Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 15 of 331
View Joe Comartin Profile
NDP (ON)

Question No. 1261--
Mr. Andrew Cash:
With regard to individuals detained under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act: (a) broken down by province and by gender, how many individuals were detained in the years (i) 2011, (ii) 2012, (iii) 2013, (iv) 2014; (b) what was the cost of detaining the individuals in (a) for the years (i) 2011, (ii) 2012, (iii) 2013, (iv) 2014; (c) broken down by province, how many of the individuals in (a) were under the age of six in the years (i) 2011, (ii) 2012, (iii) 2013, (iv) 2014; (d) broken down by province, how many of the individuals in (a) were between the ages of six and nine in the years (i) 2011, (ii) 2012, (iii) 2013, (iv) 2014; (e) broken down by province, how many of the individuals in (a) were between the ages of ten and 12 in the years (i) 2011, (ii) 2012, (iii) 2013, (iv) 2014; (f) broken down by province, how many of the individuals in (a) were between the ages of 13 and 17 in the years (i) 2011, (ii) 2012, (iii) 2013, (iv) 2014; (g) broken down by province, what is the average duration of stay in detention; (h) of those who were in detention between January 2011 and January 2015 how many individuals have remained in detention longer than (i) one year, (ii) two years, (iii) three years, (iv) four years, (v) five years; and (i) as of the most recent information, how many individuals are detained in cells with (i) one other person, (ii) two other persons, (iii) three other persons, (iv) four or more other persons?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1276--
Ms. Christine Moore:
With regard to contracts under $10,000 awarded by Health Canada since April 1, 2014: what is (i) the name of the supplier, (ii) the contract reference number, (iii) the contract date, (iv) the description of services provided, (v) the delivery date, (vi) the original contract amount, (vii) the final contract amount, if different from the original amount?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1283--
Hon. Carolyn Bennett:
With regard to contracts under $10 000 granted by Public Works and Government Services Canada since February 5, 2015: what are the (a) vendors' names; (b) contracts' reference numbers; (c) dates of the contracts; (d) descriptions of the services provided; (e) delivery dates; (f) original contracts' values; and (g) final contracts' values, if different from the original contracts' values?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1284--
Mr. Francis Scarpaleggia:
With regard to contracts under $10 000 granted by Justice Canada since January 29, 2015: what are the (a) vendors' names; (b) contracts' reference numbers; (c) dates of the contracts; (d) descriptions of the services provided; (e) delivery dates; (f) original contracts' values; and (g) final contracts' values, if different from the original contracts' values?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1286--
Hon. Irwin Cotler:
With regard to designated countries of origin (DCO): (a) what is the process for removing a country from the DCO list; (b) does the government conduct regular reviews of countries on the DCO list to ensure that they continue to meet the criteria for designation; (c )if the government does not conduct regular reviews of countries on the DCO list to ensure that they continue to meet the criteria for designation, (i) how is a review triggered, (ii) who decides whether to conduct a review, (iii) based on what factors is the decision to conduct a review made; (d) since the inception of the DCO list, has the government conducted any reviews of countries on the list to ensure that they continue to meet the criteria for designation; (e) for each review in (d), (i) what was the country, (ii) when did the review begin, (iii) when did the review end, (iv) how was the review triggered, (v) who decided to conduct the review, (vi) who conducted the review, (vii) what documents were consulted, (viii) what groups or individuals were consulted, (ix) what ministers or ministers’ offices were involved in the review, (x) what was the nature of any ministerial involvement, (xi) what was the outcome, (xii) based on what factors was the outcome determined; (f) based on what factors does the government decide whether to remove a country from the DCO list; (g) in what ways does the government monitor the human rights situation in countries on the DCO list to ensure that the countries continue to meet the criteria for designation; (h) who does the monitoring in (g); (i) what weight is given to the situation of minority groups in countries on the DCO list when evaluating whether the countries continue to meet the criteria for designation; (j) what weight is given to the situation of political dissidents in countries on the DCO list when evaluating whether the countries continue to meet the criteria for designation; (k) what type or extent of change in the human rights situation in a country on the DCO list would trigger a review of whether the country continues to meet the criteria for designation; (l) what type or extent of change in the situation of one or more minority groups in a country on the DCO list would trigger a review of whether the country continues to meet the criteria for designation; (m) what type or extent of change in the situation of political dissidents in a country on the DCO list would trigger a review of whether the country continues to meet the criteria for designation; (n) what type or extent of change in the human rights situation in a country on the DCO list would lead to the removal of the country from the list; (o) what type or extent of change in the situation of one or more minority groups in a country on the DCO list would lead to the removal of the country from the list; (p) what type or extent of change in the situation of political dissidents in a country on the DCO list would lead to the removal of the country from the list; (q) in what ways does the government discourage refugee claims from countries on the DCO list; (r) since the inception of the list, how much money has the government spent outside Canada to discourage refugee claims from countries on the DCO list, broken down by year and country where the money was spent; (s) since the inception of the list, how much money has the government spent within Canada to discourage refugee claims from countries on the DCO list, broken down by year, province or territory where the money was spent, and DCO country in question; (t) since the inception of the list, how much money has the government spent on advertising outside Canada to discourage refugee claims from countries on the DCO list, broken down by year and country where the money was spent; (u) since the inception of the list, how much money has the government spent on advertising within Canada to discourage refugee claims from countries on the DCO list, broken down by year, province or territory where the money was spent, and DCO country in question; (v) what evaluations has the government conducted of the advertising in (t) and (u); (w) for each evaluation in (v), (i) when did it begin, (ii) when was it completed, (iii) who conducted it, (iv) what were its objectives, (v) what were its outcomes, (vi) how much did it cost; (x) for each year since the inception of the list, how many refugee claims have been made by claimants from countries on the DCO list, broken down by country of origin; (y) for each year since the inception of the list, broken down by country of origin, how many of the claims in (x) were (i) accepted, (ii) rejected, (iii) abandoned, (iv) withdrawn; (z) for each year since the inception of the list, broken down by country of origin, how many of the failed claimants in (y) sought a review of their claim in Federal Court;(aa)for each year since the inception of the list, broken down by country of origin, how many of the claimants in (z) were removed from Canada while their claim remained pending in Federal Court; (bb) for each year since the inception of the list, broken down by country of origin, how many of the claimants in (z) left Canada while their claim remained pending in Federal Court; (cc) for each year since the inception of the list, broken down by country of origin, how many refugee claimants from countries on the DCO list have been deported; (dd) has the government monitored the situation of any failed refugee claimants from countries on the DCO list after they returned to their countries of origin; (ee) broken down by DCO country, how many failed claimants have been the objects of the monitoring in (dd); (ff) broken down by DCO country, regarding the monitoring of each failed claimant in (ee), (i) when did it begin, (ii) when did it end, (iii) who did it, (iv) what was its objective, (v) what was its outcome; (gg) broken down by year and country of origin, how many refugee claims by claimants from countries on the DCO list were accepted by the Federal Court after having been denied by the Immigration and Refugee Board; (hh) broken down by year and country of origin, how many of the claims in (gg) were accepted by the Federal Court after the claimant had left Canada; (ii) broken down by country of origin, how many of the claimants in (hh) now reside in Canada; (jj) what evaluations has the government conducted of the DCO system; (kk) for each evaluation in (jj), (i) when did it begin, (ii) when was it completed, (iii) who conducted it, (iv) what were its objectives, (v) what were its outcomes, (vi) how much did it cost; (ll) since the inception of the DCO list, what groups and individuals has the government consulted about the impact of the DCO list; (mm) for each consultation in (ll), (i) when did it occur, (ii) how did it occur, (iii) what recommendations were made to the government, (iv) what recommendations were implemented by the government?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1290--
Mr. Don Davies:
With regard to hydrocarbon spills in Canada’s waters by commercial entities: (a) how many spills of oil, gas, petrochemical products or fossil fuels have been reported in Canada’s oceans, rivers, lakes or other waterways, broken down by year since 2006; and (b) for each reported spill in (a), identify (i) the product spilled, (ii) the volume of the spill, (iii) the location of the spill, (iv) the name of the commercial entity associated with the spill?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1291--
Mr. Don Davies:
With regard to government-supported, rental housing in Canada: (a) how many new units were built using federal funding from the Investment in Affordable Housing bilateral agreements, since 2006, broken down by (i) unit size, (ii) province, (iii) year; (b) how many new units were built using federal funding from the National Homelessness Initiative, since 2006, broken down by (i) province, (ii) year; (c) how many new units were built using federal funding under the auspices of any other program, since 2006, broken down by (i) unit size, (ii) year; (d) how many Proposal Development Funding loans were granted by the Canadian Housing and Mortgage Corporation, since 2006, broken down by (i) province, (iii) year; and (e) how many Seed Funding grants were granted by the Canadian Housing and Mortgage Corporation, broken down by (i) value under $10,000, (ii) value over $10,000?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1292--
Mr. Don Davies:
With regard to the Live-in Caregiver and Caregiver programs, broken down by year, from 2010 to 2014: (a) how many applications were received by Citizenship and Immigration Canada; (b) how many applications for Live-in Caregiver and Caregiver visas were approved; (c) how many Canadian residents with Live-in Caregiver or Caregiver visas applied for permanent residency; (d) how many permanent residency applications by Live-in Caregiver or Caregiver visa-holders were approved; (e) what are the top three source countries for live-in caregivers in Canada; and (f) how many residents with Live-in Caregiver visas applied to sponsor their spouses or children, broken down by (i) raw numbers, (ii) percentage of the total?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1294--
Mr. Nathan Cullen:
With respect to the Canada Border Services Agency’s decision to close the border crossing between Stewart, British Columbia and Hyder, Alaska for eight hours per day, effective April 1, 2015: (a) what is the cost of keeping the border crossing open 24 hours per day; (b) what is the expected savings from this decision; (c) how many entries and exits have occurred at this border entry since April 1, 2005; and (d) what consultations were undertaken by the Canada Border Services Agency with the District of Stewart in advance of this decision being taken?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1298--
Mr. Mathieu Ravignat:
With regard to the investments made in forestry companies in the riding of Pontiac since 2011, (a) how many projects received funding through federal programs such as Canada Economic Development; and (b) of the projects identified in (a), what is the total amount of these investments, broken down by company?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1300--
Hon. Ralph Goodale:
With regard to the following telephone services (i) Service Canada’s (SC) “1-800 O Canada”, (ii) SC’s “Canada Pension Plan (CPP)”, (iii) SC’s “Employer Contact Centre”, SC’s “Employment Insurance (EI)”, (iv) SC’s “Old Age Security (OAS)”, (v) SC’s Passports”, (vi) Canada Revenue Agency’s (CRA) “Individual income tax and trust enquiries”, (vii) CRA’s “Business enquiries”, (viii) CRA’s “Canada Child Tax Benefit enquiries”, (ix) CRA’s “Goods and services tax/harmonized sales tax (GST/HST) credit enquiries” for the previous fiscal year and the current fiscal year to date: (a) what are the service standards and performance indicators; (b) how many calls met the service standards and performance indicators; (c) how many did not meet the service standards and performance indicators; (d) how many calls went through; (e) how many calls did not go through; (f) how does the government monitor for cases such as in (e); (g) what is the accuracy of the monitoring identified in (f); and (h) how long was the average caller on hold?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1303--
Ms. Élaine Michaud:
With regard to government funding, provided by the Department of the Environment, in the riding of Portneuf–Jacques-Cartier since 2011-2012 inclusively, what are the details of all grants, contributions, and loans to any organization, body, or group, broken down by (i) name of the recipient, (ii) municipality of the recipient, (iii) date on which the funding was received, (iv) amount received, (v) department or agency providing the funding, (vi) program under which the grant, contribution, or loan was made, (vii) nature or purpose?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1304--
Ms. Élaine Michaud:
With regard to government funding granted by the Department of Employment and Social Development, including the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, in the constituency of Portneuf–Jacques-Cartier since 2011-2012 inclusively, what are the details of all grants, contributions and loans to any organization, body or group, broken down by (i) the name of the recipient, (ii) the municipality of the recipient, (iii) the date on which the funding was received, (iv) the amount received, (v) the department or agency providing the funding, (vi) the program under which the grant, contribution, or loan was made, and (vii) the nature or purpose?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1306--
Ms. Élaine Michaud:
With regard to government funding granted by the Department of Infrastructure, including the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec, in the constituency of Portneuf–Jacques-Cartier since 2011-2012 inclusively, what are the details of all grants, contributions and loans to any organization, body or group, broken down by (i) the name of the recipient, (ii) the municipality of the recipient, (iii) the date on which the funding was received, (iv) the amount received, (v) the department or agency providing the funding, (vi) the program under which the grant, contribution, or loan was made, and (vii) the nature or purpose?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1308--
Ms. Nycole Turmel:
With regard to Infrastructure Canada, from fiscal year 2011-2012 up to and including the current fiscal year, broken down by fiscal year, what was the total amount allocated, including direct investment from the Government of Canada, in (a) the City of Gatineau, broken down by (i) the name of the recipient, (ii) the amount allocated to the recipient, (iii) the program under which the amount was allocated; (b) the federal constituency of Hull–Aylmer (i) the name of the recipient, (ii) the amount allocated to the recipient, (iii) the program under which the amount was allocated; and (c) the administrative region of Outaouais (i) the name of the recipient, (ii) the amount allocated to the recipient, (iii) the program under which the amount was allocated?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1311--
Ms. Rosane Doré Lefebvre:
With regard to the advisory council created by the government in 2012 mandated to promote women on the boards of public and private corporations: (a) in total, how many individuals are on this advisory council, broken down by (i) gender, (ii) name, (iii) position; (b) when did the meetings take place; (c) what were the subjects discussed by this council; (d) what is the expected date for this council’s report; (e) what was discussed during this council’s meetings with respect to (i) pay equity, (ii) the representation of women on the boards of public and private corporations; and (f) can the government table the minutes of this advisory council’s meetings?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1312--
Ms. Rosane Doré Lefebvre:
With regard to the Canada Post service reductions announced in December 2013: (a) what are the planned locations for community mailboxes in Laval; (b) how many employees were assigned to Laval before the elimination of home delivery was announced; (c) how many Canada Post employees will be required following the mailbox transition; (d) what was the volume of mail sent in the last ten years (i) from Laval to another destination, (ii) to Laval; (e) how many complaints have been received concerning (i) the transition from home delivery to community mailboxes, (ii) the location of community mailboxes in Laval; (f) how many complaints resulted in (i) an opened file, ii) a change of location of these community mailboxes; (g) what steps are being taken to look after the needs of (i) persons with mobility impairments, (ii) seniors; (h) will current post offices still be active following the transition to community mailboxes; (i) what recourse will be available to residents affected by the location of mailboxes they consider to be dangerous or harmful; (j) what recourse was or continues to be available to residents affected by the installation of a community mailbox over the last 30 years, excluding the current transition; and (k) how many customer service employees at Canada Post, broken down by language of service, are assigned to complaints concerning the installation of community mailboxes from (i) across Canada, (ii) Quebec, (iii) Laval, (iv) the residents of Alfred-Pellan?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1317--
Hon. Stéphane Dion:
With regard to contracts under $10 000 granted by Canadian Heritage since January 30, 2015: what are the (a) vendors' names; (b) contracts' reference numbers; (c) dates of the contracts; (d) descriptions of the services provided; (e) delivery dates; (f) original contracts' values; and (g) final contracts' values, if different from the original contracts' values?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1318--
Hon. Stéphane Dion:
With regard to contracts under $10 000 granted by Natural Resources Canada since February 5, 2015: what are the (a) vendors' names; (b) contracts' reference numbers; (c) dates of the contracts; (d) descriptions of the services provided; (e) delivery dates; (f) original contracts' values; and (g) final contracts' values, if different from the original contracts' values?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1319--
Mr. Jack Harris:
With regard to the United Nations Chiefs of Defence Conference of March 26-27, 2015, at the United Nations headquarters in New York City, and the absence of Chief of Defence Staff of the Canadian Armed Forces, General Thomas Lawson, from the Conference: (a) what was the reason for General Lawson’s absence; (b) which members of the Canadian Armed Forces and the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development were present at the Conference; and (c) what measures were taken to communicate Canada’s priorities and concerns with regard to international peacekeeping to those present at the Conference?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question no 1261 --
M. Andrew Cash:
En ce qui concerne les personnes détenues en vertu de la Loi sur l’immigration et la protection des réfugiés: a) pour chaque province, combien de personnes de chaque sexe ont été détenues en (i) 2011, (ii) 2012, (iii) 2013, (iv) 2014; b) quels étaient les coûts liés à la détention a) en (i) 2011, (ii) 2012, (iii) 2013, (iv) 2014; c) pour chaque province, parmi les personnes détenues en a), combien avaient moins de six ans, pour les années (i) 2011, (ii) 2012, (iii) 2013, (iv) 2014; d) pour chaque province, parmi les personnes détenues en a), combien avaient entre six et neuf ans, pour les années (i) 2011, (ii) 2012, (iii) 2013, (iv) 2014; e) pour chaque province, parmi les personnes détenues en a), combien avaient entre dix et 12 ans, pour les années (i) 2011, (ii) 2012, (iii) 2013, (iv) 2014; f) pour chaque province, parmi les personnes détenues en a), combien avaient entre 13 et 17 ans, pour les années (i) 2011, (ii) 2012, (iii) 2013, (iv) 2014; g) pour chaque province, quelle était la période moyenne de détention; h) parmi les personnes détenues entre janvier 2011 et janvier 2015, combien sont demeurées en détention plus de (i) un an, (ii) deux ans, (iii) trois ans, (iv) quatre ans, (v) cinq ans; i) selon les données les plus récentes, combien de personnes sont détenues dans des cellules occupées (i) par une autre personne, (ii) deux autres personnes, (iii) trois autres personnes, (iv) quatre autres personnes ou plus?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1276 --
Mme Christine Moore:
En ce qui concerne les contrats de moins de 10 000 $ adjugés par Santé Canada depuis le 1er avril 2014: quel est (i) le nom du fournisseur, (ii) le numéro de référence du contrat, (iii) la date du contrat, (iv) la description des services fournis, (v) la date de la livraison, (vi) le montant originel du contrat, (vii) le montant final du contrat, s'il diffère du montant originel?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1283 --
L'hon. Carolyn Bennett:
En ce qui concerne les contrats de moins de 10 000 $ adjugés par Travaux public et Services gouvernementaux Canada depuis le 5 février 2015 quel est a) le nom du fournisseur; b) le numéro de référence du contrat; c) la date du contrat; d) la description des services fournis; e) la date de livraison; f) le montant originel du contrat; g) le montant final du contrat, s’il diffère du montant originel?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1284 --
M. Francis Scarpaleggia:
En ce qui concerne chacun des contrats de moins de 10 000 $ adjugés par Justice Canada depuis le 29 janvier 2015: quel est a) le nom du fournisseur; b) le numéro de référence du contrat; c) la date du contrat; d) la description des services fournis; e) la date de livraison; f) le montant originel du contrat; g) le montant final du contrat, s’il diffère du montant originel?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1286 --
L'hon. Irwin Cotler:
En ce qui concerne les pays d’origine désignés (POD): a) quel est le processus pour le retrait d’un pays de la liste des POD; b) le gouvernement procède-t-il à l’examen régulier des pays de la liste des POD afin de vérifier qu’ils respectent toujours les critères de désignation; c) si le gouvernement ne procède pas à l’examen régulier des pays de la liste des POD afin de vérifier qu’ils respectent toujours les critères de désignation, (i) comment un tel examen est-il déclenché, (ii) qui décide si un examen doit être réalisé, (iii) en fonction de quels facteurs la décision de mener un examen est-elle prise; d) depuis l’établissement de la liste des POD, le gouvernement a-t-il fait l’examen des pays de la liste afin de vérifier qu’ils respectent toujours les critères de désignation; e) pour chaque examen en d), (i) quel était le pays, (ii) quand l’examen a-t-il commencé, (iii) quand l’examen a-t-il pris fin, (iv) comment l’examen a-t-il été déclenché, (v) qui a décidé de procéder à l’examen, (vi) qui a réalisé l’examen, (vii) quels documents ont été consultés, (viii) quels groupes ou personnes ont été consultés, (ix) quels ministres ou bureaux de ministre ont participé à l’examen, (x) quelle était la nature de toute participation ministérielle, (xi) quel a été le résultat, (xii) en fonction de quels facteurs le résultat a-t-il été déterminé; f) en fonction de quels facteurs le gouvernement détermine-t-il si un pays doit être retiré de la liste des POD; g) de quelles façons le gouvernement surveille-t-il la situation des droits la personne dans les pays sur la liste des POD afin de vérifier que les pays respectent toujours les critères de désignation; h) qui effectue la surveillance en g); i) quelle importance accorde-t-on à la situation des groupes minoritaires dans les pays de la liste des POD lorsqu’il s’agit de déterminer si les pays respectent toujours les critères de désignation; j) quelle importance accorde-t-on à la situation des dissidents politiques dans les pays de la liste des POD lorsqu’il s’agit de déterminer si les pays respectent toujours les critères de désignation; k) un changement de quel type ou de quelle ampleur quant à la situation des droits de la personne dans un pays de la liste des POD déclencherait un examen visant à déterminer si le pays respecte toujours les critères de désignation; l) un changement de quel type ou de quelle ampleur quant à la situation d’un ou plusieurs groupes minoritaires dans un pays de la liste des POD déclencherait un examen visant à déterminer si le pays respecte toujours les critères de désignation; m) un changement de quel type ou de quelle ampleur quant à la situation des dissidents politiques dans un pays de la liste des POD déclencherait un examen visant à déterminer si le pays respecte toujours les critères de désignation; n) un changement de quel type ou de quelle ampleur quant à la situation des droits de la personne dans un pays de la liste des POD entraînerait le retrait du pays de la liste; o) un changement de quel type ou de quelle ampleur quant à la situation d’un ou plusieurs groupes minoritaires dans un pays de la liste des POD entraînerait le retrait du pays de la liste; p) un changement de quel type ou de quelle ampleur quant à la situation des dissidents politiques dans un pays de la liste des POD entraînerait le retrait du pays de la liste; q) de quelles façons le gouvernement décourage-t-il les demandes de statut de réfugié provenant de pays de la liste des POD; r) depuis l’établissement de la liste, combien d’argent le gouvernement a-t-il dépensé à l’extérieur du Canada pour décourager les demandes de statut de réfugié provenant de pays de la liste des POD, par année et par pays où l’argent a été dépensé; s) depuis l’établissement de la liste, combien d’argent le gouvernement a-t-il dépensé au Canada pour décourager les demandes de statut de réfugié provenant de pays de la liste des POD, par année et par province ou territoire où l’argent a été dépensé, et par pays de la liste concerné; t) depuis l’établissement de la liste, combien d’argent le gouvernement a-t-il dépensé en publicité à l’extérieur du Canada pour décourager les demandes de statut de réfugié provenant de pays de la liste des POD, par année et par pays où l’argent a été dépensé; u) depuis l’établissement de la liste, combien d’argent le gouvernement a-t-il dépensé en publicité au Canada pour décourager les demandes de statut de réfugié provenant de pays de la liste des POD, par année et par province ou territoire où l’argent a été dépensé, et par pays de la liste concerné; v) quelles évaluations le gouvernement a-t-il réalisées à l’égard de la publicité en t) et u); w) pour chaque évaluation en v), (i) quand a-t-elle commencé, (ii) quand a-t-elle pris fin, (iii) qui l’a réalisée, (iv) quels en étaient les objectifs, (v) quels en ont été les résultats, (vi) combien a-t-elle coûté; x) pour chaque année depuis l’établissement de la liste, combien de demandes de statut de réfugié ont été présentées par des demandeurs provenant de pays de la liste des POD, par pays d’origine; y) pour chaque année depuis l’établissement de la liste, par pays d’origine, combien parmi les demandes en x) ont été (i) acceptées, (ii) rejetées, (iii) abandonnées, (iv) retirées; z) pour chaque année depuis l’établissement de la liste, par pays d’origine, combien parmi les demandeurs refusés en y) ont demandé une révision de leur demande auprès de la Cour fédérale;aa) pour chaque année depuis l’établissement de la liste, par pays d’origine, combien parmi les demandeurs en z) ont été renvoyés du Canada alors que leur demande était toujours en instance à la Cour fédérale; bb) pour chaque année depuis l’établissement de la liste, par pays d’origine, combien parmi les demandeurs en z) ont quitté le Canada alors que leur demande était toujours en instance à la Cour fédérale; cc) pour chaque année depuis l’établissement de la liste, par pays d’origine, combien de demandeurs de statut de réfugié provenant de pays de la liste des POD ont été expulsés; dd) le gouvernement a-t-il suivi la situation de demandeurs de statut de réfugié provenant de pays de la liste des POD et dont la demande a été rejetée, après leur retour dans leur pays d’origine; ee) par pays de la liste des POD, combien de demandeurs rejetés ont fait l’objet du suivi en dd); ff) par pays de la liste des POD, à l’égard du suivi de chaque demandeur rejeté en ee), (i) quand a-t-il commencé, (ii) quand a-t-il pris fin, (iii) qui l’a effectué, (iv) qu’en était l’objectif, (v) quel en a été le résultat; gg) par année et par pays d’origine, combien de demandes de statut de réfugié présentées par des demandeurs de pays sur la liste des POD ont été acceptées par la Cour fédérale après avoir été rejetées par la Commission de l'immigration et du statut de réfugié; hh) par année et par pays d’origine, combien parmi les demandes en gg) ont été acceptées par le Cour fédéral après que le demandeur a quitté le Canada; ii) par pays d’origine, combien parmi les demandeurs en hh) résident aujourd’hui au Canada; jj) quelles évaluations le gouvernement a-t-il effectuées à l’égard du système des POD; kk) pour chaque évaluation en jj), (i) quand a-t-elle commencé, (ii) quand a-t-elle pris fin, (iii) qui l’a réalisée, (iv) quels en étaient les objectifs, (v) quels en ont été les résultats, (vi) combien a-t-elle coûté; ll) depuis l’établissement de la liste des POD, quels groupes et quelles personnes le gouvernement a-t-il consultés au sujet des effets de la liste des POD; mm) pour chaque consultation en ll), (i) quand a-t-elle eu lieu, (ii) comment a-t-elle eu lieu, (iii) quelles recommandations ont été formulées à l’intention du gouvernement, (iv) quelles recommandations le gouvernement a-t-il mises en œuvre?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1290 --
M. Don Davies:
En ce qui concerne les déversements d’hydrocarbures dans les eaux canadiennes par des entreprises commerciales: a) combien de déversements de produits pétroliers, gaziers et pétrochimiques et de combustibles fossiles dans les océans, rivières, lacs et autres voies navigables du Canada ont été signalés, ventilés par année depuis 2006; (b) pour chaque déversement mentionné en a), quels sont (i) le produit déversé, (ii) le volume du déversement, (iii) l’endroit du déversement, et (iv) le nom de l’entreprise commerciale responsable du déversement?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1291 --
M. Don Davies:
En ce qui concerne le logement locatif subventionné par le gouvernement au Canada: a) quel est le nombre des nouvelles unités construites à l’aide de fonds fédéraux provenant des accords bilatéraux d’Investissement dans le logement abordable depuis 2006, ventilé par (i) taille de l’unité, (ii) province, (iii) année; b) quel est le nombre des nouvelles unités construites à l’aide de fonds fédéraux provenant de l’Initiative nationale pour les sans-abri depuis 2006, ventilé par (i) province, (ii) année; c) quel est le nombre des nouvelles unités construites à l’aide de fonds fédéraux dans le cadre de tout autre programme depuis 2006, ventilé par (i) taille de l’unité, (ii) année; d) quel est le nombre des prêts accordés par la Société canadienne d’hypothèques et de logement dans le cadre du Programme de financement pour la préparation de projets depuis 2006, ventilé par (i) province, (iii) année; e) quel est le nombre des subventions accordées par la Société canadienne d’hypothèques et de logement dans le cadre du Programme de financement initial, ventilé par (i) valeur de moins de 10 000 $, (ii) valeur de plus de 10 000 $?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1292 --
M. Don Davies:
En ce qui concerne le Programme des aides familiaux résidants et le Programme des aides familiaux, par année, de 2010 à 2014: a) combien de demandes a reçues Citoyenneté et Immigration canada; b) combien de demandes de visa d’aide familial résidant et d’aide familial ont été approuvées; c) combien d’aides familiaux résidants et d’aides familiaux détenteurs de visa ont présenté une demande de résidence permanente; d) combien de demandes de résidence permanente présentées par des aides familiaux résidants et des aides familiaux détenteurs de visa ont été approuvées; e) quels sont les trois principaux pays desquels proviennent les aides familiaux résidants au Canada; f) combien de résidents détenteurs de visa d’aide familial résidant ont présenté une demande de parrainage à l’égard du conjoint ou des enfants, réparti selon (i) les chiffres bruts, (ii) le pourcentage du total?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1294 --
M. Nathan Cullen:
En ce qui concerne la décision de l’Agence des services frontaliers du Canada de fermer le poste frontalier entre Stewart (Colombie Britannique) et Hyder (Alaska) pendant huit heures par jour, à compter du 1er avril 2015: a) combien coûte l’exploitation du poste frontalier 24 heures par jour; b) quelles sont les économies attendues de cette décision; c) combien d’entrées et de sorties ont eu lieu à ce poste frontalier depuis le 1er avril 2005; d) quelles consultations l’Agence des services frontaliers du Canada a-t-elle menées auprès du District de Stewart avant de prendre cette décision?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1298 --
M. Mathieu Ravignat:
En ce qui concerne les investissements octroyés à des entreprises forestières de la circonscription de Pontiac: depuis 2011, a) combien de projets ont été subventionnés par l'entremise de programmes fédéraux dont Développement économique Canada; b) du nombre de projets en a), quel est le montant total de ces investissements et ventilé par entreprises?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1300 --
L'hon. Ralph Goodale:
En ce qui concerne les services téléphoniques suivants : (i) « 1-800 O Canada » de Service Canada (SC), (ii) « Régime de pensions du Canada (RPP) » de SC, (iii) « Centre de services aux employeurs » de SC, « Assurance-emploi (a.-e.) » de SC, (iv) « Sécurité de la vieillesse (SV) » de SC, (v) « Passeports » de SC, (vi) « Demandes de renseignements sur l’impôt des particuliers et des fiducies » de l’Agence du revenu du Canada (ARC), (vii) « Renseignements aux entreprises » de l’ARC, (viii) « Prestation fiscale canadienne pour enfants » de l’ARC, (ix) « Crédit pour la TPS/TVH pour les particuliers » de l’ARC, pour l’exercice précédent et l’exercice courant à ce jour: a) quels sont les normes de service et les indicateurs de rendement; b) combien d’appels ont satisfait aux normes de service et aux indicateurs de rendement; c) combien d’appels n’ont pas satisfait aux normes de service et aux indicateurs de rendement; d) combien de tentatives d’appel ont abouti; e) combien de tentatives d’appel ont échoué; f) comment le gouvernement assure-t-il un contrôle des cas mentionnés au point e); g) quelle est l’exactitude du contrôle évoqué au point f); h) quel a été le temps d’attente moyen au téléphone?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1303 --
Mme Michaud (Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier) :
En ce qui concerne le financement gouvernemental, octroyé par le Ministère de l’Environnement, dans la circonscription de Portneuf-Jacques-Cartier depuis 20011-2012 inclusivement, quels sont les détails relatifs à toutes les subventions et contributions et à tous les prêts accordés à tout organisme ou groupe, ventilés par (i) le nom du bénéficiaire, (ii) la municipalité dans laquelle est situé le bénéficiaire, (iii) la date à laquelle le financement a été reçu, (iv) le montant reçu, (v) le ministère ou l’organisme qui a octroyé le financement, (vi) le programme dans le cadre duquel la subvention, la contribution ou le prêt ont été accordés, (vii) la nature ou le but?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1304 --
Mme Élaine Michaud:
En ce qui concerne le financement gouvernemental, octroyé par le Ministère d’Emploi et de développement social, incluant la Société canadienne d’hypothèques et de logement dans la circonscription de Portneuf-Jacques-Cartier depuis 2011-2012 inclusivement, quels sont les détails relatifs à toutes les subventions et contributions et à tous les prêts accordés à tout organisme ou groupe, ventilés par (i) le nom du bénéficiaire, (ii) la municipalité dans laquelle est situé le bénéficiaire, (iii) la date à laquelle le financement a été reçu, (iv) le montant reçu, (v) le ministère ou l’organisme qui a octroyé le financement, (vi) le programme dans le cadre duquel la subvention, la contribution ou le prêt ont été accordés, (vii) la nature ou le but?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1306 --
Mme Élaine Michaud:
En ce qui concerne le financement gouvernemental, octroyé par le Ministère de l’infrastructure, incluant l’Agence de Développement économique Canada pour les régions du Québec, dans la circonscription de Portneuf-Jacques-Cartier depuis 2011-2012 inclusivement, quels sont les détails relatifs à toutes les subventions et contributions et à tous les prêts accordés à tout organisme ou groupe, ventilés par (i) le nom du bénéficiaire, (ii) la municipalité dans laquelle est situé le bénéficiaire, (iii) la date à laquelle le financement a été reçu, (iv) le montant reçu, (v) le ministère ou l’organisme qui a octroyé le financement, (vi) le programme dans le cadre duquel la subvention, la contribution ou le prêt ont été accordés, (vii) la nature ou le but?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1308 --
Mme Nycole Turmel:
En ce qui concerne Infrastructure Canada, de l’exercice 2011-2012 jusqu’à l’exercice en cours, ventilé par exercice: quel a été le montant total alloué, incluant les investissements directs du gouvernement du Canada dans, a) la ville de Gatineau ventilé par le (i) nom du bénéficiaire (ii) montant alloué au bénéficiaire (iii) programme dans le cadre duquel la subvention s’intègre; b) la circonscription fédérale de Hull-Aylmer (i) nom du bénéficiaire (ii) montant alloué au bénéficiaire (iii) programme dans le cadre duquel la subvention s’intègre; c) la région administrative de l’Outaouais (i) nom du bénéficiaire (ii) montant alloué au bénéficiaire (iii) programme dans le cadre duquel la subvention s’intègre?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1311 --
Mme Rosane Doré Lefebvre:
En ce qui concerne le conseil consultatif créé par le gouvernement en 2012 ayant comme mandat de promouvoir la présence des femmes aux conseils d’administration des sociétés publiques et privées: a) au total, combien de personnes font partie de ce conseil consultatif, ventilé par (i) sexe, (ii) nom, (iii) poste; b) quand les rencontres ont-elles eu lieu; c) quels étaient les sujets discutés lors de ce conseil; d) Quelle sera la date prévue du rapport de ce conseil; e) qu’est-ce qui a été abordé lors des rencontres de ce conseil en lien avec (i) l’équité salariale, (ii) la présence des femmes dans les conseils d’administration des sociétés publiques et privées; f) le gouvernement peut-il déposer les procès-verbaux des réunions de ce conseil consultatif?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1312 --
Mme Rosane Doré Lefebvre:
En ce qui concerne les réductions de services à Postes Canada annoncée en décembre 2013: a) quels sont les emplacements planifiés pour les boîtes postales communautaires à Laval; b) combien d’employés étaient affectés à Laval avant l’annonce de l’élimination de la livraison à domicile; c) combien d’employés de Postes Canada seront nécessaires après la transition des boîtes postales; d) quel volume de courrier fût envoyé dans les dix dernières années, (i) partant de Laval vers une autre destination, (ii) en destination de Laval; e) combien de plaintes ont été reçues en rapport à (i) la transition de la livraison à domicile aux boîtes postales communautaires, (ii) aux emplacements des boîtes postales communautaires à Laval; f) combien de plaintes ont menées à (i) l’ouverture d’un dossier, ii) à un changement d’emplacement de ces boîtes postales communautaires; g) quels sont les moyens mis en place pour subvenir aux besoins des personnes (i) ayant la mobilité réduite, (ii) âgée; h) est-ce que les bureaux de poste actuels seront toujours actifs après la transition vers les boîtes postales communautaires; i) quels recours seront disponibles aux citoyens affectés par des emplacements des boîtes postales qu’ils considèrent dangereux ou nuisibles; j) quels recours étaient ou demeurent disponibles pour les citoyens affectés par l’implantation d’une boîte postale communautaire lors des 30 dernières années, excluant le processus de transition actuel; k) combien d’employés au service à la clientèle chez Postes Canada, ventilé par langue de service, sont assignés aux plaintes relatifs à l’installation des boîtes postales communautaires provenant (i) de l’ensemble du Canada, (ii) du Québec, (iii) de Laval, (iv) des citoyens d’Alfred-Pellan?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1317 --
L'hon. Stéphane Dion:
En ce qui concerne les contrats de moins de 10 000 $ adjugés par Patrimoine canadien depuis le 30 janiver 2015: quel est a) le nom du fournisseur; b) le numéro de référence du contrat; c) la date du contrat; d) la description des services fournis; e) la date de livraison; f) le montant originel du contrat; g) le montant final du contrat, s’il diffère du montant originel?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1318 --
L'hon. Stéphane Dion:
En ce qui concerne les contrats de moins de 10 000 $ adjugés par Ressources naturelles Canada depuis le 5 février 2015: quel est a) le nom du fournisseur; b) le numéro de référence du contrat; c) la date du contrat; d) la description des services fournis; e) la date de livraison; f) le montant originel du contrat; g) le montant final du contrat, s’il diffère du montant originel?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 1319 --
M. Jack Harris:
En ce qui concerne la conférence des Nations Unies réussissant les chefs d’état-major de la Défense, tenue les 26 et 27 mars 2015 au siège de l’Organisation des Nations Unies à New York, et l’absence à cette conférence du chef d’état-major des Forces armées canadiennes, le général Thomas Lawson: a) quelle est la raison de l’absence du général Lawson; b) qui étaient les représentants des Forces armées canadiennes et du ministère des Affaires étrangères, du Commerce et du Développement du Canada présents à la conférence; c) quelles dispositions ont été prises pour informer les participants à la conférence des priorités et préoccupations du Canada à l’égard du maintien de la paix dans le monde?
Response
(Le document est déposé)
8555-412-1261 Detainees8555-412-1276 Government contracts8555-412-1283 Government contracts8555-412-1284 Government contracts8555-412-1286 Designated countries of origin8555-412-1290 Fuel spills8555-412-1291 Affordable housing8555-412-1292 Live-in caregivers8555-412-1294 Canada Border Service Agency8555-412-1298 Government investments8555-412-1300 Telephone services ...Show all topics
View Mike Sullivan Profile
NDP (ON)
View Mike Sullivan Profile
2015-06-11 11:18 [p.14937]
Mr. Speaker, the bill, as I understand it, would protect all forms of service dogs, both service dogs in the forces of law enforcement, but also service dogs that are helping persons with disabilities, such as the blind, persons who use dogs as therapy, et cetera.
We really appreciate the fact that the government is trying to protect these animals, but we are concerned that the use of mandatory minimums, as always, goes too far with the current government. It could, in fact, result in judges being unable to hand down convictions because they realize the mandatory minimum would in fact be too harsh a penalty.
Would the member like to comment?
Monsieur le Président, si je comprends bien, le projet de loi protégerait tous les chiens d'assistance, y compris les chiens d'assistance policière, les chiens qui aident les personnes handicapées, comme les aveugles, et les chiens utilisés dans le cadre d'une thérapie.
Nous sommes tout à fait d'accord avec les efforts déployés par le gouvernement pour protéger ces animaux, mais nous estimons que, comme d'habitude, le gouvernement va trop loin en ayant recours à des peines minimales obligatoires. En fait, cela pourrait dissuader certains juges de condamner des contrevenants parce que la peine minimale obligatoire constituerait une sanction trop sévère.
La députée pourrait-elle nous dire ce qu'elle en pense?
View Ève Péclet Profile
NDP (QC)
View Ève Péclet Profile
2015-06-11 11:19 [p.14937]
Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my colleague for the question. I know how important matters related to persons with disabilities are to him.
Diane Bergeron from the Canadian National Institute for the Blind came to committee to testify and said how extremely important the bill is to her because it acknowledges the value of service animals for persons with disabilities or reduced mobility. To her, it is essential that we finally recognize how important these animals are to people's daily lives.
As the hon. member said in the second part of his question, the problem that often comes up in animal cruelty cases is that these offences are withdrawn when there is an agreement between the Crown and the defence lawyers. Offenders often are not prosecuted because the offences are considered less serious than others.
Mandatory minimum sentences could cause a problem. If an agreement is made, a person will agree to plead guilty to some offences, but not to animal cruelty offences because they come with a minimum sentence. As I said, we should take a balanced approach to animal cruelty offences. We must ensure that there are more convictions and not prevent convictions.
Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais remercier mon collègue de sa question. D'ailleurs, je sais toute l'importance qu'il accorde à la situation des personnes handicapées.
Mme Diane Bergeron de l'Institut national canadien pour les aveugles est venue témoigner et dire à quel point le projet de loi est extrêmement important pour elle, car il reconnaît la valeur des animaux d'assistance pour les personnes ayant un handicap ou à mobilité réduite. Pour elle, il est fondamental que l'on reconnaisse enfin l'importance qu'ont ces animaux au quotidien.
Comme le député l'a mentionné dans la deuxième partie de sa question, le problème qui survient souvent dans les cas de cruauté envers les animaux est que ces infractions sont retirées lorsqu'il y a entente entre la Couronne et les avocats de la défense. Il arrive souvent que les gens ne sont pas poursuivis parce qu'il s'agit d'infractions considérées comme étant de moindre importance par rapport à d'autres.
S'il y a une peine minimale, on pourrait voir un problème surgir. Lorsqu'il y aura une entente, on acceptera de plaider coupable à certaines infractions, mais pas à celle de cruauté envers les animaux parce qu'une peine minimale y est assujettie. Comme je l'ai dit, l'approche devrait être plutôt équilibrée lorsqu'on parle de cruauté envers les animaux. Il faut faire en sorte qu'il y ait davantage de déclarations de culpabilité et non d'empêcher de telles déclarations.
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
View Don Davies Profile
2015-06-09 10:06 [p.14782]
moved for leave to introduce Bill C-687, An Act respecting the development of a national employment strategy for persons with disabilities.
He said: Mr. Speaker, I am honoured to rise to introduce a private member's bill, seconded by the hon. member for Newton—North Delta. The bill is a product of the Create Your Canada contest in my riding. It owes its genesis to the imagination and hard work of a young high school student in Vancouver Kingsway, Harriet Crossfield from Sir Charles Tupper Secondary School.
Harriet's idea, enshrined in this bill, calls for the development of a national employment strategy for persons with disabilities. This legislation would require the Minister of Employment and Social Development to draft a plan to improve the economic participation of persons with disabilities throughout Canada. Included in this plan would be measures to educate private-sector employers about the great potential of persons with disabilities to contribute to the workforce, encourage more inclusive hiring practices, and reduce stigma. Harriet's idea would tackle the unfair social exclusion faced by too many persons with disabilities in Canada, and create new potential for a more dynamic and inclusive labour force.
I would like to congratulate Harriet on her contribution to Parliament and our country, and thank her teachers and all who entered this contest from Sir Charles Tupper Secondary School.
demande à présenter le projet de loi C-687, Loi concernant l'élaboration d'une stratégie nationale sur l'intégration des personnes handicapées au marché du travail.
— Monsieur le Président, c'est pour moi un honneur d'intervenir à la Chambre pour présenter un projet de loi de loi d'initiative parlementaire, avec l'appui de la députée de Newton—Delta-Nord. Le projet de loi découle du concours « Crée ton Canada », qui s'est tenu dans ma circonscription. Il est le fruit de l'imagination et du travail acharné d'une jeune élève de Vancouver Kingsway, Harriet Crossfield, qui fréquente l'école secondaire Sir Charles Tupper.
L'idée de Harriet, qui s'est concrétisée dans le projet de loi, prévoit l'élaboration d'une stratégie nationale d'emploi pour les personnes handicapées. La mesure législative exigerait que le ministre de l’Emploi et du Développement social élabore un plan visant à améliorer la participation des personnes handicapées à l'économie, partout au Canada. Ce plan comprendrait des mesures destinées à sensibiliser les employeurs du secteur privé au fait que les personnes handicapées peuvent constituer un excellent atout au sein de leurs effectifs, à favoriser des pratiques d’embauche plus inclusives et à réduire la stigmatisation dont les personnes handicapées font l'objet. L'idée proposée par Harriet permettrait de lutter contre l'exclusion sociale injuste dont sont victimes beaucoup trop de personnes handicapées au Canada et de créer une nouvelle main-d'oeuvre plus dynamique et plus inclusive.
Je tiens à féliciter Harriet de sa contribution au Parlement et à notre pays et à remercier ses enseignants ainsi que tous les élèves de l'école secondaire Sir Charles Tupper qui ont participé à ce concours.
View Manon Perreault Profile
Ind. (QC)
View Manon Perreault Profile
2015-05-29 13:04 [p.14360]
moved that the bill be read the third time and passed.
She said: Mr. Speaker, it is a real honour to present my bill entitled An Act to establish National Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Day. I am very pleased that it has reached this stage and that it was all done so cordially.
This bill made it through all of the previous stages and has progressed nicely to this point. That is the result of everyone working together, and I sincerely hope that this will be a turning point in the lives of people living with a spinal cord injury.
I must also mention our partners who have supported us throughout this process and who were all involved in some way in the development of this bill. I am thinking about the Rick Hansen Institute, which provided us with data, Bobby White, the director of Spinal Cord Injury Canada, and Walter Zelaya, from MEMO-Que, who gave their full support without reservation.
With this bill, we want to designate the third Friday of September as national spinal cord injury awareness day. After a number of discussions, we concluded that this awareness day could be very useful to individuals, employers and stakeholders in various fields. It will certainly also have a very positive and significant impact on people living with spinal cord injuries.
I am quite certain that I will be able to show my esteemed colleagues that implementing this bill, which will not cost anything, can have a major and meaningful impact on people with spinal cord injuries. It will do so much to raise widespread awareness of their needs and abilities.
This bill would designate the third Friday of September as national spinal cord injury awareness day. Why that day? We took a number of factors into consideration, including two major ones: accidents that happen in the summer and accidents related to winter sports. The third Friday of September is also symbolic. There is an analogy here. When someone has just suffered a spinal cord injury, it is like autumn: they see dark days ahead. In the months after a spinal cord injury, patients have to cope with a kind of darkness that is comparable to a difficult and trying winter.
This simple and effective bill that will cost nothing provides one more tool to those involved in helping people with spinal cord injuries, as well as to agencies that work on prevention and raising public awareness and recognize the harsh reality just outside the door of the rehabilitation centre. That is exactly when spinal cord injury patients first feel that those around them really are looking at them differently, that each and every outing will require considerable effort and that their new limitations mean that they have to dig to the very depths of themselves as they try to improve their lives each day and start living anywhere close to the way they did previously. They have to have the courage to forgo some activities or to summon the perseverance they need to adapt those activities to their new reality.
This bill has three components. Naturally, raising awareness among our fellow Canadians is the first objective. We want people with spinal cord injuries to feel more encouraged to take an active part in society without any prejudice towards them. If possible, they should be encouraged to develop a talent and, even better, to use it for the benefit of others. In my view, that is a fundamental part of human activity.
This day will allow people with spinal cord injuries to communicate with each other, gather information about the possibilities open to them, and listen to people with experiences to share.
It is also about recognizing the determination of those with spinal cord injuries to build a new life. One of the biggest accomplishments for anyone with a spinal cord injury is understanding that life is going to have its challenges and costs. The higher the injury is on the spinal cord, the more severe the physiological damage is and the faster the aging process seems to go.
Even people whose work requires little physical effort run into problems in terms of getting around, transfers, personal care, housekeeping, ice, snow clearing and so on.
We also want to recognize the dedication of the people who help out on a daily basis. Thanks to them, the injured persons can resume a nearly normal life. This help goes a long way toward alleviating anxiety, problems of all kinds, and especially physical exhaustion. However, what is most important in my view is that these people gently force the injured to be disciplined and to tune out the little voice in their head that tells them in the morning that they do not have the desire, energy or need to get out of bed. Believe me, that little voice is tenacious and having someone to rely on during those times is truly a blessing.
I want to acknowledge the perseverance of scientists who, through their research, are improving the lives of thousands of people with spinal cord injuries. In recent years, there have been significant advances in the neurosciences, which study everything to do with the nervous system, such as the mapping of the sensorimotor cortex.
At the trauma unit at the Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, you learn that the spinal cord is made up of nervous tissue and cells and that it looks like a cable the thickness of your little finger. It begins at the base of the brain and passes through each vertebra, ending between the first and second vertebrae. Basically, the spinal cord is the communication link between the brain and the body.
Adapting to a spinal cord injury is very difficult and takes a long time. It requires a great deal of personal effort by the injured person and the people around him or her. It turns a person's life upside down and is often accompanied by many negative emotions such as fear, anxiety and anger. It brings long hours of reflection interspersed with highs and lows.
However, as with any situation, there are also positives. Those with new injuries are taken care of by an interdisciplinary team that quickly addresses the objectives identified by specialists based on the injuries.
For several years, the notion of inclusion has dominated the debate on the place of people with disabilities in our society. A so-called inclusive society adapts to individual differences and anticipates people's needs in order to give them the best possible chance of success in life. As a result, in order for a society to be truly inclusive, collective will and collective mobilization are needed, on the part of society and the economic and political communities. They need to change their way of thinking and the way they organize things in order to integrate people who are sometimes more fragile.
Every little action to improve the living conditions of people with disabilities requires a collective and political effort, and I think that we are making such an effort today.
I also believe that as elected representatives, we must promote inclusiveness. We must position ourselves as open people who create bridges with our living environments. Of course, the inclusion of people with disabilities in society cannot be done without the support and knowledge of the medical, social and political sectors.
Finally, I sometimes get the impression that we have incorporated the notion of inclusion into our speeches, but it is difficult for a person with a disability to be convinced that political authorities are truly committed to the notion of inclusion because so much remains to be done in terms of accessibility and home care.
It is important to understand that the bill to designate a national spinal cord injury awareness day is much more than symbolic. It has the potential to help save lives and reduce the number of spinal cord injuries that happen in Canada every year.
Let us not miss this opportunity to help everyone. As I often say, spinal cord injuries do not discriminate.
As I went through the process that got me to the point of talking about this bill again today, I believe that I developed a better understanding of the real needs of people with spinal cord injuries. Let me explain. Naturally, people might think that I do not really understand them, but talking to other people can sometimes help us see other problems.
I gained a better understanding of what this special day on the calendar can contribute. This bill is representative of the political work we are all here to do because it helps us all better ourselves as a society in meaningful ways.
Sometimes we get the feeling that we are not doing enough, but in this case, even though this bill seems like a modest initiative at first glance, it is an incredible tool that leads us to a new stage in our progress toward accepting people with disabilities in Canada.
This step forward will lead to others and so on. The quality of life of all our fellow citizens, whether they are affected by spinal cord injuries or not, will certainly improve.
Creating a national spinal cord injury awareness day will ultimately significantly help improve health care, promote treatment advances, technological innovations and research in medical science, and even contribute to the Canadian economy.
Raising hope is a winning strategy, and today, the first thing we must do is make sure that this bill continues to make its way through the legislative process. We also need to make social acceptance more universal and to raise awareness among employers of the unsuspected qualities of those with spinal cord injuries, thereby making our communities more effective, productive and just.
The practical nature of this reality and the idealism of these principles work well together in this much-needed bill. We have to promote acceptance within social networks and value inclusion because it is both compassionate and for the common good.
I should mention that governments are doing their part when it comes to research, but most of the funding comes from appeals to the public's generosity. Creating a national spinal cord injury awareness day will allow for new fundraising opportunities. It will not cost us anything to provide this opportunity to organizations that offer services to persons with disabilities, and the potential returns could be extremely beneficial.
To sum up, this bill will help raise public awareness and acceptance of spinal cord injury victims. It will maximize funding and research initiatives and stimulate volunteer support and personal involvement in general. It can help communicate and draw attention to specific issues, while bringing together people on similar paths. It will validate the help and support provided by loved ones, family members, colleagues, neighbours and specialists, as well as the exceptional contribution of researchers in this area of expertise.
We are all equal before this terrible scourge and every bit of progress is a victory for all. My personal experience and that of the people I consulted, as well as the conversations I have taken part in, have convinced me that creating a national spinal cord injury awareness day is a productive, effective, economical and sensible way to do our part for Canadians with disabilities.
I often say that people living with a physical limitation who meet daily challenges have the same very strong abilities, qualities and character of people drawn to extreme sports. I am sure that my colleague across the way will agree with me. They have to have determination, courage, perseverance, and especially the will to improve their daily lives.
I think that we can do a better job of equipping these people to deal with what others would see as insurmountable obstacles. I recognize that it is often stressful and painful for the people around us, because they are not living it and do not truly understand. It is up to us to reassure them, if we want to maintain their friendship and respect, and to recognize that they may be an incredible, and even vital, source of support.
propose que le projet de loi soit pour la troisième fois et adopté.
— Monsieur le Président, je tiens à mentionner que je me sens très honorée de présenter mon projet de loi intitulé Loi instituant la Journée nationale de sensibilisation aux lésions médullaires. Je suis très contente qu'il soit rendu à cette étape et que cela se soit fait si cordialement.
Ce projet de loi a franchi les étapes précédentes et i a avancé rondement jusqu'ici. C'est le fruit d'un travail collaboratif, et il deviendra, je l'espère grandement, un moment charnière dans la vie des personnes vivant avec une blessure médullaire.
Je dois également souligner le soutien de nos partenaires qui nous ont épaulés pendant cette démarche et accompagnés d'une façon ou d'une autre dans l'élaboration de ce projet de loi. Je pense à l'Institut Rick Hansen d'où nous avons pris les données, à Bobby White, directeur de Lésions médullaires Canada, et à Walter Zelaya, de MEMO-Qc, qui ont donné leur appui sans aucune objection.
Par ce projet de loi, nous désirons désigner le troisième vendredi de septembre comme la journée nationale de sensibilisation aux lésions médullaires. Après plusieurs pourparlers, nous en sommes arrivés à la conclusion que cette journée de sensibilisation et de conscientisation pourrait être fort utile pour les citoyens, les employeurs et les intervenants des différents milieux. De plus, immanquablement, il y aura des effets positifs pour les personnes vivant avec des lésions médullaires de façon très significative.
J'ai grande confiance que je vais pouvoir démontrer à mes chers collègues que mettre en application ce projet de loi sans coût s'y rattachant peut avoir une incidence importante et réelle chez les blessés médullaires, pour faire valoir leur intérêt et leur capacité d'une façon beaucoup plus perceptible et à plus grande échelle.
Par conséquent, ce projet de loi décréterait le troisième vendredi du mois de septembre la journée nationale de sensibilisation aux lésions médullaires. Pourquoi avoir choisi le troisième? Au bout du compte, nous avons pris quelques réalités en considération, entre autres, le fait qu'il existe deux grandes réalités: les accidents qui se produisent pendant la période estivale et ceux qui sont reliés aux sports ou aux accidents hivernaux. En outre, nous avons une analogie, puisque le troisième vendredi de septembre a également une signification symbolique puisque pour un nouveau blessé médullaire, c'est l'automne et les jours plus sombres qui s'annoncent pour lui. Effectivement, le patient devra traverser au fil des mois qui suivront une certaine noirceur comparable à un hiver difficile et rigoureux.
Ce projet de loi simple, efficace et à coût nul, donne un outil supplémentaire aux intervenants qui viennent en aide aux blessés médullaires, ainsi qu'aux organismes qui font de la prévention et de la sensibilisation auprès du grand public, et qui reconnaissent la dure réalité qui survient à la sortie du centre de réadaptation. C'est à ce moment précis que le blessé médullaire sent pour la première fois que le regard de son entourage a vraiment changé, qu'il devra faire un effort considérable à chacune de ses sorties, que ses nouvelles limites vont lui demander de puiser au fond de lui-même pour chercher à améliorer son quotidien et à reprendre une vie qui va se rapprocher un tant soit peu de sa vie précédente. Il devra avoir le courage de mettre une croix sur certaines activités, ou y mettre toute la persévérance nécessaire pour adapter l'activité à sa nouvelle réalité.
Ce projet de loi comprend trois volets. Naturellement, la sensibilisation des concitoyens est le premier objectif. Nous voulons que les blessés médullaires se sentent davantage encouragés à prendre part activement, sans préjugé, à notre société et si possible à développer un talent, et encore mieux à en faire profiter les autres, ce qui deviendrait, à mon avis, une des bases de l'activité humaine.
Cette journée permettra aux personnes blessées médullaires à échanger entre elles et à se renseigner sur les possibilités qui s'offrent à elles, ainsi qu'à écouter les gens qui ont une expérience à partager.
Il s'agit aussi de reconnaître le détermination de ces personnes à se reconstruire une nouvelle vie. Une des grandes réussites pour toute personne blessée médullaire est de savoir que sa vie ne se fera pas sans heurt, sans coût, puisque plus la lésion est haute, plus les séquelles physiologiques sont sévères et plus le vieillissement se fait sentir rapidement.
Même les personnes dont le travail exige peu d'effort se retrouvent avec des désagréments, que ce soit sur le plan des déplacements, des transferts, des soins personnels, de l'entretien domestique, de la glace, du déneigement et autres.
Nous voulons également souligner le dévouement des personnes qui les aident quotidiennement. Grâce à ces dernières, les blessés peuvent reprendre une vie quasi normale. Cette aide éloigne beaucoup d'anxiété, d'ennui de toutes sortes et surtout l'épuisement physique. Toutefois, le plus important, à mon avis, c'est que ces personnes obligent gentiment les blessés à être disciplinés, et les forcent à résister à leur petite voix qui leur dit que ce matin ils n'ont pas le goût ni l'énergie ni le besoin de se lever. Qu'on me croit, cette petite voix est tenace et avoir quelqu'un sur qui compter dans ces moments est une bénédiction du ciel.
Je ne veux pas passer outre la persévérance des scientifiques qui, par leurs recherches, améliorent la vie de milliers de blessés médullaires. Il faut mentionner que sur le plan scientifique, il y a eu au cours des dernières années, des avancées significatives en matière de neurosciences, c'est-à-dire tout ce qui a trait au système nerveux tel que la cartographie du cortex sensori-moteur.
Dans le programme de traumatologie de l'Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, il est inscrit que la moelle épinière est formée de tissus et de cellules nerveuses et qu'elle ressemble à un câble de la grosseur d'un petit doigt. Elle prend naissance à la base du cerveau et passe à l'intérieur de chacune des vertèbres pour se terminer entre la première et la deuxième vertèbre. En gros, la moelle épinière est donc la voie de communication entre le cerveau et le corps.
L'adaptation à une blessure médullaire est coriace et longue. Elle demande beaucoup d'efforts personnels, tant aux blessés qu'à leurs proches. C'est un grand bouleversement, souvent accompagné de plusieurs émotions négatives telles que la peur, l'anxiété et la colère. Ce sont de longues heures de réflexions parsemées de hauts et de bas.
Cependant, comme dans toute chose, il y a également de bons côtés. Les nouveaux blessés sont entourés d'une équipe interdisciplinaire afin de répondre rapidement à leurs objectifs, identifiés par des spécialistes selon leurs lésions.
Depuis quelques années, quand il s'agit d'aborder la place des personnes handicapées dans la société, c'est la notion d'inclusion qui domine le débat. Une société dite inclusive s'adapte aux différences de la personne et va au-devant de ses besoins afin de lui donner toutes les chances de réussite dans la vie. Pour s'appliquer entièrement, l'inclusion exige donc la mobilisation et la volonté collectives, que ce soit de la société ou du milieu politique et économique, afin de repenser leur mode de réflexion et d'organisation pour l'intégration des personnes parfois plus fragiles.
Chaque petit geste porté pour améliorer les conditions de vie des personnes handicapées demande un effort collectif et politique, et je pense que c'est ce que nous sommes en train de faire aujourd'hui.
Je crois également qu'en tant qu'élus, nous devons être des acteurs de l'inclusion. Nous devons nous positionner comme des personnes ouvertes créant des passerelles avec le milieu ordinaire. Je pense que l'inclusion des personnes handicapées à la société ne peut s'envisager sans l'appui et le savoir-faire des secteurs médical, social et politique, naturellement.
Finalement, j'ai parfois l'impression qu'on s'est emparé de la notion d'inclusion dans les discours, mais pour une personne handicapée, il est difficile d'être convaincue que la notion de l'inclusion est vraiment l'engagement des pouvoirs politiques, puisqu'il reste tant à faire, notamment sur le plan de l'accessibilité et des soins à domicile.
Il est important de bien comprendre que ce projet de loi pour la création d'une journée nationale de sensibilisation aux lésions médullaires est loin d'être uniquement symbolique. Il a le potentiel de contribuer à sauver des vies et à faire diminuer le nombre de nouveaux blessés médullaires au Canada chaque année.
Ne ratons pas cette occasion qui, je le répète, profite à tous. Comme je le dis souvent, les blessures médullaires frappent n'importe qui sans aucune discrimination.
En franchissant les multiples étapes qui m'ont permis de parler à nouveau de ce projet de loi aujourd'hui, je crois avoir mieux assimilé les besoins réels des personnes vivant avec des blessés médullaires. Je m'explique parce que, naturellement, les gens pourraient penser que je les comprends mal, mais c'est en parlant avec d'autres personnes qu'on peut parfois voir d'autres problèmes.
J'ai saisi plus profondément l'apport d'une initiative telle que cette journée spéciale au calendrier. Ce projet de loi est à la base de notre travail politique à tous, en ce sens qu'il guide les citoyennes et les citoyens de notre pays vers un perfectionnement collectif et vers une amélioration en profondeur.
Parfois, nous avons l'impression de ne pas en faire assez, mais dans ce cas-ci, même si, de prime abord, ce projet de loi peut sembler modeste, c'est un incroyable outil qui nous pousse vers une nouvelle étape dans l'évolution de l'acceptation des personnes handicapées au Canada.
Ce progrès en amènera d'autres, et ainsi de suite. La qualité de vie de tous nos concitoyens, touchés ou non par les lésions médullaires, sera positivement améliorée.
La création d'une journée nationale de sensibilisation aux lésions médullaires va ultimement aider substantiellement à améliorer les soins de santé, à favoriser les progrès thérapeutiques, les innovations techniques et la recherche dans les domaines des sciences médicales, et même à contribuer positivement l'économie canadienne.
Augmenter l'espoir est une stratégie gagnante, et aujourd'hui, le premier geste à poser consiste à continuer de faire en sorte que ce projet de loi franchisse ses étapes, mais aussi à rendre l'acceptation sociale plus universelle, à sensibiliser les employeurs aux qualités insoupçonnées des blessés médullaires et, par conséquent, à rendre nos communautés plus efficaces, plus productives et plus justes.
Le pragmatisme de cette réalité et l'idéalisme des principes énoncés se complètent parfaitement dans ce projet de loi nécessaire. Il faut promouvoir l'acceptation dans les réseaux sociaux et favoriser l'inclusion par humanisme et surtout pour notre bien commun.
Il faut mentionner que les gouvernements font leur part pour la recherche, mais qu'une grande partie du financement se fait par des appels à la générosité du public. En créant une journée nationale de sensibilisation aux lésions médullaires, nous produisons de nouvelles occasions de campagnes de financement. Il n'en coûte rien d'offrir cette journée aux organismes offrant des services aux personnes handicapées, et les possibilités de retour sont très avantageuses.
En résumé, ce projet de loi va servir à la sensibilisation citoyenne et à l'acceptation des victimes de blessures médullaires. Il va maximiser les initiatives de financement de la recherche et stimuler l'apport de bénévoles et l'implication personnelle en général. Il peut aider à la communication et à susciter l'attention du public sur un enjeu précis, tout autant que rassembler des gens qui vont dans la même direction. Il va valoriser l'aide des proches, le support des familles, des collègues de travail, des voisins et des spécialistes, ainsi que la contribution exceptionnelle des chercheurs dans ce champ d'expertise.
Nous sommes tous égaux devant ce fléau et chaque progrès est une victoire pour tous. Mon expérience personnelle, comme celle des gens que j'ai consultés, et les dialogues auxquels j'ai participé m'ont convaincue que la création d'une Journée nationale de sensibilisation aux lésions médullaires était une manière productive, efficace, économique et sensée de faire notre part pour les personnes handicapées au Canada.
Je dis souvent que les personnes vivant avec une limitation physique et qui relèvent des défis sur une base quotidienne possèdent les mêmes aptitudes, les mêmes qualités et le même caractère si percutant des personnes portées vers les sports extrêmes. Je suis sûre que mon collègue d'en face sera d'accord avec moi. Ils doivent notamment avoir de la détermination, du courage, de la persévérance et, surtout, la volonté d'améliorer leur quotidien.
Je crois que ces personnes peuvent être outillées plus convenablement pour supporter ce que d'autres verraient comme des embûches insurmontables. Je reconnais que c'est souvent stressant et angoissant pour les personnes de notre entourage, parce qu'elles ne le vivent pas et ne le comprennent pas vraiment. C'est à nous de les rassurer, si nous voulons conserver leur amitié et leur respect, et de reconnaître qu'elles deviendront peut-être une aide incroyable, sinon indispensable.
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2015-05-29 13:16 [p.14362]
Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the bill before the House and applaud the member for the effort she has no doubt put in to making this possible. I understand that September 18, the third Friday, would be our first national awareness day.
Could the member provide some further comment on the importance of health care services for spinal cord injuries? Designating this day would provide an opportunity for those individuals to look at appealing to governments at different levels and different organizations. The member made reference to fundraising. There are all sorts of unlimited possibilities in recognizing this.
Could she provide some comment on the importance of research and health care dollars for this?
Monsieur le Président, j'appuie le projet de loi dont la Chambre est saisie et je félicite la députée des efforts qu'elle a indubitablement investis pour parvenir à le présenter. Je crois comprendre que le 18 septembre, le troisième vendredi, serait notre première journée nationale de sensibilisation.
La députée pourrait-elle nous parler davantage de l'importance des services de soins de santé pour les lésions médullaires? Désigner ce jour donnerait l'occasion aux personnes vivant avec ces lésions d'interpeler divers ordres de gouvernement et organismes. La députée a parlé des campagnes de financement. Les possibilités en ce sens sont illimitées.
Pourrait-elle parler de l'importance de financer la recherche et les soins de santé en lien avec ces lésions?
View Manon Perreault Profile
Ind. (QC)
View Manon Perreault Profile
2015-05-29 13:17 [p.14362]
Mr. Speaker, when it comes to research I naturally think of the Rick Hansen Institute. The institute has done much to advance research on spinal cord injuries.
There is still a lot of work to be done, but nevertheless there have been some significant advances. I am not a doctor, but rehabilitation centres are currently working very hard to ensure that spinal cord injury victims are taken care of as quickly as possible after their accident. Over the years, they have come to realize that the earlier you can operate on these individuals, the greater the chance of their muscles responding to rehabilitation.
Monsieur le Président, naturellement, en matière de recherche, je pense à l'Institut Rick Hansen. C'est lui qui a poussé si loin la recherche sur les blessures médullaires.
Il y a encore beaucoup de chemin à faire, mais il y a quand même eu de grandes avancées. Je ne suis pas médecin, mais présentement, les centres de réadaptation travaillent encore très fort pour que les blessés medullaires soient pris en charge le plus rapidement possible à la suite de leur accident. En effet, au cours des années, ils se sont aperçus que, le plus tôt on pouvait opérer ces personnes, meilleure était la chance que leurs muscles répondent à la réadaptation.
View Steven Fletcher Profile
CPC (MB)
Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the member for Montcalm for bringing this bill forward. Could the member elaborate on how society could remove systemic barriers that historically prevent persons with disabilities or mobility challenges? What can society do to be inclusive for all Canadians of every ability?
Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais remercier la députée de Montcalm d'avoir présenté ce projet de loi. La députée pourrait-elle nous parler davantage de la façon dont la société pourrait éliminer les obstacles systémiques qui nuisent depuis longtemps aux personnes ayant un handicap ou à mobilité réduite? Qu'est-ce que la société peut faire pour favoriser l'inclusion de tous les Canadiens, peu importe leurs capacités?
View Manon Perreault Profile
Ind. (QC)
View Manon Perreault Profile
2015-05-29 13:19 [p.14362]
Mr. Speaker, when someone asks me what we could do to make our society more inclusive, two things quickly come to mind: accessibility and transportation. I would like to focus on transportation, because right now, that is really the biggest problem for people in wheelchairs who need to get to work. Often these people do not have access to transportation. For example, if I take the Montcalm commuter train, not all of the exits are wheelchair accessible. Some exits are, but not all of them. Nevertheless, this infrastructure was just built in the past few years. There is therefore an enormous amount of work to be done to make transportation and buildings accessible.
I would like to add that just because there is a sign saying that a building is wheelchair accessible, that does not make it true. One of the biggest problems we have is simply going to the washroom. Wheelchairs cannot always fit through the washroom door. The member for Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia is laughing, but I know he knows exactly what I am talking about.
I would like to invite all of my colleagues to come spend an entire day following us around in wheelchairs and to do push-ups every time we have to transfer in and out of our wheelchairs. They will see that it is very physically demanding.
With regard to both transportation and accessibility, there is still much to be done.
Monsieur le Président, quand on me demande ce que nous pourrions faire pour rendre la société plus inclusive, deux choses me viennent en tête très rapidement: l'accessibilité et le transport. Je vais mettre l'accent sur le transport parce qu'en ce moment c'est vraiment le problème le plus important pour les personnes handicapées qui doivent se déplacer en fauteuil roulant pour aller travailler. Souvent, ces personnes n'ont pas accès au transport. Si je prends le train de banlieue de Montcalm, par exemple, ce ne sont pas toutes les sorties qui sont accessibles. Quelques sorties le sont, mais elles ne le sont pas toutes. Pourtant, ce sont des infrastructures qui ont été construites au cours des dernières années. Il y a donc encore énormément de travail à faire sur le plan du transport et de l'accessibilité des bâtiments.
J'ajouterais que ce n'est pas parce que le bâtiment est affiché comme étant accessible qu'il l'est nécessairement. Un des plus gros problèmes que nous retrouvons, c'est lorsque nous allons tout simplement aux salles de bain. Ce ne sont pas tous les fauteuils roulants qui peuvent entrer dans la salle de bain. Le député de Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia rit, mais je suis certaine qu'il comprend très bien de quoi je parle.
J'inviterais tous mes collègues à venir passer une journée à nous suivre en fauteuil roulant, du début jusqu'à la fin, et qu'ils fassent des extensions de bras à tous les transferts que nous devons faire. Ils verront que c'est très exigeant physiquement.
Sur le plan du transport, il y a encore énormément à faire, tout comme sur celui de l'accessibilité.
View Steven Fletcher Profile
CPC (MB)
Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the member for Montcalm for her leadership in the area of spinal cord injury and disability and for her contribution to Canada as a whole. Public service is difficult, and the member for Montcalm has distinguished herself.
I would like to pick up where the member left off on the washroom issue and the idea of encouraging everyone to spend a day in a wheelchair. We do that. My colleague from Edmonton has done that.
I used to bring people together in the morning. They would come and gather in my office. They would get their wheelchair, and I would be sure to give them lots of coffee. At the end of the day, if anyone said that he or she had spent the entire day in the wheelchair, I knew for sure that the person was telling a white lie, because the washrooms are hard to find, and when one gets there, it is hard to know what to do if one is in a wheelchair.
That is something that is really emblematic of what happens. Just having a flush entrance does not mean a facility is accessible.
With regard to spinal cord awareness week, the United Kingdom has a day and Australia has a week. Part of spinal cord awareness week is awareness. What happens to the body when people have a spinal cord injury is not well understood. It is because nobody wants to talk about what it actually means. It is very uncomfortable. I am going to use this opportunity to explain some of the uncomfortable realities of a spinal cord injury.
Generally, there are quadriplegics and paraplegics. A paraplegic is one who has use of his or her arms. A quadriplegic is someone who is, like me, paralyzed from the neck down.
What does paralyzed from the neck down mean? The obvious thing is that the person cannot move any muscles below the neck. However, it also means not feeling hunger, not feeling hot or cold, not having the sense of touch. It is a bit like being a turtle on a log. One moves toward the ambient temperature of the room or the environment in which one finds oneself.
People who are quadriplegics cannot feed themselves. They cannot dress or undress themselves. They cannot shower. People at a high level, as in my case, need people 24 hours a day to help with the activities of daily living, including going to the washroom. Again, this is really icky, but it is a reality. There are a variety of things that people do, such as using indwelling catheters and other kinds of medical devices. It is the same situation on the bowel side. The individual with the injury needs help with all of that. That is really difficult.
Then we combine it with the need for proper care, which is always difficult to find and finance. Some people are fortunate to have insurance. In most cases the insurance is not nearly enough. That is something auto insurance companies and workers' comp need to look at because most spinal cord injuries occur come from a driving or work accident.
Also, the issue of reproduction is compromised as well. It is a fundamental part of being human. We are physical creatures. The change in the lifestyle that the member for Montcalm describes is almost a metamorphosis into a different kind of existence. I have to live in my mind and I am very glad that I live in Canada where someone like the member for Montcalm, or myself or many others can be a quadriplegic or paraplegic and still contribute to society.
However, there are many barriers and they include attitudinal issues. I am sure the member for Montcalm has had this happen to her. When I go to a restaurant, someone asks the person who I am with what I want to eat. The person responds “Why don't you ask the person in the wheelchair?” Then the person will sort of raise their voice and say “What would you like to eat?” It is like there is some sort of cognitive or hearing impairment associated with the wheelchair.
These are well intentioned people, but too many people do not have the awareness. I admit that I was one of those people before my accident in 1996.
Another thing is accommodation in the workplace. In the House of Commons, I would like to thank all my colleagues for allowing a stranger in the House, my caregiver who sits with me. Here, in committees and in cabinet, no one raises an eyebrow.
There have also been efforts to adjust the seating to accommodate wheelchairs. I remember when I got here, they put me over on the opposition side because we were in opposition. Claude, the architect, described all the things he had to do to accommodate me. I told him all of that was temporary, and he kind of looked at me. I told him that in a few months I would be on the government side of the House. He laughed. Then I looked him in the eye and said “Then I'm going to run for Speaker”. If we want to see an architect melt down, that is one way to do it.
I give those examples as if those most sensitive committees at the highest level in Canadian society can accommodate a quadriplegic who cannot even move a finger, there is no reason workplaces, educational institutions or any other part of society cannot accommodate people with a disabilities. They may not be able to answer or solve a problem the same way most people can, but they will get there. Technology is a great equalizer.
Since I am not competing to play football or anything, I focus on my strengths. When I ran the first time, people said interesting things. First was that I did not sound disabled. That was a classic. I was asked why would anyone vote for me, given I was really a nobody and in this physical situation. This was on the radio too. My response to that was “I would rather be paralyzed from the neck down than from the neck up“.
The point is that we need to evaluate people on the content of their character and their ability to contribute, and we need to be creative in how that contribution is made. We also have to ensure that we have the supports in home care, transportation, and the education system. We need to empower people so that they can make the best decisions for themselves, so we need to remove the systemic barriers that exist.
What we need for spinal cord injury applies to senior citizens. Members may be interested to know that. It applies as well to people with temporary or episodic disabilities. It goes on and on.
The last comment I would like to make is that Dr. Fehlings at Toronto Western Research Institute is a medical hero in Canada. Just last week in the media he announced that research had allowed paraplegics to gain more sensation through his work and that of his team with respect to the central nervous system. That is a game changer.
The government has invested in this, and I know all of the parties support that kind of investment. Would it not be wonderful if someday spinal cord or brain injuries were something for the history books and that we would all be able to live long and prosperous lives?
We live in the best country in the world. It is the best time in human history to be alive. God bless Canada.
Monsieur le Président, je tiens à remercier la députée de Montcalm du leadership dont elle a fait preuve dans le domaine des lésions médullaires et des handicaps en découlant et de l'ensemble de sa contribution au Canada. Le domaine des services à la population est un domaine difficile, et la députée de Montcalm s'est distinguée.
Je reprends où la députée s'est arrêtée, c'est-à-dire sur la question des toilettes et l'idée d'encourager tout le monde à passer une journée en fauteuil roulant. Nous organisons de telles journées à l'occasion. Mon collègue d'Edmonton l'a fait.
J'avais l'habitude de rassembler les gens le matin. Ils se rassemblaient dans mon bureau. Ils prenaient leur fauteuil roulant, et je leur donnais beaucoup de café. À la fin de la journée, si quelqu'un me disait qu'il ou elle avait passé toute la journée dans son fauteuil roulant, je savais bien qu'il s'agissait d'un petit mensonge, parce que les toilettes sont difficiles à trouver et, lorsqu'on les trouve, il est difficile de savoir comment procéder alors qu'on est en fauteuil roulant.
C'est un exemple typique de situations dans lesquelles les personnes en fauteuil roulant se retrouvent. Le seul fait qu'une entrée soit exempte de saillie ne signifie pas que les installations sont accessibles.
En ce qui concerne la semaine de la sensibilisation aux lésions médullaires, le Royaume-Uni a désigné une journée, et l'Australie a désigné une semaine. Une partie de la semaine de la sensibilisation aux lésions médullaires est axée sur la sensibilisation. Ce qui se produit lorsque des gens ont une lésion médullaire n'est pas bien compris. C'est parce que personne ne veut parler de ce que cela signifie exactement. Cela nous rend mal à l'aise. Je vais profiter de l'occasion pour expliquer certaines des réalités désagréables liées à une lésion médullaire.
En général, il y a des quadriplégiques et des paraplégiques. Les paraplégiques peuvent utiliser leurs bras. Les quadriplégiques, eux, sont des gens qui, comme moi, sont paralysés du cou jusqu'aux pieds.
Qu'est-ce que cela signifie? Les quadriplégiques ne peuvent évidemment pas bouger leur corps en bas du cou. Cependant, ce n'est pas tout. Ils ne ressentent aucune faim, ils n'ont jamais chaud ou froid, et ils sont privés du sens du toucher. Ils sont un peu comme une tortue sur un rondin. Ils s'acclimatent à la température ambiante de la pièce ou du milieu où ils se trouvent.
Les quadriplégiques ne peuvent pas se nourrir par eux-mêmes. Ils ne peuvent pas se vêtir ou se dévêtir. Ils ne peuvent pas prendre une douche. Les personnes gravement atteintes comme moi ont besoin d'aide 24 heures par jour pour accomplir leurs activités quotidiennes, comme aller aux toilettes. Je sais que ce n'est pas très ragoûtant, mais c'est la réalité avec laquelle les quadriplégiques doivent composer. Il y a diverses choses qu'ils peuvent faire, par exemple utiliser des sondes à demeure et d'autres types d'appareils médicaux. Ils ont également besoin d'aide pour vider leurs intestins. Leur vie est loin d'être facile.
Puis, ces difficultés sont conjuguées à la nécessité d'obtenir des soins adéquats, qui ne sont pas toujours faciles à trouver ou à financer. Certaines personnes ont la chance d'avoir une assurance. Dans la plupart des cas, cela ne suffit pas. C'est un sujet sur lequel les compagnies d'assurance automobile et les commissions des accidents du travail devraient se pencher, car la plupart des lésions médullaires sont attribuables à un accident de voiture ou de travail.
La fonction reproductrice est elle aussi compromise. C'est un aspect fondamental de la nature humaine. Nous sommes des êtres physiques. Le changement de style de vie qu'a décrit la députée de Montcalm revient à une métamorphose en une existence tout autre. Je dois vivre dans ma tête, et je suis très heureux de vivre au Canada, où quelqu'un comme la députée de Montcalm, moi-même et bien d'autres peuvent contribuer à la société même s'ils sont quadriplégiques ou paraplégiques.
Ils sont quand même confrontés à des obstacles, comme les problèmes d'attitude. Je suis sûr que c'est déjà arrivé à la députée de Montcalm. Lorsque je vais au restaurant, il arrive que le serveur demande à la personne qui m'accompagne ce que j'aimerais manger. On lui répond « Pourquoi ne posez-vous pas la question à la personne dans le fauteuil roulant? » Puis, le serveur, d'une voix plus forte, me demande ce que j'aimerais manger, comme si le fauteuil roulant était associé à une déficience cognitive ou auditive.
Ces gens ont de bonnes intentions, mais beaucoup d'entre eux manquent de sensibilisation. J'admets que c'était mon cas avant mon accident en 1996.
J'aimerais aussi parler de l'adaptation des milieux de travail. Je tiens à remercier mes collègues d'avoir permis à une étrangère de pénétrer dans la Chambre des communes. Je parle de mon aide-soignante, qui est assise près de moi. Que ce soit ici ou dans les salles de réunion des comités, sa présence ne fait sourciller personne.
On a aussi pris des mesures pour modifier la disposition des sièges afin qu'il y ait de l'espace pour un fauteuil roulant. À mon arrivée ici, on m'avait assis en face, du côté de l'opposition — c'est normal, puisque nous étions dans l'opposition. Quand Claude, l'architecte, m'a expliqué tout ce qu'il avait dû faire pour m'aménager une place, je lui ai dit ce que ce n'était que temporaire de toute façon. Il m'a regardé d'un drôle d'air. Je lui ai alors assuré que je siégerais sur les banquettes ministérielles d'ici quelques mois. Il a ri. Je l'ai alors regardé dans les yeux et lui ai dit que je poserais ensuite ma candidature à la présidence. Si quelqu'un veut faire perdre ses moyens à un architecte, c'est une bonne façon.
Je donne tous ces exemples pour illustrer que, si les comités qui se penchent les questions les plus délicates et qui évoluent dans les plus hautes sphères de la société canadienne peuvent s'adapter aux besoins d'un quadriplégique incapable de remuer le petit doigt, il n'y a aucune raison pour que les milieux de travail, les établissements d'enseignement ou qui que ce soit dans la société ne puissent pas s'adapter eux aussi aux besoins des personnes handicapées. Les moyens utilisés ne sont pas obligés d'être orthodoxes, c'est le résultat qui compte. Il faut dire que la technologie règle bien des problèmes.
Comme je n'ai pas l'ambition de jouer au football ni quoi que ce soit du genre, je mise plutôt sur mes forces. La première fois que je me suis présenté, les gens disaient toutes sortes de choses. Ils disaient notamment qu'à m'entendre, je n'avais pas l'air d'une personne handicapée. C'est un classique, celle-là. On m'a demandé pourquoi quelqu'un voudrait voter pour moi, qui n'étais rien d'autre qu'un quidam et, qui plus est, physiquement handicapé. Je l'ai même entendue à la radio, celle-là. Ma réponse était toujours la même: j'aime mieux avoir le corps paralysé que la tête.
Ce qu'il faut retenir, c'est qu'il faut juger les gens en fonction de leurs qualités personnelles et de ce qu'ils peuvent apporter à la société en faisant preuve de créativité pour les y aider. Il faut aussi voir à offrir les soutiens requis en matière de soins à domicile, de transport et d'éducation. Il faut outiller les gens pour qu'ils soient à même de prendre les décisions qui leur conviennent le mieux. Il faut donc abolir les obstacles systémiques qui existent.
Les députés apprendront sans doute avec intérêt que les besoins sont les mêmes, qu'il s'agisse des personnes atteintes de lésions médullaires ou des personnes âgées, sans oublier celles qui sont aux prises avec une incapacité temporaire ou épisodique. La liste est longue.
Mon dernier point concerne le Dr Fehlings, de l'Institut de recherche Toronto Western. Il est un héros du domaine médical au Canada. Pas plus tard que la semaine dernière, il a annoncé aux médias que les travaux de recherche que son équipe et lui menaient sur le système nerveux central avaient permis à des personnes paraplégiques de recouvrer davantage de sensation. Voilà qui change tout.
Le gouvernement a investi dans ces travaux, et je sais que tous les partis appuient ce genre d'investissement. Ne serait-ce pas merveilleux si, un jour, les lésions médullaires et cérébrales n'existaient plus que dans les manuels d'histoire et que nous pouvions tous vivre vieux et prospères?
Nous vivons dans le meilleur pays du monde. De toute l'histoire de l'humanité, il n'a jamais fait aussi bon d'être en vie. Que Dieu bénisse le Canada.
View Mike Sullivan Profile
NDP (ON)
View Mike Sullivan Profile
2015-05-29 13:34 [p.14364]
Mr. Speaker, as I rise in my place, and I say that because my two colleagues who preceded me could not rise in their place. They are the bravest human beings in this room. I want to thank both of them for all their courage, efforts and wonderful heartfelt speeches.
I certainly cannot add anything to what was said by those two incredible individuals. Both of them are living proof that we can adapt our society no matter what the need to accommodate those individuals who need accommodation in the workplace, society and ordinary daily living, and on transportation, as the member for Montcalm has said,
On the spinal cord awareness day, I tried to be in a wheelchair for a full day, and it was not easy. Bathrooms were difficult to manoeuver, but I did stick to it. Eventually I had to give up waiting for a bus because the folks running the buses said that they did not have enough buses and that were unable to transport me in time to make it back for a vote. However, I did get back into the chair after that occurrence.
My brother has multiple sclerosis, and while it is not a spinal cord injury, he is well on his way to being full-time in a wheelchair. He is not there yet, but I watch him and realize that, in his case, it is not a sudden and traumatic injury but a long, gradual, painful transition to where the member for Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia and the member for Montcalm are now.
It is sad and hard to watch, but it makes me all the more determined, as the critic for persons with disabilities, to create a Canada in which everything we can possibly do is done, not just to raise awareness and to do research but to actually make it possible for everyone to live as though they were no different than anyone else.
I am thankful for this opportunity. I want to again thank my colleagues for their incredible speeches.
God Bless Canada. God bless them.
Monsieur le Président, je me lève aujourd'hui pour m'adresser à la Chambre, car contrairement à mes deux collègues qui ont pris la parole avant moi, je peux le faire. Ce sont les deux êtres humains les plus courageux de toute l'assemblée. Je tiens à les remercier tous les deux pour leur courage, les efforts qu'ils déploient et les discours poignants qu'ils ont prononcés.
Je n'ai absolument rien à ajouter à ce qu'ont déjà dit ces deux personnes extraordinaires. Ils sont la preuve vivante que nous pouvons adapter notre société, quels que soient les besoins de ceux qui doivent faire adapter leur milieu de travail, leur milieu de vie, leur domicile ou leurs moyens de transport, comme l'a mentionné la députée de Montcalm.
Lors de la journée nationale de sensibilisation aux lésions médullaires, j'ai essayé de passer la journée complète dans un fauteuil roulant; c'était loin d'être facile. Les toilettes, surtout, m'ont donné du fil à retordre, mais j'ai tenu bon. J'ai finalement dû renoncer à monter dans un autobus avec mon fauteuil, parce que les responsables m'ont informé qu'il n'y avait pas assez d'autobus et qu'ils étaient incapables de me ramener à temps pour le vote qui avait lieu ce jour-là. Mais aussitôt revenu, j'ai repris ma place dans mon fauteuil roulant.
Mon frère est atteint de la sclérose en plaques, et même si ce n'est pas à cause d'une lésion médullaire, il sera bientôt obligé de se déplacer uniquement en fauteuil roulant. Ce n'est pas encore le cas, mais quand je le regarde aller, je me rends compte que, dans son cas, il ne s'agit pas d'une blessure traumatique soudaine, mais d'une longue et douloureuse transition graduelle qui le mènera dans la même situation que les députés de Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia et de Montcalm.
C'est à la fois navrant et difficile de le voir dépérir, mais cela ne fait que renforcer ma détermination, à titre de porte-parole pour les personnes handicapées, à créer un Canada où l'on fera tout ce qui est humainement possible de faire, pour sensibiliser la population et faire de la recherche, certes, mais surtout pour que chaque personne puisse vivre comme si elle n'était pas différente des autres.
Je suis reconnaissant de l'occasion qui m'est offerte aujourd'hui. Merci encore à mes deux collègues pour leurs discours incroyables.
Que Dieu bénisse le Canada. Que Dieu les bénisse.
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2015-05-29 13:37 [p.14364]
Mr. Speaker, I too would like to add a few thoughts on this issue and thank the member for Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia for a very passionate speech and the member for Montcalm for her tenacity. It does take a great deal of tenacity in order to not only generate the idea and put it on a piece of paper but also to get it through the House. It depends upon a bit on luck too, I must say. She was in a great position to do something of some substance, and we are debating this issue today because of her efforts.
However, let me get back to my friend from Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia, who I think articulated exceptionally well why we as a society need to get a better understanding of the impact of some of the things that happen virtually every day in our community or in our vast country, and their consequences. He speaks with obvious first-hand experience.
I have known of the member for many years, probably more years than he has likely known of me, and I am in admiration of the member's desire to have change and the recognition that is necessary, not only on this particular issue but on other issues as well, whether at the University of Manitoba or on the streets in Winnipeg.
I applaud the fact that he took the time to share some of those personal stories, because we do take things for granted, whether it is changing or eating or some of those normal daily functions. It is hard for individuals to have empathy unless they have experienced these situations first-hand, as the member for Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia has.
It is very enlightening for all of us, and the viewers, to listen to what the member was sharing with not only members of this chamber but with those who were tuned in through CPAC.
Recognizing a national spinal cord injury awareness day is important. It is important for the very reasons we just witnessed—that is, it would enlighten and bring awareness to a wide variety of Canadians.
I would like to share some thoughts with respect to just how wide a variety it really can be. Both speakers, the introducer and the member for Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia in particular, talked about some of the issues they have to face. Government spends literally hundreds of millions of dollars annually dealing with this issue in our health care system through hospitals or other types of institutions, but what we really need to focus on is ensuring a sense of independent living. This is something both speakers referred to, whether directly or indirectly.
There are very tangible things that government can do. The single largest landlord is, in fact, the Government of Canada, in co-operation with the different provincial governments. We build non-profit housing or low-income housing or provide life-lease housing. We promote housing co-ops and all sorts of government-initiated programs to revitalize communities, which includes the revitalization of housing units. All of these, I would suggest, should always take into consideration the issue of disabilities. Accessibility is an issue. It is a very serious issue.
I was intrigued when the member for Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia described his office gathering, where he provided a lot of coffee for those individuals who were about to make the commitment to spend the day in a wheelchair, and his reference to the white lie. It is very much a valid story that provides a better understanding of that one very basic issue.
I have the privilege of having Parminder Buttar working in my constituency office. He is in a wheelchair and is very dependent on the rest of civil society, as people in wheelchairs are, in ensuring that we are sensitive to the needs and respect those needs, and where we can take action that we do so.
It means ensuring that washrooms are accessible. It is to ensure that when we look at purchasing or acquiring new city buses that we take that into consideration. It is to ensure that when it comes time to build another large housing complex, that disability is taken into consideration.
So much can be done, and it is not only at the federal level. What I like about the motion before us today, is that it is Ottawa recognizing the importance of the issue and designating a day in the year. This year will be the first year we recognize it, with the understanding that the bill will get royal assent. September 18 will not only be a wonderful opportunity to educate people, but also to promote the many different positive attributes individuals, whether they are paraplegic or quadriplegic, have contributed to our society in every aspect.
In many ways it is special and is a different type of challenge. When the mover of the bill made reference to the super sports athletes, we will find that also applies to individuals in wheelchairs. They are exceptionally well motivated. Their contributions are immense and of equal nature in many different ways.
I have had the opportunity to speak on other days of action. With the passage of this legislation, members of Parliament will be afforded the opportunity to promote this going forward. The most obvious ways of promoting this are with our ten parceners or householders, or through other forms of communication that we might have with technology, the Internet and so forth.
Other ways would be to look at our local schools, taking the time where it is possible, to encourage education or awareness within a school atmosphere or to look at employers and encourage them to get more engaged in the day. I suspect there will be wide and a fairly general appreciation of the true value of having a day of this nature designated.
If we were to look at the number of days of recognition that have been passed through the House, this would be ranked as one of those issues that really and truly merits a much wider appreciation not only in Ottawa but also at the different levels of government.
I do not know, for example, if my provincial government of Manitoba has acknowledged the importance of this day. If it has not, hopefully one of the MLAs in the Manitoba legislature will do so. Even local municipalities and city councillors can get engaged on this issue. We can do much more and I encourage people to do what they can, given what has been asked of us today.
On behalf of the Liberal Party, I want to thank the mover of the motion for coming up with the idea and bringing it forward. I suspect that it will receive the unanimous support of the House as we try to deal with those important issues Canadians have to face day in and day out.
The issue of disability deserves a great deal more debate in the House of Commons, in the different legislatures, and by the public at large.
Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais ajouter quelques réflexions, moi aussi. J'aimerais tout d'abord remercier le député de Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia pour son vibrant discours et la députée de Montcalm pour sa ténacité. Il faut beaucoup de ténacité non seulement pour concevoir une idée et la mettre sur papier, mais pour qu'elle fasse son chemin à la Chambre. Il faut aussi un peu de chance, bien sûr. La députée était très bien placée pour poser un geste substantiel, et c'est grâce à ses efforts que nous débattons de cet enjeu aujourd'hui.
J'aimerais toutefois revenir à mon collègue de Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia. Il a superbement expliqué pourquoi nous devons, en tant que société, mieux comprendre les conséquences de certaines situations qui se produisent chaque jour dans les collectivités de notre vaste pays. Il parle en toute connaissance de cause, de toute évidence.
Je connais le député depuis plusieurs années, probablement depuis plus longtemps qu'il ne me connaît, et j'admire sa détermination à obtenir les changements et la reconnaissance nécessaires non seulement dans ce domaine, mais aussi dans d'autres domaines, que ce soit à l'Université du Manitoba ou dans les rues de Winnipeg.
Je le remercie d'avoir pris le temps de nous faire part de son expérience personnelle, parce que nous tenons les choses pour acquises, qu'il s'agisse de s'habiller, de manger ou d'accomplir d'autres gestes normaux de la vie quotidienne. Il est difficile d'avoir de l'empathie quand on n'a pas une expérience directe de ces situations, comme c'est le cas du député de Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia.
Le témoignage du député a été très éclairant non seulement pour les députés ici présents, mais aussi pour tous ceux qui nous regardent sur la chaîne parlementaire.
Il est important d'instituer une Journée nationale de sensibilisation aux lésions médullaires, précisément pour les raisons que nous venons d'entendre — c'est-à-dire pour éclairer et sensibiliser des gens de tous les milieux.
J'aimerais faire part à la Chambre de quelques idées au sujet de l'éventail de personnes qui pourraient être touchées. Les deux intervenants, la marraine du projet de loi et le député de Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia, en particulier, ont parlé de certaines difficultés auxquelles les personnes atteintes doivent faire face. Chaque année, le gouvernement injecte littéralement des centaines de millions de dollars dans le système de soins de santé pour le traitement de ces lésions dans les hôpitaux ou d'autres établissements, mais il faut surtout tâcher d'assurer une certaine autonomie aux personnes qui en sont atteintes. C'est ce que les deux intervenants nous ont fait comprendre, directement ou indirectement.
Il y a des choses très concrètes que le gouvernement pourrait faire. Le plus grand propriétaire de logements est, en fait, le gouvernement du Canada, avec les différents gouvernements provinciaux. Nous construisons des logements sans but lucratif, à loyer modique ou en location viagère. Nous faisons la promotion des coopératives d'habitation et d'un éventail de programmes gouvernementaux visant à revitaliser les collectivités, notamment en restaurant des logements. Toutes ces démarches devraient toujours prendre en considération la question des handicaps. L'accessibilité est un enjeu très sérieux.
J'ai été intrigué quand le député de Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia a décrit les réunions dans son bureau, où il servait quantité de café aux personnes qui allaient s'engager à passer la journée en fauteuil roulant, et quand il a fait allusion à leur petit mensonge. C'est une anecdote très éloquente, qui aide à mieux comprendre cet unique problème, très courant.
J'ai le privilège de compter Parminder Buttar parmi les personnes qui travaillent à mon bureau de circonscription. Il est en fauteuil roulant et dépend beaucoup du reste de la société civile, comme toutes les personnes en fauteuil roulant. Il faut être sensibles aux besoins, respecter ces besoin, et agir en ce sens.
Cela signifie s'assurer que les salles de bain sont accessibles, que, lorsqu'on envisage d'acheter ou d'acquérir de nouveaux autobus urbains, que nous tenions compte de cet aspect, et, lorsque vient le temps de construire un grand complexe d'habitation, que la question de l'invalidité soit prise en considération.
Nous pourrions faire beaucoup et non seulement au fédéral. Ce que j'aime de la motion dont nous sommes saisis aujourd'hui, c'est l'idée qu'Ottawa reconnaisse l'importance du problème et désigne une journée de sensibilisation. Cette année sera la première où nous reconnaîtrons celui-ci, en supposant que le projet de loi reçoive la sanction royale. Le 18 septembre offrira une belle occasion non seulement de sensibiliser les gens, mais aussi de promouvoir les différentes qualités que les personnes, qu'elles soient paraplégiques ou quadriplégiques, apportent dans toutes les sphères de la société.
Il s'agit d'un défi particulier à bien des égards. La députée qui parraine le projet de loi a parlé des athlètes qui pratiquent des sports extrêmes, et nous verrons que ses propos s'appliquent également aux personnes en fauteuil roulant. Ce sont des gens particulièrement motivés. À bien des égards, leurs contributions sont immenses et tout aussi importantes.
J'ai eu l'occasion de prendre la parole lors d'autres journées d'action comme celle qu'on propose d'instituer. Avec l'adoption de ce projet de loi, les députés auront dorénavant l'occasion de sensibiliser leurs concitoyens aux lésions médullaires. La façon la plus simple de le faire est par l'envoi de dix-pour-cent ou de bulletins parlementaires ou par l'utilisation d'autres formes de communication qui sont à notre disposition grâce aux moyens technologiques comme Internet.
Par ailleurs, nous pourrions envisager, lorsque c'est possible, de prendre le temps d'encourager l'éducation et la sensibilisation dans les écoles de notre région ou d'encourager les employeurs à souligner davantage cette journée. Je crois que bien des gens sauront généralement reconnaître l'importance de souligner une journée de ce genre.
Si on se penchait sur le nombre de journées de reconnaissance que nous avons adoptées à la Chambre, on se rendrait compte que celle-ci concerne une réalité qui mérite vraiment d'être soulignée à bien plus grande échelle, au sein non seulement du gouvernement fédéral mais aussi des différents ordres de gouvernement.
Par exemple, j'ignore si le gouvernement de ma province, le Manitoba, a reconnu l'importance de souligner une journée de ce genre. Si ce n'est pas le cas, j'espère que les députés de l'Assemblée législative du Manitoba le feront. Même les municipalités et les conseillers municipaux de la région peuvent s'engager dans ce dossier. Nous pouvons en faire beaucoup plus, et j'encourage les gens à faire tout ce qu'il peuvent, compte tenu de ce qu'on nous a demandé de faire aujourd'hui.
Au nom du Parti libéral, je tiens à remercier l'auteure de la motion d'avoir eu cette idée et de l'avoir proposée à la Chambre. Je suppose que la motion sera adoptée à l'unanimité par la Chambre, pour que nous puissions essayer de régler ces problèmes importants auxquels les Canadiens se heurtent au quotidien.
L'invalidité est un sujet qui doit être abordé davantage ici, à la Chambre des communes, dans les diverses assemblées législatives et par la population en général.
View John Duncan Profile
CPC (BC)
View John Duncan Profile
2015-05-29 13:48 [p.14365]
Mr. Speaker, I will not take all of the time, but I did want to speak to this motion from the member for Montcalm and seconded by the member for Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia.
I cannot remember the exact year, but I was the seatmate of the member for Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia, and it was during that time that he wrote his book. We had a book unveiling in Ottawa. As a member of the caucus, and particularly because the member was my seatmate, it was incumbent upon me to get to know him much better. Now we have been caucus colleagues for at least a decade. The adversity that I realize the member has gone through, and the inspiration he provides, have carried on. There is no member of this caucus of which the member for Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia is a member who has ever heard him utter a complaint. The member is constructive, and as everyone has witnessed today, he is quite hilarious.
I realize that I am restricting my comments to the member for Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia rather than to the member for Montcalm. It is not for any reason other than that I know the member for Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia much more intimately. There is no slight intended.
We are reminded every time we see the member for Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia attending meetings, whether they are early or late, that whatever adversity or struggles we may be going through, they pale in comparison. This is part of the ongoing inspiration we all feel.
There was a time, after 13 years of serving in the opposition in this place, that I actually lost an election. It was the very year we formed government. On my way, as I departed from Ottawa by car, guess who called? It was the member for Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia. He was thinking about me. I have never forgotten that.
We all have to recognize that these members who brought this motion forward are more than contributing members of Parliament. They are much more than full members, in a sense. I know from many discussions that the member for Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia is actively engaged in the Treasury Board, for example. He is pursuing advanced education. He is a great student of Canadian history. There are many things all of us could learn about Canadian history from just having a short conversation with the member.
I believe that we have a strong responsibility to know our colleagues who face adversity. Today is one of those opportunities, but there is another opportunity, and it is called “every day”.
What we witnessed today is consistent with the motion that has been put forward by the member for Montcalm and seconded by the member for Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia. I congratulate them, and I know that this place will be happy to adopt this motion.
Monsieur le Président, je ne prendrai pas tout le temps qui m'est alloué, mais je tiens toutefois à intervenir au sujet de la motion présentée par la députée de Montcalm et appuyée par le député de Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia.
Je ne sais pas en quelle année exactement, mais je me souviens que j'étais voisin de pupitre du député de Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia à l'époque où il rédigeait son livre, dont le lancement a eu lieu à Ottawa. Comme j'étais membre du caucus et surtout voisin de pupitre du député, je me devais de le connaître davantage. Voilà au moins 10 ans que nous siégeons ensemble au caucus. Je suis conscient de l'adversité qu'a affrontée le député, qui n'a jamais cessé de nous inspirer. Aucun membre du caucus auquel il siège ne l'a jamais entendu se plaindre le moindrement. Il fait preuve d'un esprit constructif et, comme nous l'avons tous constaté aujourd'hui, d'un grand sens de l'humour.
Je me rends compte que je ne parle que du député de Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia, sans mentionner la députée de Montcalm. C'est seulement parce que je connais beaucoup plus intimement le député de Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia. Loin de moi l'idée de blesser la députée.
Chaque fois que nous voyons le député de Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia à des réunions, qu'elles se tiennent tôt ou tard, nous nous rendons compte que tous nos malheurs et nos problèmes sont bien insignifiants par rapport aux siens. Il est constamment une source d'inspiration pour nous tous.
L'année même où nous sommes arrivés au pouvoir, j'ai perdu mes élections, après avoir été député de l'opposition pendant 13 ans. Alors que je quittais Ottawa, j'ai reçu un appel du député de Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia, qui voulait me dire qu'il pensait à moi. Je n'ai jamais oublié ce geste.
Nous devons tous reconnaître que les députés qui ont présenté cette motion ne sont pas uniquement des députés qui contribuent pleinement au fonctionnement du Parlement. Ils sont bien plus que cela. Je sais, grâce à mes nombreuses discussions avec le député de Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia, qu'il est très impliqué dans le Conseil du Trésor, par exemple. Il poursuit aussi des études avancées. Il est féru d'histoire canadienne. Nous pourrions tous apprendre beaucoup de choses sur l'histoire canadienne en ayant une brève conversation avec lui.
Je crois qu'il est très important que nous apprenions à connaître nos collègues qui font face à l'adversité. Nous ne devrions pas seulement profiter de l'occasion qui s'offre à nous aujourd'hui. Nous devrions prendre cette initiative tous les jours.
Le débat d'aujourd'hui cadre avec la motion présentée par la députée de Montcalm et appuyée par le député de Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia. Je les félicite et je sais que la Chambre sera heureuse d'adopter la motion.
View Manon Perreault Profile
Ind. (QC)
View Manon Perreault Profile
2015-05-29 13:53 [p.14365]
Mr. Speaker, I often tell people that it is more difficult for them to approach us than it is for us to go and talk to them. I think that this national day will make more and more people aware of this issue.
When I came to this place in 2011 and I met people, they told me that they were surprised to see me in a wheelchair, and all I could do was nod. However, when I was campaigning, I did not hide it from anyone. It seems that people did not realize it until they met me.
I also realized that people often say that they think we are very nice. That makes me laugh, because everyone is nice. Being in a wheelchair does not stop you from being nice.
Last week I received an invitation from Mr. Demers to take a horse out on a racetrack. I think everyone here knows that I had a riding accident and that horseback riding was one of my great passions. A little earlier, we were talking about accessibility and changing how we look at things. That gentleman let me take his racehorse out on a track. That was such a wonderful thing for me.
When something like that happens, you have to take another look at everything you used to love doing so you can do it again. Excuse me, I am having a hard time because this is so emotional for me.
I would like to take this opportunity to thank Mr. Demers from the bottom of my heart. He helped me understand that even though my accident happened in 1993, and even though I could no longer ride, I could find other ways to pursue my passion. I honestly never thought I would be able to do it. I am very proud of that.
We have to salute those who are open-minded and are helping our society become more inclusive so that everyone has a place in it.
I often say that people with disabilities have their limitations, and that is true, but we all have our limitations, and in many cases, we impose them on ourselves. When we meet people who are ready to help us challenge those limitations, they almost become heroes to us.
My colleague may understand what I am saying. Regardless, I am very happy to see that all of my colleagues in the House have so readily supported my bill. I realize that there are many national days and that they are all important. However, I know that this national day will help give people a greater voice in society.
I will end my speech there, since I am a bit overwhelmed talking about all of this.
Monsieur le Président, je dis souvent aux gens qu'il est plus difficile pour eux de nous aborder que ce ne l'est pour nous d'aller leur parler. Ainsi, je pense que cette journée nationale va permettre de sensibiliser de plus en plus les gens.
Quand je suis entrée ici, en 2011, et que je rencontrais les gens, ils me disaient d'abord qu'ils étaient surpris que je sois en fauteuil roulant, et je ne pouvais qu'acquiescer. Pourtant, quand j'avais fait ma campagne électorale, je ne l'avais caché à personne. Il semble que les gens ne l'avaient pas réalisé, jusqu'à ce qu'ils me rencontrent.
Je me suis aussi rendu compte que les gens nous disent souvent qu'ils nous trouvent quand même sympathiques. Cela me fait rire, parce que tout le monde est sympathique; être en fauteuil roulant ne nous empêche pas d'être sympathiques.
Par ailleurs, la semaine passée, j'ai reçu une invitation de M. Demers pour aller conduire un cheval sur une piste de course. Je pense que tout le monde ici sait très bien que j'ai eu un accident d'équitation et que c'était une de mes grandes passions. Un peu plus tôt, on parlait d'accessibilité et de changer la façon de voir les choses, et ce monsieur m'a permis de conduire son cheval de course sur une piste. Cela a été si grandiose pour moi.
Quand un tel événement nous arrive, il faut revoir tout ce que l'on aimait faire afin de le faire à nouveau. Pardon, j'ai du mal à s'exprimer, car je suis très émue.
Je profite de ce moment pour remercier énormément M. Demers, qui m'a permis de comprendre, même si mon accident est arrivé en 1993, que, même si je ne pouvais plus faire d'équitation, je pouvais poursuivre ma passion autrement. En effet, sincèrement, je ne pensais pas que je pourrais le faire. En tout cas, j'en suis vraiment très fière.
Il faut féliciter les personnes qui ont cette ouverture d'esprit et faire en sorte que notre société devienne de plus en plus inclusive, afin qu'il y ait une place pour tout le monde.
Je dis souvent qu'une personne handicapée a ses limites, et c'est vrai. Cependant, tout le monde a aussi ses limites, et c'est souvent nous qui nous nous les mettons. Quand on rencontre des gens qui sont prêts à nous aider à les repousser, ils deviennent presque des héros dans notre coeur.
Mon collègue peut peut-être comprendre un peu ce que j'ai dit. Quoi qu'il en soit, je suis très contente de constater que tous mes collègues à la Chambre appuient si facilement mon projet de loi. Je suis consciente qu'il y a plusieurs journées nationales et qu'elles ont chacune leur nécessité. Toutefois, je sais que cette journée nationale permettra d'accorder une plus grande place aux gens dans la société.
Sur ce, je vais terminer mon discours, parce que parler de tout cela m'a un peu bouleversée.
View Manon Perreault Profile
Ind. (QC)
View Manon Perreault Profile
2015-05-26 19:07 [p.14209]
Mr. Speaker, this morning I was speaking with a woman from my riding of Montcalm, Ms. Francoeur, of the Résidence coopérative Quatre-Soleils in Saint-Lin–Laurentides. She was very pleased to have finally received funding from the Government of Canada for accommodations at her centre.
I would like to recognize the efforts that are made every year in Quebec and Canada to improve the quality of life of people with disabilities. The resources invested mean a great deal to people living with physical limitations. The government plays a key role, but there is so much work still to be done before we can talk about a truly inclusive society.
These resources, as much as they are appreciated, are certainly very modest. Investing in the integration of people with disabilities and in accessibility is something that goes far beyond compassionate or altruistic considerations. To put it simply, such investments are good social decisions and actions that demonstrate the goodwill behind the government's public policies.
I have said it before and I will say it again: an investment in people with disabilities is, above all, an investment that is good for everyone and one that contributes directly to our communities.
Had we gotten into the habit of handling funding requests for projects that meet the needs of people with disabilities the same way we handle economic requests, we might have much more effective practices for those people now.
People with disabilities are people first, and each step toward social inclusion is a sure way to help all of them and all affected families thrive.
I deplore the lack of stable programs and the dearth of information about their recurrence. The government has to be consistent and offer more independence to people with disabilities and greater social cohesiveness for all.
The enabling accessibility fund accepts applications at much too unpredictable intervals, making it impossible for organizations to prepare applications in advance for specific projects.
When an organization that helps people with disabilities has a specific need, it asks many community groups for help finding solutions. Everyone—from family caregivers to workers in the network, advocates, professionals and volunteers—pitches in to improve services and contribute to a solution. Funding is piecemeal. Donations from members of the public, private interests and civil society all do their part.
To give an idea of the situation, these organizations often survive thanks to charitable individuals and the generosity of their community. However, there comes a time when the federal government must take responsibility and encourage such efforts, resourcefulness and ingenuity.
Good programs do exist, and their impact has been measured at length. They are clearly beneficial. Unfortunately, the lack of consistency of programs provided to organizations that help people with disabilities, as well as the stability, recurrence and coherence of the programs, must be vastly improved.
Would it be possible to make the enabling accessibility fund a permanent program, with recurring application dates everyone is aware of, in order to improve the stability of government assistance provided to organizations that help people with disabilities?
I realize that reviewing the enabling accessibility fund requires that we be prepared, above all, to implement diverse solutions in order to improve this program's performance. I also believe that as elected officials, we must promote inclusiveness. We must position ourselves as open people who create bridges with our living environments.
The inclusion of people with disabilities in society cannot be done without the support and knowledge of the medical, social and political sectors. It is difficult for a disabled person to be convinced that political authorities are truly committed to the notion of inclusion because so much remains to be done in terms of accessibility, transportation, home care and so forth.
Monsieur le Président, ce matin, j'ai parlé avec une dame du comté de Montcalm, Mme Francoeur de la Résidence coopérative Quatre-Soleils de Saint-Lin–Laurentides. Elle était très contente d'avoir reçu finalement de l'aide financière du gouvernement du Canada pour l'adaptation de son centre.
Je dois souligner les efforts qui sont faits chaque année au Québec et au Canada pour améliorer la qualité de vie des personnes handicapées. Les ressources investies comptent beaucoup pour les personnes vivant avec des limitations physiques. Le gouvernement joue un rôle de premier plan, mais il reste tellement à faire avant de parler d'une vraie société inclusive.
Ces ressources, aussi bienvenues soient-elles, sont sans contredit modestes. Investir dans l'intégration des personnes handicapées et dans l'accessibilité sont des politiques qui dépassent longuement les considérations humanistes ou altruistes. Il s'agit, pour le dire simplement, de bonnes décisions sociales et des gestes démontrant la bonne volonté des politiques publiques du gouvernement.
Je l'ai dit souvent et je dois le répéter: investir de l'argent auprès des personnes vivant avec un handicap est avant tout un placement profitable qui rapporte concrètement à nos communautés.
Alors, si nous avions pris l'habitude de gérer les demandes d'aide financière des projets répondant aux besoins des personnes handicapées de la même manière que l'on gère les demandes à caractère économique, nous aurions possiblement des pratiques beaucoup plus efficaces pour ces citoyens.
En effet, les personnes handicapées sont des personnes avant tout, et chaque pas fait dans le sens de l'inclusion sociale permet un rayonnement certain pour toutes ces personnes et pour les familles affectées.
Je déplore le manque de stabilité des programmes et l'insuffisance des informations quant à leur récurrence. Il faut être conséquent et offrir plus d'autonomie à nos concitoyens handicapés et une plus grande cohérence sociale pour tous.
Le Fonds pour l'accessibilité présente des périodes d'ouverture trop souvent erratiques qui ne permettent pas aux organismes de préparer une demande à l'avance pour des projets précis.
Quand un organisme qui vient en aide aux personnes handicapées a un besoin particulier, plusieurs groupes communautaires sont sollicités pour trouver des solutions. Que ce soit les aidants naturels, les travailleurs du réseau, les intervenants, les professionnels ou les bénévoles, tous mettent la main à la pâte pour améliorer les services et apporter leur part de solution. Le financement se fait à la petite semaine. Que ce soit les dons du public, les intérêts privés ou la société civile, chacun fait sa part.
Pour dresser un portrait, ces organismes survivent souvent grâce à des âmes charitables et à la générosité de leur environnement. Toutefois, il vient un temps où le gouvernement fédéral doit prendre ses responsabilités et encourager ce grand déploiement d'efforts, de débrouillardise et d'ingéniosité.
De bons programmes existent et leur effet est largement mesuré. Ils sont clairement profitables. Malheureusement, le manque de constance des programmes offerts aux organismes qui viennent en aide aux personnes handicapées, ainsi que la stabilité, la récurrence et la cohérence de ces programmes, doivent être grandement améliorés.
Serait-il possible d'instaurer le Fonds pour l'accessibilité de manière permanente, avec des dates d'ouverture récurrentes et connues de tous, dans le but d'améliorer la stabilité de l'aide gouvernementale offerte aux organismes d'aide aux personnes handicapées?
Je suis consciente que revoir le Fonds pour l'accessibilité demande avant tout d'être prêt à apporter une diversité de solutions pour améliorer la performance de ce programme. Je crois également qu'en tant qu'élus, nous devons être des acteurs de l'inclusion. Nous devons nous positionner comme des personnes ouvertes créant des passerelles avec nos milieux de vie.
L'inclusion des personnes handicapées en société ne peut s'envisager sans l'appui et le savoir-faire du secteur médical, social et politique. Pour une personne handicapée, il est difficile d'être convaincue que la notion d'inclusion est vraiment l'engagement des pouvoirs politiques, puisqu'il reste tant à faire en matière d'accessibilité, de transport, de soins à domicile, etc.
Results: 1 - 15 of 331 | Page: 1 of 23

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data