sorte de table ronde qui réunissait l'ensemble des élus des différents ordres de gouvernement. C'était un exercice exemplaire en ce qui a trait à la bonne conduite démocratique de notre pays. Nous avons eu de belles conversations. Je voudrais féliciter la Corporation de développement communautaire de Beauport pour cet exercice fort intéressant qui, je l'espère, deviendra une tradition dans les années à venir.
Je voudrais également souligner que dans ma belle province, le Québec, il y a actuellement de très importantes inondations un peu partout. Ce matin, lorsque j'ai quitté la ville de Québec, vers six heures, j'ai constaté moi-même les dégâts tout le long de la route entre Trois-Rivières et Montréal et dans la région de Maskinongé. Il y a toujours un peu d'eau là-bas au printemps, mais cette fois-ci, il y en a énormément. Ensuite, quand je suis arrivé dans la région de Gatineau-Ottawa, j'ai vu des maisons inondées. Ce sont presque 8 000 personnes, des femmes, des hommes et des familles, qui ne sont pas chez elles en ce moment. Ce sont des moments très difficiles. Je tiens donc à leur dire que je suis avec eux de tout coeur. Je leur souhaite toute la force qu'ils peuvent avoir et trouver en eux. Je suis content de voir que le gouvernement du Québec a déjà annoncé son aide, de même que le gouvernement fédéral, bien entendu.
La motion présentée par le NPD aujourd'hui est quand même intéressante. On y retrouve des questions concernant le fait que l'actuel premier ministre du Canada a tenté d'influencer le cours de la justice à quelques égards, notamment dans l'affaire SNC-Lavalin, qui a été très médiatisée au cours des trois derniers mois.
Le NPD aborde également la question du coût des médicaments. Nous, les conservateurs, avons constaté que dans l'ALENA 2.0, qui n'a toujours été ratifié par aucun pays, les libéraux ont malheureusement cédé aux pressions de M. Trump, le président américain, qui leur demandait de prolonger la durée des brevets sur les médicaments. Si le traité était ratifié, cela ferait en sorte que les Canadiens paieraient plus cher pour leurs médicaments. D'ailleurs, on se demande quand les libéraux vont commencer à engager des discussions sérieuses au sujet des tarifs sur l'acier et l'aluminium et quand ils vont présenter à la Chambre le débat sur la ratification de l'ALENA.
La motion du NPD parle également du lobbying de la part de Loblaws. Cette histoire était presque une blague. Les citoyens n'en croyaient pas leurs yeux ni leurs oreilles: on a versé 12 millions de dollars à Loblaws, une compagnie extrêmement riche qui voulait remplacer ses réfrigérateurs. C'est hallucinant.
D'autre part, le NPD nous parle aussi des pratiques bancaires au Canada. À cet égard, nous, les conservateurs, pensons que les banques sont importantes, mais que certaines d'entre elles n'ont pas nécessairement lieu d'être, surtout celles qui émanent du gouvernement. La Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada, comme les néo-démocrates le disent souvent à juste titre, est une manière de favoriser les grands groupes d'intérêt, et les Canadiens ne devraient pas avoir à financer des projets d'infrastructure privés.
On pourrait aussi mentionner la Banque asiatique d'investissement dans les infrastructures, qui est totalement ridicule. On envoie presque 250 millions de dollars outre-mer pour financer des projets d'infrastructure, alors qu'ici même, le plan d'infrastructure du fédéral de 187 milliards de dollars peine à fonctionner. Au cours des trois dernières années, on n'a dépensé que 14 milliards de ces 187 milliards de dollars. C'est déplorable, car les besoins étaient grands à cet égard. Alors, en ce qui a trait aux pratiques bancaires, je trouve la motion du NPD intéressante.
Par ailleurs, l'une des choses qui me dérangent le plus en tant que citoyen, c'est l'évasion fiscale. La lutte contre l'évasion fiscale devrait notamment passer par l'éducation dans nos écoles. Malheureusement, cela relève davantage des gouvernements provinciaux. Il faudrait remettre le patriotisme à l'ordre du jour. Si beaucoup de riches Canadiens font de l'évasion fiscale sans aucune vergogne et de manière tout à fait honteuse, c'est parce qu'ils n'ont aucun esprit patriotique. Ils n'ont aucun amour pour leur pays.
L’école et les autorités auraient dû inculquer cette notion, dès leur jeune âge, en leur disant qu’être patriotique, c’est faire en sorte que l’argent canadien reste au Canada pour les Canadiens, pour nos programmes sociaux, pour nos entreprises, pour nos rues et pour nos communautés.
À mon avis, l’évasion fiscale est d’abord et avant tout causée par un manque d’amour pour son pays. Il faudrait inculquer aux jeunes qu’il ne faut pas se plaindre du système démocratique, mais qu’il faut y participer et aimer le Canada.
C'était mon éditorial de la journée.
Par contre, là où il sera difficile d’appuyer la motion du NPD, c’est que, comme d’habitude, ils ont inséré dans leur belle motion une attaque frontale contre le marché pétrolier canadien et contre tous les emplois liés au pétrole au Canada.
Le pétrole canadien est le pétrole le plus éthique au monde. Certes, auparavant, il y a eu des questions sur la façon de traiter les sables bitumineux, mais je pense qu’on a fait beaucoup d’efforts, au cours des dernières années, pour trouver d’incroyables technologies pour capter le carbone, lorsqu’on nettoie la terre pour en faire sortir du pétrole.
Comme on arrive à la fin du mandat très rapidement, j’aimerais quand même saisir la balle au bond. Cette motion m’a permis de me remémorer certains problèmes d’éthique assez troublants qu'a connus le gouvernement libéral au cours des dernières années.
D’abord, le premier ministre et député de Papineau a fait un voyage sur une île privée de notre très cher et populaire Aga Khan. Ce voyage a été sanctionné par le droit canadien, par la justice canadienne. C’est la première fois de l’histoire du Canada qu’un premier ministre du Canada est reconnu coupable, en vertu d’une loi fédérale, de plusieurs chefs, parce qu’il a fait un voyage privé familial qui n’avait rien à voir avec les intérêts étatiques, en grande partie aux frais de l’Aga Khan. On peut se questionner, parce qu’au moment même où il effectuait ce voyage sur une île privée de l’Aga Khan, il y avait des tractations entre le bureau de l’Aga Khan et lui-même au sujet de certains investissements.
Ensuite, il y a eu une belle chronique sur l’histoire du ministre des Finances, lequel nous avait présenté une réforme pour les petites et moyennes entreprises qui était censée être robuste et faite avec rigueur, alors qu'au même moment, il cachait des actions de son ancienne compagnie familiale Morneau Shepell dans des compagnies à numéro, en Alberta. De plus, il avait omis de dire à la commissaire à l’éthique qu’il avait une villa en France.
Aux chers jeunes qui nous écoutent, je dirai que c’est quand même incroyable d’oublier de dire à la commissaire à l’éthique qu’on a une superbe villa en France sur le bord de la Méditerranée, j’imagine. Ce devait être sur le bord d’un lac ou de la mer.
Il y a également le scandale des palourdes. Je suis de tout coeur avec le ministre des Pêches et des Océans de l’époque, parce qu’il a un cancer actuellement. C’est triste, mais cela n’empêche pas qu’il a agi de façon déplorable sur le plan de l'éthique, il y a deux ans, lorsqu’il a tenté d’influencer le processus d’appel d’offres pour des compagnies de pêche à la palourde, afin d’octroyer le contrat à quelqu’un qui avait un lien familial avec lui.
Il y a aussi le cas de SNC-Lavalin. De toute évidence, il y a eu plusieurs problèmes d’éthique dans toute cette histoire. Ce qui est quand même incroyable, c’est qu’encore aujourd’hui les libéraux tentent de nous faire croire qu’il n’y avait absolument pas anguille sous roche. Je suis désolé, mais quand deux ministres démissionnent, quand le secrétaire personnel du premier ministre démissionne, quand le greffier du Conseil privé démissionne, il y a anguille sous roche.
En ce qui concerne l’éthique, je terminerai en parlant du cas vu récemment dans les médias, celui de la nomination des juges. Il y a ce qu’ils appellent « Libéraliste ». C’est un mot que je trouve un peu étrange. C’est une liste sur laquelle on retrouve les noms de tous ceux qui ont déjà fait un don au Parti libéral du Canada. Tous les partis politiques ont évidemment des listes de leurs membres, mais eux, ils utilisent carrément cette liste pour faire du triage. Ils filtrent, à partir de cette liste, les noms des juges en vue de nominations.
Cela veut dire que, si on veut devenir juge sous le premier ministre et député de Papineau, il vaut mieux faire un don au Parti libéral du Canada pour avoir son nom sur « Libéraliste », sinon, on peut oublier cela, puisque les compétences judiciaires n’auront aucun rôle à jouer dans l'accès à la plus haute cour du pays ou aux autres cours supérieures du fédéral.
En ce qui concerne le lobbying, je dois dire que c'est incroyable de voir à quel point les libéraux s'agenouillent devant la pression constante des grandes compagnies, comme on l'a vu avec Loblaws. C'est dommage. Malheureusement, la motion du NPD s'attaque encore une fois aux gens qui travaillent dans notre industrie pétrolière.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-04-29 13:29 [p.27133]
Mr. Speaker, the Liberal government has no climate change plan. It has a taxation plan. That is exactly what it is doing.
On the reverse side, under Stephen Harper, a great and honourable Canadian, we had the ecoENERGY efficiency initiative. All the young guys listening to us should google that right now, please. The ecoENERGY efficiency initiative in 2007 was even recognized by Steven Guilbeault, a great ecologist in Canada.
The ecoENERGY efficiency initiative was a decentralized way of doing things in Canada to make sure that we were strong on the climate change problem in the world. For example, there was an envelope of $1.3 billion that was divided among the provinces. About $300 million or $400 million was sent to Quebec at the time, to the Charest government, which used this money to put forward the province's ecological plan. At the same time, there were other projects in Ontario that received money from the ecoENERGY efficiency initiative.
All that put together gave us one important result that Canadians should remember every single day: There was a reduction of carbon dioxide in Canada of 2.2% under the great leadership of the Conservative Party from 2006 to 2015.
We did not do that by taxing more Canadians; we did it through decentralization and through respect for federalism.
Monsieur le Président, le gouvernement libéral n'a aucun plan de lutte contre les changements climatiques. Il a un plan visant à imposer les Canadiens, et c'est exactement ce qu'il fait.
À l'inverse, les conservateurs de Stephen Harper, un grand et honorable Canadien, ont mis en oeuvre l'Initiative écoÉNERGIE sur l'efficacité énergétique. J'invite tous les jeunes qui sont à l'écoute à faire une petite recherche Google à ce sujet. Cette initiative, qui a été lancée en 2007, a même reçu le sceau d'approbation de Steven Guilbeault, un éminent écologiste canadien.
L'Initiative écoÉNERGIE sur l'efficacité énergétique était une mesure décentralisée au Canada pour veiller à ce que nous puissions nous attaquer sérieusement au problème des changements climatiques dans le monde. Par exemple, les provinces se partageaient une enveloppe de 1,3 milliard de dollars. À ce moment-là, environ 300 ou 400 millions de dollars avaient été envoyés à Québec, au gouvernement Charest, qui s'est servi de cet argent pour mettre en oeuvre le plan écologique du Québec. Au cours de la même période, l'Initiative écoÉNERGIE sur l'efficacité énergétique a permis d'accorder une aide financière à d'autres projets en Ontario.
Toutes ces mesures réunies ont permis d'atteindre un résultat dont les Canadiens devraient se souvenir chaque jour: il y a eu une réduction de 2,2 % des émissions de dioxyde de carbone au Canada de 2006 à 2015, sous l'excellente gouverne des conservateurs.
Ce n'est pas en augmentant les impôts des Canadiens que nous y sommes parvenus. Nous y sommes parvenus au moyen de la décentralisation et dans le respect du fédéralisme.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-04-29 13:31 [p.27133]
Mr. Speaker, I believe in a free market with safeguards to protect everyone's rights. However, we must never ignore the fierce global competition.
Contrary to popular belief, Mr. Harper's government eliminated many subsidies for big oil.
An article published by CBC this morning indicated:
The total volume of Canadian imports from Saudi Arabia has increased by 66 per cent since 2014...
Saudi oil accounted for roughly 10 per cent of Canadian consumption, up from about eight per cent in 2017...
Saudi Arabia is the second-largest source of foreign oil for Canada, after the U.S.
Even human rights groups are saying that we need to stop importing oil from Saudi Arabia.
One of the reasons why I believe we need to support the Canadian oil industry is the great Canadian paradox. The article goes on to say:
Canada is the fourth-largest producer and fourth-largest exporter of oil in the world...and 99 per cent of Canadian oil exports go to the U.S.
Canada is also an oil importer, which is rare for an exporting country.
The paradox is that we have one of the world's largest energy resources. Importing oil for our country is ridiculous. We need to put an end to that.
Under the leadership of the Conservative leader, the member for Regina—Qu'Appelle, Canada would become self-sufficient. That is a commendable goal that everyone in the country should support.
Monsieur le Président, je crois au libre marché accompagné de balises pour respecter les droits de tout le monde. Par contre, il ne faut jamais faire fi de la concurrence mondiale extrême d'autres pays.
Sous M. Harper, contrairement à la croyance populaire, nous avons éliminé de nombreuses subventions accordées aux grandes compagnies pétrolières.
Un article publié par Radio-Canada, ce matin, mentionne ceci:
Depuis 2014, les importations de pétrole venant de l'Arabie saoudite ont augmenté de 66 %. [...]
Le pétrole arabe répond désormais à environ 10 % des besoins canadiens, contre 8 % en 2017.
L'Arabie saoudite est ainsi devenue la deuxième source de pétrole étranger, après les États-Unis, pour le Canada.
Même les groupes de défense des droits de la personne disent qu'il faut absolument arrêter d'importer du pétrole de l'Arabie Saoudite.
L'une des raisons pour lesquelles je crois qu'il faut soutenir l'industrie pétrolière canadienne est justement le grand paradoxe canadien. Voici ce que mentionne le même article:
D'une part, [le Canada] est le 4e producteur mondial de pétrole, et le 4e plus important exportateur, dont 99 % de la production est exporté aux États-Unis.
D'autre part, le Canada est aussi un importateur de pétrole, ce qui est rare pour un pays exportateur.
Le paradoxe qui consiste à avoir une des plus grandes ressources énergétiques au monde et d'en importer pour notre population est ridicule, et il faut mettre fin à cela.
Sous le leadership de notre chef de Regina—Qu'Appelle, le Canada deviendra autosuffisant. Il s'agit d'un objectif louable qui devrait être soutenu par tout le monde au pays.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-04-10 17:21 [p.26995]
Mr. Speaker, I must say that in this case, I also appreciated the speech made by my colleague from Sherbrooke. I agree with him, much to the chagrin of my colleague from Sackville—Preston—Chezzetcook.
As the member for Sherbrooke said, this budget is dragging up broken promises, such as the promise to return to a balanced budget this year, which is rather unbelievable. It does not even include a timeline for balancing the budget. This is a first in our country's history.
The government is budgeting $41 billion to deflect attention from its mistakes, including its bungled foreign and domestic policy. Once again, the budget favours the major interest groups, as the member for Sherbrooke pointed out. We saw more evidence of this today, when the government gave Loblaws $12 million for refrigerators. It is absolutely ridiculous.
Does my colleague from Sherbrooke agree that this budget shows a lack of respect for Quebeckers?
In 2015, the member for Papineau, the Prime Minister, told a New York newspaper that Canada was postnational. This is an outright affront to Quebeckers, whose historical and political reality is very much alive and well.
There are also no measures in this bill to address the Quebec premier's concerns about the cost of the arrival of a huge number of illegal refugees. I know he does not like that term, but Quebec wants to be reimbursed for some of those costs. There is also nothing in the budget about a single tax return or the Quebec Bridge, and there is nothing to address the discriminatory measure wherein larger cities will get more money for sustainable mobility infrastructure than smaller ones like Quebec City.
Does my colleague agree that the 2019 budget implementation bill once again shows the government's lack of respect for all our fellow Quebeckers?
Monsieur le Président, je dois dire dans ce cas-ci que j'ai aussi apprécié le discours de mon collègue de Sherbrooke. Je suis d'accord avec lui, au grand dam de mon collègue de Sackville—Preston—Chezzetcook.
Comme le député de Sherbrooke le disait, c'est un budget qui réitère des promesses brisées, dont celle du retour à l'équilibre budgétaire cette année, ce qui est assez incroyable. Il n'y a même pas d'échéance concernant un retour éventuel à l'équilibre budgétaire. C'est du jamais vu dans l'histoire du pays.
On voit dans ce budget que 41 milliards de dollars sont dépensés pour détourner l'attention des erreurs de ce gouvernement, que ce soit en matière de politique étrangère ou de politique interne. Encore une fois, c'est un budget qui favorise les grands groupes d'intérêt, comme l'a dit le député de Sherbrooke. On l'a vu encore aujourd'hui, alors que 12 millions de dollars ont été octroyés à Loblaws pour des réfrigérateurs. C'est totalement ridicule.
Est-ce que mon collègue de Sherbrooke trouve aussi que ce budget illustre un non-respect envers les Québécois?
En 2015, le député de Papineau, le premier ministre, a dit à un journal de New York que le Canada était postnational. C'est un affront total envers les Québécois, qui se considèrent comme un peuple historico-politique toujours bien vivant.
Par ailleurs, dans ce budget, aucune mesure ne répond aux doléances du premier ministre du Québec concernant les coûts de l'arrivée massive de réfugiés illégaux. Je sais qu'il n'aime pas ce terme, mais il y a des coûts que le Québec veut se faire rembourser. Ensuite, il n'y a rien non plus au sujet de la déclaration d'impôt unique, il n'y a rien pour le pont de Québec et il n'y a rien pour pallier la discrimination en ce qui a trait aux infrastructures de mobilité durable, qui fait que les grandes villes vont recevoir plus d'argent que les petites villes comme Québec.
Mon collègue est-il d'accord avec moi que ce projet de loi de mise en oeuvre du budget de 2019 illustre encore une fois un non-respect envers tous nos compatriotes québécois?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-04-01 14:39 [p.26557]
Mr. Speaker, last week, confidential information about an individual's candidacy to the Supreme Court was reported by the media.
Let's be clear. The fundamental purpose of that media leak was to have Canadians believe that the relationship between the Prime Minister and his former attorney general began to fray some time ago.
There is every reason to believe that the source of the leak is the Prime Minister in an effort to launch a smear campaign, but in doing so he wilfully tarnished the reputation of Manitoba Justice Glenn Joyal.
Will the Minister of Justice launch an official investigation into this breach of confidentiality?
Monsieur le Président, la semaine dernière, des informations confidentielles relatives à la nomination d’un individu à la Cour suprême ont été rapportées par les médias.
Ne soyons pas dupes: l'objectif fondamental de cette fuite médiatique est de faire croire aux Canadiens que la relation conflictuelle entre le premier ministre et son ancienne procureure générale ne date pas d’hier.
Tout porte à croire que cette fuite médiatique provient du premier ministre pour une campagne de « salissage », mais en faisant cela, il salit sciemment la réputation du juge manitobain Glenn Joyal.
Le ministre de la Justice va-t-il enquêter officiellement sur cette violation de confidentialité?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-03-22 12:03 [p.26520]
Mr. Speaker, Liberal MPs voted for 48 hours straight for one reason and one reason alone: to protect the Prime Minister, who is refusing to disclose all the facts about the SNC-Lavalin case.
Over the past two weeks, two ministers, the Prime Minister's senior adviser and the Clerk of the Privy Council resigned. This week, a Liberal MP even quit the caucus. There is clearly more to the story.
When will the Prime Minister give Canadians the whole truth and shed light on the SNC-Lavalin affair?
Monsieur le Président, les députés libéraux ont voté pendant presque 48 heures sans arrêt pour une seule et unique raison: protéger le premier ministre, qui refuse de faire toute la lumière sur l'affaire SNC-Lavalin.
Au cours des deux dernières semaines, deux ministres, le conseiller principal du premier ministre ainsi que le greffier du Conseil privé ont démissionné. Cette semaine, une députée libérale a même quitté le caucus. Il y a visiblement anguille sous roche.
Quand le premier ministre va-t-il permettre aux Canadiens de connaître toute la vérité et faire la lumière sur l'affaire SNC-Lavalin?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, today, we are celebrating the International Day of La Francophonie.
French is a noble language with a rich vocabulary, and its complexity is living proof of its strength and history. Let us not forget that French is the language of Molière, Voltaire, Montesquieu and Georges-Étienne Cartier. The International Day of La Francophonie is an important one, not only for the international community, but also for our great bilingual federation, Canada.
As Prime Minister Harper always said, Canada, as a political entity, was first founded by French speakers. Today, over 11 million francophones are living and thriving in our magnificent country. Over 300 million people around the world speak French and that number will grow to over 700 million by 2050.
It is important to point out that Canada is the one that pushed the French government to establish the Organisation internationale de la Francophonie in the 1970s. We are one of the organization's founding members, and we must continue to play a leadership role in that organization in the coming years. Long live the Francophonie.
Monsieur le Président, aujourd'hui, nous célébrons la Journée internationale de la Francophonie.
Le français est une langue noble, riche en mots, et sa complexité est une preuve vivante de sa force et de toute son histoire. N'oublions pas qu'il s'agit de la langue de Molière, de Voltaire, de Montesquieu et de Georges-Étienne Cartier. Non seulement s'agit-il d'une journée lourde de sens pour la communauté internationale, mais c'est aussi tout autant le cas pour notre grande fédération bilingue, le Canada.
En effet, comme le précisait toujours le premier ministre Harper, le Canada, comme entité politique, fut d'abord et avant tout fondé par des locuteurs francophones. Aujourd'hui, ce sont plus de 11 millions de francophones qui vivent et prospèrent sur nos glorieuses terres canadiennes. Dans le monde, plus de 300 millions de personnes parlent le français et, en 2050, elles seront plus de 700 millions.
Il faut savoir que c'est le Canada qui, dès les années 1970, a poussé l'État français à concrétiser l'avènement de l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie. Nous en sommes donc un membre fondateur, et nous nous devons de perpétuer notre leadership en son sein pour les années à venir. Vive la francophonie!
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-03-01 11:06 [p.26049]
Mr. Speaker, I am well known for going door to door in my riding, and, honestly, I meet very few constituents who are satisfied with this Liberal government. Fewer still feel they are in a better financial position than they were before the Liberals were elected in 2015.
There is no arguing with that kind of general consensus. Here are just some of the public policies that have made people feel that way.
People have experienced three years of taxes going up, three years of our Canadian Armed Forces being underfunded, three years of deficit and mismanagement of public funds, three years of what might politely be called ethical breaches, three years of an infrastructure program that fails to deliver the goods, three years of multiple failed natural resources and border security policies, and three years of countless other broken promises.
Canadians and the people of Beauport—Limoilou simply cannot afford another four years of Liberal government.
As of October 2019, they will be able to count on the Conservative team and our great leader to change the way this country is run and renew people's hope for the future.
Monsieur le Président, au cours de mon fameux porte-à-porte, je dois dire très sincèrement que je rencontre peu de citoyens qui se disent satisfaits de ce gouvernement libéral, et encore moins qui pensent qu'ils sont dans une meilleure situation financière qu'avant les élections des libéraux en 2015.
La sagesse populaire a toujours raison, et voici quelques exemples de politiques publiques qui la conduisent à ce verdict.
En effet, les citoyens ont constaté: trois ans d'augmentation de leurs impôts et de leurs taxes; trois ans de sous-financement au sein de nos Forces armées canadiennes; trois ans de déficit et de mauvaise gestion de nos finances publiques; trois ans de manquements à l'éthique, et c'est le moins qu'on puisse dire; trois ans d'un programme d'infrastructures qui ne livre pas la marchandise; et enfin, trois ans d'échec sur échec dans le domaine de nos ressources naturelles, dans le domaine de nos frontières et une panoplie d'autres promesses brisées.
Les Canadiens et les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou ne peuvent tout simplement pas se permettre encore quatre ans de ce gouvernement libéral.
À partir d'octobre 2019, ils pourront compter sur l'équipe conservatrice et notre grand chef pour changer la direction du pays et redonner confiance aux citoyens dans leur avenir.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-02-20 16:21 [p.25608]
Mr. Speaker, I want to point out how disappointed I am. I could hardly wait to speak about this bill today, mainly for personal reasons. I have an Inuit first name, Alupa, which means “strong man”. My entire family is very aware of and attuned to indigenous matters. My wife is an anthropologist who has worked with the Inuit for many years, and my father is a forensic historian, who has defended indigenous people in many cases by locating treaties or doing research for them.
The minister said that this is an extremely important bill that will protect and promote indigenous languages, some of which are dying out. That much is true. The Liberals have also said that no relationship is more important than the relationship with indigenous peoples. They have said it over and over, but this bill was introduced only a few months before the election, at the end of their mandate and four years after they were elected. Yes, it is urgent that we take action, but it is not true that we will all be able to state our position and discuss it in committee. As there are only three spots for opposition members, I do not think I will have the opportunity to debate the bill or to suggest amendments in committee.
Although we support this bill on the face of it, it deals with some very serious issues. There is a very clear reason why we support this bill, and that appears in the last paragraph of the preamble to the Official Languages Act, which states that the government recognizes the importance of preserving and enhancing the use of languages other than English and French while strengthening the status and use of the official languages.
This bill is therefore perfectly aligned with Canada's political doctrine. However, there are some very important issues that need clarification, and I will talk about them now. Why is the Official Languages Act quasi-constitutional? That is because it is linked to sections 16 to 23 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The minister told us that Bill C-91, an act respecting indigenous languages, is linked to section 35 of the Constitution. Does that mean that this bill will become quasi-constitutional legislation like the Official Languages Act? If so, we will have to discuss this for weeks because it will have a major impact on our society. It will be a very positive impact, to be sure, but when we say that the bill could be quasi-constitutional we need to know where that takes us.
The bill also states that there would be a commissioner of indigenous languages. Will this commissioner have duties similar to those of the Commissioner of Official Languages? Will they have a joint office?
The bill also talks about funding to protect, preserve and promote indigenous languages. Will that involve developing action plans as we do for official languages? Will this cost billions of dollars over five years every five years, as is the case with the action plan for official languages? Will the department also receive $1 billion in recurring funding every five years?
There are all kinds of questions to which we have no answers today. Could we maybe get an inkling of an answer right now?
Monsieur le Président, je tiens à souligner ma déception. J'étais très impatient de parler de ce projet de loi aujourd'hui, d'abord pour des raisons très personnelles. J'ai un prénom inuit, Alupa, qui veut dire « homme fort », et dans ma famille, nous sommes très sensibilisés à toutes les questions autochtones. Ma femme, qui est anthropologue, travaille auprès des Inuits depuis plusieurs années, et mon père est un historien légiste qui a défendu les Autochtones dans plusieurs causes en trouvant des traités ou en faisant des recherches pour ceux-ci.
Le ministre a dit que c'était un projet de loi extrêmement important pour protéger et promouvoir les langues autochtones, dont certaines sont en train de disparaître. C'est vrai. Auparavant, les libéraux nous ont aussi dit que le lien le plus important de ce gouvernement est celui qu'il a avec les Autochtones. Ils l'ont dit à maintes reprises, mais on constate que ce projet de loi n'apparaît que quelques mois avant les élections, à la fin de leur mandat, quatre ans plus tard. Oui, il y a urgence d'agir, mais ce n'est pas vrai que nous pourrons tous et toutes prendre position et en discuter au sein du comité. Comme il n'y a que trois places réservées à l'opposition, je ne pense pas avoir la chance d'y débattre ou d'y apporter mes suggestions d'amendement.
Bien que nous appuyons ce projet de loi de prime abord, celui-ci est lié à des questions très sérieuses. La raison pour laquelle nous l'appuyons est très claire. Elle se trouve dans le préambule de la Loi sur les langues officielles, au dernier paragraphe, où il est écrit que le gouvernement reconnaît l'importance, parallèlement à l'affirmation du statut des langues officielles et à l'élargissement de leur usage, de maintenir et de valoriser l'usage des autres langues.
Ce projet de loi s'insère donc parfaitement dans la doctrine politique canadienne. Toutefois, il y a des questions très importantes à éclaircir, et je vais les énumérer dès maintenant. Pourquoi la Loi sur les langues officielles est-elle quasi constitutionnelle? C'est parce qu'elle est liée aux articles 16 à 23 de la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés. Le ministre nous a dit que le projet de loi C-91, Loi concernant les langues autochtones, est lié à l'article 35 de la Constitution. Est-ce que cela en fera une loi quasi constitutionnelle comme c'est le cas pour la Loi sur les langues officielles? Si tel est le cas, il faudra en discuter pendant des semaines, parce que cela aura de grandes conséquences dans notre société. Ce seront des conséquences sûrement très positives, soit, mais il faut savoir où on s'en va lorsqu'on dit qu'un projet de loi pourrait être quasi constitutionnel.
Par ailleurs, le projet de loi stipule qu'il y aura un commissaire aux langues autochtones. Aura-t-il des fonctions similaires à celles du commissaire aux langues officielles? Auront-ils un bureau conjoint?
On nous parle également de financement visant à protéger, préserver et valoriser les langues autochtones. Est-ce que ce seront des plans d'action comme c'est le cas pour les langues officielles? Est-ce que ce seront des milliards de dollars sur cinq ans tous les cinq ans, comme dans le cas du plan d'action pour les langues officielles? Est-ce que le ministère va recevoir une somme récurrente de 1 milliard de dollars tous les cinq ans également?
Bref, il y a toutes sortes de questions auxquelles on n'a pas de réponse aujourd'hui. Peut-être pourrions-nous avoir des balbutiements de réponse dès maintenant.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-02-05 13:22 [p.25306]
Mr. Speaker, the 5,500 federal employees in Shawinigan and Jonquière will keep their jobs. We will ensure that they keep their jobs in the administrative agreements that we will sign as soon as we take office in October.
The member said that she would rather help 5,500 public servants, who are merely being asked to make a bit of a transition, than the 8.3 million Quebeckers who clearly stated during our “Listening to Quebeckers” tour that they want a single tax return. The member is also going against the 125 members of the Quebec National Assembly, who together represent the 8.3 million Quebeckers who said that they want a single tax return. She is going to protect 5,500 individuals at the expense of 8.3 million people.
Is that what the member is trying to tell us right now?
Monsieur le Président, les 5 500 employés fédéraux à Shawinigan ou à Jonquière vont garder leur emploi. Dans les ententes administratives que nous allons conclure dès notre élection au mois d'octobre, nous allons nous assurer qu'ils garderont leur emploi.
La députée nous dit qu'elle préfère favoriser 5 500 fonctionnaires, à qui on demande de ne faire qu'une certaine transition, plutôt que les 8,3 millions de Québécois qui ont exprimé clairement, notamment lors de nos consultations intitulées « À l'écoute des Québécois », qu'ils voulaient la déclaration de revenus unique. La députée va également à l'encontre les 125 députés de l'Assemblée nationale qui représentent l'ensemble des 8,3 millions de Québécois qui ont dit vouloir une déclaration de revenus unique. Elle va protéger 5 500 personnes au détriment de 8 millions d'individus.
Est-ce bien ce que la députée nous dit en ce moment?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-02-05 13:33 [p.25307]
Mr. Speaker, I find this debate very interesting. What has been happening in the news in recent months or for a little more than a year is also very interesting. We can see that the very root, the core identity, of the Liberal Party has not changed.
Every time that Quebec asks the Liberal government for something, whether it is in the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s or today, the answer is always no.
Mr. Couillard, the former premier, asked if there could be a dialogue on Quebec’s place in the Canadian Constitution. The Prime Minister dismissed it out of hand. He did not even want to have a dialogue.
Recently, Quebec asked for more autonomy in immigration. The Liberals said that they would look into it, but that means no. The National Assembly, the 125 members representing 8.3 million Quebeckers, unanimously called for a single tax return, and the Liberals today are saying no, without any shame.
Why is it that the core identity of the Liberal Party of Canada since 1867 is still to answer no to Quebeckers and the province of Quebec when they ask for more power in their areas of jurisdiction?
Monsieur le Président, je trouve ce débat fort intéressant. Ce qui se passe dans l'actualité des derniers mois ou depuis un an et plus est aussi très intéressant. On voit que la source même ou l'identité profonde du Parti libéral n'a pas changé.
Chaque fois que le Québec demande quelque chose au gouvernement libéral, que ce soit dans les années 1970, 1980, 1990 ou aujourd'hui, la réponse est toujours non.
M. Couillard, l'ex-premier ministre, a demandé si on pouvait avoir un dialogue sur la place du Québec dans la Constitution canadienne. Le premier ministre a rejeté cela du revers de la main. Il ne voulait même pas tenir de dialogue.
Dernièrement, le Québec a demandé plus d'autonomie en immigration. Les libéraux ont répondu qu'ils allaient examiner cela, mais cela veut dire non. L'Assemblée nationale, c'est-à-dire les 125 députés représentant 8,3 millions de Québécois, a demandé à l'unanimité d'avoir une déclaration de revenus unique, et les libéraux aujourd'hui disent non, sans vergogne.
Pourquoi l'identité profonde du Parti libéral du Canada depuis 1867 est-elle toujours de répondre non aux Québécois et à la province du Québec quand ils demandent plus de pouvoir dans leurs champs de compétence?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-02-05 13:39 [p.25308]
Mr. Speaker, I will be sharing my time with the member for Mégantic—L'Érable, who will certainly build on what I have to say.
It is always an honour to speak in the House. I want to say hello to the people of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching us. Today, we are debating a single tax return for Quebeckers.
The member for Vaudreuil—Soulanges has said some pretty unbelievable things. He asked why the Conservatives raised this topic this year, which is an election year. In reality, we actually talked about this matter in May last year, at our general council meeting in Saint-Hyacinthe. There were 400 Conservatives at this meeting, including members of the Bloc Québécois who were tired of the pointless bickering. The Bloc Québécois will never be in power. At this general council, we adopted the motion calling for a single tax return. The motion received the support of the vast majority, 90%, of attendees. It was quite popular.
That said, introducing this motion at the Saint-Hyacinthe general council was not a casual idea plucked from thin air. Our political lieutenant for Quebec and other Quebec Conservative MPs held public consultations, consultations we called “Listening to Quebecers”.
We held consultations in about 40 municipalities all across Quebec, covering all of Quebec's regional districts. Quebeckers themselves told us they wanted us to simplify their day-to-day lives. Then, a month later, in May 2018, Quebec's National Assembly unanimously adopted a motion calling on the federal government, regardless of the party in power after the October 2019 election, to start working on an administrative agreement that would enable Quebec to collect federal taxes and then transfer that money to the federal government. The ultimate goal was to make Quebeckers' lives easier and give them a much easier way to do things.
I would like to re-read the motion for those watching at home because it may not be written out in full at the bottom of their screen. The motion states:
That, given:
(a) the House has great respect for provincial jurisdiction and trust in provincial institutions;
(b) the people of Quebec are burdened with completing and submitting two tax returns, one federal and one provincial; and
(c) the House believes in cutting red tape and reducing unnecessary paperwork to improve the everyday lives of families; therefore,
the House call on the government to work with the Government of Quebec to implement a single tax return in Quebec, as adopted unanimously in the motion of the National Assembly of Quebec on May 15, 2018.
That is the motion that our political lieutenant, the member for Richmond—Arthabaska, moved this morning.
Why do we want the House to adopt this motion? As I said, over the past few months, we consulted with most Quebeckers as part of our province-wide consultation process. They told us that they needed this to happen because they are fed up. That is what they said. They are fed up with filling out two tax returns.
The Conservative Party of Canada has always had one fundamental goal, which we pursued under the leadership of Mr. Harper when we cut taxes through 163 different measures. Clearly, the most popular measures were the ones that cut the GST from 7% to 6% and then from 6% to 5% and those that sought to cut red tape in half for all federal departments. It just so happens that the Liberals kept this administrative formality because they know how important it is. It is one of the good things they have done so far.
We are also moving forward with that, because it reflects the desire of all elected officials from Quebec. That desire was reiterated a year ago, as I said at the start of my speech.
There is a bit more of a personal reason that residents of Beauport—Limoilou may not be familiar with. I have knocked on 40,000 doors in my riding. I continue to do so. I even did it this Saturday in -20°C weather. I once again thank the volunteer who was with me that day. He was brave to follow me. The member for Louis-Saint-Laurent also went door to door. All the Conservatives in Canada did that.
Saturday, I knocked on the doors of about 50 homes and the topic came up many times. That idea was put forward publicly by the Conservative Party before the Bloc Québécois began talking about it and well before the unanimous motion in Quebec’s National Assembly, because we had heard about it on the ground and we respect Quebeckers. Our fundamental goal in politics is to make life easier for all Canadians, and particularly to avoid them having to pay for the Prime Minister's mistakes in the future.
Today, we have learned something important in the House, and I asked the member for Vaudreuil—Soulanges a question about this, namely, the fact that the true identity of the Liberal Party of Canada is clear for all to see. Perhaps it does not reflect on all of its individual members, although they are part of it, as they are involved in it, but fundamentally, it is a centralist party that does not care about the demands of Quebeckers for greater control. It does not care about the constitutional anguish and anxiety of Quebeckers. In particular, there is no desire to improve the lives of Quebeckers and Canadians through its government policies.
On the contrary, we have never seen a government spend so much money on so few results for individual Canadians. We sometimes get the impression that the government is working for the bureaucracy and government programs instead of working for Quebeckers and Canadians in general. We have seen that identity throughout history. In 1867, George Brown and the Red Party did not want a large federation like Canada created by two founding peoples working hand in hand
From 1867 to today, we Conservatives have maintained our constitutional and political openness to the grievances of both founding peoples and the legal grievances of the Province of Quebec. Remember the total affront by the Liberals in 1982 when they repatriated the Constitution without the consent of Quebec’s National Assembly. We see history repeating itself.
In 1982, Quebec’s National Assembly did not sign the Constitution. As the bastion of the Francophonie in North America, Quebec certainly had a prominent place at the table. Even political conventions and jurisprudence clearly reflected Quebec's crucial role in the matter of the repatriation of the Constitution, but the Liberals, in their arrogance, brazenly repatriated the Constitution without Quebec’s signature, just as they are now brazenly and shamelessly dismissing the unanimous request by the National Assembly regarding a single income tax return.
Under Mr. Mulroney, we resumed an honourable and enthusiastic dialogue. We made every possible effort, despite the extreme pressure on all sides from the elder Mr. Trudeau. We reached the Charlottetown and Meech Lake accords; we tried to bring Quebec into the fold. Later, Mr. Harper entered into administrative agreements, because the time was not right. People did not want a constitutional debate. Just as our leader, the member for Regina—Qu'Appelle, would like to do, Mr. Harper entered into administrative agreements that helped Quebeckers in their everyday lives, while waiting for the time when we might see a constitutional debate. Later, he got a seat for Quebec at UNESCO, the last thing the Liberals would have done, and the Bloc Québécois would never have had the power to do, as they will never be in power.
Not only did we get a seat for Quebec at UNESCO, but we also acknowledged the existence of the Quebec nation in this assembly, in this Westminster Parliament, on North American soil. We acknowledged that the Quebec people formed a nation within a united Canada. Mr. Harper did that. It was not the Liberals or the Bloc Québécois, who could never do it, as they will never be in power.
What party increased its number of seats in Quebec in the last election? It was not the Bloc Québécois, it was the Conservative Party, which won 12 seats. Unfortunately, due to their many promises, the Liberals were able to win many seats. However, that will change, as they are unable to keep their promises. As the deficit will not be eliminated this year, they will raise taxes over the coming days, months and years if they are re-elected.
By all appearances, this is the same party as it was back in the day. By its very identity, the Liberal Party of Canada has no respect for Quebeckers or for areas of jurisdiction.
A few days after being elected, the Prime Minister and member for Papineau went to New York and told a newspaper that Canada had no national identity. Really? Canada has no national identity? That is not what Quebeckers think. Quebeckers will never be well served by the Liberal Party of Canada. With our leader, the member for Regina—Qu’Appelle, we will give them more independence in their areas of jurisdiction when they seek it.
Monsieur le Président, je veux vous dire que je vais partager mon temps de parole avec le député de Mégantic—L'Érable, qui pourra certainement ajouter à ce que je vais dire.
C'est toujours un honneur de prendre la parole à la Chambre. J'aimerais saluer tous les citoyens et toutes les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent. Aujourd'hui, nous discutons de la déclaration de revenus unique pour les Québécois et les Québécoises.
Ce que dit le député de Vaudreuil—Soulanges est assez incroyable. Il demande pourquoi les conservateurs abordent ce sujet cette année, alors qu'il s'agit d'une année électorale. Ce n'est pas vrai, nous en avons parlé l'année passée, au mois de mai, lorsque nous avons tenu notre conseil général à Saint-Hyacinthe. D'ailleurs, 400 conservateurs s'y sont présentés, incluant des membres du Bloc québécois qui étaient tannés des chicanes qui ne mènent nulle part. Le Bloc québécois ne sera jamais au pouvoir. Lors dudit conseil, nous avons adopté la motion demandant une déclaration de revenus unique. La motion a reçu l'appui d'une grande majorité de personnes, soit de 90 % des gens. Ce fut donc un grand succès.
Cela étant dit, la raison pour laquelle nous avons voulu présenter cette motion lors du conseil général tenu à Saint-Hyacinthe n'était pas issue d'une idée anodine qui a jailli de nulle part. Notre lieutenant politique du Québec ainsi que les députés conservateurs québécois ont tenu des consultations publiques. Ces consultations étaient intitulées « À l'écoute des Québécois ».
Nous avons tenu ces consultations d'un bout à l'autre du Québec, dans environ 40 municipalités, c'est-à-dire dans tous les districts régionaux du Québec. Ce sont les Québécois eux-mêmes qui nous ont dit qu'ils voulaient qu'on simplifie leur vie de tous les jours. En plus de cela, un mois plus tard, soit au mois de mai 2018, l'Assemblée nationale du Québec a adopté de façon unanime une motion qui demandait au gouvernement fédéral, peu importe quel parti serait au pouvoir après les élections d'octobre 2019, de démarrer le processus pour en arriver à une entente administrative qui permettrait au Québec de percevoir l'impôt fédéral et de le renvoyer au fédéral par la suite. L'objectif fondamental était de rendre la vie des Québécois et des Québécoises plus facile, et de leur donner une façon de faire beaucoup plus facile.
Au bénéfice des gens qui nous écoutent à la maison, j'aimerais relire la motion, parce qu'elle n'est peut-être pas écrite au complet au bas de leur écran. Elle se lit comme suit:
Que, attendu que:
a) la Chambre éprouve un profond respect pour les compétences provinciales et une grande confiance à l’égard des institutions provinciales; [comme c'est le cas pour nous, les conservateurs]
b) les Québécois sont tenus de remplir et de soumettre deux déclarations d’impôt, l’une fédérale et l’autre provinciale;
c) la Chambre souscrit à la réduction des formalités administratives et de la paperasse inutile pour améliorer la qualité de vie des familles;
la Chambre demande au gouvernement de travailler de concert avec le gouvernement du Québec pour mettre en place une déclaration d’impôt unique au Québec, conformément à la motion adoptée à l’unanimité par l’Assemblée nationale du Québec le 15 mai 2018.
Voilà la motion que notre lieutenant politique et député de Richmond—Arthabaska a déposée ce matin.
Pourquoi voulons-nous que la Chambre adopte cette motion? Comme je l'ai dit, au cours des derniers mois, nous avons consulté la majorité des Québécois dans le cadre de consultations panquébécoises. Ces derniers nous ont dit que c'était un besoin pour eux, parce qu'ils en ont marre. C'est le mot qu'ils ont utilisé. Ils en ont marre de devoir remplir deux formulaires de déclaration de revenus.
Depuis toujours, le Parti conservateur du Canada a un objectif fondamental. C'est ce que nous avons fait sous M. Harper, alors que nous avons réduit les impôts au moyen de 163 mesures différentes. Bien entendu, les mesures les plus populaires étaient celles qui visaient la réduction de la TPS de 7 % à 6 % et de 6 % à 5 % et les mesures visant à réduire la paperasse de moitié dans l'ensemble des ministères fédéraux. D'ailleurs, c'est une formalité administrative que les libéraux ont gardée, parce qu'ils savent à quel point c'est important. D'ailleurs, c'est une des bonnes choses qu'ils ont faites jusqu'à maintenant.
De plus, nous allons de l'avant avec cela, parce que cela reflète la volonté de l'ensemble des élus du Québec. Cette volonté a été réitérée il y a un an, comme je l'ai dit au début de mon allocution.
Il y a une raison un peu plus personnelle, que les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou connaissent peut-être. J'ai cogné à 40 000 portes dans ma circonscription. Je continue de le faire. Je l'ai fait notamment ce samedi à -20 degrés Celsius. Je remercie encore une fois le bénévole qui était avec moi ce jour-là. Il a été courageux de me suivre. Le député de Louis-Saint-Laurent a également fait du porte-à-porte. Tous les conservateurs du Canada en ont fait.
Samedi, j'ai cogné à la porte d'une cinquantaine de maisons et c'est un sujet qui est revenu à maintes reprises. Cette idée, le Parti conservateur l'a mise en avant publiquement bien avant que le Bloc québécois ne commence à en parler et bien avant la motion unanime de l'Assemblée nationale du Québec, parce que nous en avions entendu parler sur le terrain et que nous respectons les Québécois. Notre objectif fondamental en politique est de faciliter la vie à tous les Canadiens et les Canadiennes, et surtout d'éviter que ceux-ci aient à payer pour les erreurs du premier ministre dans l'avenir.
Aujourd'hui, on fait un constat très important à la Chambre, et j'ai posé une question au député de Vaudreuil—Soulanges à ce sujet: on voit l'identité fondamentale du Parti libéral du Canada. Il ne s'agit peut-être pas de ses députés individuels, bien qu'ils en fassent partie, puisqu'ils y participent, mais fondamentalement, c'est un parti centralisateur qui n’en a rien à cirer des demandes des Québécois pour obtenir plus de pouvoirs. Il n'en a rien à cirer des angoisses et des anxiétés constitutionnelles des Québécois. Surtout, il n'a aucun désir d'améliorer la vie des Québécois et des Canadiens par l'entremise de ses politiques gouvernementales.
Au contraire, on n'a jamais vu un gouvernement dépenser autant d'argent et produire aussi peu de résultats pour les Canadiens sur une base individuelle. On a parfois l'impression que le gouvernement travaille pour la bureaucratie et les programmes gouvernementaux au lien de travailler pour les Québécois et les Canadiens en général. Cette identité, on l'a vue au cours de l'histoire. En 1867, George Brown et le Parti rouge ne voulaient pas d'une grande fédération comme le Canada créée par deux peuples fondateurs qui travaillent main dans la main.
De 1867 à aujourd'hui, nous, les conservateurs, avons maintenu notre ouverture constitutionnelle et politique à l'égard des doléances des deux peuples fondateurs et des doléances juridiques de la province du Québec. Rappelons l'affront total des libéraux en 1982, lorsqu'ils ont rapatrié la Constitution sans le consentement de l'Assemblée nationale du Québec. On voit que cela se répète.
L'Assemblée nationale du Québec, en 1982, n'a pas signé la Constitution. Le Québec, en tant que bastion de la Francophonie en Amérique du Nord, avait plus que son mot à dire. Même les conventions politiques et la jurisprudence disaient clairement que le Québec avait une prépondérance importante dans toute cette histoire du rapatriement de la Constitution. Pourtant, les libéraux, sans aucune vergogne et avec arrogance, ont rapatrié la Constitution sans la signature du Québec, tout comme ils rejettent aujourd'hui du revers de la main, sans aucune vergogne et sans aucune gêne, la demande unanime de l'Assemblée nationale concernant la déclaration d'impôt unique.
Avec M. Mulroney, à l'époque, nous avons repris le dialogue avec honneur et enthousiasme. Nous avons fait tous les efforts possibles, malgré les pressions extrêmes exercées un peu partout par M. Trudeau, le père. Nous avons conclu les accords de Charlottetown et du lac Meech; nous avons tout tenté pour intégrer le Québec. Ensuite, M. Harper a conclu des ententes administratives, parce que le fruit n'était pas mûr. Les gens ne voulaient pas de débats constitutionnels. Comme notre de chef le député de Regina—Qu'Appelle veut le faire, M. Harper a conclu des ententes administratives qui vont aider les Québécois dans leur vie de tous les jours, en attendant le jour où nous verrons peut-être un débat constitutionnel. Ensuite, il a donné un siège au Québec à l'UNESCO, la dernière chose que les libéraux auraient faite et ce que le Bloc québécois n'aura jamais le pouvoir de faire, puisqu'il ne prendra jamais le pouvoir.
Non seulement nous avons donné un siège au Québec à l'UNESCO, mais nous avons également reconnu la nation québécoise en cette assemblée, dans ce Parlement westminstérien, sur les terres de l'Amérique du Nord. Nous avons reconnu que le peuple québécois formait une nation au sein d'un Canada uni. C'est M. Harper qui l'a fait. Ce n'étaient pas les libéraux ni le Bloc québécois, qui ne pourraient jamais le faire, puisqu'ils n'auront jamais le pouvoir.
Quel parti a augmenté son nombre de sièges au Québec lors des dernières élections? Ce n'est pas le Bloc québécois, c'est le Parti conservateur, qui a gagné 12 sièges. Les libéraux, malheureusement, en raison de leurs nombreuses promesses, ont réussi à gagner plusieurs sièges. Toutefois, cela va changer, puisqu'ils seront incapables de remplir leurs promesses. Comme le déficit ne sera pas épongé cette année, ils vont augmenter les impôts et les taxes au cours des jours, des mois et des années à venir s'ils sont reportés au pouvoir.
Comme on peut le constater, c'est le même parti qu'à l'époque. Le Parti libéral du Canada, dans son identité propre, n'a aucun respect pour les Québécois ou les champs de compétence.
Le premier ministre et député de Papineau, quelques jours après avoir été élu, est allé à New York et a dit à unjournal qu’il n’y avait pas d’identité nationale au Canada. Vraiment? Il n’y a pas d’identité nationale au Canada? Ce n’est pas ce que pensent les Québécois. Les Québécois ne seront jamais bien servis par le Parti libéral du Canada. Nous, avec notre chef de Regina—Qu’Appelle, nous allons leur donner plus d’autonomie dans leurs champs de compétence lorsqu’ils le demanderont.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-02-05 13:50 [p.25310]
Mr. Speaker, I know the member and respect him. We were on the OGGO committee together. He spoke to me in French so I will speak to him in English.
Do members know why the Liberals speak about the technicalities of the matter? It is because they do not want to talk about the matter at hand, which is whether they are for or against our ideas. They are against them. Every time the government talks about complexities and technicalities, it is because it does not want to face reality.
This is a good idea. It does not come from them. It comes from us. More than that, as I said during my speech, it is not possible for Liberal MPs in this land to do differently from what they are doing today, because this is part of their core identity.
They do not want to respect decentralization. They do not believe in federalism. They do not believe in this country. They believe that everything should be centralized in Ottawa. First and foremost, they do not believe in French Canada.
Monsieur le Président, je connais le député et je le respecte. Nous siégeons tous deux au comité des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires. Il m'a parlé en français, alors je vais lui parler en anglais.
Les députés savent-ils ce qui explique que les libéraux s'attardent aux détails de la question? C'est parce qu'ils ne veulent pas se mouiller sur le fond de la question, soit de savoir s'ils appuient nos idées ou non. Ils ne les appuient pas. Quand le gouvernement s'attarde aux détails et aux points techniques, c'est qu'il cherche à éviter de faire face à la réalité.
Il s'agit d'une bonne idée, mais elle ne vient pas d'eux. Elle vient de nous. En outre, comme je l'ai souligné pendant mon discours, il est absolument impossible pour les députés libéraux au pays d'agir différemment de ce qu'ils font présentement; cela fait partie de leur ADN.
Ils ne veulent pas de la décentralisation. Ils ne croient pas au fédéralisme. Ils ne croient pas au Canada. Ils considèrent que tout devrait se décider depuis Ottawa. Surtout, ils ne croient pas au Canada francophone.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-02-05 13:52 [p.25310]
Mr. Speaker, how typical of Canadian socialists. It is the opinion of the majority, because Quebec's National Assembly voted unanimously for a motion asking the federal government to begin administrative-level talks on a single tax return. It is always the same thing: every time the majority goes against what they believe in, Canadian socialists say that the majority's opinion is hogwash.
I am not the one pitting Quebeckers against each other; the Liberals are. I am not the one disrespecting Quebeckers; the Liberals are. The Liberals are not the ones who will increase Quebec's jurisdictional powers; the Conservatives will be, after October 21, 2019.
Monsieur le Président, cela est typique des socialistes au Canada. C'est l’opinion de la majorité, puisque c'est l’Assemblée nationale du Québec qui a voté à l’unanimité une motion demandant au fédéral d’entamer des discussions administratives par rapport à la déclaration de revenus unique. C'est typique, chaque fois que l’opinion de la majorité va à l’encontre de leur croyance, les socialistes canadiens disent que c’est basé sur des balivernes.
Ce n’est pas moi qui oppose les Québécois les uns aux autres, ce sont les libéraux. Ce n’est pas moi qui ne respecte pas les Québécois, ce sont les libéraux. Ce ne sont pas les libéraux qui vont pouvoir augmenter le pouvoir des champs de compétence des Québécois, ce seront les conservateurs, le 21 octobre 2019.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-02-05 13:54 [p.25311]
Mr. Speaker, it is this party which has repatriated the Constitution without the Quebec National Assembly. It is the Trudeau father who put huge pressure on Newfoundland not to open on the day of the Meech Lake vote. This is the reality of history.
Monsieur le Président, on parle du parti qui a rapatrié la Constitution sans l'aval de l'Assemblée nationale du Québec. C'est Trudeau père qui avait fait pression sur Terre-Neuve pour qu'elle se ravise au moment du vote sur l'accord du lac Meech. C'est ce qui s'est réellement passé.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-02-04 16:59 [p.25263]
Madam Speaker, the member for Louis-Hébert said that we were giving tax credits to wealthy families. After knocking on 40,000 doors in my riding, I found that, on the contrary, the families using our tax credits were not wealthy. Under the member's government, 46% of these families are $200 away from insolvency at the end of the month. Perhaps they could have used some tax credits.
I have a very specific question for the member. We signed Canada onto the Trans-Pacific Partnership and the CETA, which are major forward-looking projects. We also developed a shipbuilding strategy to ensure that Canada is prepared to defend itself in the world.
Can the member name a single visionary project, not for today, but for 50 years from now, that his government could have developed? I would like to hear him name just one.
Madame la Présidente, le député de Louis-Hébert a dit que nous accordions des crédits d'impôt aux familles riches. Ce n'est pas ce que j'ai constaté. Après avoir frappé à 40 000 portes dans ma circonscription, j'ai constaté que les gens qui bénéficiaient de nos crédits d'impôt n'étaient pas du tout des familles riches, au contraire. Ce qu'on constate sous le gouvernement du député, c'est que 46 % d'entre elles sont à 200 $ de l'insolvabilité à la fin du mois. Elles auraient peut-être besoin de quelques crédits d'impôt.
J'ai une question très précise à poser au député. Nous avons fait en sorte que le Canada adhère au Partenariat transpacifique et à l'Accord économique et commercial global entre le Canada et l'Union européenne, de grands projets d'avenir. Nous avons également mis sur pied une stratégie de construction navale pour que le Canada soit prêt à se défendre dans le monde.
Le député peut-il me nommer un seul grand projet visionnaire, pas pour aujourd'hui, mais pour dans 50 ans, que son gouvernement aurait mis sur pied? Qu'il m'en nomme un seul.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-01-29 14:09 [p.25005]
Mr. Speaker, this year marks the 50th anniversary of the Official Languages Act.
As everyone knows, it is no ordinary act or simple guideline for the development of our public policy. On the contrary, not only does this act reflect the history of our Canadian identity, but it should also reflect our current society, specifically by meeting the present-day needs of minority language communities.
That is why anglophones and francophones across the country expect their legislators, everyone in this place, to commit to modernizing the act immediately.
The Official Languages Act will guarantee the continuity of what has defined us as Canadians since 1867. In doing so, the act will undoubtedly ensure the peaceful coexistence of our founding peoples and unite our great federation. That is why the Conservative Party of Canada and our leader are firmly committed to modernizing the act.
Monsieur le Président, cette année, nous célébrons le 50e anniversaire de la Loi sur les langues officielles.
On n'est pas sans savoir qu'il ne s'agit ni d'une loi ordinaire ni d'une simple ligne directrice pour l'élaboration de nos politiques publiques. Tout au contraire, cette loi est non seulement le reflet historique de notre identité canadienne, mais elle se doit aussi d'être le reflet de notre époque, et ce, en répondant aux nouveaux besoins des communautés linguistiques en situation minoritaire.
C'est pourquoi, partout au pays, autant les anglophones que les francophones s'attendent à ce que leurs législateurs, nous tous ici, s'engagent sans plus tarder à moderniser la loi.
La Loi sur les langues officielles est un gage de continuité à l'égard de ce qui fait de nous des Canadiens depuis 1867. Ce faisant, la Loi permet sans contredit la coexistence paisible des peuples fondateurs et assure l'unité de notre grande fédération. C'est pourquoi le Parti conservateur du Canada et notre chef s'engagent fermement à moderniser la Loi.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-01-29 16:27 [p.25027]
Madam Speaker, I am very pleased to rise here in the new House of Commons. Looking down, it feels like we are in the old chamber, but looking up, that is clearly not the case. It is certainly a lot brighter here than in the old chamber, so bright that it is difficult to look up at the sky.
I am honoured to rise on behalf of the 100,000 people of my riding, Beauport—Limoilou. Now that it is 2019, we are slowly but surely gearing up for an election campaign. Personally, I intend to be re-elected, if my constituents would once again do me the honour, but since we can neither know what fate has in store nor determine the outcome, I will, of course, work very hard. For that reason, I am savouring this honour and this opportunity to speak here for yet another parliamentary session.
Today, I would like to clarify something very important for the people of my riding. This morning, the member for Carleton moved a motion in the House of Commons, a fairly simple motion that reads as follows:
That, given the Prime Minister broke his promise to eliminate the deficit this year and that perpetual and growing deficits lead to massive tax increases, the House call on the Prime Minister to table a plan in Budget 2019 to eliminate the deficit quickly with a written commitment that he will never raise taxes of any kind.
My constituents may find it rather strange to ask a Prime Minister to promise not to raise taxes after the next election, if he is re-elected. He might even raise taxes before the election. After all, the Liberals tried to raise taxes many times over the past three years. I will say more about that in my speech. However, we are asking the Prime Minister to make this promise because we see that public finances are in total disarray.
In addition, the Prime Minister has broken several of the key promises he made to Canadians and Quebeckers. Some of them were national in scope. For example, he promised to return to a balanced budget by 2019, which did not happen. Instead, our deficit is nearly $30 billion. The budget the Liberals presented a few months ago forecast an $18-billion deficit, but according to the Office of the Parliamentary Budget Officer—an institution that forces the government to be more transparent to Canadians and that was created by Mr. Harper, a great Prime Minister—the deficit would actually be around $29 billion instead of $18 billion.
The Prime Minister quite shamelessly broke his promise to rebalance the budget, since this is the first time in the history of Canada that a government has racked up a deficit outside of a war or serious economic crisis. There was a big economic recession when the Conservatives were in power between 2008 and 2012.
I like to remind Canadians who may be listening to us that accountability is a key part of the Westminster system. That is why we talk about the notion of government accountability and why we have question period every day. It is not all about the theatrics, I might add. We ask the same ministers, although sometimes other ministers, questions every day because one day they are going to slip up and tell us the truth. Then we can talk about responsibility and accountability.
In short, the Prime Minister broke his promise to balance the budget by 2019. He also broke his promise to change our electoral system, which was very important to a huge segment of the Canadian left and Canadian youth.
He also broke his promise about the Canada Post community mailboxes. Although we believe that Canada Post's five-point action plan was important for ensuring the corporation's survival in the long term, the Prime Minister nevertheless promised the return of community mailboxes. I travelled across the country with my colleague from Edmonton and other members of the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates. All Canadians told Liberal members of the committee that they hoped the government would restore community mailboxes. However, the Liberals only put in place a moratorium.
The member from Quebec City and Minister of Families, Children and Social Development said that the state of the Quebec Bridge was deplorable, that the bridge was covered in rust and that some citizens were concerned about security and public safety.
I would like to reassure them. Our engineers' reports states that the bridge is not dangerous. That said, it is a disgrace that this historic bridge is completely rusty. The Liberals promised that this would be taken care of by June 30, 2016. That was over two years ago.
They also promised to help the middle class. In fact, to some extent, they followed in the footsteps of Mr. Harper's Conservative government, which also focused on helping Canadian families as much as possible. I held three public consultations in 2018. It is already 2019. Time flies. I called those public consultations, “Alupa à l'écoute”.
I will table my report in a month and a half. It will express my willingness to suggest to my leader to either table a bill or include in his election platform measures to address the labour shortage and to help seniors return to the labour market without being further penalized. I go door to door every month. What is more, during my public consultations, what I heard most often from my constituents, who I thank for coming, is that they are surviving. Their lives have not improved at all in three and a half years. On the contrary, they are facing challenges as a result of the Prime Minister's repeated failures.
I said we needed the Prime Minister to promise not to raise taxes either before the election or, if he wins, after. We all know what he has done over the past three years. He tried to tax dental benefits. He tried to tax employee benefits and bonuses. For example, some restaurant owners give their servers free meals. That is what happened when I was a server. The Liberals wanted to tax that benefit. They tried to tax small and medium-sized businesses by taxing their revenue as capital gains, and that was a total disaster. They wanted to tax every source of income businesses could use to prepare for bad times or retirement so they would eventually be less of a burden on the state.
The Liberals also significantly increased taxes. Studies show that 81% of Canadians have to pay more than $800 a year in taxes because the Liberals got rid of almost all of the tax credits the Conservatives had implemented, such as those for textbooks or public transit. They got rid of the tax credits for sports and for families. The Prime Minister and his Liberal team got rid of all kinds of family credits, which significantly increased taxes. Furthermore, they tried many times to significantly increase other taxes. They also tried payroll deductions, like the increase to the Canada pension plan. If we really take a look at the various benefits or income streams Canadians receive, we can see that their taxes have increased.
We do not trust the Prime Minister when he says he will not raise taxes after the next election if he is re-elected. We know he will have to raise taxes because of his repeated failures. In economic terms, there is an additional $60 billion in deficits on top of the debt. His deficits now total $80 billion after three and a half years. I am also thinking of his failures on immigration and on managing border crossings. Quebec is asking for $300 million to make up for the shortfall it has suffered because of illegal refugees. I am also thinking of all the problems related to international relations. I am also thinking of infrastructure.
How is it possible that the Prime Minister, still to this day, refuses tell the people of Beauport—Limoilou and Quebec City that he will agree to go ahead and help the CAQ government build the third link? All around the world, huge infrastructure projects are under way, yet over the past three years, the Liberal government has been incapable of allocating more than a few billion dollars of the $187 billion infrastructure fund.
Canadians are going to pay for the Prime Minister's mistakes. We want him to commit in writing that he will not raise taxes if he is re-elected.
Madame la Présidente, je suis très heureux de prendre la parole dans cette nouvelle Chambre des communes. Lorsqu'on regarde vers le bas, on pourrait croire qu'on est dans l'ancienne enceinte parlementaire, mais lorsqu'on lève les yeux, on réalise que ce n'est manifestement pas le cas. Je remarque que c'est beaucoup plus illuminé qu'à l'autre endroit. On a presque de la difficulté à lever les yeux vers le ciel.
Je suis honoré de prendre la parole au nom des 100 000 citoyens et citoyennes de ma circonscription, Beauport—Limoilou. Puisque nous sommes en 2019, nous entamons lentement, mais sûrement la campagne électorale. Pour ma part, j'ai fermement l'intention d'être réélu, si les citoyens me font cet honneur une autre fois, mais puisque le hasard fait ses choses et qu'on ne peut jamais vraiment déterminer ce qui va arriver, je vais quand même travailler très fort. Je savoure donc cet honneur et cette chance de pouvoir m'exprimer pendant encore toute une session au Parlement.
Aujourd'hui, j'aimerais éclairer les citoyens et les citoyennes de ma circonscription sur un sujet fort important. Il s'agit de la motion que nous avons présentée à la Chambre des communes et qui a été déposée ce matin par le député de Carleton. C'est une motion assez simple qui se lit comme suit:
Que, étant donné que le premier ministre a rompu sa promesse d’éliminer le déficit cette année, et que les déficits perpétuels et croissants entraînent d’énormes hausses d’impôts, la Chambre demande au premier ministre de déposer, avec le budget de 2019, un plan pour l’élimination rapide du déficit, en s’engageant par écrit à ne jamais hausser les impôts, sous quelque forme que ce soit.
Mes concitoyens trouvent peut-être cela un peu paradoxal de demander à un premier ministre de nous promettre de ne pas hausser les impôts à la suite des prochaines élections s'il est réélu. Il se peut même qu'il les hausse avant les élections. Après tout, les libéraux ont tenté à maintes reprises d'augmenter les impôts au cours des trois dernières années, et j'en parlerai davantage dans mon discours. Toutefois, nous demandons cela au premier ministre parce que nous constatons de prime abord que les finances publiques sont en plein désarroi.
Nous constatons également que le premier ministre a brisé plusieurs des promesses phares qu'il avait faites aux Canadiens et aux Québécois. Certaines d'entre elles étaient d'une envergure nationale. Par exemple, il avait promis un retour à l'équilibre budgétaire dès l'année 2019, ce qui n'a pas eu lieu. Nous avons plutôt un déficit de presque 30 milliards de dollars. Le budget que les libéraux ont présenté il y a quelques mois faisait état d'un déficit de 18 milliards de dollars, mais grâce au bureau du directeur parlementaire du budget, une institution qui pousse le gouvernement à être plus transparent à l'égard des électeurs et qui a été créée par M. Harper, un grand premier ministre, on a appris que le déficit n'était pas de 18 milliards de dollars, mais plutôt d'environ 29 milliards de dollars.
Le premier ministre a donc brisé cette promesse du retour à l'équilibre budgétaire de manière assez éhontée, puisque c'est la première fois dans l'histoire du Canada qu'un gouvernement cumule des déficits hors d'une période de guerre ou de crise économique importante. Sous les conservateurs, entre 2008 et 2012, il y avait la grande récession économique.
J'aime rappeler aux citoyens qui nous écoutent que la responsabilité est un élément phare du parlementarisme westminstérien. C'est pourquoi on parle de la notion de gouvernement responsable et que nous avons une période de questions tous les jours. Celle-ci n'est pas du tout un théâtre, en passant. Nous posons des questions tous les jours aux mêmes ministres, parfois à d'autres, parce qu'un jour, ils vont flancher et nous dire la vérité. À ce moment-là, on pourra parler de responsabilité et de reddition de comptes.
Bref, le premier ministre a brisé la promesse du retour à l'équilibre budgétaire en 2019. Il a également brisé sa promesse de changer le mode de scrutin, qui était très importante pour tout un pan de la gauche canadienne et de la jeunesse canadienne.
En outre, il a brisé sa promesse concernant le retour des boîtes communautaires pour Postes Canada. Bien que nous pensions que la réforme en cinq points de Postes Canada était intéressante pour assurer la survie de celle-ci à long terme, le premier ministre avait quand même promis le retour des boîtes communautaires. J'ai moi-même traversé le pays au complet avec mon collègue d'Edmonton et les autres membres du Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires. Tous les Canadiens disaient aux membres libéraux du Comité qu'ils espéraient que le gouvernement rétablisse les boîtes communautaires. Cependant, les libéraux n'ont fait que mettre en place un moratoire.
Le député de Québec et ministre de la Famille, des Enfants et du Développement social avait dit que la situation du pont de Québec était déplorable, que le pont était complètement rouillé et que certains citoyens avaient peur quant à la protection et à la sécurité publique.
Je tiens à les rassurer: les rapports de nos ingénieurs disent que le pont n’est pas dangereux. Cela étant dit, c’est une honte de voir ce pont historique être complètement rouillé. Les libéraux nous avaient promis que cela serait réglé avant le 30 juin 2016. Cela fait plus de deux ans.
Ils nous avaient également promis d’aider la classe moyenne. En fait, ils suivaient un peu les traces du gouvernement conservateur de M. Harper, qui mettait autant que possible l’accent sur l’aide aux familles canadiennes. J’ai mené trois consultations publiques en 2018. Nous sommes déjà rendus en 2019; le temps passe très vite. J’ai nommé ces trois consultations publiques « Alupa à l’écoute ».
Je vais déposer mon rapport dans un mois et demi. Ce rapport va faire état de ma volonté de suggérer à mon chef soit de mettre dans sa plateforme, soit de déposer dans un projet de loi des mesures qui vont pallier la pénurie de la main-d’œuvre et qui vont aider les aînés à retourner sur le marché du travail sans être pénalisés davantage. Je fais du porte-à-porte chaque mois. De plus, lors de mes consultations publiques, ce que j’ai entendu le plus souvent de la part de mes concitoyens et concitoyennes, que je remercie d’être venus, c’est qu’ils survivent. Leur vie n’a pas du tout été améliorée depuis trois ans et demi. Bien au contraire, ils font face à des difficultés. Ces difficultés découlent des échecs répétés du premier ministre.
Je disais que nous avions besoin que le premier ministre nous promette de ne pas hausser les taxes et les impôts d’ici aux élections et après les élections, si jamais il gagne. Nous avons vu ce qu’il a fait au cours des trois dernières années: il a tenté de taxer les prestations de l’assurance dentaire. Il a tenté de taxer les prestations et les bonis des employés. Par exemple, il arrive qu’un propriétaire de restaurant offre le repas à une serveuse qui y travaille. Quand j’étais serveur, c’était le cas. Les libéraux voulaient taxer cet avantage. Ils ont tenté de taxer, de manière complètement catastrophique, les petites et moyennes entreprises en taxant leur revenu en gain en capital. Ils ont voulu taxer toutes les sources de revenus que les entreprises peuvent utiliser soit pour se préparer pour de mauvais jours soit pour se préparer à leur retraite, et donc, être un moindre poids pour l’État ultérieurement.
Les libéraux ont également augmenté les taxes de manière tangible. En fait, les études démontrent que 81 % des Canadiens doivent payer plus de 800 $ par année en taxes, parce que les libéraux ont coupé dans presque toutes les mesures de crédits d’impôt que les conservateurs avaient mises en place, comme les mesures pour les manuels scolaires ou pour le transport en commun. Ils ont coupé dans les mesures pour les activités sportives ou les crédits d’impôt pour la famille. Ce qu’on constate, c’est que le premier ministre et son équipe libérale ont mis fin à toutes sortes de crédits familiaux, ce qui a fait augmenter les taxes de manière substantielle. De plus, ils ont tenté à maintes reprises d’augmenter de manière très importante d’autres taxes. Ils ont également augmenté des retenues sur le salaire. On pense notamment à l’augmentation du Régime de pensions du Canada. Vraiment, lorsqu’on regarde l’ensemble des différents bénéfices ou des différentes avenues monétaires que les Canadiens reçoivent, on voit que leurs taxes ont augmenté.
Nous ne faisons pas confiance au premier ministre lorsqu’il nous dit qu’il n’y aura pas d’augmentation de taxes après les prochaines élections s’il est réélu. Nous savons qu’il va devoir le faire à cause de tous ses échecs répétés. Sur le plan économique, il y a des déficits importants de 60 milliards de dollars de plus sur la dette. Ces déficits atteignent 80 milliards de dollars après trois ans et demi. Je pense également à ses échecs en ce qui concerne notre système d’immigration et la gestion des aller-retour à la frontière. Le Québec demande 300 millions de dollars pour pallier son déficit engendré par l’accueil des réfugiés illégaux. Je pense également à tout ce qui touche les relations internationales. Je pense aussi aux infrastructures.
Comment est-il possible que le premier ministre soit encore incapable aujourd’hui de confirmer aux citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou et de Québec qu’il va accepter d’aller de l’avant et d’aider le gouvernement de la CAQ à construire le troisième lien? Partout au monde, des projets gigantesques se font en matière d’infrastructures. Pourtant, depuis trois ans, le gouvernement libéral est incapable de fournir plus de quelques milliards de dollars sur 187 milliards de dollars.
Les Canadiens vont payer pour les échecs du premier ministre. Nous voulons qu'il s'engage par écrit à ne pas augmenter les impôts ou les taxes s'il est réélu.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-01-29 16:39 [p.25029]
Madam Speaker, it is quite simple. We will do as we did before: We will have responsible management of our finances here in Canada.
We will never cut services to Canadians; we will cut and stop the increase of money flowing to the bureaucrats. We have never seen in the history of Canada so much money being spent on deficits by a government, with so little result for Canadians individually. We gave the Liberals a surplus of $3 billion while having child benefit measures and one of the best OECD numbers of economic development and while being the first country to get out of the financial crisis of 2008.
Madame la Présidente, c'est très simple. Nous allons procéder comme avant: nous gérerons de manière responsable nos finances, ici, au Canada.
Nous ne sabrerons jamais dans les services aux Canadiens; nous réduirons et freinerons la hausse des sommes versées aux bureaucrates. Nous n'avons jamais vu dans l'histoire du Canada un gouvernement dépenser et creuser le déficit à ce point en offrant si peu de résultats pour les Canadiens. Nous avons laissé aux libéraux un excédent de 3 milliards de dollars tout en prenant des mesures concernant les allocations pour les enfants et en affichant parmi les meilleurs chiffres de l'OCDE pour le développement économique. Nous avons été le premier pays à se sortir de la crise financière de 2008.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-01-29 16:41 [p.25029]
Madam Speaker, I go door-knocking every month and I can tell you that Quebeckers have no appetite to see their tax bill constantly go up and their quality of life go down.
I would like us to focus on more important things. When we look at the state of international relations, whether with China, Southeast Asia, South America, Africa, Asia or Europe, we see countries that have plans to address the great challenges of the 21st century. Here, the government is barely capable of drafting a plan to balance the budget.
How will this government prepare for the great challenges of the 21st century when it cannot even come up with a plan to balance the budget?
If my NDP colleague conducted a survey in his riding, I am sure that everyone would tell him that the government has to stop raising taxes. That is what is important.
Madame la Présidente, je fais du porte-à-porte tous les mois, et je peux dire que les Québécois et les Québécoises n’en peuvent plus de voir leur compte de taxes augmenter constamment et leur qualité de vie diminuer.
Je voudrais qu’on s’attarde à des choses beaucoup plus importantes. Lorsqu’on regarde l’état des relations internationales, que ce soit avec la Chine, l’Asie du Sud-Est, l’Amérique du Sud, l’Afrique, l’Asie ou l’Europe, on voit des pays qui ont des plans pour affronter les grands défis du XXIe siècle. Ici, le gouvernement est à peine capable de mettre sur papier un plan de retour à l’équilibre budgétaire.
Comment peut-on se préparer aux grands défis du XXIe siècle quand n'est même pas capable d'avoir un plan de retour à l’équilibre budgétaire?
Si mon collègue du NPD faisait un sondage dans sa circonscription, je suis certain que tout le monde lui dirait qu’il faut cesser d’augmenter les taxes et les impôts. C’est cela qui est fondamental.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-01-29 16:43 [p.25029]
Madam Speaker, I do not know what world the member lives in, but maybe she should cross the floor, because she seems to be attracted to the way they manage the economy on the Liberal benches.
I want to speak about the veterans file. To the contrary, my colleague was the minister before the last election and did an amazing job making sure that we had new benefits. There were dozens of new benefits given to veterans under the Conservative government, and that is the truth. It is just outrageous to see the Liberals lying like that on the backs of veterans.
Madame la Présidente, je ne sais pas dans quel monde vit la députée, mais elle devrait peut-être traverser de l'autre côté, car elle semble aimer la façon dont les libéraux gèrent l'économie.
J'aimerais parler du dossier des anciens combattants. Contrairement à ce qu'a dit la députée, mon collègue a été ministre avant les dernières élections et a fait un excellent travail pour s'assurer que nous aurions de nouvelles prestations. Les anciens combattants ont reçu des dizaines de nouvelles prestations à l'époque du gouvernement conservateur. C'est la vérité. C'est tout à fait aberrant d'entendre les libéraux mentir de cette manière, en se servant des anciens combattants.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-12-13 13:07 [p.24860]
Mr. Speaker, I had the honour and privilege to be chosen, among the 338 members of Parliament, to speak today on the last day we will be sitting in this building, the Centre Block, in the House of Commons, in our wonderful Parliament, in our great federation.
Before I go any further and talk a bit about Centre Block, I should say that I will be sharing my time with the excellent member for Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, one of my esteemed colleagues, whose riding is quite close to my own. We share a border, between Sainte-Brigitte-de-Laval and Beauport. I am very happy to work with him on various issues that affect our respective constituents.
I would like to wish a very merry Christmas to everyone in Beauport—Limoilou who is watching us right now or who might watch this evening on Facebook, Twitter or other social media. I wish everyone a wonderful time with their family, and I hope they take some time to rest and relax. That is important. This season can be a time to focus a little more on ourselves and our families, and to spend time together, to catch up and to rest up. I wish all my constituents the very best for 2019. Of course we will be seeing one another next week in our riding. I will be in my office and out in the community all week. I invite all my constituents to the Christmas party I am hosting on Wednesday, December 19, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., at my office, which is located at 2000 Sanfaçon Avenue. Refreshments will be served and we will celebrate Christmas together. Over 200 people attended the event last year. I hope to see just as many people out this year. Merry Christmas and happy new year to everyone.
Today I want to talk about Bill C-76. I think this is the third time I speak to this bill. This is the first time I have had the opportunity to speak at all three readings of the same bill, and I am delighted I have been able do so.
This is somewhat ironic, because we have every reason to feel nostalgic today. The Centre Block of the House of Commons has been the centre of Canadian democracy since 1916, or rather, since its reconstruction, which was completed in 1920 after the fire. We have been sitting in this place for over a century, for 102 years. We serve to ensure the well-being of our constituents and to discuss democracy, to discuss legislation and the issues that matter to our country every day.
Today, rather ironically, we are discussing Bill C-76, which seeks to amend the Canada Elections Act. This is the legislation that sets the guidelines, standards, conditions and guarantees by which we, the 338 members of Parliament, were elected by constituents to sit here in the House of Commons. It is an interesting bill that we are discussing on our last day here, but this situation is indeed somewhat ironic, as my NDP colleague so rightly said in his question to the parliamentary secretary. He asked why, if this bill is so important to the Liberals, they waited until the last minute to rush it through after three years in power. The same version appeared in Bill C-33 in 2015-16, and the Liberals delayed implementation of that bill.
Since we are talking about Bill C-76, which affects the Elections Act and democracy, I must say I find it a shame that only six out of the 200 amendments the Conservatives proposed in committee were accepted.
We have concrete grievances based on real concerns and even the opinion of the majority. I will share with the House some of the surveys I have here. I just want to take a minute to say to all those watching us on CPAC or elsewhere right now, that it has been my dream ever since I was 15 to serve Canadians first and foremost. That is why I enrolled in the Canadian Armed Forces. That is why I dreamed of becoming an MP since I was 15. In 2015, I had the exceptional honour of earning the confidence of the majority of the 92,000 constituents of Beauport—Limoilou. I would like to tell them that, in my view, the House of Commons represents the opposite of what the Prime Minister said yesterday. He said it was just a room.
I did not like that because the House of Commons, which will close for renovations for 15 years in a few days, is not just a room, as the Prime Minister said. I find it unfortunate that he used that term. It is the chamber of the people. That is why it is green. The colour green represents the people and the colour red represents aristocracy. Hence the Senate chamber is red.
I hope I am not mistaken. Perhaps the parliamentary guides could talk to me about this.
It is unfortunate that the Prime Minister said that it is not the centre of democracy, because that is not true. I will explain to Canadians why it is wrong to say that Parliament is not the centre of democracy.
The Prime Minister was right when he said that democracy resides everywhere, whether in protests in the streets, meetings of political associations or union meetings. Of course, democracy happens there. However, the centre of democracy is here, because it is here that elected members sit and vote on the laws that govern absolutely everything in the country. It is also here that we can even change Canada's Constitution. The country's Constitution cannot be changed anywhere else or as part of political debates by a political association or a protest. No, it can only be done here or in the other legislative assemblies of the provinces in Canada. It is only in those places that we can make amendments and change how democracy works or deal with problems to address current issues. Yes, by definition, in a practical manner, the centre of democracy is right here. It is not, as the Prime Minister said, just a room like so many others. No, it is the House of Commons.
Just briefly, before I get back to Bill C-76, I want to talk about the six sculptures on the east wall. The first represents civil law; the second, freedom of speech; the third, the Senate; the fourth, the governor general; the fifth, Confederation; and the sixth, the vote. On the west wall, there are sculptures representing bilingualism, education, the House of Commons, taxation—it says “IMPÔT — TAX” up top—criminal law and, lastly, communications. Those sculptures are here because we are at the centre of democracy. The 12 sculptures represent elements of how our federation works.
With respect to Bill C-67, we have three main complaints.
First, Bill C-76 would make it possible for a Canadian to use a voter card as their only document at a polling station. To be clear, the voter card is the paper people get for registering as an eligible voter. From now on, the Liberals will let people vote using that card only. Currently, and until this bill is passed, voters have to present a piece of identification to vote.
There are risks in letting people vote without an ID card like a driver's licence, health card or passport. First, in 2015, the information on over one million voter identification cards was incorrect. That is a major concern. Second, it is easy to vote with a card displaying incorrect information. That creates a significant problem. It is serious. We need to make sure that voting remains a protected, powerful and serious privilege in Canada.
Our second concern—and this is why we have no choice but to vote against the bill and what upsets me the most personally—is that the government is going to allow Canadians who live outside the country to vote, regardless of how long they have been living abroad. There used to be a five-year limit. In Australia, it is six years. Many countries have limits.
Now, the Liberals want to allow 1.4 million Canadians who live abroad to participate in Canadian elections, even if they have not lived in Canada for 20 or 30 years. They will even be allowed to choose what riding they want to vote in.
Do the Liberals realize the incredible power they are giving to Canadian citizens who have not lived in Canada for 20 years? Those individuals could potentially choose a riding where the polls indicate that the race is very close and change which party is chosen to govern.
Our third concern about this bill is that the Liberals want to prevent third parties, such as labour groups, from accepting money from individuals or groups outside the country during the pre-writ period.
That is good, but there is nothing stopping this from happening before the pre-writ period. People will be able to take in money and receive money from groups outside the country before the start of the pre-writ period.
I thank all Canadians who are watching us for their trust. I look forward to seeing them in the riding next week.
Monsieur le Président, aujourd'hui, j'ai l'honneur, la chance et le privilège d'avoir été choisi parmi 338 députés pour prendre la parole au cours de la dernière journée où nous siégeons au sein de cet édifice, l'édifice du Centre, au sein de la Chambre des communes, dans notre grand Parlement, dans notre grande Fédération.
Avant d'aller un peu plus loin et de parler un peu de l'édifice du Centre, je dois dire que je vais partager mon temps de parole avec le très grand député de Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, un de mes très chers collègues, dont la circonscription est très proche de la mienne. Nous partageons une frontière, entre Sainte-Brigitte-de-Laval et Beauport. Je suis très content de collaborer avec lui sur divers enjeux qui touchent nos concitoyens respectifs.
À tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent actuellement ou qui nous écouteront ce soir sur Facebook, Twitter ou d'autres réseaux sociaux, je souhaite un très joyeux Noël. Je leur souhaite de passer de très bons moments en famille et je leur souhaite de se reposer. C'est important. C'est une occasion de se recentrer un peu sur soi-même et sur la famille et de prendre du temps pour être ensemble, pour discuter et se reposer. Je souhaite une belle année 2019 à mes concitoyens. Bien entendu, nous nous reverrons dans la circonscription la semaine prochaine. Je serai à mon bureau et sur le terrain toute la semaine. Le mercredi 19 décembre, j'invite mes concitoyens au réveillon de Noël du député, qui aura lieu à mon bureau situé au 2000, avenue Sanfaçon, de 18 heures à 21 heures. Des bouchées et des boissons seront servies. Nous fêterons Noël ensemble. L'année dernière, plus de 200 personnes y étaient présentes. J'espère que l'événement aura le même succès cette année. Joyeux Noël à tous! Bonne année 2019!
Aujourd'hui, je vais parler du projet de loi C-76. Je crois bien que c'est la troisième fois que je parle de ce projet de loi. C'est la première fois que j'ai l'occasion de prendre la parole lors des trois étapes de la lecture d'un même projet de loi. J'en suis fort content.
C'est assez ironique, parce que, aujourd'hui, il y a matière à nostalgie. L'édifice du Centre de la Chambre des communes est le centre de la démocratie canadienne depuis 1916, ou plutôt depuis la reconstruction qui a été terminée en 1920 à la suite de l'incendie. Nous siégeons ici depuis plus d'un siècle, depuis 102 ans. Nous siégeons pour le bien-être de tous les citoyens et pour discuter de la démocratie, pour discuter de nos projets de loi et des enjeux qui font tressaillir notre pays de jour en jour.
Aujourd'hui, la situation est très ironique, car nous discutons du projet de loi C-76, qui vise à modifier la Loi électorale du Canada. Cette dernière met en place les balises, les barèmes, les conditions et les garanties de par lesquelles nous, les 338 députés, avons été élus par nos concitoyens pour siéger ici-même à la Chambre des communes. C'est quand même un projet de loi intéressant dont nous discutons en dernier ici, mais c'est aussi un peu paradoxal, comme mon collègue du NPD l'a si bien dit dans une question qu'il a posée au secrétaire parlementaire. Il lui a demandé pourquoi les libéraux déposaient ce projet de loi, qui semblait si important pour eux, à la hâte, après trois ans au pouvoir. La même version existait dans le projet de loi C-33 en 2015-2016, et les libéraux ont tardé à mettre en place ce projet de loi.
Puisque nous parlons du projet de loi C-76, qui vise la Loi électorale et la démocratie, je dois dire que je trouve dommage que seulement 6 amendements sur les 200 amendements présentés par les conservateurs en comité aient été acceptés.
Nous avons des doléances concrètes qui sont basées sur de vraies inquiétudes et même sur une opinion majoritaire. Je vais faire état à la Chambre des sondages que j'ai en main. J'aimerais quand même prendre une minute pour dire à tous mes collègues et à tous les concitoyens qui nous écoutent en ce moment sur CPAC ou ailleurs que depuis depuis que j'ai 15 ans, je caresse un rêve, soit celui d'être d'abord et avant tout au service des citoyens et des citoyennes du Canada. C'est pourquoi je me suis enrôlé dans les Forces armées canadiennes. C'est pourquoi je rêve de devenir député depuis l'âge de 15 ans. En 2015, j'ai eu l'honneur exceptionnel d'avoir la confiance de la majorité des 92 000 citoyens de la circonscription de Beauport—Limoilou. J'aimerais leur dire qu'à mes yeux, la Chambre des communes représente tout le contraire de ce que le premier ministre a dit hier. Il a dit que ce n'était qu'une salle.
Cela m'a déplu d'entendre cela, parce que la Chambre des communes, qui va fermer pour 15 ans dans quelques jours pour des rénovations, n'est pas juste une salle, comme l'a dit le premier ministre. Je trouve dommage qu'il ait employé ce mot. C'est la Chambre du peuple. C'est pour cela qu'elle est de couleur verte. Le vert représente le peuple et le rouge représente l'aristocratie, d'où la couleur rouge du Sénat.
J'espère que je ne me trompe pas. Les guides du Parlement pourraient peut-être m'en parler.
C'est dommage que le premier ministre dise que ce n'est pas le centre de la démocratie, parce que c'est faux. Je vais expliquer aux citoyens et aux citoyennes pourquoi c'est erroné de dire que le Parlement n'est pas le centre de la démocratie.
Le premier ministre avait raison de dire que la démocratie se vit partout, que ce soit dans les manifestations dans la rue, les réunions d'associations politiques ou les réunions syndicales. Bien entendu, la démocratie s'exerce dans ces lieux, mais le centre de la démocratie est ici parce que c'est ici que les élus siègent et qu'on vote les lois qui régissent absolument tout au pays. C'est ici également qu'on peut même changer la Constitution du pays. On ne peut pas changer la Constitution du pays à tout autre endroit ou dans le cadre de débats politiques dans une association politique ou d'une manifestation. Non, cela peut se faire seulement ici ou dans les autres assemblées législatives provinciales dans le pays. C'est dans ces seuls lieux qu'on peut véritablement faire des amendements et modifier le fonctionnement de la démocratie ou pallier les problématiques pour répondre aux enjeux courants. Oui, par définition, d'une manière pratique, c'est bel et bien ici que se situe le centre de la démocratie. Ce n'est pas, comme le premier ministre l'a dit, une simple salle parmi tant d'autres. Non, c'est la Chambre des communes.
Très rapidement, avant de retourner au projet de loi C-76, sur le mur est, on voit six sculptures. L'une parle du droit civil, l'autre de la liberté de parole, la troisième du Sénat, la quatrième du gouverneur général, la cinquième de la Confédération, de notre grand pays, et la sixième du vote. Sur le mur ouest sont représentés le bilinguisme, l'éducation, la Chambre des communes, le régime fiscal — c'est écrit « IMPÔT — TAX » en haut — le droit criminel et en dernier la communication. Toutes ces sculptures ne sont pas ici par hasard. Elles sont ici parce qu nous sommes au centre de la démocratie. Ces 12 sculptures représentent d'une manière ou d'une autre le fonctionnement de la fédération.
En ce qui a trait au projet de loi C-67, nous avons trois doléances principales.
Premièrement, le projet de loi C-76 prévoit de permettre à un Canadien ou à une Canadienne de se présenter à un bureau de vote avec une carte de l'électeur comme seul document. Comprenons-nous bien, une carte d'électeur, c'est le papier qu'on reçoit pour être enregistré à titre d'ayant droit pour voter. Dorénavant les libéraux vont permettre qu'une personne vienne voter seulement avec cette carte. Pour le moment, et jusqu'à nouvel ordre parce que la loi n'est pas encore passée, il faut présenter une carte d'identification de l'électeur pour voter.
Il y a des risques au fait de permettre que quelqu'un puisse voter sans carte d'identification comme un permis de conduire, une carte d'assurance-maladie ou un passeport. Premièrement, en 2015, plus de 1 million de cartes d'électeur étaient erronées. C'est quand même une préoccupation importante. Deuxièmement, il est facile de voter avec une simple carte erronée. Cela crée un grave problème. C'est sérieux. Il faut faire en sorte que le vote reste quelque chose de privilégié, de fort et de protégé et de sérieux au Canada.
La deuxième préoccupation qui fait en sorte que nous n'avons pas le choix de voter contre ce projet de loi — c'est ce qui me dérange le plus personnellement — c'est qu'on va permettre aux Canadiens qui vivent à l'extérieur du pays de voter peu importe depuis combien d'années ils vivent à l'extérieur du pays. Avant, il y avait une limite de cinq ans. En Australie, c'est six ans. Dans plein de pays, il y a des limites.
Là, les libéraux veulent faire en sorte que 1,4 million de Canadiens qui vivent à l'extérieur du pays, après même 20 ou 30 ans, puissent voter aux élections canadiennes. Ils vont même pouvoir choisir la circonscription dans laquelle ils veulent voter.
Se rend-t-on compte du pouvoir incroyable qu'on donne à un citoyen canadien qui ne vit pas au Canada depuis 20 ans? Il pourrait choisir une circonscription où le vote est très serré, selon le sondage, et il pourrait faire toute la différence dans la sélection du gouvernement.
Enfin, une troisième chose nous préoccupe dans ce projet de loi. On veut empêcher pendant la période préélectorale les tierces parties comme les groupes syndicaux d'engranger des gains monétaires venant des gens ou des groupes de l'extérieur du pays.
C'est bien, mais rien n'empêche que cela se fasse avant la période préélectorale. Les gens vont pouvoir encaisser les fonds et avoir l'argent de groupes de l'extérieur du pays avant que la période préélectorale débute.
Je remercie tous les Canadiens et toutes les Canadiennes qui nous écoutent de leur confiance. Au plaisir de se voir dans la circonscription la semaine prochaine.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-12-13 13:19 [p.24861]
Mr. Speaker, I am glad to know the member opposite had the same dream as I did, starting at age 15. I am glad to see that she went all the way to realizing this dream. Good for her. Marvellous.
The Liberals speak about this bill as if it is something fundamental, so why did they wait three years? We are three years into their mandate right now, three years of failures. We have three years of failure on the border, where we have almost 100,000 illegal border crossings happening right now. There is huge financial pressure on provincial governments to deal with this crisis. We have three years of failure concerning deficits. They promised that they would run a small $10-billion deficit, and now the Parliamentary Budget Officer, an institution created by Mr. Harper, something we should never forget, who brings accountability to the government every day he acts, has informed us this week that the deficit is way larger than what was announced two weeks ago. It will be about $26 billion just for 2018-19.
I completely disagree with the member. Yes, the right to vote is fundamental. However, the responsibility of the government is to make sure that voting is respected and protected for everyone.
Monsieur le Président, je me réjouis d'apprendre que la députée d'en face entretenait le même rêve que moi dès l'âge de 15 ans. Quel plaisir de voir que son rêve est devenu réalité. Tant mieux pour elle. C'est merveilleux.
Les libéraux parlent de ce projet de loi comme s'il s'agissait d'une mesure fondamentale. Force est de se demander alors pourquoi il leur a fallu trois ans avant de le présenter. Nous sommes maintenant dans la troisième année de leur mandat, qui, soit dit en passant, se caractérise par une succession d'échecs. Depuis trois ans, les échecs se succèdent à la frontière, puisque, à ce jour, près de 100 000 personnes sont entrées illégalement au Canada. Cette situation exerce d'énormes pressions financières sur les gouvernements provinciaux, qui doivent composer avec une crise migratoire. Nous avons également été témoins de trois années d'échecs au chapitre des déficits. Les libéraux avaient promis de limiter le déficit à 10 milliards de dollars, mais, aujourd'hui, le directeur parlementaire du budget — dont le poste a été créé par M. Harper, ce qu'il ne faudrait jamais oublier —, qui exige au quotidien que le gouvernement rende des comptes, a informé la Chambre cette semaine que l'ampleur du déficit dépasse considérablement ce qui a été annoncé il y a deux semaines. En fait, le déficit se chiffrera à quelque 26 milliards de dollars, uniquement pour l'exercice 2018-2019.
Enfin, je suis totalement en désaccord avec la députée. Le droit de vote est effectivement fondamental. Cependant, le gouvernement a la responsabilité de veiller à ce que ce droit soit respecté et à ce que tous les Canadiens puissent s'en prévaloir.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-12-13 13:22 [p.24862]
Mr. Speaker, as I said, from day one we contributed to this bill. We proposed over 200 amendments, and only six of them were accepted. It is disappointing to see that now the Liberals will be going forward without the acceptance of all members. We are talking about a bill that would have an impact on future elections. We should require all members to stand behind such an important bill. We think it should have been a must for the government to accept many more of our amendments.
Yes, with respect to what the member just told us, if those kinds of situations happened during the last election, which was completely unacceptable, why not give more powers to the election directorate if we are able to? Why was the government so negative toward all the other amendments we brought forward?
Monsieur le Président, comme je l'ai dit, nous avons tenté d'améliorer ce projet de loi depuis le début. Nous avons proposé plus de 200 amendements, mais seulement 6 d'entre eux ont été acceptés. C'est décevant de constater que les libéraux ont décidé de faire adopter ce projet de loi sans obtenir l'unanimité de la Chambre. On parle ici d'un projet de loi qui va avoir une incidence sur les prochaines élections. Il faudrait absolument que tous les députés approuvent un projet de loi aussi important. Nous sommes d'avis que le gouvernement aurait dû accepter un nombre beaucoup plus élevé de nos recommandations.
Pour en revenir aux propos du député, qui a dit que des situations totalement inacceptables s'étaient produites au cours des dernières élections, je pense que, effectivement, il faudrait accorder plus de pouvoirs au directeur général des élections, si c'est possible de le faire. Pourquoi le gouvernement a-t-il rejeté tous les autres amendements que nous avions proposés?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-12-13 14:35 [p.24873]
Mr. Speaker, I also really like history. During the financial crisis between 2008 and 2015, we released $80 billion from our economic action plan, we safeguarded 250,000 jobs and we posted the best performance of the OECD.
In 2015, the Prime Minister could not have been clearer when he said that the budget would be balanced in 2019. Not only did that not happen—which makes it a broken promise—but also the Liberals have no idea when the budget will be balanced. No government since 1867 has ever been so irresponsible with the public purse.
When will we see a balanced budget?
Monsieur le Président, moi aussi, j'aime bien l'histoire. Lors de la grande crise, entre 2008 et 2015, nous avons sorti 80 milliards de dollars de notre plan de relance économique, nous avons maintenu 250 000 emplois et nous avons eu la meilleure performance de l'OCDE.
En 2015, le premier ministre a été on ne peut plus clair en disant que le retour à l'équilibre budgétaire serait atteint en 2019. Non seulement ce n'est pas arrivé — c'est donc une promesse brisée —, mais les libéraux n'ont pas de date de retour à l'équilibre budgétaire. Depuis 1867, aucun gouvernement n'a eu une attitude aussi irresponsable à l'égard des finances publiques.
À quand le retour à l'équilibre budgétaire?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-27 16:41 [p.24089]
Madam Speaker, it is a bit unfortunate to notice that the parliamentary secretary cannot spontaneously speak without any notes about their supposedly great budget engagement.
I went out for a few seconds and I am sure I missed the point where the member said when his government would balance the budget. I am sure I missed that. The Liberals seem to want to be a responsible government, so I am sure I missed that point.
Could the member just repeat to me in which year the government will balance the budget?
Madame la Présidente, il est un peu malheureux de constater que le secrétaire parlementaire ne peut parler spontanément sans utiliser ses notes au sujet de leur prétendu engagement budgétaire important.
Je suis sorti quelques secondes et je suis sûr que j’ai manqué le moment où le député a dit quand son gouvernement allait équilibrer le budget. Je suis sûr que je l’ai manqué. Les libéraux semblent vouloir être un gouvernement responsable, alors je suis sûr que j’ai manqué ce moment important.
Le député pourrait-il me répéter en quelle année le gouvernement équilibrera le budget?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-27 16:46 [p.24090]
Madam Speaker, I would like to respond to something the member for Saanich—Gulf Islands said. She said the government always has iconic and historical engagement announcements. I have come to think that it is all the government is about. It is always historical, amazing, so great, but we have never in Canadian history seen a government spend so much money to do so little.
I am very happy to speak today in the House of Commons on behalf of the citizens of Beauport—Limoilou.
Centre Block will soon be closing for complete renovations for 10 or 15 years. I wanted to mention that. There is no cause for concern, however, because we will be moving to West Block. I will therefore be able to continue to speak on behalf of my constituents.
Today I am discussing Bill C-86, a second act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 27, 2018 and other measures.
I will focus on the fact that the members of the Conservative Party are extremely disappointed with the bill. We have witnessed a string of broken promises over the past three years. It is a little ironic that the hon. member for Papineau, the current head of the Liberal government, said during the election campaign that he wanted to do something to make people less cynical of politics, to help them have more confidence in politicians, in the ability of the executive branch, the legislative branch and members of Parliament to do things that are good for Canadians and especially to respect the major promises formally made during the campaign.
A group of researchers at Laval University have created what they call the Vote Compass. It shows the number of promises kept and broken by the provincial and federal governments.
I remember that, to their chagrin, a few months before the 2015 election, the research institute had to acknowledge that 97% of all promises made by Mr. Harper during the 2011 election campaign had been kept.
The Liberal government elected in 2015 broke three major promises and is continuing to break them in the 2018 budget. These were not trifling promises. They were major promises that were to set the guidelines for how the government was to behave and for the results Canadians would see.
The Canadians we talk to are familiar with the three major promises, since I often repeat them. I have to, because this is serious.
The Liberals promised to limit themselves to minor $10-billion deficits in the first two years and a $6-billion deficit in the third year.
What did they do? The first year, they posted a deficit of $30 billion. The second year, they posted a deficit of $20 billion. This year, the deficit is $18 billion, or three times what was announced.
That is the first broken promise, and it was not just some promise that was jotted down on the back of a napkin. In any case, I hope not. In fact, I remember quite well that the promise was made from a crane in the midst of the election campaign. The member for Papineau was in Toronto, standing on a crane when he said that he would run deficits to pay for infrastructure. That is the second broken promise. He said that the $10 billion a year in deficits would be used to inject more money into infrastructure. However, of the $60 billion in deficits this government has racked up to date, only $9 billion has gone to infrastructure. That is another problem, another broken promise.
That is why I was saying earlier that we have rarely seen, in the history of Canada, a government spend so much money for so few results. This is probably the first time we have seen this sort of thing.
I will give an example. He said that he would invest $10 billion in infrastructure in 2017, but he invested only $3 billion and yet racked up a deficit of $20 billion. Where did the other $17 billion go? It was used for all sorts of different things in order to satisfy very specific interest groups who take great pleasure in and boast ad nauseam about the Liberal ideology.
The third broken promise is an extremely important and strategic one. In fact, it was so obvious that we did not even really think of it as a promise before.
All Canadian governments, in a totally responsible manner and without questioning it, traditionally endorsed this practice. If there was a deficit, the document would indicate the date by which the budget would be balanced. There was a repayment date, just as there is for anyone in Canada. When the families of Beauport—Limoilou, many of whom are watching today, want to buy a car or appliance, such as a washer or dryer, not only does the seller ask them to get a bank loan, but he also asks them to sign a paper that indicates when the debt will be repaid in full.
Thus, it is quite normal to indicate when the budget will be balanced. We have been asking that question for three years, but what is even more interesting is that the Liberals had promised that the budget would be balanced in 2019, and now there are 45 days remaining in 2018. Telling us when the budget will be balanced is the least the Liberals could do.
There are consequences to running up large deficits, however. The Liberal government has been accumulating gigantic deficits at a time when the global economy is doing rather well, although forecasts indicate that we will enter a recession in the next 12 months. Although times are tough in Alberta and Ontario, where General Motors just closed a plant, the situation is positive. There are regions in Canada that are suffering tremendously, but the global economic context is nevertheless healthy. Knock on wood, which is everywhere in the House of Commons.
The first serious mistake is to run up deficits when times are good. When the global economy is doing well and our financial institutions are making money, we have to put money aside for an emergency fund and an assistance fund, especially for the employees of General Motors who lost their jobs and for all families in the riding of my Alberta colleague who have lost their jobs in the oil sector.
We have to have an emergency fund for the next economic crisis because that is how our capitalist system works. There are ups and downs. That is human nature. It is random. Agreements are signed, things are done, progress is made, and there are ups and downs. The current positive situation has been going on for five or six years now, so we need to be prepared. That is why growing the deficit during good economic times can have very serious consequences.
I would like to talk about another serious consequence, and I am sure this will strike a chord with the people of Beauport—Limoilou who are listening to us now. Does anyone know how many billions of dollars the government spends on federal health transfers? It is $33 billion per year. To service the debt, to pay back people around the world who lend us money, we spent $37 billion last year. We spent $4 billion more on servicing our debt than on health transfers.
An hon. member: That is shameful.
Mr. Alupa Clarke: Yes, Madam Speaker, it is shameful. It sure looks like bad management of public affairs. It makes no sense, and I am sure Canadians agree. I am sure they are sick and tired of hearing us talk about $10-billion, $20-billion, $30-billion deficits and so on.
Canada's total debt is now $670 billion. My fellow Canadians, that means that, at this point in time, your family owes $47,000. That is a debt you will have to pay.
The Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage was very proud to announce that the government was giving nearly $6,000 a year per child, through the Canada child benefit, to people earning less than $45,000 a year. They are not giving money away, however; they are buying votes, which is unfortunate, since the very children this money is helping will end up having to pay it back. This is completely unacceptable on the part of the government.
I am proud to be part of a former Conservative government that was responsible, that granted benefits without running deficits and that also managed to balance the budget.
Madame la Présidente, j’aimerais réagir à quelque chose qu’a dit la députée de Saanich—Gulf Islands. Elle a dit que le gouvernement avait toujours des mesures symboliques et sans précédent à annoncer. J’en suis venu à penser que c’est tout ce que ce gouvernement fait. C’est toujours sans précédent, incroyable, extraordinaire, mais nous n’avons jamais vu dans l’histoire du Canada un gouvernement dépenser tant d’argent pour si peu de résultats.
Je suis très content de prendre aujourd'hui la parole à la Chambre des communes, au nom des citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou.
L'édifice du Centre va bientôt fermer durant 10 ou 15 ans, parce que tout sera rénové. Je tenais à le dire. Cependant, il n'y a pas de crainte à avoir, parce que nous allons déménager à l'édifice de l'Ouest. Je vais donc pouvoir continuer à débattre au nom de mes concitoyens.
Aujourd'hui, je prends la parole pour discuter du projet de loi C-86, Loi no 2 portant exécution de certaines dispositions du budget déposé au Parlement le 27 février 2018 et mettant en oeuvre d'autres mesures.
Je vais mettre l'accent sur le fait que les députés du Parti conservateur sont extrêmement déçus du projet de loi sur le budget. Depuis trois ans, on voit une série de promesses rompues. Ce qui est un peu paradoxal, c'est que le député de Papineau, l'actuel chef du gouvernement libéral, avait dit, pendant la campagne électorale, qu'il voulait faire en sorte que les gens soient moins cyniques envers la politique, que les gens croient plus en leurs politiciens, en la capacité de l'exécutif, du législatif et des représentants politiques d'effectuer des choses qui sont bonnes pour les gens et surtout de respecter les promesses phares faites en bonne et due forme lors de la campagne électorale.
À l'Université Laval, un groupe de recherche a créé ce qu'on appelle la Boussole électorale. Cela permet de connaître le nombre de promesses tenues ou non tenues par les gouvernements provinciaux et fédéral.
Je me rappelle que, quelques mois avant l'élection de 2015, à leur grand dam, cet institut de recherche avait dû confirmer que 97 % des promesses faites par M. Harper pendant la campagne de 2011 avaient été tenues.
Le gouvernement libéral de 2015 a rompu trois grandes promesses, et il continue de le faire dans le budget 2018. Il ne s'agit pas de promesse de pacotille, mais bien de promesses structurantes qui devaient permettre de fixer les balises quant à la façon dont le gouvernement allait se conduire et aux résultats pour les Canadiens.
Les citoyens qui nous écoutent connaissent ces trois grandes promesses, car je les répète souvent. Il faut le faire, parce que c'est grave.
Les libéraux avaient promis de faire seulement de petits déficits de 10 milliards de dollars durant les deux premières années et un déficit de 6 milliards de dollars la troisième année.
Qu'est-ce que nous avons vu? La première année, ils ont fait un déficit de 30 milliards de dollars. La deuxième année, ils ont fait un déficit de 20 milliards de dollars. Cette année, ils font un déficit trois fois plus élevé que ce qui était prévu, c'est-à-dire un déficit de 18 milliards de dollars.
C'est donc une première promesse rompue. On s'entend quand même pour dire qu'il ne s'agit pas d'une promesse faite sur le coin d'une table. En tout cas, je l'espère bien. En fait, je me rappelle très bien que la promesse a été faite sur une grue, en pleine campagne électorale. Le député de Papineau était à Toronto, sur une grue, quand il a dit qu'il ferait des déficits en faveur de l'infrastructure. Voilà la deuxième promesse rompue. Il a dit que les déficits de 10 milliards de dollars par année serviraient injecter davantage d'argent dans les infrastructures. Or sur les 60 milliards de dollars de déficit engrangés jusqu'à présent, seulement 9 milliards de dollars ont été dans les infrastructures. Voilà un autre point faible, une autre promesse rompue.
C'est pour la raison pour laquelle je disais plus tôt, en anglais, qu'on a rarement vu, dans l'histoire du Canada — c'est probablement la première fois qu'on le voit de cette manière —, un gouvernement dépenser autant pour en arriver à si peu de résultats.
Je vais donner un exemple. Il avait dit qu'il investirait 10 milliards de dollars dans les infrastructures en 2017, alors qu'il a investi seulement 3 milliards de dollars et qu'il a fait un déficit de 20 milliards de dollars. Où sont passés les 17 milliards de dollars? Ils ont servi à toutes sortes de fins pour satisfaire des groupes d'intérêt très précis qui se complaisent et se gargarisent à n'en plus finir dans l'idéologie libérale.
La troisième promesse rompue est une promesse structurante extrêmement importante. D'ailleurs, c'est une promesse qui, auparavant, n'était pas une promesse tellement cela allait de soi.
Tous les gouvernements canadiens, de manière tout à fait responsable et sans se poser de questions, adhéraient traditionnellement à cette pratique. Dans un budget, on indiquait, si déficit il y avait, une date de retour à l'équilibre budgétaire. Il y avait une date butoir, comme pour n'importe qui au Canada. Lorsque les familles de Beauport—Limoilou, qui nous écoutent en grand nombre, veulent s'acheter une voiture ou un appareil ménager, comme une laveuse ou une sécheuse, non seulement le vendeur leur demande de contracter un prêt à la banque, mais il leur demande aussi de signer un papier indiquant la date où la dette sera remboursée au complet.
Il n'y a donc rien de plus naturel que d'indiquer quand l'équilibre budgétaire sera atteint. Nous posons la question depuis trois ans, mais ce qui est encore plus intéressant, c'est que les libéraux avaient promis que l'équilibre budgétaire serait atteint en 2019, alors qu'il ne reste que 45 jours à l'année 2018. Ce serait la moindre des choses que les libéraux nous disent la date du retour à l'équilibre budgétaire.
Par ailleurs, quelles sont les conséquences de ces déficits importants? Le gouvernement libéral cumule des déficits gargantuesques dans une période économique mondiale plutôt favorable, bien que toutes les prévisions indiquent qu'on va tomber en récession d'ici 12 mois. Même s'il y a des situations difficiles en Alberta et en Ontario, où General Motors a fermé une usine, la situation est favorable. Il y a des régions du Canada qui souffrent énormément, mais le contexte économique mondial est quand même en santé. Touchons du bois; il y en a partout à la Chambre des communes.
La première erreur grave consiste donc à cumuler des déficits dans une bonne période. Lorsque nous sommes dans un contexte économique favorable sur le plan mondial et que nos institutions financières et le gouvernement font du fric, il faut mettre de l'argent de côté pour avoir des fonds d'urgence et des fonds d'aide, notamment pour les familles des employés de General Motors qui ont perdu leur emploi et pour toutes les familles de la circonscription de mon collègue de l'Alberta qui ont perdu leur emploi dans le secteur pétrolier.
Il faut surtout des fonds d'urgence pour la prochaine crise économique, puisque tel est fait notre système capitaliste: il y a des hauts et des bas. C'est la nature humaine. C'est aléatoire. On fait des ententes, on fait des choses, on avance et il y a des hauts et des bas. La situation favorable actuelle dure depuis cinq ou six ans, alors il faudrait se préparer. Voilà pourquoi cumuler des déficits dans un climat économique plutôt favorable a des conséquences très graves.
Je vais parler d'une autre conséquence grave, et je crois que cela va frapper l'imaginaire des citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent. Sait-on combien de milliards de dollars on consacre chaque année aux transferts fédéraux en santé? C'est 33 milliards de dollars par année. Quant au service de la dette, soit la somme que l'on doit rembourser aux gens de partout dans le monde qui nous prêtent de l'argent, on y a consacré 37 milliards de dollars l'année passée. On a donc consacré 4 milliards de dollars de plus au service de la dette qu'aux transferts en santé.
Une voix: C'est une honte.
M. Alupa Clarke: Oui, madame la Présidente, c'est une honte. De toute évidence, c'est une mauvaise gestion des affaires publiques. Cela n'a pas de sens et je suis convaincu que les Canadiens sont du même avis. Je suis convaincu qu'ils sont tannés de nous entendre parler des déficits de 10 milliards de dollars, de 20 milliards de dollars, de 30 milliards de dollars, etc.
D'autre part, la dette totale du Canada se chiffre à 670 milliards de dollars. Chers Canadiens, cela veut dire que vous avez une dette personnelle familiale de 47 000 $ en ce moment. C'est une dette que vous devez payer.
Le secrétaire parlementaire du ministre du Patrimoine canadien était très fier de dire que le gouvernement envoyait, par l'entremise de l'Allocation canadienne pour enfants, près de 6 000 $ par année par enfant aux personnes qui gagnent moins de 45 000 $ par année. Ce n'est pas donner de l'argent, c'est acheter des votes. C'est malheureux, car cet argent va devoir être remboursé par les mêmes enfants qui en bénéficient présentement. C'est complètement inacceptable d'agir de cette manière.
Personnellement, je suis fier d'appartenir à un ancien gouvernement conservateur qui était responsable, qui a consenti des allocations sans faire de déficits et qui a réussi à atteindre l'équilibre budgétaire.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-27 16:59 [p.24091]
Madam Speaker, I will respond to that, because the Conservatives do not hide and we are not afraid of the truth.
The fact is that the MP for Papineau, the Liberals' leader, the Prime Minister presently, said during the last campaign that never in the world would he present an omnibus bill. There was no nuance. It was, “no omnibus bill, ever”. The fact is that it is the biggest omnibus bill we have ever seen in this Parliament. It is bigger than an elephant. Seriously, it is huge. It is over 800 pages.
The blunt fact is that we were not ashamed of putting forward omnibus bills, because Canadians wanted the House to be efficient. Canadians wanted the House to go forward to make changes when necessary. Sometimes, when we had to debate every article, it did not go fast enough for the quickly changing pace of the world and all the needs of the Canadian people.
Right now the member is trying to engage with people to try to hide the fact that the Liberals are doing omnibus bills. They are ashamed of it.
Madame la Présidente, je vais répondre à cela parce que les conservateurs ne se cachent pas et n'ont pas peur de la vérité.
Le fait est que le député de Papineau, le chef du Parti libéral, le premier ministre actuel, a dit au cours de la dernière campagne électorale qu’il ne présenterait jamais de sa vie un projet de loi omnibus. Il n’y avait aucune nuance. C’était « pas de projet de loi omnibus, jamais ». Le fait est qu’il s’agit du plus important projet de loi omnibus que nous ayons jamais vu au cours de cette législature. C’est plus gros qu’un éléphant. Sérieusement, c’est énorme. Il compte plus de 800 pages.
En réalité, nous n’avions pas honte de présenter des projets de loi omnibus parce que les Canadiens voulaient que la Chambre soit efficace. Les Canadiens voulaient que la Chambre aille de l’avant pour apporter des changements nécessaires. Parfois, lorsque nous devions débattre de chaque article, nous n’allions pas assez vite pour tenir compte de l’évolution rapide du monde et de tous les besoins de la population canadienne.
À l’heure actuelle, le député essaie de divertir les gens pour essayer de cacher le fait que les libéraux présentent des projets de loi omnibus. Ils ont honte de ce qu’ils font.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-27 17:01 [p.24092]
Madam Speaker, I personally believe we should ensure that workers pensions are protected when a company files for bankruptcy.
As a society, we cannot tell workers who have worked for 30 or 40 years and who were counting on a pension that, all of a sudden, for purely capitalist reasons, their pension will be slashed.
There are people in my riding who suffered a great deal when White Birch Paper almost went under. There were unbelievable cuts to employees’ pensions. The only comfort I could find when I met with the people on the board of White Birch Paper, which employed 400 people, was when they told me that their pensions had been cut as well.
The NDP is working hard on this. Good for them, because it is an important issue.
Madame la Présidente, personnellement, je pense qu'on devrait protéger les pensions des travailleurs lorsqu'une entreprise fait faillite.
En tant que société, on ne peut pas se permettre de dire à des travailleurs qui ont travaillé pendant 30 ou 40 ans et qui avaient l'espoir d'avoir une pension que tout à coup, à cause de décisions purement capitalistes, leur pension sera coupée de manière importante.
Il y a des gens de ma circonscription qui ont extrêmement souffert quand Papiers White Birch a presque fait faillite. Il y a eu d'incroyables coupes relativement aux pensions. La seule chose qui m'a réconforté lorsque j'ai rencontré les gens du conseil d'administration de Papiers White Birch, qui employait 400 personnes, c'est qu'ils m'ont dit que leur pension avait aussi été coupée.
Effectivement, le NPD travaille fort sur ce dossier. C'est tant mieux pour eux car c'est quelque chose d'important.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-27 17:16 [p.24094]
Madam Speaker, I am sure that the member must have skipped one of the paragraphs in his speech where he was intending to announce when the government would balance the budget. That has always been the case in Canada's history. Maybe he could check his speech once more. All of my constituents are calling non-stop every single day about when the budget will be balanced.
Madame la Présidente, je suis convaincu que le député a sauté le paragraphe dans son discours où il prévoyait annoncer que le gouvernement rétablirait l'équilibre budgétaire. Au cours de l'histoire du Canada, le gouvernement a toujours précisé quand il comptait revenir à l'équilibre. Il devrait peut-être vérifier son discours. Les gens de ma circonscription ne cessent de téléphoner à mon bureau quotidiennement pour demander quand l'équilibre budgétaire sera rétabli.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie should stop misleading the House.
The Prime Minister said that he has spoken with the Premier of Ontario about this critical situation GM employees find themselves in.
After playing partisan games on the backs of Franco-Ontarians for a week, did he at least address this language issue with the Premier of Ontario?
Monsieur le Président, la ministre du Tourisme, des Langues officielles et de la Francophonie devrait cesser d'induire la Chambre en erreur.
Tout à l'heure, le premier ministre a confirmé qu'il a parlé avec le premier ministre de l'Ontario en ce qui concerne l'enjeu très important des travailleurs et des travailleuses de l'usine General Motors.
Après avoir fait de la partisanerie pendant une semaine sur le dos des Franco-Ontariens, a-t-il au moins abordé cette question linguistique avec le premier ministre de l'Ontario?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-23 11:55 [p.23821]
Mr. Speaker, the third link project is very important, not only for traffic, but also for the economic development of the greater Quebec City region.
I do not think I am mistaken in saying that the hon. member for Louis-Hébert has said on the radio many times that he supports the third link project. However, his leader has just appointed a new advisor, Steven Guilbeault, who is fiercely opposed to the third link project.
I would like to give the hon. member for Louis-Hébert the opportunity to tell us today whether he has concerns in that regard and whether he still supports the third link, as he has done on the radio.
Monsieur le Président, le projet du troisième lien est très important, non seulement pour le trafic mais aussi pour le développement économique de la grande région de la ville de Québec.
Je ne pense pas me tromper lorsque je dis que le député de Louis-Hébert a dit à maintes reprises à la radio qu'il était en faveur du projet du troisième lien. Toutefois, son chef a nommé un nouveau conseiller, M. Steven Guilbeault, qui se dit farouchement contre le projet du troisième lien.
J'aimerais donner l'occasion au député de Louis-Hébert de nous dire aujourd'hui s'il a des inquiétudes à cet égard et s'il appuie toujours le troisième lien, comme il l'a fait à la radio.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-23 11:56 [p.23822]
Mr. Speaker, it is a shame the member for Louis-Hébert was unable to answer the question. The minister said he would take a very close look at it. This is no longer hypothetical. It is going to happen. It is on the CAQ government's agenda.
Will they support the project once it is ready to go? Can they tell us right now if they support it, yes or no?
Monsieur le Président, c'est dommage que le député de Louis-Hébert n'ait pas pu répondre à la question. Le ministre a dit qu'il regarderait cela avec beaucoup d'intérêt. Ce n'est plus hypothétique, cela va se faire. C'est à l'ordre du jour du gouvernement caquiste.
Une fois que le projet va être là, vont-ils l'appuyer? Dès maintenant, peuvent-ils nous dire s'ils l'appuient, oui ou non?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-23 12:11 [p.23824]
Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order regarding the following statements made by the Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie. On Thursday, November 22, she said:
It has been seven days since Ontario's Conservative government cut services for Franco-Ontarians, but so far, no one in the Conservative Party has condemned what is happening in Ontario. That is unacceptable.
Page 63, 22nd edition of Erskine May, refers to a resolution passed by the U.K. House of Commons: ministers have a duty to Parliament to account, and to be held to account, for the policies, decisions and actions of their departments; it is of paramount importance that ministers give accurate and truthful information to Parliament. Erskine May then states that ministers must correct the record at the earliest opportunity.
I would also like to draw the Speaker's attention to the Prime Minister's message to his cabinet ministers in the document “Open and Accountable Government”.
[Ministers must] answer honestly and accurately about [their] areas of responsibility [and] correct any inadvertent errors in answering to Parliament at the earliest opportunity...
The Minister's statement fails to reference my public condemnation and that of the political lieutenant—
Monsieur le Président, j'invoque le Règlement relativement à ces déclarations faites par la ministre du Tourisme, des Langues officielles et de la Francophonie le jeudi 22 novembre:
Je vais le dire dans la langue de Molière et dans la langue de Shakespeare: cela fait sept jours, seven days, que le gouvernement conservateur en Ontario a coupé les services aux Franco-Ontariens et sept jours qu'il n'y a personne sur les bancs du Parti conservateur qui dénonce exactement ce qui se passe en Ontario. C'est inacceptable.
À la page 63 de la 22e édition de son ouvrage, Erskine May nous renvoie à cette résolution adoptée par la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni: les ministres doivent rendre compte au Parlement des politiques, des décisions et des actes de leurs ministères; il est de la plus haute importante que les ministres fournissent des renseignements précis et justes au Parlement. M. Erskine May dit ensuite que les ministres doivent rectifier les faits à la première occasion.
J'aimerais également attirer l'attention du Président sur le message qu'adresse le premier ministre à ses ministres dans le document intitulé « Pour un gouvernement ouvert et responsable »:
[Les ministres doivent] répondre avec honnêteté et exactitude aux questions concernant [leurs] secteurs de responsabilité [et] corriger toute erreur involontaire en répondant au Parlement le plus rapidement possible [...]
La déclaration de la ministre omet les dénonciations publiques faites par moi-même ainsi que le lieutenant politique...
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-22 14:56 [p.23780]
Mr. Speaker, for the past year, the members for Québec and Louis-Hébert have been parading around Quebec City talking about how they are going to help create a third link.
Yesterday, the Liberals hired an adviser, Steven Guilbeault, who has said he is officially against the third link. A third link is important to Beauport—Limoilou, Quebec City, and the economic development of the whole region.
Are the Liberals for or against a third link in Quebec City?
Monsieur le Président, cela fait un an que le député de Québec et le député de Louis-Hébert se pavanent dans la ville de Québec en disant qu'ils vont aider à la création d'un troisième lien.
Hier, les libéraux ont engagé un conseiller, M. Steven Guilbeault, qui s'est dit officiellement contre le troisième lien. Un troisième lien, c'est important pour Beauport—Limoilou, pour la ville de Québec et pour le développement économique de la grande région de la Vieille Capitale.
Est-ce que les libéraux sont contre ou pour le troisième lien à Québec?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-22 15:08 [p.23782]
Mr. Speaker, I have an obligation to tell you that the Minister of Official Languages misled the House today in question period when she claimed that no Conservative members of the House have publicly criticized the Ford government's actions in front of the cameras.
I did so, as did several members—
Monsieur le Président, je suis dans l'obligation de vous dire que la ministre des Langues officielles a induit la Chambre en erreur aujourd'hui, pendant la période de questions, lorsqu'elle a prétendu qu'aucun député conservateur de la Chambre n'avait dénoncé les actions du gouvernement Ford publiquement devant les caméras.
Cela a été fait par moi-même et par plusieurs députés...
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-19 15:52 [p.23587]
Mr. Speaker, I must be mistaken, or maybe I went outside to the lobby, but I must have missed the part of the hon. member's speech when he was talking about when the government will balance the budget. I have never seen a budget speech that did not include a date, or anything like a date, confirming when the budget would be balanced. Therefore, I would like the member to rectify the situation. I must have been somewhere else or not listening. I am very sorry. When will the government balance the budget?
Monsieur le Président, peut-être que je fais erreur, ou peut-être que j'étais sorti dans l'antichambre, mais j'ai raté la partie du discours du député où il parlait du moment où le gouvernement équilibrerait le budget. Je n'ai jamais entendu de discours du budget qui ne compte une date, ou quelque chose de similaire, indiquant quand le budget serait équilibré. J'aimerais donc que le député rectifie la situation. Je devais être ailleurs ou je n'écoutais pas. Je suis vraiment désolé. Quand le gouvernement équilibrera-t-il le budget?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-19 16:03 [p.23589]
Mr. Speaker, as usual, I am very pleased to rise today.
Without further delay, I would like to inform the House that I will be sharing my time with the hon. member for Barrie—Innisfil.
As always, I extend my warmest greetings to the many people in Beauport—Limoilou who are watching us today.
Today's debate is very interesting. An opposition motion was moved in the House by the Conservative Party, of which I am of course a member. It reads as follows, and I quote:
That the House call on the government to tell Canadians in what year the budget will be balanced, and to do so in this week’s Fall Economic Statement.
Canadians may be wondering what is happening and how it is possible that we still do not know when the government will balance the budget. That has always been a basic concept for me, even before I got into politics.
It seems to me that any reasonable, responsible government, whether it be Liberal or Conservative—and I was going to add NDP, but that has not happened yet at the federal level—with nothing to hide should indicate in its policy statement, budget, and everyday political messaging a date on which it will balance the budget, or at least a concrete timeframe for doing so.
There are two rather surprising things about the Liberals' refusal to give us a timeframe for returning to a balanced budget. There are two historic elements with regard to the practice that they are currently using.
As the hon. member for Louis-Saint-Laurent keeps saying, we have never seen a government run a deficit outside wartime or outside an economic crisis.
According to Keynesian economics, it is normal to run deficits. Keynes made some mistakes in several of his analyses, but there is one analysis he did that several governments have been adhering to for 60 years now. According to his analysis, when an international economic crisis is having an impact on every industrialized country in the world, it is not a bad idea for the government to invest heavily in its community, in its largest industries, in every industrial region of the country, to ensure that jobs are maintained and that there is some economic vitality despite the crisis.
For example, we Conservatives ran a few deficits in 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011 because the country was going through the worst economic crisis ever, the greatest recession since the 1930s.
Our reaction was responsible. Why? First, because there was a major global recession. Second, because even though we were a Conservative government, we embraced Keynesianism because we felt it made good economic sense. Through our strategic reinvestment plan, we managed to maintain 200,000 jobs. Not only did we maintain jobs across Canada, but we also repaired infrastructure, bridges and overpasses.
Two years ago, when I was a member of the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates, I read a report that noted this was the first time an economic recovery and stimulus plan had been implemented so quickly. In three or four years, we invested $80 billion in infrastructure to help Canada weather some rough economic times.
The first surprise from the Liberals was that they ran up massive deficits of $20 billion this year, $20 billion last year, and $30 billion in 2015-16, even though there is no major crisis or war going on.
There is a second surprising thing. Let us go back to the time when lords were waging wars against the king of England, which is in the 13th century. In 1215, the Magna Carta resulted from several confrontations between the lords, the capitalist bourgeoisie and the aristocracy, all pleading for their interests with the king. The idea was to create an assembly where they could present their admonitions and complaints to the king and could limit the outrageous sums the king wanted to spend on the holy crusades. That is when our parliamentary system was born.
When I was first elected to the House of Commons, I learned Parliament's primary function. My university professors knew I liked philosophy, but they said I would soon come to realize that, in the House of Commons, discussions are about money, the economy, the country's economic situation and public finances. I learned that, in the House of Commons, debates are almost entirely about public finances.
That is as it should be, since the philosophical and political foundations of the British parliamentary system are accountability and the principle of responsible government allowing citizens to know what their money is used for. In those days, it was the capitalist bourgeoisie who wanted to know, whereas nowadays all citizens expect it. Nevertheless, the process and the principle remain the same. We want to know what happens with our money. Why are there deficits, if any, and most importantly when is the government going to balance the budget? Deficits involve our money, and it is commendable and reasonable to know when the budget will be balanced.
My colleague from Longueuil—Saint-Hubert was just saying how absurd this is. What would a government MP do if an ordinary Canadian asked him to simply tell him when his party would balance the budget? For three years, members of Parliament have not really been allowed to answer such a question, yet it is quite a normal question. They have to come up with foolish answers, think about something else or say that everything is fine because they have been cutting taxes, when in fact each citizen in Beauport—Limoilou pays $800 more every year in income tax.
That amounts to almost $2,000 per family, not to mention the tax credits they axed, the oil that is not being shipped out of the country, all the cuts in exports to the U.S., all the U.S. investment in Canada that has been lost while Canadian investment in the U.S. has increased, not to mention the fact that household debt is at an all-time high. The OECD remarked on this recently. In short, I could go on for a long time without even talking about the USMCA.
Nonetheless, there are some surprising things. What is incredible, and I repeat this every time I give a speech about Canada's economy, is that, in 2015, the Liberals were smart enough and had enough honour to explain why they were running a deficit even though we were not at war or in an economic crisis. At the time, the member for Papineau, under a gigantic crane in Toronto—I remember watching on television from my campaign office in Beauport—Limoilou and that it was partly cloudy and it rained a little—announced to Canadians that the Liberals would run a deficit of $10 billion in the first two years and then a deficit of $6 billion in the third year. He promised a deficit. Everyone was surprised that he was promising a deficit. It was a first.
He added that the Liberals would run a deficit in order to invest in infrastructure, which, he said, had been abandoned, and to invest more in infrastructure in general across the country. At least he was consistent in his comments once he was elected. He announced that they were creating a historic infrastructure plan—everything is always historic with them—worth $187 billion, which is not bad either. That was a continuation of what we had done. We had invested $80 billion over the course of the six previous years. It is only natural to continue to invest in infrastructure in Canada. Some even claim that Canada exists thanks to the railroad. Infrastructure has always been foundational here in Canada.
However, the Parliamentary Budget Officer—which, I repeat every time, as we must not forget, is an institution created by Mr. Harper, a great democrat who wanted there to be an independent body in Parliament to constantly hold the government to account—informed us in a report that, of the $187 billion invested in infrastructure, only $9 billion has actually been spent over the past three years. If I am not mistaken, $9 billion divided by three is $3 billion. The Liberals have invested $3 billion a year in infrastructure, and yet, they ran a $30-billion deficit in the first year.
Let us not forget that the $10-billion deficit was supposed to be for infrastructure. However, in their first year in office, the Liberals ran a $30-billion deficit and only $3 billion of that went to infrastructure. The second year, they ran a $20-billion deficit with only $3 billion for infrastructure, and they did the same again this year. Obviously, we have never seen a government put so much energy into spending so much money in such a reckless and dishonourable way while achieving so little for the economic well-being of the country and Canadians at home.
In closing, setting a deadline for paying off debt is something that Canadian families do at home all the time, for example when paying off their mortgages or their car loans. When people borrow money for a car, the dealer does not just say, “Have a good day, sir. See you around.” He tells them that they need to take out a bank loan and that they have four years to pay it back. There is a deadline for all sorts of things like that.
When will a balanced budget be achieved?
Monsieur le Président, je suis très content de prendre la parole aujourd'hui, comme d'habitude.
Sans plus tarder, j'aimerais informer la Chambre que je vais partager mon temps de parole avec l'honorable député de Barrie—Innisfil.
Comme toujours, je salue chaleureusement tous les citoyens et toutes les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent actuellement en grand nombre.
Aujourd'hui, c'est intéressant. Une motion d'opposition a été présentée à la Chambre par le Parti conservateur, dont je fais partie, bien entendu. La motion se lit comme suit:
Que la Chambre demande au gouvernement de dire aux Canadiens en quelle année l’équilibre budgétaire sera rétabli et de l’annoncer lors de son énoncé économique de l’automne présenté cette semaine.
Les citoyens se demandent peut-être ce qui se passe et comment c'est possible qu'on ne sache pas encore quand l'équilibre budgétaire sera atteint. C'était, pour moi, une notion de base, avant même d'entrer en politique.
Il me semble que tout gouvernement le moindrement raisonnable, responsable, qu'il soit libéral ou conservateur — j'allais aussi dire néo-démocrate, mais ce n'est pas encore le cas au fédéral —, et n'ayant rien à cacher devrait mettre en avant, dans son énoncé politique, dans son budget et dans ses discours politiques de tous les jours, une date de retour à l'équilibre budgétaire, ou au moins une échéance concrète pour y parvenir.
Il y a deux choses assez surprenantes au sujet du fait que les libéraux ne veulent pas nous faire part d'une échéance concernant le retour à l'équilibre budgétaire. Il y a deux éléments historiques à l'égard de la pratique qu'ils utilisent actuellement.
Comme le député de Louis-Saint-Laurent le dit chaque fois, jamais on n'a vu un gouvernement faire des déficits sans être en situation soit de guerre, soit de crise économique.
D'après ce qu'on a appris de l'économiste Keynes, le père du keynésianisme, il est normal de faire des déficits. Il a fait quelques erreurs dans plusieurs de ses analyses, mais il y a une analyse qu'il a faite et que plusieurs gouvernements suivent depuis déjà 60 ans. Selon son analyse, quand des crises économiques internationales ont des conséquences sur tous les pays industrialisés du monde, ce n'est pas une mauvaise chose que le gouvernement investisse massivement dans sa communauté, dans ses industries les plus importantes, dans chacune des régions industrielles du pays, pour faire en sorte que les emplois soient maintenus et qu'il y ait une certaine vitalité économique, malgré la crise.
Par exemple, nous, les conservateurs, avons accusé quelques déficits lors des années 2008, 2009, 2010 et 2011, parce que le pays faisait face à la plus grave crise économique, à la plus grande récession de l'histoire depuis les années 1930.
Nous y avons répondu de manière responsable. Pourquoi? En premier lieu, c'est parce qu'il y avait une raison fondamentale, soit une récession majeure internationale. En deuxième lieu, même si nous étions un gouvernement conservateur, nous avons épousé le keynésianisme en disant qu'il s'agissait d'une position économique sensée. Nous avons investi au moyen du plan stratégique de réinvestissement et nous avons maintenu 200 000 emplois. Non seulement nous avons permis de garder des emplois partout au Canada, mais nous avons aussi réparé des infrastructures, des ponts et des viaducs.
J'ai lu un rapport, il y a deux ans, alors que je siégeais au Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires. Le rapport faisait état du fait que c'était la première fois qu'on voyait un plan de relance et de stimulation économique se faire aussi rapidement. En trois ou quatre ans, nous avons investi 80 milliards de dollars dans les infrastructures et pour aider l'économie canadienne, dans des périodes houleuses sur le plan économique.
La première chose surprenante que font les libéraux, c'est de nous amener dans une période déficitaire assez importante avec un déficit de 20 milliards de dollars cette année, 20 milliards de dollars l'année passée, 30 milliards de dollars en 2015-2016, alors qu'il n'y a pas de crise ni de guerre majeure.
Il y a une deuxième chose surprenante. Remontons au temps des guerres entre les seigneurs et le roi d'Angleterre, c'est-à-dire au XIIIe siècle. LaMagna Carta, en 1215, résultait de plusieurs affrontements entre les seigneurs, les bourgeois capitalistes et les aristocrates auprès du roi. Pourquoi? C'était pour avoir une assemblée dans laquelle ils pouvaient faire au roi des remontrances, des doléances et le restreindre dans ses dépenses outrancières par rapport aux croisades religieuses que le roi voulait payer à cette époque. C'est de là qu'est apparu le parlementarisme.
Quand je suis arrivé au Parlement, j'ai bien appris ce qu'était la fonction première du Parlement. Mes professeurs à l'université me disaient qu'ils savaient que j'aimais bien la philosophie, mais que j'allais réaliser que, à la Chambre des communes, on parle de fric, d'économie, de la situation économique du pays et des finances publiques. J'ai appris que, à la Chambre des communes, presque l'entièreté des débats porte sur les finances publiques.
C'est tout à fait normal, parce que l'essence même philosophique et politique de l'avènement du parlementarisme britannique, c'était de faire qu'il y ait une reddition de compte et responsabilité de la gouvernance pour savoir ce qui est fait avec l'argent des citoyens. À l'époque, c'était les bourgeois capitalistes, aujourd'hui, c'est l'ensemble des citoyens qui le demandent. Cependant, le processus et le principe demeurent les mêmes, à savoir ce qui se passe avec notre argent, pourquoi il y a des déficits s'il y en a et, surtout, quand le gouvernement atteindra l'équilibre budgétaire. Les déficits sont faits avec notre argent et c'est louable et raisonnable de savoir quand l'équilibre va être atteint.
Mon collègue de Longueuil—Saint-Hubert disait très bien que c'est aberrant. Que ferait un député du gouvernement devant un Canadien ordinaire qui lui demanderait simplement quand son parti va équilibrer le budget? Depuis trois ans, les députés n'ont pas vraiment le pouvoir de répondre à une question pourtant ordinaire. Ils doivent inventer des sottises, penser à d'autres choses ou dire que tout va bien parce qu'ils réduisent nos impôts, alors qu'ils ont augmenté les impôts de tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou de 800 $ par année chacun.
C'est presque 2 000 $ par famille, sans parler de tous les crédits d'impôt qu'ils ont coupé, du pétrole qui ne sort pas du pays, de toutes les exportations vers les États-Unis qui ont diminué, de tous les investissements américains au Canada qui ont chuté, alors que les investissements canadiens aux États-Unis ont augmenté, sans parler du fait que l'endettement de nos ménages n'a jamais été aussi grand. Cela a été commenté par l'OCDE dernièrement. Bref, je pourrais continuer très longtemps, sans parler de l'AEUMC.
Il y a quand même des choses surprenantes. Ce qui est incroyable — je le répète chaque fois que je fais un discours sur l'économie en général au Canada —, c'est qu'en 2015, les libéraux ont quand même eu l'intelligence et l'honneur d'expliquer pourquoi ils feraient des déficits sans qu'on soit en guerre ou en situation de crise économique. Le député de Papineau, à l'époque, sous une grue gigantesque à Toronto — je m'en souviens, il faisait un peu soleil et il pleuvait un peu, j'avais vu cela à partir du téléviseur dans mon bureau de campagne à Beauport—Limoilou —, annonçait aux Canadiens que pour les deux premières années, les libéraux allaient faire un déficit de 10 milliards de dollars et la troisième année, un déficit de 6 milliards de dollars. Il promettait de faire un déficit. Tout le monde était surpris qu'il promette de faire un déficit. C'était une première.
Il a ajouté que les libéraux allaient faire un déficit pour investir dans les infrastructures qui, selon lui, avaient été laissées à l'abandon et pour investir davantage dans les infrastructures en général partout au pays. C'est pour cela qu'une fois élu, il a quand même été cohérent dans son discours. Il a annoncé que c'était historique — avec eux, c'est toujours historique —, de mettre sur pied un plan d'infrastructure de 187 milliards de dollars, ce qui n'est pas mauvais non plus. C'est en continuité avec ce que nous avions fait. Nous avions mis 80 milliards de dollars au courts des six années antérieures. C'est normal de continuer à investir dans les infrastructures au Canada; on pourrait même prétendre que le Canada a vu le jour grâce aux chemins de fer. Les infrastructures ont toujours été fondamentales ici, au Canada.
Cependant, le directeur parlementaire du budget — comme je le répète chaque fois, ne l'oublions pas, c'est une institution crée par M. Harper, un grand démocrate, qui voulait qu'il y ait un organe indépendant dans le Parlement qui puisse demander des comptes constamment au gouvernement — nous a appris dans un rapport que, sur les 187 milliards de dollars prévus en infrastructure, seulement 9 milliards sont sortis dans les trois dernières années. Sauf erreur, 9 milliards divisés par 3 font 3 milliards. Les libéraux ont mis 3 milliards de dollars par année en infrastructure et pourtant, la première année, ils ont fait un déficit de 30 milliards de dollars.
Rappelons-nous que le déficit de 10 milliards de dollars devait être pour l'infrastructure. Cependant, la première année, il y a eu un déficit de 30 milliards de dollars, dont 3 milliards de dollars sont allés à l'infrastructure. La deuxième année, il y a un déficit de 20 milliards de dollars, dont 3 milliards de dollars en infrastructure et, encore cette année, il y a un déficit de 20 milliards de dollars, dont seulement 3 milliards de dollars sont allés à l'infrastructure. Clairement, jamais on n'a vu un gouvernement mettre autant d'énergie à dépenser autant d'argent de manière incontrôlable et sans honneur pour si peu de résultat pour le bien-être économique du pays et pour les Canadiens dans leur foyer.
En terminant, l'exercice visant à fixer une date d'échéance pour atteindre l'équilibre budgétaire, c'est une chose normale que toutes les familles canadiennes font dans leur propre foyer, que ce soit pour l'hypothèque de la maison ou pour les prêts automobiles. Quand on fait un emprunt pour une voiture, le concessionnaire ne dit pas « bonne journée, monsieur, on se reverra ». Il dit qu'il faut faire un emprunt à la banque et qu'on a quatre ans pour le rembourser. Il y a une date d'échéance pour toutes sortes de choses comme celle-là.
Quand l'équilibre budgétaire sera-t-il atteint?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-19 16:15 [p.23590]
Mr. Speaker, the hon. member completely misconstrued what I said. I was not talking about investments. These are deficits.
SMEs at the heart of job creation in my riding, Beauport—Limoilou, do not borrow money to invest in their projects, they use their profits for that. It is important to reinvest budgetary surpluses. In 2015, we left $3 billion to the Liberals when they came to power and they spent it all in just a few months.
If investment is truly what the government is after, then why did the Liberals say that they would run a $10-billion infrastructure deficit? Why are the deficits not being used to invest in infrastructure, as the Liberals claimed they wanted to do in 2015? It is because the Liberals' deficits are not being used to improve infrastructure or Canadians' lives. They are being used to please the lobby groups that have always supported the Liberals.
Monsieur le Président, le député a complètement déformé ce que j'ai dit. Je ne parlais pas d'investissements. Ce sont des déficits.
Toutes les PME qui sont au coeur de la création d'emplois dans ma circonscription, Beauport—Limoilou, n'empruntent pas de l'argent pour investir dans leurs projets, elles utilisent leurs profits pour le faire. Ce qui est important, c'est de réinvestir les surplus budgétaires. En 2015, nous avons laissé 3 milliards de dollars aux libéraux, lorsqu'ils ont pris le pouvoir, et ils les ont dépensés en quelques mois.
Si l'investissement est vraiment l'objectif du gouvernement, pourquoi les libéraux ont-ils dit qu'ils allaient accuser un déficit de 10 milliards de dollars en infrastructure? Comment se fait-il que les déficits engendrés ne servent pas à investir dans les infrastructures, comme les libéraux prétendaient vouloir le faire en 2015? C'est parce que les déficits des libéraux ne visent pas à améliorer les infrastructures ou la vie des Canadiens et des Canadiennes. C'est plutôt pour plaire à tous les groupes d'intérêt du Canada qui les appuient depuis toujours.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-19 16:17 [p.23591]
Mr. Speaker, I wish I could say the government could be more transparent, but that would surprise me. There is a lot of back and forth between the Liberals and the Office of the Ethics Commissioner. Transparency is not this government's strong suit.
My colleague talked about investments, but why is the army underfunded? According to another recently released report, the Canadian Forces had a $2-billion shortfall last year alone.
Also, why is the government not doing anything to reduce delays associated with the national shipbuilding strategy? The price tag for the 15 Iroquois-class frigates that are scheduled to be built in Halifax has gone up from $30 billion to $60 billion.
When will the Liberals give us the date the budget will be balanced? That is a simple question, and it boils down to being accountable to Parliament.
Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais bien pouvoir dire que le gouvernement pourrait être plus transparent, mais cela me surprendrait. Entre les libéraux et le bureau du commissaire à l'éthique, il y a constamment des allers-retours. La transparence n'est pas le point fort de ce gouvernement.
Mon collègue parlait d'investissements, mais comment se fait-il que l'armée soit sous-financée? Un autre rapport publié récemment démontre qu'il y a un manque à gagner de 2 milliards de dollars au sein de nos Forces canadiennes, et ce, seulement pour l'année dernière.
Par ailleurs, comment se fait-il que ce gouvernement ne s'occupe pas de réduire les retards liés à la Stratégie nationale de construction navale? On est passé de 30 milliards de dollars à 60 milliards de dollars pour les 15 frégates de classe Iroquois qui seront construits à Halifax.
Quand les libéraux vont-ils nous dire la date du retour à l'équilibre budgétaire? C'est une question simple qui relève de la responsabilité parlementaire de rendre des comptes.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-08 14:08 [p.23496]
Mr. Speaker, on Sunday, November 11, thousands of Canadians will gather at various war memorials in Canada to commemorate the ultimate sacrifice made by so many of our ancestors and our contemporaries.
Our soldiers sacrificed their lives not only during both world wars, but also more recently, in UN peacekeeping missions and in Afghanistan, where Canada served to combat terrorism. Let us not forget the 158 soldiers we lost in this recent and major war in Afghanistan. Corporal Jean-François Drouin, from my region of Beauport, bravely served his country in Afghanistan and lost his life on September 6, 2009. Since then, his courageous parents have laid a wreath in Beauport every year in memory of their son. Let us keep them in our hearts and thoughts.
Let us never forget the ultimate sacrifice that Corporal Jean-François Drouin made for our great federation. Lest we forget.
Monsieur le Président, le dimanche 11 novembre, des milliers de Canadiens se recueilleront aux divers lieux de commémoration militaire du pays afin de se remémorer collectivement les nombreux sacrifices ultimes qui ont été faits par nos aïeux et par nos contemporains.
Ces sacrifices militaires ont été vécus non seulement lors des grandes guerres, mais aussi, plus récemment, lors des missions de paix de l'ONU ainsi qu'en Afghanistan, où nous avons servi pour combattre le terrorisme. De cette guerre récente et marquante en Afghanistan, rappelons-nous les 158 militaires qui y ont laissé leur vie. Chez nous, à Beauport, le caporal Jean-François Drouin, qui a courageusement servi sa patrie en Afghanistan, a perdu la vie le 6 septembre 2009. Depuis, et chaque année, ses valeureux parents déposent une couronne à Beauport à la mémoire de leur fils. Soyons avec eux de coeur et d'esprit pour les soutenir.
N'oublions jamais le sacrifice ultime que le caporal Jean-François Drouin, de Beauport, a fait pour notre grande fédération. N'oublions jamais.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-08 14:49 [p.23503]
Mr. Speaker, it is not just a matter of investments. This goes beyond the government's broken promises to veterans. We are talking about red tape and a lack of respect within Veterans Affairs Canada itself for the calls it receives from our brave men and women in uniform. I have heard stories from people who, every year anew, have to provide proof of having lost their arm in Afghanistan.
Does the government think it is right or fair to do that to our dedicated soldiers who often continue to serve here or abroad?
The Prime Minister needs to understand and commit today to reduce the department's red tape and burdensome rules.
Monsieur le Président, ce n'est pas juste une question d'investissements. Au-delà des promesses envers les vétérans que ce gouvernement a brisées, c'est une question de lourdeur administrative et d'un manque de respect au coeur même d'Anciens Combattants Canada envers les appels qu'ils reçoivent de nos valeureux militaires. Il y a des histoires de gens qui, chaque année, doivent prouver encore une fois qu'ils ont perdu leur bras en Afghanistan.
Pense-t-on que c'est juste et normal de faire cela à nos valeureux militaires qui continuent souvent à combattre ici-même ou ailleurs?
Le premier ministre doit comprendre et s'engager aujourd'hui à faire en sorte de réduire la paperasse et les règles encombrantes qu'il y a au sein du ministère.
Results: 1 - 60 of 415 | Page: 1 of 7

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
>
>|