Committee
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 61 of 61
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Order, please.
Fellow members, welcome to the Subcommittee on International Human Rights of the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development. Today is October 21, 2014, and we are holding our 39th hearing.
We're televised today, first of all, so act accordingly. We are discussing a subject that has come before this committee in the past, the issue of forced harvesting and trafficking of human organs.
Today we have two individuals with us. Damon Noto is spokesperson for Doctors Against Forced Organ Harvesting. He will be speaking first. Then Ethan Gutmann will be speaking.
That said, I have been asked by one of our members to deal with a procedural matter first.
Mr. Sweet, you have the floor.
À l'ordre, s'il vous plaît.
Chers collègues, nous sommes le Sous-comité des droits internationaux de la personne du Comité permanent des affaires étrangères et du développement international. Nous tenons aujourd'hui, le 21 octobre 2014, notre 39e séance.
J'aimerais d'abord signaler que la séance d'aujourd'hui est télédiffusée; par conséquent, comportez-vous en conséquence. Nous discutons d'un sujet que nous avons abordé dans le passé, la question du prélèvement forcé et le trafic d'organes humains.
Aujourd'hui, nous accueillons deux personnes. Damon Noto est le porte-parole de Doctors Against Forced Organ Harvesting. Il comparaîtra en premier. Ensuite, ce sera au tour d'Ethan Gutmann.
Cela dit, un de nos membres m'a demandé de permettre au comité de commencer par se pencher sur une question de procédure.
Monsieur Sweet, vous avez la parole.
Damon Noto
View Damon Noto Profile
Damon Noto
2014-10-21 13:05
Honourable members of Parliament, thank you for your invitation to come and speak today. It truly is an honour and a pleasure to be here.
As the chair said, I am a member of an NGO called Doctors Against Forced Organ Harvesting, which is an organization that consists of medical professionals, mostly transplant surgeons, from around the world.
In the 1990s and early 2000s evidence continued to mount that China’s transplant practices were completely unethical. As early as 2001, the first solid evidence surfaced when a Chinese transplant surgeon named Wang Guoqi came to the United States to testify in front of a United States congressional hearing that China was using organs from executed prisoners.
Medical doctors were further alarmed by the rapid exponential increase in transplantations that occurred in China from 1999 onward. China went from performing a few hundred transplants each year to performing transplants on thousands of patients each year by 2004. This situation plus the tremendous increase in the number of transplant centres across China was very concerning, since no other country's transplantation program had ever grown so fast. China had done in five years what the United States took decades to accomplish.
According to China’s own official numbers, the number of transplants performed each year went from several hundred in 1999 to well over 10,000 in 2008. According to the China Daily newspaper, the actual number was closer to 20,000. It's now recognized by the international transplant community that China performs the second-highest number of transplants a year, behind only the United States, and that it will possibly overtake them in the next year or two. China, at one point, seemed to have an overabundance of organs, and its medical tourism for organs was booming.
Chinese hospitals were all over the Internet advertising that they could guarantee patients organs within a time frame of weeks and that transplantations could be scheduled in advance. This was shocking to medical professionals since the time frame to receive organs is typically years and not weeks. And the ability to schedule a transplant surgery in advance was simply unheard of.
Some hospital websites were bold enough to state that their transplants were superior because they were able to test the living donor’s organ function prior to the harvesting. It became very apparent that organ transplantation was an extremely profitable business in China, with some hospitals stating that their organ transplant programs were their number one source of revenue. On the Internet they were quoting prices as follows: kidneys, $60,000; livers, $100,000; and hearts and lungs, $170,000.
On the surface it might make sense, since China is such a big country, that they would be transplanting in such large numbers, but a few factors really need to be taken into consideration. First, there is no effective formal public organ donation system in China. This means that the hospitals rely on local situations and they have their own waiting times and organ supply. According to the Red Cross, there are only several hundred people who have registered to become organ donors in China. This is in stark contrast to the situation in other countries, such as the United States, which has over 100 million organ donors.
In 2010 China's own Vice-Minister of Health, Dr. Huang Jiefu, admitted that between 1997 and 2008 China had performed more than 100,000 transplants, with over 90% of the organs coming from executed prisoners. China's own people stated that.
The Chinese government does not provide an official count of people executed each year; however, most experts put the number of executions anywhere between 2,000 and 5,000. Obviously this number falls far short of the 10,000 organ transplants that occur every year. Furthermore, even if the numbers were to add up, there would still be a large discrepancy for the simple reason that it's impossible, given all the variables that go into transplantation, that all these people would be suitable candidates for organ donation and that they would match the people needing an organ transplant.
There was also a major problem in that the prison population has a very high percentage of people who have hepatitis B or hepatitis C, which would not make them candidates for organ donation.
Then you have the factor and the issue of timing. Since an organ, such as a liver, once harvested lasts outside the body only several hours, you cannot stockpile organs after execution for future use. That's just not possible.
China's own laws state that prisoners, once sentenced to execution, must be executed within seven days. All of this suggests that convicted felons sentenced to death could not fully account for all the large numbers of transplantations occurring every year in China, especially when you talk about the type of advanced, scheduled transplantations that occur with medical tourism.
The question from the medical community is the following: how is China able to have such an on-demand transplant system, capable of extremely short wait times compared with every other country around the world, including the United States, where the average wait time for a kidney is over two years, Canada being over three years? The only possible way China is able to do this is to have another source of donors that is available and that can be utilized on demand.
Several investigations have been performed—including by Ethan Gutmann, sitting next to me—and they have all pointed to the use of prisoners of conscience as the main source of organs, with practitioners of Falun Gong comprising the vast majority. If you follow the timeline of China's transplant boom and you compare it with the start of the persecution of Falun Gong, which occurred in 1999, the timelines correspond almost exactly. It's estimated that two million Falun Gong practitioners were arrested nationwide and placed in detention during the first year alone of the persecution, in 1999.
China has an extremely vast prison system. According to an NGO, the Laogai foundation, it's estimated that between three million to five million people sit in these prisons at any given time. Many experts now believe that Falun Gong practitioners comprise the largest population of prisoners of conscience in China today, with up to 500,000 to a million practitioners being held at any given time. Falun Gong practitioners are also persecuted nationwide, not just in one region, making these organs available to hospitals across the entire country.
One reason this may all be possible is that China has a very unique situation: the military controls the prison system. They control the forced labour camps. They control the majority of the hospitals that are performing transplantations. When patients who go to China for organs come back, they often state that they were performed secretively by military doctors in military hospitals, often in the middle of the night.
The persecution against Falun Gong is an officially state-sanctioned policy. Falun Gong practitioners are considered enemies of the state, without the right to have any legal representation. According to my knowledge, not a single person, since the start of the persecution, has ever faced criminal charges for either the torture or murder of practitioners. The lack of legal repercussions for the murdering of Falun Gong practitioners has made them a particularly vulnerable group. Falun Gong practitioners are often unwilling to give up their true identities in order to protect their families and friends, so they sit in these jails unidentified. Furthermore, a systematic propaganda campaign against this group has demonized them to the public.
An investigation in 2007 by Canada's own David Kilgour and David Matas compiled 52 verifiable forms of proof that Falun Gong practitioners were being killed for their organs. They estimated that 41,500 organ transplants that occurred in China from the years 2000 to 2004 alone had no verifiable source other than practitioners of Falun Gong. There have also been other investigators, including European Parliament member Edward McMillan-Scott.
Falun Gong practitioners who've escaped from China often testify that they underwent serial blood and urine testing, and had physical exams, X-rays, and ultrasound testing multiple times while in prison, while their fellow inmates didn't. It's hard to believe that they were doing these expensive tests to benefit the health of these people who were being tortured in prison camps.
There have also been interviews of fellow prisoners and prison staff who witnessed Falun Gong practitioners having their organs harvested. There have been several high-level Chinese officials admitting during taped phone conversations that they are aware that Falun Gong practitioners are being used as a source for organ donation. China's own vice-minister of health, Huang Jiefu, who's often quoted, has performed hundreds of transplants using organs from prisoners. He stated in an interview with China's People's Daily that the struggle against Falun Gong is a serious political campaign; we must not be merciful.
The two foremost international transplant organizations issued a letter this year to Xi Jinping, the leader of the Chinese Communist Party. In that letter, they called China's system of organ transplantation corrupt and “scorned by the international community”.
In April of this year, the director of the China organ transplant system, Wang Haibo, stated that the Chinese regime had no intention of announcing the schedule for weaning itself off the use of organs from executed prisoners, thus stating that the practice of using prisoners and prisoners of conscience as the main source of organs continues to this day, with no end in sight.
If we go by the statistics, we can estimate that every day a few dozen people are executed for their organs. If we wait another five years, there's a possibility that another 50,000 innocent lives may be taken. If we do nothing, we really run a serious risk of becoming accomplices to a great tragedy that we are witnessing in our own time.
Thank you for allowing me to be here today.
Honorables députés, merci de m'avoir invité à comparaître ici aujourd'hui. C'est vraiment un honneur et un plaisir pour moi d'être ici.
Comme le président l'a dit, je suis membre d'une ONG appelée Doctors Against Forced Organ Harvesting. L'organisation est composée de professionnels de la santé du monde entier, surtout de chirurgiens transplantologues.
Dans les années 1990 et au début des années 2000, des preuves de plus en plus nombreuses ont révélé que les pratiques de prélèvement d'organes en Chine étaient tout à fait contraires à l'éthique. Dès l'année 2001, les premiers éléments de preuve solides ont été mis en lumière quand un chirurgien transplantologue, appelé Wang Guoqi, est venu aux États-Unis pour comparaître devant le Congrès américain. Il a dit que la Chine utilisait des organes de prisonniers qui avaient été exécutés.
Les médecins ont été encore plus alarmés par l'augmentation rapide et exponentielle du nombre de transplantations qui ont été réalisées en Chine à partir de l'année 1999. En Chine, le nombre de transplantations effectuées est passé de quelques centaines par année à des milliers par année en 2004. Cette situation, conjuguée à l'augmentation du nombre de centres de transplantation d'un bout à l'autre de la Chine, était très préoccupante, étant donné qu'aucun autre programme de transplantation d'un autre pays n'avait jamais augmenté aussi rapidement. En cinq ans, la Chine a fait ce que les États-Unis ont fait sur une période de plusieurs décennies.
Selon les statistiques du gouvernement chinois, le nombre de transplantations effectuées chaque année est passé de plusieurs centaines, en 1999, à bien plus de 10 000, en 2008. Selon le journal China Daily, ce nombre se rapprochait plutôt de 20 000. À l'heure actuelle, le milieu international de transplantologues reconnaît que la Chine se situe au deuxième rang pour ce qui est du nombre de transplantations réalisées chaque année, après les États-Unis, et qu'elle lui ravira probablement la première place d'ici un an ou deux. À un moment donné, la Chine semblait avoir une surabondance d'organes, et son tourisme médical pour des organes était en plein essor.
Les hôpitaux chinois faisaient beaucoup de publicité sur le Web pour dire qu'ils pouvaient garantir aux patients des délais d'attente de quelques semaines pour des organes et que les transplantations pouvaient être planifiées d'avance. Les professionnels de la santé ont trouvé cela stupéfiant étant donné qu'il faut normalement des années pour obtenir des organes, non pas des semaines. De plus, le fait de planifier une greffe d'avance était une notion inconnue.
Certains sites Web d'hôpitaux ont même été assez audacieux pour déclarer que leurs transplantations étaient de qualité supérieure parce qu'ils pouvaient tester le fonctionnement des organes du donneur vivant avant le prélèvement. Il est devenu très évident que les transplantations d'organes étaient un commerce extrêmement profitable en Chine, certains hôpitaux déclarant que leurs programmes de transplantation d'organes étaient leur plus importante source de revenu. Les prix indiqués en ligne étaient les suivants: 60 000 $ pour un rein, 100 000 $ pour un foie et 170 000 $ pour un coeur ou un poumon.
Au premier coup d'oeil, il pourrait sembler logique que la Chine puisse réaliser un si grand nombre de transplantations du fait qu'il s'agit d'un si grand pays. Cependant, il faut tenir compte d'un certain nombre de facteurs. Tout d'abord, il n'existe aucun système national de don d'organes en Chine. Cela veut dire que les hôpitaux doivent compter sur des événements locaux et qu'ils ont leurs propres temps d'attente et leurs propres sources d'approvisionnement d'organes. Selon la Croix-Rouge, seules quelques centaines de personnes se sont inscrites pour devenir des donneurs d'organes en Chine. Cela diffère nettement de la situation dans d'autres pays, notamment les États-Unis qui compte plus de 100 millions de donneurs d'organes.
En 2010, le vice-ministre de la Santé publique de Chine, le Dr Huang Jiefu, a admis que, entre 1997 et 2008, la Chine avait réalisé plus de 100 000 transplantations, dont 90 % des organes provenaient de prisonniers qui avaient été exécutés. Des Chinois ont admis cela.
Le gouvernement chinois ne fournit pas de chiffres officiels du nombre de personnes exécutées chaque année. Toutefois, la plupart des experts estiment que ce nombre se situe entre 2 000 et 5 000. De toute évidence, ce nombre est de loin inférieur aux 10 000 transplantations d'organes qui sont effectuées chaque année. De plus, même si ces chiffres s'accordaient, il existerait tout de même un grand écart pour la simple raison que cela serait impossible. Je dis cela à cause du nombre de variables dont il faut tenir compte quand on effectue des greffes, notamment pour déterminer si toutes ces personnes seraient des candidates convenables pour un don d'organes et si elles seraient compatibles avec celles qui ont besoin d'une greffe.
L'autre divergence importante, c'est que, dans les prisons, un très haut pourcentage des gens sont atteints d'hépatite B ou d'hépatite C, ce qui fait qu'ils ne seraient pas des candidats convenables pour des dons d'organes.
Ensuite, il y a le facteur des délais. Une fois prélevé, un organe, comme un foie, est bon pendant quelques heures seulement après avoir été prélevé d'un corps. Il serait donc impossible de créer un stock d'organes après des exécutions pour un usage ultérieur. Ce serait tout simplement impossible.
Même les lois de la Chine stipulent que, une fois que des prisonniers ont été condamnés à la peine de mort, cela doit se faire dans les sept jours qui suivent. Tout cela montre que le nombre de criminels condamnés à la peine de mort ne peut pas justifier le grand nombre de prélèvements d'organes qui sont effectués chaque année en Chine — surtout quand on dit que les greffes effectuées dans le cadre du tourisme médical peuvent être planifiées d'avance.
La question que se pose le milieu médical est la suivante: comment la Chine peut-elle avoir un système de transplantation d'organes sur demande, qui prévoit des délais d'attente extrêmement courts comparativement à ce qui se fait dans tous les autres pays du monde, y compris les États-Unis, où les délais d'attente pour un rein sont de plus de deux ans, et le Canada, où ils sont de plus de trois ans? La seule façon dont la Chine peut être en mesure de faire cela, c'est en ayant une autre source de donneurs disponible, qui peut être utilisée sur demande.
Plusieurs enquêtes ont été menées — notamment par Ethan Gutmann, qui est assis à mes côtés —, et elles ont toutes fait état de l'utilisation des prisonniers d'opinion comme étant la principale source d'organes — les adeptes du Falun Gong représentant la grande majorité de ceux-ci. Si vous regardez la chronologie de l'essor des transplantations d'organes en Chine, et que vous la comparez à celle de la persécution des adeptes du Falun Gong, qui a commencé en 1999, les deux se suivent presque parfaitement. Selon les estimations, en 1999 seulement, deux millions d'adeptes du Falun Gong ont été arrêtés au pays et placés dans des centres de détention.
La Chine a un système pénitencier extrêmement grand. Selon une ONG, la fondation Laogai, à tout moment, entre trois et cinq millions de personnes se trouvent dans ces prisons. Beaucoup d'experts croient maintenant que les adeptes du Falun Gong constituent la majeure partie des prisonniers d'opinion en Chine à l'heure actuelle, et que, à tout moment, de 500 000 à un million d'adeptes peuvent y être détenus. De plus, les adeptes du Falun Gong sont persécutés à l'échelle nationale, pas seulement dans une seule région, ce qui fait que leurs organes sont à la disposition des hôpitaux de l'ensemble du pays.
Une des raisons pour lesquelles tout cela est possible, c'est que la Chine se trouve dans une situation tout à fait unique: l'armée contrôle le système pénitencier, les camps de travaux forcés et la majorité des hôpitaux qui effectuent ces transplantations. Quand les patients qui se sont rendus en Chine pour des organes reviennent au pays, souvent ils déclarent que les greffes ont été effectuées de façon secrète par des médecins militaires dans des hôpitaux militaires, souvent au milieu de la nuit.
La persécution des adeptes du Falun Gong est une politique officielle de l'État. Les adeptes du Falun Gong sont considérés comme étant des ennemis de l'État, qui n'ont pas droit à une représentation juridique. À ma connaissance, depuis le début de la persécution, pas une seule personne n'a jamais fait l'objet d'accusations au pénal pour avoir torturé ou tué des adeptes. Le manque de répercussions sur le plan juridique rend ce groupe de personnes particulièrement vulnérables. Les adeptes du Falun Gong refusent souvent de révéler leur véritable identité afin de protéger leur famille et leurs amis, ce qui fait qu'ils restent dans ces prisons sans être identifiés. Par ailleurs, une campagne de propagande systématique contre ce groupe les a diabolisés aux yeux de la population.
Une enquête menée en 2007 par les Canadiens David Kilgour et David Matas a compilé 52 véritables preuves que les adeptes du Falun Gong ont été tués pour leurs organes. Ils ont estimé que 41 500 greffes d'organes à avoir été effectuées en Chine entre 2000 à 2004 seulement n'avaient aucune autre source vérifiable que les adeptes du Falun Gong. Il y a eu d'autres enquêteurs, notamment Edward McMillan-Scott, un membre du Parlement européen.
Les adeptes du Falun Gong qui ont réussi à s'enfuir de la Chine témoignent souvent du fait qu'ils ont fait l'objet d'analyses de sang et d'urine en série, et qu'ils ont subi des examens physiques, des rayons X et des échographies à de nombreuses reprises pendant qu'ils étaient en prison, tandis que ce n'était pas le cas pour leurs codétenus. Il est difficile à croire que ces analyses coûteuses aient été dans l'intérêt de la santé des adeptes, qui étaient torturés dans ces camps de travaux forcés.
Par ailleurs, pendant des entrevues, des codétenus et des membres du personnel des prisons ont déclaré avoir été témoins de prélèvements d'organes chez les adeptes du Falun Gong. Pendant des appels téléphoniques enregistrés, plusieurs hauts dirigeants chinois ont admis être au courant du fait que les adeptes du Falun Gong servent de source d'organes. Même le vice-ministre de la Santé de Chine, Huang Jiefu, qui est souvent cité, a pratiqué des centaines de greffes en utilisant des organes de prisonniers. Dans une entrevue avec le People's Daily de la Chine, il a déclaré que la lutte contre le Falun Gong constitue une importante campagne politique, et que le gouvernement ne doit pas être clément à l'égard des adeptes.
Les deux principaux organismes internationaux de greffe d'organes ont envoyé une lettre au chef du Parti communiste chinois, Xi Jinping, dans laquelle ils qualifient le système chinois de greffe d'organe de système corrompu « méprisé par la communauté internationale ».
En avril dernier, le directeur du système chinois de greffe d'organes, Wang Haibo, a déclaré que le régime chinois n'avait aucunement l'intention de publier un échéancier pour se sevrer du prélèvement d'organes sur des prisonniers exécutés, confirmant ainsi le maintien pour longtemps de cette pratique qui consiste à utiliser les prisonniers et les prisonniers d'opinion à titre de principale source d'organes.
Selon les statistiques, on peut estimer que chaque jour, des douzaines de personnes sont tuées pour leurs organes. À ce rythme, dans cinq ans, 50 000 autres innocents pourraient avoir perdu la vie. Si nous ne réagissons pas, nous risquons de devenir des complices de cette grande tragédie humaine.
Je vous remercie de m'avoir donné l'occasion de venir m'exprimer sur le sujet.
Ethan Gutmann
View Ethan Gutmann Profile
Ethan Gutmann
2014-10-21 13:16
Thank you.
For those who engage in primary research on the organ harvesting of prisoners of conscience in China, this hearing comes at the end of a particularly ominous year.
Winter saw the fatal collapse of two years of medical engagement with Chinese medical authorities. Spring brought new evidence that the mass harvesting of prisoners of conscience was not only continuing but accelerating. Fall carried with it the first reports—unconfirmed, yet surprisingly consistent across China's provinces—that the Chinese authorities are no longer taking DNA swabs and blood tests consistent with tissue-matching from Falun Gong just in prisons and labour camps, but in their homes.
In short, the history that I'm going to condense for you today is still being written.
Let's begin the slides in the mid-1990s with one of these men who have just carried out an execution. The enlisted armed policeman on the left of the screen tries to look official. In the foreground, a supreme procuratorate officer, wearing a white rag against back splatter, meets our gaze defiantly. These are the eternal faces of routine execution. Blur the racial features and we see the same uneasy postures in many authoritarian states. In fact, the man in the front is actually wearing a white rag to protect against back splatter as he fires the gun.
Yet from an official Chinese perspective, there is nothing surreptitious taking place in this photograph. The signs on the executed prisoners indicate that they were duly convicted of capital crimes: murder, rape, drug sales, etc. Their bodies will be gathered into medical vans and harvested for their kidneys and livers. That's not secret either. Since 2006, Beijing has admitted that the vast majority of the organs that Chinese hospitals transplant into aging western organ tourists and rich Chinese are from death row prisoners.
Twenty years later—now—most executions are carried out in secret by surgeons. In the photograph shown here, they carry freshly extracted organs. The critical change since the mid-1990s is that the majority of retail organs in China are not extracted from death row convicts, but from prisoners of conscience—again, political and religious prisoners—who cannot be sentenced to death even under the vagaries of Chinese law: Tibetan monks, or a Uyghur activist who openly shook his fist in a demonstration, or a Falun Gong woman who passed out leaflets on the street.
The Chinese medical system is said to generate approximately 10,000 transplants per year. As Damon said, the number of legally executed prisoners is well below 5,000. Voluntary organ donations are negligible, and this suggests another source, but the fact is that we don't have to rely solely on mysterious numerical gaps. We can bracket this 20-year transformation through reliable medical witnesses such as this one.
I've supplied a map to you—I think you have it in your hands—that includes major police and medical installations throughout China that were involved in organ harvesting. It's not a comprehensive map; the sites are the ones that I established through personal interviews in my new book, The Slaughter. At the northwest corner of the map, you'll find Urumqi Railway Central Hospital.
In 1995, one of the hospital's surgeons, Dr. Enver Tohti, shown on the screen here, was driven to the Western Mountain Execution Grounds. Following an apparently routine mass execution, a prisoner was singled out for harvesting. The man was alive. The gunshot was deliberately aimed to the left of the side of the chest to produce shock that could act as a natural anesthesia. Dr. Tohti was told to remove the man's kidneys and liver. Following the prisoner's single reflexive contraction, Dr. Tohti performed the extraction. Based on the pulsing blood, the man's heart was beating until that. Now, this was a medical advance. Live organ harvesting promotes a lower rate of rejection by the new host.
Hard-core criminals also have a lot of health problems, particularly hepatitis. Two years later, Xinjiang was the staging point for a second change in medical ethics. The first organ harvesting of Uyghur political prisoners was carried out in Urumqi on behalf of five high-ranking Communist Party officials who had come in search of healthy young organs. Live organ harvesting would become routine through China, but the harvesting of prisoners of conscience who had not been convicted of capital crimes was initially confined to Xinjiang.
In 1999 the Chinese state security launched its largest action of scale since the cultural revolution: the eradication of Falun Gong. Yet by 2001, the blitzkrieg had become trench war, and Chinese military hospitals began targeting select Falun Gong prisoners for harvesting.
There are many points of evidence for this. As Damon said, Kilgour and Matas list 52 of them. I’ll present just one: Dr. Ko Wen-je, chairman of the Traumatology Department, National Taiwan University Hospital. Ten years ago Dr. Ko went to a mainland hospital to negotiate reduced kidney and liver prices for his department’s elderly patients. After a friendly banquet, Dr. Ko was given the Chinese price, which was about half of what a foreigner pays. In response to Dr. Ko’s concerns about unhealthy criminal organs, the Chinese surgeons assured Dr. Ko all the organs would come from Falun Gong: these people don’t drink; they don't smoke; they practise very healthy qigong. We appreciate your discretion.
Dr. Ko is now the leading candidate to be mayor of Taipei, largely due to the perception that he is a man of integrity. I’ll go further. Dr. Ko’s testimony has done more for this investigation than all the world’s health organizations put together.
The larger point is that the organ harvesting of prisoners of conscience did not begin with Falun Gong. It evolved organically. The central decision to exploit prisoners of conscience on a mass scale was little more than a legal blurring around the edges. Yet why would the Chinese Communist Party, so rich in resources and power, so eager for international acclaim, take such a risk? Thus the investigative problem becomes one of motive, of plausibility. It is not just the how, it is the why, and that question dominates six out of ten chapters in my book. I’ll just touch on it here.
You may have heard it said that the party’s decision to crush Falun Gong was driven by its size. At 70 million, there were five million more practitioners than party members. That’s true, but it is also germane that Falun Gong came from the Chinese heartland with no western intellectual or foreign trappings. So the party’s fears had more to do with that little boy in the picture in the front.
That boy could grow up to be a man and perhaps a soldier of the People’s Liberation Army like this one, and most of all they feared this woman Ding Jing. She lives in Toronto. She's in the hospital, I believe. As a Falun Gong coordinator, she taught the exercises. She carried plastic garbage bags around to make sure that practice sites stayed tidy, and she looked after three sites. The first was for China Central Television. The second was for the Public Security Bureau, the secret police of China. The third was for the high-ranking Communist Party officials and their wives.
For the party, Ding Jing’s tidy sites seemed to spring out of the Marxist template for seizing power. Start up in the heartland, infiltrate the intellectuals, then the military, and the leadership itself. For the nationalist elements of the party who believe this is China’s century, Falun Gong’s belief in truth, compassion, and forbearance suggested an earlier China: passive, weak, easily dominated.
Their theory was wrong. Falun Gong’s resistance in the labour camps and indeed globally was not passive. It was extraordinary, as was the party’s ferocious response. I won't show you pictures of labour camps and atrocities, but I will show you this picture of Falun Gong refugees, because if you take out this guy in the middle, this is a pretty good numerical representation of my findings. All these women were in labour camps. All were tortured. One of them was sexually abused. And the woman on the left was given a series of physical examinations aimed exclusively at assessing the health of her retail organs and tissue matching.
From a sample of 50 refugees, I conclude that half a million to one million Falun Gong are incarcerated at any given time. By 2008, approximately 65,000 Falun Gong practitioners had been harvested for their organs. My calculations are published in two books, The Slaughter and also State Organs, and my estimate is used as a baseline calculation in the text of U.S. Congress House Resolution 281. Your own Kilgour and Matas study, extrapolating from official Chinese numbers, estimate that approximately 60,000 Falun Gong organs were harvested by 2008. That’s an apples and oranges comparison, but clearly we are looking at fatalities above 50,000.
Although the numbers are much smaller, many Tibetans, Uyghurs, and even some house Christians received the same testing as Falun Gong. Enforced disappearances of Uyghurs are particularly dramatic. I won’t estimate that fatalities at this time. I can only say that two Tibetans came back alive.
I have some brief, final points. Any pretense that harvesting was not state controlled evaporated with this discovery that in 2012 these photographs of Wang Lijun are of the protege of former politburo member Bo Xilai. In fact Wang Lijun is directing live organ harvesting. Wang was given a public award for using a new lethal injection method on thousands of harvested prisoners. That discovery led the Chinese medical establishment to attempt to create a public picture of a rapidly reforming transplant system. Perhaps some of you have heard of these promises. In the west, the Transplantation Society played along by politely refusing to acknowledge the harvesting of prisoners of conscience, even if many members privately believe the allegations to be true.
Earlier this year the Chinese explicitly reneged on those promises of reform, leading the Transplantation Society with nothing but this now-embarrassing snapshot. We, in turn, have been left with a policy vacuum.
One component of that aborted reform was a supposed ban on western organ tourism. Actually, it never ended. Three months ago these Chinese organ brokers were still advertising openly on the Web.
The harvesting of Falun Gong did not end either. At this time I can't supply a Falun Gong fatality count after 2008, but this Falun Gong labour camp refugee was tested for her organs, along with 500 other prisoners, mainly practitioners, one year ago.
What should Canada do? I urge you to read my book with a critical eye. I am confident in my conclusions, in part because I don't go much beyond the findings that I've just presented. I did not write my book to tell you how you should think about the Chinese state.
If you believe that China is a good investment, well, perhaps it is. Yet the history I've described is also true, and that history is still being written even in this hearing today. I do not ask you to follow the path of divestment or trade war. I ask that you follow your own values. How can any Canadian citizen be complicit in a scheme where an innocent person will be killed so that a Canadian might live?
Canada has the power to stop this. The basic mechanism of criminalizing organ tourism is straightforward. If you go to China and you come back with a new organ, you will be incarcerated. Until the Chinese authorities provide a full accounting of this crime against humanity, I believe this is precisely the model that Canada should follow.
Thank you.
Merci.
Pour les personnes qui mènent des recherches originales à propos des prélèvements d’organes sur les prisonniers d’opinion en Chine, cette audience arrive à la fin d’une année particulièrement sinistre.
Au cours de l’hiver, nous avons assisté à l’effondrement définitif de l’engagement médical de l’Occident auprès des autorités médicales chinoises. Au printemps, nous avons eu de nouvelles preuves, non seulement que le prélèvement forcé d’organes à très grande échelle sur les prisonniers d’opinion se poursuivait, mais qu’il s’accélérait. Puis, à l’automne, on a émis les premiers rapports, non confirmés, mais étonnamment corroborés à l’échelle de toutes les provinces de Chine, selon lesquels les autorités chinoises ne se contentaient plus de recueillir des échantillons d’ADN et des analyses sanguines pour vérifier la compatibilité des tissus auprès d’adeptes du Falun Gong dans les prisons et les camps de travail, mais aussi à leur domicile.
En bref, l’histoire que je m’apprête à vous résumer aujourd’hui continue de s’écrire.
Commençons par le milieu des années 1990, avec ces hommes qui viennent tout juste de procéder à une exécution. Le policier armé sur la gauche s’efforce de se donner un air « officiel ». Au premier plan, un agent du parquet populaire suprême portant une guenille blanche pour se protéger contre des éclaboussures nous défie du regard. Ce sont là les visages qui reviennent éternellement au cours d’une exécution courante; gommons les caractéristiques raciales et nous retrouvons les mêmes attitudes empreintes d’un certain malaise dans de nombreux états totalitaires. D'ailleurs, l'homme au premier plan porte une guenille blanche pour se protéger contre des éclaboussures lorsqu'il fait feu.
Et pourtant, dans l’optique officielle de la Chine, il n’y avait là rien d’illicite; les signes sur les prisonniers exécutés indiquent qu’ils ont été dûment condamnés pour des crimes punissables de la peine de mort: meurtre, viol, trafic de drogues, etc. Leurs corps seront conservés dans des fourgons médicaux et on prélèvera leurs reins et leur foie. Ce n’est pas non plus un secret; depuis 2006, Beijing a reconnu que la grande majorité des organes que les hôpitaux chinois greffent sur des touristes occidentaux « de la transplantation » vieillissants et sur des Chinois fortunés ont été prélevés sur des condamnés à mort.
Vingt ans plus tard, donc, aujourd'hui, la plupart des exécutions sont menées en secret, par des chirurgiens. Sur cette photo, ils transportent des organes fraîchement prélevés. Le changement majeur survenu depuis le milieu des années 1990 consiste en ceci, soit que la majorité des organes sur le marché ne sont pas prélevés sur des condamnés à mort, mais sur des prisonniers d’opinion — des prisonniers politiques et de conscience — qui ne peuvent pas être condamnés à mort, même en vertu de la loi chinoise: les moines tibétains, un militant ouïghour qui a ouvertement levé le poing durant une manifestation, ou une adepte du Falun Gong qui distribuait des dépliants dans la rue.
On dit que le système médical chinois pratique environ 10 000 greffes par année. Le nombre de prisonniers exécutés légalement se situe bien en deçà de 5 000. Les dons volontaires d’organes sont négligeables. Cela indique qu’il existe une autre source. Mais nous n’avons pas à nous fier uniquement à de mystérieux écarts dans les chiffres. Nous pouvons étayer cette transformation qui dure depuis 20 ans en nous appuyant sur des témoignages fiables dans le monde médical.
J’ai fourni une carte — je crois que vous l'avez devant vous — sur laquelle se trouvent les principaux postes de police et les principales installations médicales à l’échelle de la Chine ayant participé à des prélèvements d’organes. La liste n’est pas exhaustive; elle représente les centres que j’ai pu identifier au moyen d’entrevues que j’ai menées pour mon nouveau livre, The Slaughter. Dans le coin nord-ouest de la carte, vous pouvez voir l’hôpital de la gare centrale d’Urumqi.
En 1995, un des chirurgiens de l’hôpital, le Dr Enver Tohti, que l'on voit ici sur la photo, a été conduit au terrain d’exécution des montagnes occidentales. À l’issue de ce qui semblait une exécution de masse comme une autre, un des prisonniers a été sélectionné pour le prélèvement d’organes. L’homme était vivant; le coup de feu avait délibérément visé le côté gauche de sa poitrine pour produire un choc susceptible de créer une anesthésie naturelle. On a dit au docteur Tohti de prélever les reins et le foie de l’homme. Après une contraction réflexe unique, le docteur Tohti a effectué le prélèvement. À en juger par les pulsations veineuses, le coeur de l’homme a battu jusqu’à la fin. Il s’agissait d’une percée médicale; le prélèvement d’organes sur une personne vivante réduit le taux de rejet des receveurs.
Les criminels endurcis ont beaucoup de problèmes de santé, notamment des hépatites. Deux ans plus tard, Xinjiang a été le lieu d’un deuxième changement en matière d'éthique médicale. Le premier prélèvement d’organes sur des prisonniers politiques ouïghours a eu lieu à Urumqi pour le compte de cinq hauts gradés du parti communiste qui étaient à la recherche d’organes sains de personnes jeunes. Le prélèvement d’organes sur des personnes vivantes allait devenir courant à l’échelle de la Chine, mais pour ce qui est des prisonniers d’opinion, il se limitait à l’origine au Xinjiang.
En 1999, la Sécurité d’État en Chine a lancé l’opération à grande échelle la plus importante depuis la révolution culturelle, soit l’éradication du Falun Gong. Et voilà qu’en 2001 déjà, les opérations éclairs s’étaient transformées en guerre de tranchées, quand les hôpitaux militaires chinois ont commencé à sélectionner certains prisonniers adeptes du Falun Gong pour prélever leurs organes.
Il existe bien des éléments de preuve à cet égard; comme Damon l'a souligné, Kilgour et Matas ont dressé la liste de 52 d’entre eux. Je ne vous en présenterai qu’un seul: le Dr Ko Wen-je, directeur du service de traumatologie à l’hôpital national universitaire de Taiwan. Il y a 10 ans, le Dr Ko s’est rendu dans un hôpital du continent pour négocier une baisse des prix des reins et des foies pour les patients âgés de son service. Au terme d’un banquet amical, le Dr Ko a obtenu le prix réservé aux Chinois, soit environ la moitié de ce que paie un étranger. En réponse aux inquiétudes du Dr Ko par rapport aux organes prélevés sur des criminels en mauvaise santé, les chirurgiens chinois lui ont assuré que tous les organes seraient prélevés sur les adeptes du Falun Gong. Ces gens-là ne fument pas et ne boivent pas. Ils s’adonnent au qi gong, ce qui est bon pour la santé. Nous apprécions votre discrétion.
Le Dr Ko est le principal candidat à la mairie de Taipei, surtout parce qu’on le perçoit comme un homme intègre. J’irai plus loin: le témoignage du Dr Ko a pu faire avancer cette enquête mieux que toutes les organisations de la santé du monde entier réunies.
Dans les faits, le prélèvement d’organes sur des prisonniers d’opinion n’a pas commencé avec les adeptes du Falun Gong. Le phénomène a évolué de façon organique. La décision centrale d’exploiter le filon des prisonniers d’opinion à grande échelle s’est à peu près résumée à instaurer une sorte de flou juridique. Mais alors, pourquoi le parti communiste chinois, fort de tant de richesses et de pouvoirs et si avide de l’approbation internationale, est-il disposé à prendre un tel risque? C’est pourquoi le problème de l’enquête porte sur la motivation et non la plausibilité. On ne tente pas seulement de répondre à la question comment, mais aussi, pourquoi. Cette question est au coeur de six chapitres sur dix dans mon livre. Je ne ferai ici que l’effleurer.
Vous avez sans doute entendu dire que la décision du parti d’éradiquer le Falun Gong était avant tout motivée par l’ampleur du mouvement. Avec ses 70 millions de membres, il en compte cinq millions de plus que le parti. C’est vrai. On peut également affirmer que le Falun Gong est né dans le centre de la Chine, sans lien avec des intellectuels occidentaux et sans que les Chinois ne soient confrontés à des « ruses » d’étrangers. Ainsi, la crainte du parti a davantage à voir avec le petit garçon que l’on voit au premier plan de la photo.
Le garçon pourrait grandir pour devenir un homme, peut-être même un soldat de l’Armée populaire de libération. Mais c'est cette femme, Ding Jing, que le parti craignait le plus. Elle habite à Toronto. Si je ne m'abuse, elle est hospitalisée. À titre de coordonnatrice du Falun Gong, elle enseignait les exercices et transportait des sacs de plastique pour s’assurer que les lieux demeuraient propres. Elle s’occupait de trois emplacements. Le premier, pour la télévision nationale en Chine. Le deuxième, au bureau de la sécurité publique, la police secrète chinoise. Le troisième, pour les hauts responsables du parti communiste et leurs épouses.
Pour le parti, les emplacements dont s’occupait Ding Jing semblaient sortir tout droit du modèle marxiste de prise du pouvoir. On s'installe d'abord au centre du pays, puis on infiltre les intellectuels, ensuite les militaires, et enfin les dirigeants. Pour les éléments nationalistes du parti, qui croient que ce siècle est celui de la Chine, la foi des adeptes du Falun Gong en la vérité, la compassion et la clémence rappelait le passé d’une Chine faible, passive et facilement dominée.
Leur théorie était fausse. La résistance des adeptes du Falun Gong dans les camps de travail, et en fait, partout, n’avait rien de passif. Elle était extraordinaire. Tout comme la réaction féroce du parti. Je ne vais pas vous montrer de photos des camps de travail ni d’atrocités. Mais je vais vous montrer cette photo d’adeptes du Falun Gong réfugiés parce que, à l’exception du type au centre, ce que l’on voit ici constitue une représentation assez fidèle de mes constatations. Toutes ces femmes ont été envoyées dans un camp de travail. Elles ont toutes été torturées. L’une d’elles a été victime de violences sexuelles, et la femme sur la gauche a subi une série d’examens physiques exclusivement destinés à déterminer la santé de ses organes pour les vendre et la compatibilité de ses tissus.
En me fondant sur un échantillon de 50 réfugiés, j'ai conclu qu’à tout moment, entre 500 000 et un million d’adeptes du Falun Gong sont emprisonnés. En 2008, on avait déjà prélevé les organes d’environ 65 000 d’entre eux. Mes chiffres figurent dans deux livres: The Slaughter et State Organs, et mon évaluation est utilisée comme calcul de référence dans le texte de la résolution 281 de la Chambre des représentants des États-Unis. Extrapolant à partir des données officielles des autorités chinoises, Kilgour et Matas estiment qu’en 2008, on avait déjà prélevé environ 60 000 organes des adeptes du Falun Gong. Sans vouloir comparer des pommes et des oranges, il ne fait aucun doute que cela se traduit par plus de 50 000 décès.
Bien que les chiffres soient beaucoup plus faibles, de nombreux Tibétains et Ouïghours et même certains chrétiens « de maison » reçoivent le même traitement que les adeptes du Falun Gong. Les disparitions forcées de Ouïghours sont particulièrement troublantes. Je ne peux pas estimer le nombre de décès à l’heure actuelle. Je peux seulement affirmer que les deux Tibétains que voici ont survécu.
Brièvement, j'aurais quelques points à souligner pour terminer. Tous les démentis visant à réfuter que le prélèvement d’organes était téléguidé par le gouvernement sont partis en fumée avec la découverte, en 2012, de ces photographies de Wang Lijun, le protégé de l’ancien membre du Politburo, Bo Xilai. En fait, il dirige le prélèvement d’organes sur des personnes vivantes; Wang a reçu un prix du gouvernement pour le recours à une nouvelle méthode d’injection mortelle sur des milliers de prisonniers victimes de prélèvements. Cette découverte a amené les responsables médicaux chinois à s’efforcer de forger aux yeux du public un portrait d'un système de transplantation en voie d’être rapidement réformé. Peut-être que certains d’entre vous ont entendu parler de cette promesse. En Occident, la Société de transplantation a joué le jeu en refusant poliment de reconnaître le prélèvement d’organes sur les prisonniers d’opinion, même si de nombreux membres croient que les allégations sont véridiques.
Plus tôt cette année, le gouvernement chinois a renié explicitement sa promesse de réformer le système, ne laissant à la Société de transplantation rien de plus que cette photo maintenant embarrassante. Nous, à notre tour, avons été laissés avec un vide politique.
L’un des éléments de cette réforme avortée portait sur une prétendue interdiction du tourisme occidental de la transplantation. En fait, cette pratique n’a jamais pris fin. Il y a trois mois, ces vendeurs chinois d’organes continuaient d’annoncer ouvertement leurs activités sur le Web.
Le prélèvement des organes sur les adeptes du Falun Gong n’a pas non plus pris fin. Je ne peux pas encore fournir de chiffres sur le nombre de décès de membres du Falun Gong depuis 2008, mais l’année dernière, cette réfugiée d’un camp de travail pour membres du Falun Gong a subi des examens visant à déterminer la compatibilité de ses organes, en même temps que 500 autres prisonniers, surtout des adeptes du Falun Gong.
Que devrait faire le Canada? Je vous invite à lire mon livre avec un regard critique. Je peux affirmer que mes conclusions sont fiables, en partie parce que je m’en tiens largement aux constatations que je viens de présenter. Je n’ai pas écrit ce livre pour influencer votre opinion sur l’État chinois.
Si vous croyez que la Chine constitue un bon investissement, eh bien, vous avez peut-être raison. Mais l’histoire que je viens de vous raconter est également vraie. Et cette histoire continue de s’écrire, aujourd’hui, durant cette audience. Je ne suis pas là pour vous demander de vous engager dans la voie du désinvestissement ou de la guerre commerciale; je vous demande de suivre vos propres valeurs. Comment un citoyen canadien peut-il être complice d’une situation où l’on tue un innocent pour qu’un Canadien puisse vivre?
Le Canada a le pouvoir de mettre un terme à cela. Le mécanisme de criminalisation du tourisme de transplantation des organes est simple — celui qui se rend en Chine et qui en revient avec un nouvel organe ira en prison. Tant et aussi longtemps que les autorités chinoises n’auront pas assumé pleinement la responsabilité de ce crime contre l’humanité, je crois que c’est précisément dans cette voie que le Canada doit s’engager.
Merci.
View David Sweet Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you very much, Chair.
Thank you to both of our witnesses for your testimony.
Whether it's Dr. Noto or Mr. Gutmann, I am okay with either responding.
I want to make it clear that the average Chinese citizen is much different from the People's Republic of China and the regime there. Is the average Chinese citizen suppressed in their protest due to the fact that they'll be lumped in with Falun Gong, and their fear of imprisonment in protesting this kind of behaviour of their own government?
Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.
Je tiens à remercier les témoins d'avoir accepté notre invitation.
L'un ou l'autre d'entre vous peut me répondre.
Je tiens à préciser que la position du citoyen chinois moyen est bien différente de celle de la République populaire de Chine. La crainte d'être associé au Falun Gong et d'être emprisonné pour avoir protesté contre le comportement du gouvernement a-t-elle pour effet de faire taire les protestations des citoyens moyens?
Ethan Gutmann
View Ethan Gutmann Profile
Ethan Gutmann
2014-10-21 13:29
I'm not sure that we know at this time what the ordinary Chinese citizen knows about organ harvesting. There are certainly rumours. This is widely suppressed on the Web.
There is one interesting factoid, though. Just three days before the Chinese medical establishment made its widely trumpeted claims of reform—they were on the front pages of Canadian newspapers, and in my home country of America in The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times—they did open up the Internet to search the term “Wang Lijun live organ harvesting” for 24 hours. This was clearly a factional play. It was as if one faction was saying to another, “How far do you want to go here?”
During this time a lot of the things that people consider rumours were suddenly verified precisely by establishments such as this. They looked at congressional hearings in America, they looked at EU hearings, and they said, “My God, there's something here.”
So as much as I gave a very harsh testimony earlier, I want to say that just the fact that you're holding this hearing is a huge step forward for the Chinese people; it really is.
Nous ne savons pas vraiment pour le moment l'étendue des connaissances du citoyen chinois au sujet du prélèvement d'organes. Il y a des rumeurs qui circulent. Le gouvernement empêche la divulgation d'informations sur le sujet sur le Web.
Toutefois, il y a un fait intéressant à souligner. Trois jours avant que les autorités médicales chinoises annoncent en grandes pompes la mise en oeuvre d'une réforme — ils ont fait la une des journaux canadiens et américains, notamment The Wall Street Journal et The New York Times —, Internet a été déverrouillé pendant 24 heures pour permettre aux gens de rechercher l'expression « Wang Lijun: prélèvement d'organes sur des personnes toujours en vie ». C'était clairement le coup d'une faction. On aurait dit une faction qui disait à une autre: « Jusqu'où êtes-vous prêts à aller? »
Cette courte période a permis à des institutions comme celle-ci de confirmer certaines rumeurs. Les gens ont pu écouter des audiences du Congrès américain et des audiences tenues en Europe et ils se sont rendu compte que les rumeurs étaient vraies.
Donc, malgré mon exposé très dur, je tiens à souligner que cette audience-ci constitue un grand pas en avant pour le peuple chinois. Sincèrement.
Damon Noto
View Damon Noto Profile
Damon Noto
2014-10-21 13:30
I would say that in my experience the ordinary Chinese person is somewhat suppressed by what is taking place with Falun Gong, because when I see Chinese people coming abroad to Canada or the U.S., sometimes if you simply talk with them or discuss with them the issue of organ harvesting or the persecution of Falun Gong, they're afraid. They avoid the topic; they don't want to take a flyer; they don't want to look at the material. I believe that fear is not because they don't want to know; it's because they fear they will be subject to some type of persecution when they return. So I do believe it's having the effect of suppressing their own people.
Mon expérience me porte à croire que le Chinois moyen est quelque peu étouffé par ce qui se passe avec le Falun Gong, car lorsque l'on parle à des ressortissants chinois qui voyagent à l'étranger, au Canada ou aux États-Unis, ou que l'on discute avec eux de la question du prélèvement d'organes ou de la persécution du Falun Gong, on constate qu'ils ont peur. Ils évitent le sujet; ils ne veulent pas prendre un dépliant ou consulter la documentation. À mon avis, ce n'est pas qu'ils ne veulent pas savoir ce qu'il en est; ils ont peur parce qu'ils craignent d'être persécutés d'une façon ou d'une autre à leur retour. Donc, je crois que cela a pour effet de réduire au silence leur propre population.
View David Sweet Profile
CPC (ON)
If you visit Yad Vashem in Israel, you'll see that there's been a sizeable attempt to catalogue all those who were killed in the Holocaust. Is there any attempt within the Falun Gong, Uyghur, and Tibetan communities to try to assemble the names of those missing so we have an idea of those people who have been killed in this forced organ harvesting?
Si vous visitez le centre Yad Vashem, en Israël, vous verrez qu'on y a fait des efforts considérables pour dresser la liste des victimes de l'Holocauste. Au sein du mouvement Falun Gong et des collectivités ouïghoures et tibétaines, a-t-on essayé de faire la liste des personnes disparues pour avoir une idée du nombre de personnes qui ont été tuées dans le cadre de ce stratagème de prélèvements forcés d'organes?
Ethan Gutmann
View Ethan Gutmann Profile
Ethan Gutmann
2014-10-21 13:31
I think what Damon just said is applicable to that as well. There are two problems. One is that families, of course, are afraid at a certain point to go any further in looking for a missing family member. The second point is that many Falun Gong practitioners simply remained nameless after a certain point because they were sick of their families losing their jobs, getting in trouble, and so forth. So when they were asked their name, they would just say Falun Gong practitioner. When they were asked where are you from, what province, they'd say the cosmos. Of these, the nameless ones, there were thousands, tens of thousands possibly. Out of interviewing over 100 people, 100 practitioners, I've only met one who made it out of China alive—one.
Je pense que ce que Damon vient de dire vaut aussi pour cela. Il y a deux problèmes. Le premier est évidemment que les familles ont peur de faire des recherches plus poussées pour retrouver un parent disparu. Le deuxième point, c'est qu'à un moment donné, beaucoup d'adeptes du Falun Gong ont choisi de demeurer anonymes parce qu'ils n'en pouvaient plus de voir des membres de leur famille perdre leur emploi ou avoir des ennuis, etc. Donc, lorsqu'on leur demandait leur nom, ils se disaient simplement des adeptes du Falun Gong. Lorsqu'on leur demandait d'où ils venaient, de quelle province, ils répondaient qu'ils venaient du cosmos. Ces personnes anonymes se comptent par milliers, peut-être par dizaines de milliers. J'ai eu des entretiens avec plus de 100 personnes, 100 adeptes. Parmi ces personnes, une seule est sortie de Chine vivante — une seule.
View David Sweet Profile
CPC (ON)
I think Dr. Noto mentioned that there are only a couple of hundred people on the list in China as far as legitimate donors for organ harvesting are concerned. But yet there must be a very sophisticated system within the military to be able to do this number. You're talking about a minimum of 10,000 up to 20,000, and maybe even more, per year. Do you have any idea about how that system is constructed, how that infrastructure actually plays out?
Si je ne me trompe pas, M. Noto a indiqué qu'en Chine, la liste de donneurs d'organes légitimes ne compte que deux ou trois centaines de personnes. Or, pour arriver à ce nombre de transplantations, les militaires doivent avoir mis en place un système très perfectionné. Vous parlez d'au moins 10 000 par année, et ce nombre pourrait s'élever jusqu'à 20 000 ou plus. Avez-vous une idée de la structure et du fonctionnement de ce système?
Damon Noto
View Damon Noto Profile
Damon Noto
2014-10-21 13:32
We do have a theory that within these prison camps there must be some categorizing of these people's blood types, tissue types, and they must have some type of data bank that makes it easily accessible. Whether that's happening regionally or locally, we do know that when medical tourism happens and someone comes, they are able to rapidly find a person who matches them. So there must be some type of categorizing for this to occur. We don't know exactly how it takes place, but we do theorize that it is happening.
Nous avons une hypothèse selon laquelle il y aurait dans ces camps de prisonniers un genre de répertoire où seraient consignés le groupe sanguin et les types de tissus des gens, ainsi qu'une base de données quelconque qui rendrait ces données facilement accessibles. Nous savons que lorsqu'une personne se rend là-bas à des fins de tourisme médical, on parvient à trouver rapidement un donneur compatible, et ce, tant à l'échelle régionale qu'à l'échelle locale. Donc, pour que ce soit possible, il faut un genre de répertoire. Nous ne savons pas exactement comment cela fonctionne, mais c'est notre hypothèse.
Ethan Gutmann
View Ethan Gutmann Profile
Ethan Gutmann
2014-10-21 13:33
Dr. Ko Wen-je claimed—I asked him this question—that it's done on an informal e-based system between doctors. In other words, if somebody's looking for something and says, I need this blood type, it's passed around through that. There are some fantastic dissident hackers who have wanted to hack into sort of a central database. We're not sure it exists.
Lorsque je lui ai posé la question, le Dr Ko Wen-je a affirmé que pour ce faire, les médecins utilisaient un système électronique non officiel. Autrement dit, si quelqu'un cherche quelque chose et indique avoir besoin d'un groupe sanguin précis, l'information est transmise par ce système. Parmi les dissidents, on trouve de formidables pirates informatiques qui ont voulu pirater une base de données centrale quelconque. Nous ne sommes pas certains qu'il y en ait une.
View Wayne Marston Profile
NDP (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I just want to note that when I first arrived here in 2006—I won't name them—there were a number of MPs who said to me, the Falun Gong, stay away from them, they're crazy. I stopped and listened to them and I realized why these MPs were saying it was because of their disbelief of the facts, the horrific facts, of the people being murdered for their organs. I and others in this room have stood with the Falun Gong for a number of years, and Matas and Kilgour have come here at least three times that I can recall presenting the information. I'm really pleased with your testimony here today because it's added to the level of understanding, which is is so important. Recently I met with some Falun Gong practitioners, who were, I would say, slightly optimistic that the change of leadership that's happening in China was an opening for them. Listening to you today now I doubt that. In your efforts to study this, did you look at the leadership change and what that impact might be?
Merci, monsieur le président.
Je veux simplement souligner que lorsque je suis arrivé ici en 2006, plusieurs députés que je ne nommerai pas m'ont dit de me tenir loin des adeptes du Falun Gong, qu'ils ont qualifié de fous. J'ai interrompu mes activités pour écouter ces députés et je me suis rendu compte qu'ils tenaient de tels propos parce qu'ils étaient consternés par le fait — horrible — que des gens étaient assassinés pour leurs organes. À l'instar d'autres personnes qui sont ici, j'ai appuyé des adeptes du Falun Gong pendant un certain nombre d'années, et d'après ce que je me rappelle, MM. Matas et Kilgour sont venus au moins trois fois pour nous présenter des informations. Je suis véritablement heureux du témoignage que vous avez livré ici aujourd'hui parce qu'il a accru notre degré de compréhension, ce qui est très important. Récemment, j'ai rencontré des adeptes du Falun Gong qui, je dirais, avaient bon espoir que la passation des pouvoirs que l'on voit en Chine représente une ouverture pour eux. Or, en vous écoutant aujourd'hui, j'en doute. Dans votre étude sur la question, avez-vous tenu compte de la passation des pouvoirs et de l'incidence que cela pourrait avoir?
Ethan Gutmann
View Ethan Gutmann Profile
Ethan Gutmann
2014-10-21 13:35
I'm not a Falun Gong practitioner, but Falun Gong practitioners have obviously taken a strong interest in my work over the years and I've often been an embedded reporter with them. They'd often say to me, Ethan, you have to hurry up on your research. Why is that, I asked? It's because the leadership's changing, Xi Jinping is coming in, and this kind of thing. They used to say this about Hu Jintao. That was quite a while ago when we was coming in. I didn't have to hurry my research it turns out, because this has remained as a problem. In fact, when I thought I was writing it, I thought I was probably writing history because I wondered how the Chinese, given this level of exposure, could continue to do this. But to my complete surprise, they are.
Je ne suis pas un adepte du Falun Gong, mais de toute évidence, les adeptes de ce mouvement ont démontré un vif intérêt pour mon travail au fil des ans et j'ai souvent été journaliste intégré au sein du groupe. On m'a souvent indiqué que je devrais accélérer mes recherches. Lorsque je demandais pourquoi, on me disait que c'était en raison du changement à la tête du pays, de l'arrivée de Xi Jinping, etc. Ils tenaient les mêmes propos par rapport à Hu Jintao. Cela remonte à un certain temps, à son arrivée au pouvoir. Il s'avère que je n'ai pas dû intensifier mes recherches, parce que la situation posait toujours problème. En fait, pendant la rédaction, j'ai pensé que j'étais probablement en train d'écrire l'histoire parce que je me demandais comment les Chinois pourraient continuer à agir ainsi étant donné l'attention que suscite cet enjeu. Or, à ma grande surprise, cela se poursuit.
View Wayne Marston Profile
NDP (ON)
It sounds to me, listening to your report, that there is a far more sophisticated system at work here than people anticipated. When you start talking about the number of victims, I don't think we've ever heard the numbers you related to us today and the scale of this, which means there's a tremendous number of people involved beyond the leadership and a whole system dependent on sourcing Uyghurs and Tibetans. It's really tragic.
I don't know whether you're aware or not, but our Prime Minister is scheduled to go to China. I don't know whether you could measure this or not, but do you think there's an opening for any kind of influence with this government? You alluded to trade. Of course, going back a number of years, we were one of the first countries to start going to China. We have an opportunity, I think, to utilize our sensibilities around human rights issues to raise this, but do you think that there would be a sympathetic ear there at all?
À la lumière de votre témoignage, il semble y avoir là un système beaucoup plus perfectionné que ce que les gens avaient imaginé. Lorsqu'on parle du nombre de victimes, je ne pense pas que nous ayons déjà entendu parler de chiffres comme ceux que vous nous avez présentés aujourd'hui ni du fait que cela avait atteint une telle ampleur. Cela signifie donc qu'outre les dirigeants, un nombre effarant de personnes et un système tout entier utilisent les Ouïghours et les Tibétains comme source d'organes. C'est vraiment tragique.
Je ne sais pas si vous êtes au courant, mais notre premier ministre doit se rendre en Chine. Je ne sais pas si vous êtes en mesure de le déterminer ou non, mais pensez-vous que cela pourrait avoir une influence quelconque sur ce gouvernement? Vous avez fait allusion au commerce. Évidemment, si l'on remonte à un certain nombre d'années, nous étions parmi les premiers pays à se tourner vers la Chine. Je pense que nous avons l'occasion d'utiliser nos préoccupations à l'égard des questions liées aux droits de la personne pour soulever ce point, mais selon vous, y a-t-il une possibilité que cela soit accueilli favorablement?
Ethan Gutmann
View Ethan Gutmann Profile
Ethan Gutmann
2014-10-21 13:37
I do and I will take a shot at that question.
The interesting thing is that Israel—and basically half of its software and IT industry has Chinese investment—chose to simply end organ tourism. They just turned around and did it without caring about any economic repercussions. It turned out there were no economic repercussions.
That's one case. I'm not saying it changes everything.
I'd like to deal with the political, if possible. It's hard for me to imagine that Canada would actually use trade as a weapon in this situation, which is why I asked for what I think is possible, which is to control the medical procedures here.
Oui; je vais essayer de répondre à la question.
Fait intéressant, Israël — où la moitié de l'industrie des TI et des logiciels bénéficie des investissements chinois — a choisi d'interdire le tourisme à des fins de transplantation d'organes. Le pays l'a fait sans se soucier des répercussions économiques. En fin de compte, il n'y a eu aucune répercussion économique.
Ce n'est qu'un exemple. Je ne dis pas que cela change tout.
J'aimerais, si possible, parler de l'aspect politique. J'ai de la difficulté à imaginer que le Canada puisse vraiment utiliser le commerce comme une arme dans ce dossier. Voilà pourquoi j'ai demandé une chose que j'estime possible, soit la surveillance des procédures médicales au Canada.
View Wayne Marston Profile
NDP (ON)
Nexen purchased $15 billion in the oil sands, so the door is open that way already.
Going back to your thoughts around criminalization of the organ transplant tourist, that sounds to me like it's something reasonable. Have they done this in Europe?
Nexen a des intérêts de 15 milliards de dollars dans les sables bitumineux. Il y a donc déjà une ouverture de ce côté.
Pour revenir à vos commentaires sur la criminalisation du tourisme à des fins de transplantation d'organes, cela me semble une solution raisonnable. Une telle mesure a-t-elle été adoptée en Europe?
Damon Noto
View Damon Noto Profile
Damon Noto
2014-10-21 13:38
Europe has not, but a very reasonable thing to do, at least, would be to have a medical advisory that patients travelling outside the country—
Non, mais la moindre des choses serait d'avoir un avis des autorités médicales indiquant que les patients voyageant à l'extérieur du pays...
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
I wonder if I could follow up on one point before I go to the next questioner?
You said Israel shut this down. Did Israel adopt a regime similar to what you suggested: a statute saying that it is an offence to go to China for this purpose?
Avant de passer au prochain intervenant, pourrais-je poser une question complémentaire sur un point précis?
Vous avez indiqué qu'Israël l'a interdit. Israël a-t-il adopté une mesure semblable à celle que vous avez proposée, soit une loi qui prévoit que se rendre en Chine à cette fin constitue une infraction?
Damon Noto
View Damon Noto Profile
Damon Noto
2014-10-21 13:39
The answer is yes. The first thing they enacted was that no medical insurance within Israel could pay for any type of organ transplantation abroad. Then they put policies in place to make it illegal to travel for medical tourism, especially transplantation, to China. So the answer is yes.
Oui. La première mesure à entrer en vigueur était d'interdire aux compagnies d'assurance médicale israéliennes de rembourser les frais pour toute transplantation d'organes à l'étranger. Ensuite, Israël a mis en place des politiques visant à rendre illégaux les voyages en Chine à des fins de tourisme médical, en particulier pour une transplantation. Donc, la réponse est oui.
View Nina Grewal Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Chair, and thank you to our witnesses today for their time and presentations.
When we look at the Kilgour/Matas report and the actions of the European Parliament and the UN, have they caused any real change on the ground in China? Did China slow organ trafficking at all because of this international attention?
Merci, monsieur le président. Merci aux témoins de leur temps et de leurs exposés.
Le rapport Kilgour-Matas ainsi que les mesures prises par le Parlement européen et les Nations Unies ont-ils entraîné de véritables changements sur le terrain en Chine? La Chine a-t-elle freiné le trafic d'organes en raison de l'attention internationale?
Damon Noto
View Damon Noto Profile
Damon Noto
2014-10-21 13:40
There has been some effect. One is that a lot of it went underground. There were a lot of things that we had access to before the Kilgour/Matas report. They had an open public register that we could actually look at in Hong Kong. That closed after the Kilgour/Matas report. The information became harder to get, but as for whether this mass system slowed, we don't feel that it did. The only thing that might have slowed it was the Olympics in Beijing. I don't really think the Kilgour/Matas report had an effect. The fact that they made it open to the public, and made it more widely known, had ripples, but did not really slow the amount of transplants that were occurring.
Cela a eu certains effets, dont l'un est que beaucoup d'activités se font maintenant dans la clandestinité. Avant le rapport Kilgour-Matas, nous avions accès à beaucoup de choses. Il y avait, à Hong Kong, un registre public que l'on pouvait consulter, ce qui n'est plus possible depuis la publication du rapport. L'information est devenue plus difficile à obtenir, mais quant à la question de savoir s'il y a eu un ralentissement de ces activités, nous n'avons pas cette impression. La seule chose qui pourrait avoir entraîné un ralentissement, ce sont les Jeux olympiques de Beijing. Je ne crois pas que le rapport Kilgour-Matas ait eu un effet. Le fait que cela a été rendu public et que le problème est mieux connu a eu une incidence, mais cela n'a pas vraiment réduit le nombre de transplantations qui sont effectuées.
Ethan Gutmann
View Ethan Gutmann Profile
Ethan Gutmann
2014-10-21 13:40
I think there is another aspect, which is that it slowed the rate of public executions in China. Again, these are prisoners who are on death row. It appears to have had an effect on slowing down that rate. Supposedly they are closing some of the labour camps, although we don't actually see a sign of a lessening of the overall population in Laogai if you put together everything: prisons, labour camps, black jails, mental hospitals, and detention centres. So in fact it's a kind of reorganization.
But these clearly seem to be oriented towards western consumption. One of the problems we've had in this—if you think of it as an activist struggle of some kind—is that some doctors look at this and just say, “Well, nobody should be executed for their organs, period”. Others are looking—and I guess I'd put myself in with Kilgour and Matas, who are much more concerned with prisoners of conscience. We really think this steps over a very serious line.
In Europe, because they're very against the death penalty, they often equate Liaoning province and Texas as being practically the same thing.
Je pense qu'il y a un autre aspect, soit la réduction du taux d'exécution publique en Chine. Encore une fois, ce sont des prisonniers condamnés à mort. Il semble y avoir eu une baisse du nombre d'exécutions. Il semblerait que l'on procède à la fermeture de certains camps de travail, même si l'on n'observe pas une réelle diminution de la population globale des Laoga lorsque l'on regroupe tous les établissements: les prisons, les camps de travail, les prisons noires, les hôpitaux psychiatriques et les centres de détention. Donc, en réalité, c'est une réorganisation, en quelque sorte.
Toutefois, on semble clairement cibler la clientèle occidentale. L'un des problèmes que nous avons eus à cet égard — si l'on aborde la question comme une lutte activiste quelconque —, c'est que certains médecins examinent la question et se contentent de dire que personne ne devrait être exécuté pour ses organes, point. D'autres se rangent plutôt du côté de Kilgour et Matas qui sont beaucoup plus préoccupés par les prisonniers d'opinion. Nous croyons vraiment que cela va beaucoup trop loin.
En Europe, en raison de leur grande opposition à la peine de mort, les gens ont souvent tendance à mettre la province du Liaoning et le Texas sur un pied d'égalité.
View Nina Grewal Profile
CPC (BC)
Regarding organ transplant tourism, how many so-called international tourists are there annually, and do you have the number of Canadians travelling to China for this each year?
Concernant le tourisme à des fins de transplantation d'organes, combien y a-t-il de soi-disant touristes internationaux annuellement? Combien de Canadiens se rendent en Chine à cette fin chaque année?
Damon Noto
View Damon Noto Profile
Damon Noto
2014-10-21 13:42
There are thousands of tourists. I don't know the number of Canadians. I can say that there are over 100 from the U.S. a year. I know those numbers; I don't know Canadian numbers. But by far for America the number one place to go for organs is China, and it's increasing every year. I don't know the Canadian numbers, but if you look at all the countries, there are thousands of people going to China for organs.
On parle de milliers de touristes. Je ne connais pas le nombre de Canadiens. Je peux vous dire qu'il y a plus de 100 ressortissants américains par année. Ce sont les chiffres que j'ai; je n'en ai pas pour le Canada. Toutefois, pour les États-Unis, la destination de choix pour les organes est la Chine, et cela augmente chaque année. Je ne connais pas les données pour le Canada, mais si vous regardez l'ensemble des pays, des milliers de personnes se rendent en Chine à des fins de transplantation d'organes.
Ethan Gutmann
View Ethan Gutmann Profile
Ethan Gutmann
2014-10-21 13:42
Anecdotally—and I hate to plug another author's book—Daniel Asa Rose wrote a book called Larry's Kidney, a very humourous account of his getting a kidney for his ne'er-do-well cousin in China.
En passant — et je n'aime pas promouvoir le livre d'un autre auteur —, Daniel Asa Rose a écrit un livre intitulé Larry's Kidney, dans lequel il raconte avec beaucoup d'humour comment il est allé chercher un rein en Chine pour son incapable cousin.
View Nina Grewal Profile
CPC (BC)
Can one of you expand on the demand for organs in China? Is legislation against organ trafficking enough to stop the demand for organs? How does this demand get addressed in a healthy way?
L'un de vous peut-il nous parler de la demande d'organes en Chine? Une mesure législative interdisant le trafic d'organes suffirait à enrayer la demande d'organes? Comment peut-on s'attaquer à cette demande de façon adéquate?
Damon Noto
View Damon Noto Profile
Damon Noto
2014-10-21 13:43
Do you mean the demand to get organs? That demand is huge worldwide, and I don't think enacting laws is going to stop the demand. I do believe that it would stop Canadian citizens on a large scale from going over to China, but that demand we're looking at is going to be there for years to come.
Parlez-vous de la demande pour obtenir des organes? À l'échelle mondiale, la demande est énorme et je ne pense pas que l'adoption d'une loi puisse enrayer cette demande. Je crois cependant que cela empêcherait les citoyens canadiens à se rendre en Chine en grand nombre, mais la demande que nous voyons actuellement se maintiendra pendant des années.
Ethan Gutmann
View Ethan Gutmann Profile
Ethan Gutmann
2014-10-21 13:43
I don't want to say that the revenue stream is really the significant thing. If you were stopping organ tourism coming from Canada, perhaps that's not the most salient point. But it is true that there are cases, at least unverified, of people having paid up to $2 million for one of these organs. If you're talking about some extremely wealthy person, the kind of person who could easily exist in Japan, Canada, or the United States, it's very possible that some people have paid these sorts of figures. That is an incentive.
It is true that the Chinese pay half the foreigner price. They pay sometimes much less than the foreigner price. For example, if we take the $62,000 U.S. wanted for a kidney back in 2004, the Chinese were paying sometimes as low as $2,000 for that same kidney, so there is a monetary point.
But I think the larger point is this, that China has great ambitions in the medical field. They see this as what they call a pillar industry—pharmaceuticals. They see themselves as the new Rome, the new FDA, where people will go to do their experiments and go for drug approval. Any message that this body can send them saying, “No, you're not there yet” is very important. It does have a massive impact, far beyond what you might recognize.
Je ne veux pas dire que la question des revenus est l'élément essentiel. Ce n'est peut-être pas l'aspect le plus important si l'on veut empêcher les Canadiens à se livrer au tourisme à des fins de transplantation d'organes. Toutefois, il est vrai qu'il existe des cas — du moins non confirmés — de gens qui ont payé jusqu'à deux millions de dollars pour l'un de ces organes. Si l'on parle de gens extrêmement riches, le genre de personnes que l'on pourrait trouver facilement au Japon, au Canada ou aux États-Unis, il est tout à fait possible que certaines de ces personnes aient payé ce genre de montants. C'est un incitatif.
Il est vrai que les Chinois paient un prix deux fois moindre que les étrangers. Parfois, il est beaucoup plus bas que le prix pour les étrangers. Par exemple, si l'on prend le montant de 62 000 $ américains que l'on exigeait pour un rein en 2004, les Chinois payaient parfois aussi peu que 2 000 $ pour ce même rein. Il y a donc un aspect financier.
Cependant, je pense que le point le plus important est le suivant: dans le domaine médical, la Chine a de grandes ambitions. Elle considère que l'industrie des médicaments est une industrie pilier, comme on l'appelle. La Chine se perçoit comme la nouvelle Rome, la nouvelle FDA, la destination de choix pour les gens qui voudront mener des expériences et faire approuver des médicaments. Tout message que peut lui envoyer cette institution pour faire savoir à la Chine qu'elle n'en est pas encore là est très important. Cela a certes un effet colossal, un effet bien plus important que ce que vous seriez prêts à reconnaître.
View Nina Grewal Profile
CPC (BC)
My last question goes to Mr. Gutmann. It seems that China's criminal system has an incentive to kill its prisoners in order to supply the health care system with new organs, so how do you break that connection between China's criminal justice system and its health care system?
Ma dernière question s'adresse à M. Gutmann. Il semble que le système judiciaire chinois ait intérêt à exécuter les prisonniers afin de fournir de nouveaux organes au système de soins de santé. Par conséquent, comment peut-on briser le lien entre le système judiciaire et le système de soins de santé en Chine?
Ethan Gutmann
View Ethan Gutmann Profile
Ethan Gutmann
2014-10-21 13:45
What we hear not so anecdotally from World Organization to Investigate the Persecution of Falun Gong, which actually has a very strong investigative team of native Chinese who go in and make phone calls and get to know people who are involved in this business, is what they describe as a bidding system, almost a bidding war for judges between the armed police on the one side and the military hospitals on the other.
In other words, the military hospitals were always given carte blanche to do organ harvesting of prisoners of conscience. The armed police are trying to move into the action, and that's where we're at. The legal system, I'm afraid, is totally corrupt and of course that is the larger tragedy of this whole thing, that you've taken the two most respected professions in any society—well, perhaps not the legal one in our society—but certainly doctors are number one in any society, and it has been deeply corrupted.
D'après ce que nous a indiqué l'Organisation mondiale d'enquête sur la persécution du Falun Gong — qui compte sur une excellente équipe d'enquête formée de personnes d'origine chinoise qui se rendent sur le terrain, qui font des appels téléphoniques et qui apprennent à connaître les gens qui sont dans ce milieu — il s'agirait d'une sorte de système d'enchères, presque une guerre d'enchères pour les juges, une guerre qui opposerait les services de police armés aux hôpitaux militaires.
Autrement dit, les hôpitaux militaires ont toujours eu carte blanche pour le prélèvement des organes des prisonniers d'opinion. Les services de police armée tentent de s'immiscer dans ce milieu. Voilà où en est la situation. Malheureusement, le système juridique est totalement corrompu. La plus grande tragédie dans toute cette affaire, c'est que deux des professions les plus respectées dans toute société — eh bien, ce n'est peut-être pas le cas de la profession juridique dans notre société —, mais les médecins le sont certainement dans toute société, et la profession est profondément minée par la corruption.
View Irwin Cotler Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
As has been said, we've had witness testimony on these matters more than once, principally from David Kilgour and David Matas.
I have to say that I feel that today is a tipping point in this whole matter because a number of considerations have emerged from your joint testimony today, which I think really are the basis for what needs to be done at this point, and that is to sound the alarm.
First, there is an ongoing crime against humanity being committed. There has been some sense—and maybe this has been part of what the Chinese authorities have managed to accomplish—that somehow there has been an abatement or that they have turned away from it, etc. I think the first thing that emerges is that there are ongoing crimes against humanity.
Second, these are state-sanctioned. I think that's an important dimension to it.
The third is that it is targeting political prisoners—mainly Falun Gong but not only Falun Gong—in the manner in which it is targeting minorities and the vulnerable in China.
The fourth thing is that there is an ongoing culture of impunity, and nobody has been held responsible.
The final thing—and this is where it becomes the responsibility of us as parliamentarians—is that if we remain silent, we effectively are complicit in all of the above things that I mentioned.
I've introduced a private member's bill to do what you've suggested, Dr. Gutmann, which is to criminalize organ tourism. It has been seconded by my colleague here Judy Sgro. But since I am a member of the Liberal party, the third party, it will not go anywhere. I'm also low on the totem pole, etc. in terms of getting a private member's bill considered.
This to me is something we have to get the government onside with, because unless we have governmental backing for it, it will go nowhere. That's what I think makes your comments propitious for the Prime Minister and the foreign minister, who will be visiting China shortly. I'm not saying that their bringing it up will have an impact; I'm saying that their not bringing it up would have an impact, because then China could therefore infer that we don't take it seriously.
So I think, therefore, number one, the representations in China have to be made by our leadership. Number two, we have to push that private member's bill to try to get it to be a governmental bill.
Finally—and this is what I wanted to put as a question on this—how can we internationalize the advocacy? How can we create a critical mass of advocacy around the points you mentioned, so that there will end up being a mobilization of shame against the human rights violated, in this instance in China, that will have some effect?
Merci, monsieur le président.
Comme on l'a indiqué, nous avons entendu des témoignages à ce sujet plus d'une fois, principalement de la part de David Kilgour et David Matas.
Je dois dire que j'ai l'impression d'être à un point tournant dans ce dossier aujourd'hui en raison du nombre de considérations qui sont ressorties de vos témoignages aujourd'hui, lesquels forment, selon moi, le fondement de ce qu'il faut faire au point actuel, c'est-à-dire sonner l'alarme.
Tout d'abord, il se commet actuellement un crime contre l'humanité. On a eu l'impression — peut-être en raison de ce que les autorités chinoises ont réussi à accomplir — que le phénomène était en régression ou que ces pratiques avaient été abandonnées. Je pense que le premier constat qui émerge, c'est qu'on commet des crimes contre l'humanité.
De plus, ces actes sont sanctionnés par l'État. Je pense que c'est une dimension importante du problème.
Ensuite, on prend pour cible des prisonniers politiques — principalement, mais pas exclusivement, des adeptes du Falun Gong —, de la manière dont on cible les minorités et les personnes vulnérables en Chine.
Il existe en outre une culture d'impunité, et personne n'a été tenu responsable de ces actes.
Enfin — et c'est là que l'affaire relève de notre responsabilité à titre de parlementaires —, si nous restons silencieux, nous devenons complices de tous les actes que je viens d'énumérer.
J'ai déposé un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire pour faire ce que vous avez proposé, monsieur Gutmann, c'est-à-dire criminaliser le tourisme de transplantation des organes. Ce projet de loi a été appuyé par ma collègue ici présente, Judy Sgro. Mais comme je suis membre du Parti libéral, le troisième parti, les choses n'iront nulle part. Je suis également en bas de l'échelle quand vient le temps de faire examiner des projets de loi.
À mon avis, il faut convaincre le gouvernement d'agir dans ce dossier, car sans son appui, cela n'ira nulle part. Voilà pourquoi vos commentaires arrivent à point nommé pour le premier ministre et le ministre des Affaires étrangères, qui visiteront bientôt la Chine. Je ne prétends pas que le fait de soulever la question aura une incidence, mais je dis que de ne pas le faire en aura une, car la Chine pourrait alors conclure que nous ne prenons pas le problème au sérieux.
Je pense donc que nos dirigeants doivent aborder le problème avec la Chine et que nous devons faire la promotion de ce projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire pour en faire un projet de loi émanant du gouvernement.
Enfin — et c'est sur ce point que je voulais poser une question — comment pouvons-nous élargir des efforts de défense des victimes à l'échelle internationale? Comment pouvons-nous créer une masse critique de défense des droits au sujet des points que vous avez soulevés afin de mobiliser ceux qui ont honte pour qu'ils agissent contre la violation des droits de la personne afin d'avoir une incidence, en Chine dans le cas présent?
Damon Noto
View Damon Noto Profile
Damon Noto
2014-10-21 13:49
I can talk only from a medical perspective. Our goal has always been to have the international medical community make it very difficult for China.
I'll give you an example. These Chinese transplant surgeons and the Chinese Medical Association are still members of the international transplant society. Their memberships have not been revoked even though they don't comply with any of the international standards for ethical transplantation. They continue to want to engage with China, to keep them in, to keep talking with them, instead of actually forcing them and saying, “Listen, you can't be a member and you can't join our meetings and you can't give presentations unless you can abide by these standards”.
We keep having different types of standards for China, whether we're interacting with it economically or medically. If different countries could put pressure on their own organizations—for instance, we are working on the American Medical Association—and their transplant societies and say, “Listen, we really need to do something about China being a member of any of these organizations”, that would put pressure on them, from at least a medical aspect, to say, “Listen, you have to knock this off. You can't be a member of our international community and continue to do these unethical crimes against humanity”.
Je ne peux parler que du point de vue médical. Notre objectif a toujours consisté à convaincre la communauté médicale internationale de rendre les choses très difficiles pour la Chine.
Je vous donnerai un exemple. Les chirurgiens chinois qui effectuent des transplantations et la Chinese Medical Association sont encore membres de la société de transplantation internationale. Leur adhésion n'a pas été révoquée même s'ils ne se conforment pas aux normes internationales de transplantation éthique. La société continue de traiter avec la Chine, de garder ses membres en son sein et de lui parler au lieu de lui forcer la main en lui indiquant qu'elle ne peut rester membre, participer aux réunions et faire des exposés à moins qu'elle ne respecte les normes.
Nous continuons d'appliquer des normes différentes pour la Chine, que ce soit dans les domaines économique ou médical. Si divers pays pouvaient exercer des pressions sur leurs propres organisations — nous travaillons avec l'American Medical Association, par exemple — et leurs sociétés de transplantation pour leur signifier qu'il faut vraiment faire quelque chose à propos du fait que la Chine est membre de ces organisations, cela les obligerait, du moins du point de vue médical, à dire « Écoutez, ces pratiques doivent cesser. Vous ne pouvez faire partie de notre communauté internationale et continuer de commettre ces crimes contre l'humanité contraires à l'éthique. »
Ethan Gutmann
View Ethan Gutmann Profile
Ethan Gutmann
2014-10-21 13:50
I'd just add that there are several states certainly—I've testified in Scotland—that have shown a huge interest. Whether they're independent or not, they control their health policy, and they control their education policy. They've shown a lot of interest in stopping organ tourism, and they've seriously considered it.
In New South Wales in Australia, the Greens wrote up a very intricate and beautifully designed bill that would have stopped organ tourism. They even did it without actually mentioning China. This was their very clever way of doing it, but they apparently hade a fair amount of bipartisan support, even though they're Greens.
I think there are other states. I live in London, and I don't expect Westminster to move quickly on this. It's the world's bank, and London is the world's banker, but it is interesting to note this sort of strange confluence of Scotland, Australia, and potentially Canada. These are the countries that could really change everything, because they could put that kind of pressure on Westminster. So even to consider it, or even to have some kind of cooperation with these other parties out there, some sort of coordination, could make a major change. If Westminster were to change its mind, if Westminster were to feel a lot of pressure—the Irish too, by the way, have shown a lot of interest—one can imagine that Berlin could change its mind too.
J'ajouterais seulement que plusieurs États — j'ai témoigné en Écosse — ont certainement fait preuve d'un intérêt considérable. Qu'ils soient indépendants ou non, ils administrent leurs politiques en matière de santé et d'éducation. Ils se sont montrés très intéressés à mettre fin au tourisme de transplantation des organes et envisagent sérieusement d'agir à cet égard.
En Nouvelle-Galles du Sud, en Australie, le Parti vert a écrit un projet de loi magnifiquement conçu et très élaboré qui aurait mis fin au tourisme de transplantation des organes. Il l'a même fait sans faire mention de la Chine. C'était très futé de sa part, mais il jouissait apparemment d'un solide soutien bipartite, même s'il s'agit du Parti vert.
Je pense qu'il y a d'autres États. Je vis à Londres et je ne m'attends pas à ce que Westminster agisse promptement dans ce dossier. C'est la banque mondiale, et Londres est le banquier du monde, mais il est intéressant de constater qu'il y a une sorte de confluence étrange entre l'Écosse, l'Australie et potentiellement le Canada. Ce sont les pays qui pourraient vraiment tout changer, parce qu'ils pourraient exercer des pressions sur Westminster. Ainsi, le seul fait d'envisager d'agir ou même d'avoir une sorte de coopération ou de coordination avec ces autres parties de l'étranger pourrait apporter un changement majeur. Si Westminster changeait d'avis ou subissait beaucoup de pression — les Irlandais font aussi preuve d'un grand intérêt, soit dit en passant —, on peut imaginer que Berlin pourrait changer son fusil d'épaule également.
View Irwin Cotler Profile
Lib. (QC)
I might add that I borrowed from the Australian model and did not mention China specifically for the purposes of mobilizing more support.
Je pourrais ajouter que je me suis inspiré du modèle australien et que je n'ai pas parlé directement de la Chine pour recueillir plus de soutien.
View Gary Schellenberger Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you.
Thank you for your presentation today.
I've heard in this committee about many tragic occurrences, about things that you just wouldn't realize would still happen in this world today.
A very good friend of mine donated a kidney to his sister quite a number of years ago. She survived for 26 years, I think, as a live transplant recipient. She just passed away a couple of years ago.
I know you can't transplant hearts and have two people living at the end, but with kidneys, some liver transplants, or partial liver transplants, is that part of what goes on in China now?
Merci.
Je vous remercie de vos exposés d'aujourd'hui.
Au sein du comité, j'ai entendu parler de nombreux événements tragiques et de choses dont on ne peut imaginer qu'elles se produisent encore de nos jours.
Un de mes très bons amis a fait don d'un rein à sa soeur il y a bien des années. Elle a survécu 26 ans, je pense, après avoir reçu la transplantation. Elle est décédée il y a deux ou trois ans.
Je sais qu'on ne peut transplanter de coeur et avoir deux personnes vivantes à la fin, mais est-ce qu'il s'effectue des transplantations de rein ou des transplantations partielles du foie en Chine actuellement?
Damon Noto
View Damon Noto Profile
Damon Noto
2014-10-21 13:53
We believe it occurs in very small numbers. It's almost insignificant, when you look at the total number of transplants being performed every year, that those are taking place. Typically, if it's from the prisoner system, obviously they are executed and cremated. There are very few people coming forward to donate for a relative or a friend in that type of perspective. There has been an increase over the past couple years in the Chinese literature, but it's been small.
Nous pensons qu'il s'en fait très peu. C'est presque insignifiant au regard du nombre total de transplantations réalisées chaque année. Habituellement, si cela se produit dans le système carcéral, les gens sont évidemment exécutés et incinérés. Très peu de personnes se proposent pour faire don d'un organe à un parent ou un ami dans ce contexte. Il y a eu une augmentation ces dernières années dans la documentation en Chine, mais c'est minime.
Ethan Gutmann
View Ethan Gutmann Profile
Ethan Gutmann
2014-10-21 13:54
It's not terribly well verified, either. I mean, one of the reasons we have that picture of the three surgeons is that it was one of the very rare occasions where somebody actually donated their organs. It was released for that reason. Even so, the surgeons still look awfully nervous about the whole thing.
On ne vérifie pas tellement bien les faits non plus. Si nous avons une photo des trois chirurgiens, c'est parce que c'était une des très rares occasions où quelqu'un a fait don de ses organes. C'est la raison pour laquelle elle a été publiée. Même ainsi, les chirurgiens semblent extrêmement nerveux à propos de toute l'affaire.
Damon Noto
View Damon Noto Profile
Damon Noto
2014-10-21 13:54
Just one further point here is that one of the big problems we have is that the international standard for transplantation means you should be open to scrutiny, which means the public should have the ability to go in and look at your transplant numbers, where they're coming from, and if it's being done ethically. China fails on this completely. There are no third parties that can look at or verify anything that takes place within China.
That's a big part of the problem that the transplant community has with China. We can't verify all these things. They won't let you. They just don't give you access to any of this.
J'aimerais également faire remarquer qu'un des gros problèmes qui se posent, c'est que la norme internationale de transplantation exige qu'on soit disposé à faire l'objet d'un examen, ce qui signifie que le public devrait pouvoir consulter les données sur le nombre de transplantations et l'origine des organes, et savoir si on a procédé de manière éthique. La Chine ne fait rien de tel. Aucune tierce partie ne peut examiner ou vérifier les activités menées en Chine.
C'est une part considérable du problème auquel la communauté de la transplantation est confrontée avec la Chine. Nous ne pouvons vérifier tout cela, car on ne nous permet pas de le faire. On ne nous donne accès à aucun renseignement.
View Gary Schellenberger Profile
CPC (ON)
Given the aging population and demographic reality in China, will there be even greater demand for organ transplants in the coming decades? Or is it the international community that's keeping the demand high?
Le vieillissement de la population et la réalité démographique en Chine feront-elles augmenter encore la demande en transplantation d'organes au cours des prochaines décennies ou est-ce la communauté internationale qui maintient la demande élevée?
Damon Noto
View Damon Noto Profile
Damon Noto
2014-10-21 13:55
I think it will be both. China's mean income is coming up, and the demand worldwide for organs is just going to increase over the next five to ten years. So in my opinion, the demand will go higher.
Je pense que les deux facteurs entreront en jeu. Le revenu familial moyen augmente en Chine, et la demande en organes à l'échelle mondiale ne fera que croître au cours des 5 à 10 prochaines années. À mon avis, donc, la demande augmentera.
View Gary Schellenberger Profile
CPC (ON)
You stressed earlier, or I think you were suggesting, that putting pressure on the medical community would be more beneficial then a direct push on the Chinese government. I think this should probably be double-barrelled, but at the same time, is it your feeling that putting pressure on the international medical community would be more beneficial to try to reach a resolve?
Précédemment, vous avez souligné — ou laissé entendre, je pense — qu'il serait préférable d'exercer des pressions sur la communauté médicale que d'agir directement auprès du gouvernement chinois. Je pense qu'il faudrait probablement agir sur les deux plans, mais tout de même, considérez-vous qu'il serait plus bénéfique d'exercer des pressions sur la communauté médicale internationale que de tenter d'en arriver à une résolution?
Damon Noto
View Damon Noto Profile
Damon Noto
2014-10-21 13:56
Actually, I was just saying that I know more about the medical community, but I think it needs to be double-effect. I know that in the U.S. a lot of medical doctors are working on a resolution, which is going through Congress right now and hopefully will be passed this year, that pretty much has a very strong stance against organ harvesting in China, possibly banning people being able to go to China for organs.
I think the medical community feels that we need to do it definitely from both angles, but the problem with us is that I feel the medical community is being somewhat hypocritical saying “Yes, we should be doing something” when we still allow them in all our organizations. When we talk about being complicit in a crime against humanity, it's very sad that in this day in age our own medical community might be being very complicit in a crime against humanity.
En fait, je dirais simplement que j'en sais plus sur la communauté médicale, mais je pense qu'il faut agir sur les deux plans. Je sais qu'aux États-Unis, de nombreux médecins travaillent à une résolution, laquelle est actuellement devant le Congrès. On espère qu'elle sera adoptée cette année. On s'y oppose fermement contre le prélèvement d'organes en Chine et y interdit peut-être aux gens de pouvoir se rendre dans ce pays pour recevoir des organes.
Je pense que la communauté médicale considère qu'il faut certainement agir sur les deux plans, mais pour nous, le problème est qu'elle fait preuve d'une certaine hypocrisie en disant qu'il faut faire quelque chose, alors qu'elle laisse quand même les Chinois faire partie de toutes ses organisations. Quand on parle d'être complice d'un crime contre l'humanité, il est très triste de voir qu'à notre époque, notre propre communauté médiale pourrait bien être complice d'un tel crime.
Ethan Gutmann
View Ethan Gutmann Profile
Ethan Gutmann
2014-10-21 13:56
I think Damon has really hit on it here. The dilemma is that if you push the medical community to go out there and talk to their Chinese counterparts and try to influence them, you enter a process of engagement. We just went through that for two years, and it led to exactly that—the feeling of, well, the medical community kind of has this under control and the problem is sort of ending. Look, I felt that too when I was writing my book, but the fact was that of course it was not true.
So you have a choice. You may have to actually take more punitive measures to make the point, so engagement in this case may not be a pleasant thing. I think that would be a great starting point for the medical community. They don't have a lot of experience in doing this kind of negotiation.
I used to live in Beijing. I used to do a lot of business negotiations. I mean, you never come in saying I'm not going to verify what happens here.
Je pense que Damon a vraiment mis le doigt sur le problème. Le dilemme, c'est que si on pousse la communauté médicale à parler à ses homologues chinois pour tenter de les influencer, on amorce un processus de pourparlers. Nous l'avons fait pendant deux ans, et cela nous a menés exactement là où nous en sommes, avec une impression que la communauté médicale maîtrise en quelque sorte le problème et que ce dernier est plus ou moins en train de disparaître. Écoutez, c'est aussi l'impression que j'avais quand j'ai écrit mon livre, mais le fait est que ce n'est évidemment pas vrai.
Vous avez donc un choix. Vous pourriez avoir à prendre des mesures plus punitives afin de vous faire comprendre, auquel cas les pourparlers pourraient ne pas être agréables. Ce serait un bon point de départ pour la communauté médicale, selon moi. Elle ne possède pas beaucoup d'expérience dans ce genre de négociations.
J'ai déjà vécu à Beijing, où j'ai mené bien des négociations d'affaires. On n'arrive jamais en déclarant qu'on ne vérifiera pas ce qui se passe sur place.
View Gary Schellenberger Profile
CPC (ON)
I have just one point. I know Mr. Cotler said he had brought in a private member's bill and that he's way down on the totem pole and so it probably won't make it to the floor.
Lots of times we hear devastating testimony at this particular committee, and then we keep it in this room more or less, and by the time we bring out a report, it could be six months or a year down the road, and it's already history.
I suggest to this committee that after we hear your testimony—and I think there's more—we at least put out a statement of what we feel as a committee now, not six months from now. It might fall on some ears that will listen.
Thank you, Chair.
J'ai juste une remarque à formuler. Je sais que M. Cotler a dit qu'il a présenté un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire, mais que puisqu'il se trouve au bas de l'échelle, son projet de loi ne sera probablement donc pas débattu.
Bien souvent, nous entendons des témoignages dévastateurs pendant nos séances, des témoignages qui restent plus ou moins dans cette pièce, et il peut s'écouler six mois à un an avant que nous ne déposions notre rapport. C'est donc déjà de l'histoire ancienne.
Je propose au comité qu'après avoir entendu vos témoignages — et je pense qu'il y en a d'autres —, nous émettions au moins une déclaration où nous ferions part du sentiment du comité sans attendre six mois. Peut-être que cela tombera dans une oreille qui écoutera.
Merci, monsieur le président.
View Tyrone Benskin Profile
NDP (QC)
Thank you.
We do indeed hear some pretty horrific stories from around the world of what we as human beings do to each other, and how ingenious we can be at times in finding new ways or refurbishing old ways of hurting each other.
I have a quick question and then a question and comment. I'm assuming the largest part of the organ tourism, which is a rather creepy name if you forgive my colloquialism, is that people can afford it, and I assume the largest recipients in the Chinese population are people who can afford it.
But you said earlier the average Chinese person pays significantly less than what a foreigner would pay. Would you comment on whether or not you believe that's a means of keeping the average Chinese public on side with what's going on. You said before as far as the average Chinese person's concerned there's not a lot of outcry against what's happening to the Falun Gong practitioners.
Could it be because it allows them to have access to these organs if they should need them?
Merci.
Nous entendons effectivement des récits assez horrifiants sur ce que les êtres humains s'infligent les uns aux autres dans le monde et sur toute l'ingéniosité dont ils peuvent parfois faire preuve pour trouver de nouvelles façons ou renouveler d'anciens moyens pour se faire du mal.
J'ai une brève question, puis une question et un commentaire. Je présume que le problème du tourisme de transplantation des organes, dont le nom donne froid dans le dos, si vous me permettez l'expression, vient en grande partie du fait que les gens peuvent se le permettre, et la plupart des gens qui reçoivent des organes en Chine sont ceux qui en ont les moyens.
Mais vous avez affirmé plus tôt que le citoyen chinois moyen paie beaucoup moins qu'un étranger ne le ferait. Pourriez-vous nous dire si vous pensez ou non que c'est une façon d'obtenir l'appui du grand public par rapport à ce qui se passe? Vous avez dit précédemment que le citoyen chinois moyen ne s'oppose pas tellement à ce qui arrive aux adeptes du Falun Gong.
Serait-ce parce que cela leur permet d'avoir accès à des organes si jamais ils en ont besoin?
Ethan Gutmann
View Ethan Gutmann Profile
Ethan Gutmann
2014-10-21 14:00
How is the average Chinese organ tourist different from a western organ tourist? There's not a “single” western organ tourist, because we know there are plenty. Not one has written anything. It's very difficult to interview them. Hospitals of course are very protective, but I've recently scored an interview with a Chinese fellow in the U.K. and am expecting to interview him when I get back.
No. The organ tourists do not complain. First of all they are kept away from the process, so they are allowed a level of plausible deniability about what is going on. They are desperate people. They are undergoing a miracle in their lives. These are people who are very sick and suddenly rise out of a hospital bed and go on to live another 25 years.
I don't see a huge difference in that. Everybody's allowed to pretend this isn't going on, and they are no different. The only person who has written about this is Daniel Asa Rose, a nice humorist from Massachusetts
En quoi le touriste chinois moyen de la transplantation diffère-t-il d'un touriste occidental de la transplantation? Il n'existe pas de touriste de la transplantation « unique », parce que nous savons qu'il y en a toutes sortes. Aucun n'a écrit quoi que ce soit. Il est très difficile de les interviewer. Les hôpitaux se montrent évidemment très protecteurs, mais j'ai récemment réussi à organiser une entrevue avec un Chinois au Royaume-Uni, et je prévois l'interviewer à mon retour.
Non. Les touristes de la transplantation ne se plaignent pas. Tout d'abord, ils sont tenus à l'écart du processus; ils peuvent donc nier ce qui se passe de façon vraisemblable. Ce sont des gens désespérés, qui voient un miracle se produire dans leur vie. Ils sont très malades et tout à coup, ils émergent d'un lit d'hôpital et peuvent vivre encore 25 ans.
Je ne vois pas de grande différence à cet égard. Tout le monde peut prétendre que rien ne se passe, et ils ne sont pas différents. Le seul à avoir écrit sur le sujet est Daniel Asa Rose, un bon humoriste du Massachusetts.
Damon Noto
View Damon Noto Profile
Damon Noto
2014-10-21 14:01
I think part of it is doing business as usual in China. What I mean by that is if a westerner goes to a hotel in China, they are paying approximately 50% more than the average Chinese person. It's standard business.
But I think the other aspect of it is it's highly possible that members within the Communist Party enjoy this as a privilege, and if they needed an organ transplant they have easy access to organs.
Je pense que cela fait partie des façons de faire habituelles en Chine. J'entends par là que si un occidental descend dans un hôtel en Chine, il paie environ 50 % plus cher que le Chinois moyen. C'est une pratique courante.
Il est toutefois fort possible que les membres du Parti communiste jouissent d'un privilège à cet égard et que s'ils ont besoin d'une transplantation, ils ont aisément accès à des organes.
View Tyrone Benskin Profile
NDP (QC)
Okay, thank you.
Also, Mr. Gutmann, you mentioned before that the economic aspect of this—I can't remember the words you used—is not as much of an issue as.... I would ask you to comment, or I'm going to challenge that a bit, for the simple reason that throughout history we've seen how various dominant cultures have used one form or another of inhumanity toward humans—for example, slavery in America—as an economic driver for their countries.
It seems to me that the skill set—if you'll forgive—that the Chinese are building, even in the experimentation of drugs, pharmaceuticals, and things of this nature, is tantamount to what the Nazis did in the concentration camps, to the economic boon of what slavery was to America, and to what's happening in various other countries right now in terms of cheap or no-paid labour.
So to have this literal treasure trove of organs available on demand is a massive economic storehouse. The economics of this can't be overlooked. I think, first and foremost, cutting down on economic tourism, drying up that aspect of the economic boon to China, is something we can do in the west. We can say that our people cannot go there and contribute to this situation by bypassing our laws and going to China to get organs.
Would you comment on that?
D'accord, merci.
Monsieur Gutmann, vous avez indiqué précédemment que l'aspect économique de la question — je ne me souviens pas des mots que vous avez employés — n'entre pas tellement en ligne de compte. Je vous demanderais de vous expliquer, ou je vais mettre cette affirmation un peu en question, pour la simple raison que nous avons vu, au cours de l'histoire, comment diverses cultures dominantes ont recouru à une forme ou une autre d'inhumanité envers des êtres humains — comme dans le cas des esclaves en Amérique — pour stimuler l'économie de leurs pays.
Il me semble que la manière dont les Chinois sont en train de se constituer un ensemble de compétences — vous me pardonnerez l'expression —, même dans l'expérimentation de médicaments, de produits pharmaceutiques et de choses de cette nature, s'apparente à ce que les nazis ont fait dans les camps de concentration, à la manne économique que l'esclavage représentait en Amérique et à ce qui se passe dans d'autres pays du monde concernant la main-d'oeuvre peu ou pas rémunérée.
En ayant ce qui est littéralement un coffre au trésor d'organes disponibles sur demande, la Chine dispose d'une énorme réserve économique. On ne peut faire fi de l'aspect économique du problème. Je pense que l'Occident peut tout d'abord mettre fin au tourisme de la transplantation d'organes afin de priver la Chine de cet aspect de la manne économique. Nous pouvons dire que nos citoyens ne peuvent aller là-bas et contribuer à cette situation en contournant nos lois et en se rendant en Chine pour recevoir des organes.
Qu'en pensez-vous?
Ethan Gutmann
View Ethan Gutmann Profile
Ethan Gutmann
2014-10-21 14:04
Yes, I think what you just said is incredibly persuasive.
I would only add that China has a propensity to do its dirty work through entrepreneurial work if possible. In other words, Deng Xiaoping, as an old army guy, said to the military that they'd have to start paying some of their own freight because they cost too much, and to do whatever they needed to do to make money. That ended up including prostitution and all kinds of bad hotels, and in some cases drugs. In fact, when the AIDS crisis came to China, the army solved it pretty much by cleaning up the drug situation and the prostitution.
So I think the military has certainly used this in their own way to make money, and it probably means a lot to them. This probably has all sorts of kickbacks to other officials. I think those officials would miss some of that money, even if it were a small change in the money.
I really do agree with your point. I'm just saying that we can't look at the money alone. This is an attempt to destroy a people. I don't really care if it falls under the exact definition of genocide; it's certainly mass murder. This is an attempt to wipe out Falun Gong, which became a troublesome group—more than troublesome, a group that absolutely stubbornly refused to go away. They were supposed to be beaten in three months, and they're still around, as you know.
So I think that part of it...that the leadership.... This became an issue of face. This has become an issue of national pride or party pride for the Chinese. These two things are unfortunately closely interlinked at this point.
En effet, ce que vous venez de dire est très convaincant.
J'ajouterais simplement que la Chine a tendance à faire son sale boulot sous le couvert d'entreprises, lorsque c'est possible. Autrement dit, Deng Xiaoping, un ancien dirigeant militaire, a dit aux militaires qu'ils devaient commencer à payer leurs choses parce que cela coûtait trop cher et qu'ils devaient faire tout ce qu'il fallait pour gagner de l'argent. On s'est donc retrouvé avec de la prostitution, entre autres, dans toutes sortes d'hôtels, et avec de la drogue, dans certains cas. En fait, lorsque la crise du sida est arrivée en Chine, l'armée l'a en grande partie réglée en mettant un terme à la prostitution et à la drogue.
Par conséquent, les militaires s'en sont certainement servis à leur façon pour faire de l'argent, et cela représente probablement beaucoup pour eux. On parle sans doute de pots-de-vin versés à d'autres responsables qui s'ennuieront d'une partie de cet argent, même s'il s'agissait d'une petite somme.
Je suis d'accord avec vous. Je dis simplement qu'il ne faut pas se contenter de l'aspect financier. On cherche ici à détruire un peuple. Je ne sais pas si cela correspond à la définition exacte d'un génocide; mais chose certaine, il s'agit d'un massacre. On tente d'éliminer le Falun Gong, qui est devenu un groupe problématique — plus que problématique, un groupe qui s'entête à rester. On était censé s'en débarrasser après trois mois, mais les pratiquants sont toujours présents, comme vous le savez.
Je pense que le leadership... c'est devenu une question d'image, une question de fierté nationale. Ces deux éléments sont malheureusement étroitement liés.
Damon Noto
View Damon Noto Profile
Damon Noto
2014-10-21 14:06
I have just a quick comment. Economically it's been estimated that this industry is easily over one billion dollars a year. One person, if done well, could be worth close to $500,000 if you extracted multiple organs.
But I think, going to Ethan's point, you had a perfect storm here. You had a group of people the government wanted to get rid of. They were troublesome to the government, a very vulnerable group, and the government had a way to make a lot of money off them. And I agree, this a hard system to stop.
J'aimerais faire une brève observation. Sur le plan économique, cette industrie est estimée à plus de 1 milliard de dollars par année. Si le travail est bien fait et qu'on peut extraire plusieurs organes, une personne peut valoir près de 500 000 $.
Toutefois, pour revenir à ce que disait Ethan, on a les conditions idéales pour créer une jolie tempête. On a un groupe de gens dont le gouvernement veut se débarrasser. Il s'agit d'un groupe qui pose problème au gouvernement, un groupe vulnérable, et le gouvernement a trouvé un moyen de faire beaucoup d'argent à ses dépens. Et j'en conviens, il est difficile d'interrompre un tel système.
View Tyrone Benskin Profile
NDP (QC)
And that perfect storm has repeated itself throughout history. In all those cases it's been a perfect storm of accessibility, projected need, and some sort of uniqueness that could be pulled out of a group of people to demonize them, to make it easier and more palatable for the general public to accept what was going on and thereby isolate those groups.
Et cette tempête s'est répétée à plusieurs reprises au cours de l'histoire. Dans tous les cas, on s'est retrouvé avec une combinaison parfaite d'accessibilité, de besoins futurs et de pures inventions en vue de diaboliser un groupe de gens et de rendre cette situation plus acceptable aux yeux de la population dans le but de les isoler.
Ethan Gutmann
View Ethan Gutmann Profile
Ethan Gutmann
2014-10-21 14:07
There's one other factor that I think people neglect sometimes. One of the ideas of the anti-Falun Gong campaign was to make everybody in society complicit. That meant you went down to the lowest party level, the old women with the arm bands who walked around the hutong making sure it was clean. Everybody had to get involved. Everybody had to make statements against Falun Gong, from dog catcher all the way up to the top.
So it becomes a sort of “thick as thieves” situation for the entire society. This is, of course, is the great problem and the great tragedy for China, because this ultimately makes democracy impossible, when everybody is guilty.
Il y a un autre facteur que les gens négligent souvent, selon moi. La campagne lancée contre les pratiquants du Falun Gong visait à rendre toute la société complice. Cela signifie les plus bas niveaux, même les vieilles dames qui arborent un brassard et qui parcourent les hutongs en s'assurant qu'ils sont propres. Tout le monde doit s'en mêlé. Tout le monde devait se prononcer contre le Falun Gong, du préposé au ramassage de chiens jusqu'aux plus hauts échelons.
Toute la société doit en quelque sorte être solidaire. C'est le gros problème en Chine, et c'est aussi une grande tragédie, parce qu'au bout du compte, la démocratie devient impossible lorsque tout le monde est coupable.
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you.
Mr. Tyrone Benskin: Thank you for indulging me.
The Chair: I did indulge you a wee bit. It's up to nine minutes right now.
That's okay, it was largely very fulsome answers.
I have a couple of questions that actually come out of Mr. Benskin's questions, and then we'll wrap up here.
Dr. Noto, you said that in your estimate this is about a $1 billion industry right now, and that a person is worth about $500,000. I assume that means if a person's organs are harvested and more than one organ is used. Just to be clear with the economics, which ultimately drives this whole thing, that is to say, if it weren't profitable it would stop. Therefore, it would be helpful to me to understand that when you say a person is worth $500,000, is that in profit or volume of sales?
Merci.
M. Tyrone Benskin: Je vous remercie de votre indulgence.
Le président: Je me suis montré très patient. Vous en êtes à neuf minutes.
Il n'y a pas de problème; on a eu droit à des réponses très complètes.
Je vais maintenant poser quelques questions qui font suite à celles de M. Benskin, après quoi nous allons conclure.
Monsieur Noto, vous avez estimé qu'il s'agissait d'une industrie de 1 milliard de dollars, et qu'une personne valait près de 500 000 $. J'imagine que c'est lorsque les organes sont extirpés et que plus d'un organe est utilisé. Juste pour mettre les choses au clair, si cette industrie n'était pas rentable, on cesserait ces activités. Lorsque vous dites qu'une personne vaut 500 000 $, parlez-vous des profits ou du volume de ventes?
Damon Noto
View Damon Noto Profile
Damon Noto
2014-10-21 14:08
Volume of sales.
Je parle du volume de ventes.
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Right, the profits involved are not $1 billion, but substantially below those.
D'accord. Dans ce cas, les profits seraient considérablement inférieurs à 1 milliard de dollars.
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Okay, that's helpful.
This raises a question. Given China's size and influence and the fact that other countries, the entire world community, are not going to be as confrontational with China over this or any other abuse that the PRC regime engages in, as they would be vis-à-vis virtually any country in the world, we can only influence them by causing them to see that it is not in their interest and making them voluntarily decide to change their practices. So this raises the question: is this whole organ harvesting industry seen, in your view, as a key state interest by the people in the regime itself who are capable of making change? Is it what we would assume they would regard as a key state interest that can't be changed, such as the one China policy for example, or is it a peripheral activity that would be judged non-essential under the right circumstances?
I'd actually be interested in both your answers, but I see, Mr. Gutmann, you'd like to start.
Très bien. C'est très pertinent.
Cela soulève une question. Étant donné la taille et l'influence de la Chine, et le fait que les autres pays, toute la communauté internationale, n'adopteront pas une attitude de confrontation à l'égard de la Chine ou de tout autre abus commis par le régime de la RPC comme ils le feraient pour n'importe quel autre pays dans le monde, nous pouvons seulement les influencer en leur montrant qu'ils n'agissent pas dans leur meilleur intérêt et en les amenant à changer eux-mêmes leurs pratiques. Est-ce que toute cette industrie de la transplantation d'organes revêt, selon vous, un intérêt considérable pour l'État, aux yeux des gens du régime qui ont la capacité de faire bouger les choses? Peut-on supposer que cette industrie présente un intérêt majeur pour l'État qui ne changera pas, comme la politique d'une seule Chine par exemple, ou s'il s'agit plutôt d'une activité périphérique jugée non essentielle dans les bonnes circonstances?
J'aimerais vous entendre tous les deux là-dessus, mais je vois que M. Gutmann est déjà prêt à répondre.
Ethan Gutmann
View Ethan Gutmann Profile
Ethan Gutmann
2014-10-21 14:09
I do have a point about that.
I'm afraid I don't think it's quite either. I think the problem....
Let us assume, just for the sake of argument, that there are many in the Chinese leadership who wish this had never happened and wished we had never gotten to this point. The problem is that there are two factions always fighting within China. I don't even say which one is better than the other; I don't have a side. They might as well be the Bloods and Crips for all I care. The point is that neither of them can stop it because, among the ones who stop it, somebody will get blamed and one faction will take the brunt of the guilt for this. For that reason, like a game of musical chairs, this must continue.
That is more the way I see it, that they are stuck in this situation. They really don't know how to stop it. There may have been even an honest attempt within the medical community to do that, but it was believed that it would open up too many cans of worms, that once you started exposing this thing there would be a problem.
I may be wrong in that. That's just my interpretation of the events.
J'aurais quelque chose à dire à ce sujet.
J'ai bien peur que ce ne soit ni l'un ni l'autre. Je pense que le problème...
Supposons un instant que de nombreux dirigeants chinois souhaitent que cette situation ne soit jamais arrivée et regrettent qu'on en soit rendu là. Le problème, c'est qu'il y a deux factions rivales en Chine qui se livrent bataille. Je ne peux même pas dire laquelle est la meilleure; je n'ai pas de préférence. Il pourrait bien s'agir des Bloods et des Crips; cela m'importe peu. Ce qu'il faut savoir, c'est que ni l'une ni l'autre ne peut y mettre fin et, parmi ceux qui le feront, il y aura quelqu'un qui sera blâmé et une faction qui prendra le blâme. Pour cette raison, comme le jeu de la chaise musicale, il ne faut pas s'arrêter.
C'est ainsi que je perçois la situation. Ils sont coincés et ne savent pas comment y mettre un terme. Ils ont peut-être même fait une tentative dans le milieu médical, mais ils ont cru que cela ouvrirait une boîte de Pandore, qu'ils se retrouveraient confrontés à un important problème une fois qu'ils auraient exposé la situation.
Je me trompe peut-être. C'est mon interprétation des événements.
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Just before you leave that point though, that assumes both stopping and exposing. Is it possible to stop without an actual forensic investigation as to who is responsible and without prosecution of past practices, that kind of thing?
Avant de passer à autre chose, vous dites que si on cesse le prélèvement d'organes, on fait la lumière sur toute l'histoire. Est-il possible de mettre fin à cette situation sans qu'il n'y ait d'enquête approfondie à savoir qui est responsable ni de poursuite à l'égard des pratiques antérieures et ce genre de choses?
Ethan Gutmann
View Ethan Gutmann Profile
Ethan Gutmann
2014-10-21 14:11
The problem is that if you have two factions and they're both gunning for each other, once you start admitting anything it becomes a slippery slope to some kind of prosecution, investigation, and so forth. That's my understanding of this. I don't have absolute proof for what I'm saying; this is just my interpretation.
Le problème, c'est que si vous avez deux factions qui s'attaquent mutuellement, lorsqu'on commence à admettre quelque chose, on s'engage sur une pente glissante menant à des poursuites, des enquêtes, etc. C'est ce que je comprends. Je n'ai pas de preuve absolue de ce que j'avance; c'est seulement mon interprétation.
Damon Noto
View Damon Noto Profile
Damon Noto
2014-10-21 14:11
Further to his point, I think a lot of the hope among the Falun Gong community and also the transplant community is that once Xi Jinping, the new president, came in.... It was largely Jiang Zemin's regime that started the organ harvesting and there was the hope that once that regime left, there would be the possibility of really talking to this new regime about stopping it. But that hasn't seemed to take place and I believe it's probably because, as he's saying, once you start exposing or admitting any of it, it's like a little piece that's open and it just spirals. So I don't think they've been able to get a handle on how to deal with this issue.
À ce sujet, je pense que les pratiquants du Falun Gong avaient bon espoir que lorsque Xi Jinping, le nouveau président, arriverait au pouvoir, — il semble que ce soit Jiang Zemin qui ait donné l'ordre d'amorcer le prélèvement forcé d'organes — il serait possible de s'entretenir avec le nouveau régime pour mettre fin à ces tortures. Toutefois, cela ne semble pas s'être produit car, comme M. Gutmann le disait, dès qu'on commence à admettre quoi que ce soit, il y a un effet d'enchaînement. Par conséquent, je ne crois pas qu'ils savent comment gérer la situation.
Results: 1 - 61 of 61

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data