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Results: 1 - 100 of 268
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I would like to present two petitions.
The first petition calls on the government to respect the rights of small family farms to store, trade and use seed.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the second petition is signed by people who suffered as a result of the Lac-Mégantic train derailment and its horrible after-effects. They are calling on the government to launch a public inquiry into the derailment of that train, which took 47 lives.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, 50 years ago, the Abenaki Museum opened its doors to visitors who wanted to discover Abenaki culture and heritage: 50 years of collaboration with the Odanak community.
To mark the occasion, a new exhibit will pay tribute to all those who founded the museum, supported it and kept it going all these years. This exceptional exhibit runs until December 23, 2016. It is a must-see.
Since 2011, the museum has won 11 recognition awards. In a little more than six months, the museum won four awards of excellence and recognition: the Société des musées du Québec Excellence Award, the National Aboriginal Cultural Tourism Award, the Quebec Aboriginal Tourism Award in the Interpretation Site category, and the Canadian Museums Association Award of Excellence.
The museum earned these awards of distinction for its innovative archeological projects and for its research, which promotes understanding and learning. I invite my colleagues to not only come visit the Abenaki Museum this summer, but also and especially to come discover and learn about the rich heritage of the Abenaki people.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the government introduced bills this week for the sole purpose of building its election platform. While it is at it, why does the government not introduce bills in response to Quebec's expectations, such as a bill to comply with environmental measures in relation to pipelines, a bill in line with Quebec's expectations as regards foreign workers, or a bill in line with Quebec's expectations as regards firearms?
As long as it is using public funds, it should be using them to further Quebec's interests as well.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, it is unbelievable that the National Energy Board of Canada will be the one to make the final decision about whether to allow oil to move through Quebec, without consultation or consent.
Whether by pipeline, train or ship, and whether those are painted red, blue or orange, the shipping of oil poses the same risk to our rivers, our environment, our cities and towns and our people.
Does the Minister of the Environment realize that these risks are being imposed on Quebeckers, even though Quebec will not get a single—
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, Mario Beaulieu, president and leader of the Bloc Québécois, and Gilles Duceppe were on Parliament Hill this afternoon together with 18 candidates to send a simple message: the Bloc Québécois is making a strong comeback.
Mario Beaulieu's generosity and selflessness show that separatists believe that the cause is more important than the individuals. It is noble and admirable, as is the decision by Gilles Duceppe to once again serve Quebec and the separatist movement. Congratulations to these two men and to all who put Quebec ahead of their own interests. A new political cycle is starting up in Quebec.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, first the government made the unilateral decision to allow supertankers to go through Montreal and Quebec City. Now the federalist parties have agreed to run the oil pipeline through Quebec, whether Quebec likes it or not. It is rather ironic that Quebec has to fight to have a say on what happens on its territory.
Will the Minister of the Environment live up to her title and finally stop imposing all these economic, social, and environmental risks on Quebeckers, just to fatten up western oil companies?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, once again, the Prime Minister showed the whole world that he is more concerned about the oil industry than the fight against climate change.
At the G7 meeting, Canada once again expressed reluctance to adopt greenhouse gas reduction targets, in order to diminish the scope of the planned agreement.
Will the government finally understand that the era of polluting fossil fuel energy is behind us and we must now encourage electric transportation, including by restoring an improved ecoAUTO program?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, once again, the federal government is acting unilaterally without any concern for the impact on Quebec. This time, Ottawa wants to interfere in France-Quebec relations bluntly, heedless of the formal request from Quebec ministers Weil and St-Pierre and the international agreements Quebec has with its partners. The federal government changed the visa rules for foreign interns. Ottawa's lack of subtlety will deprive nearly 300 French students of internships in Quebec. This is “Ottawa knows best” at its finest.
Is this the latest version of the federal government's policy on collaboration? Does it intend to flatly reject formal requests from Quebec ministers—and federalist ones at that?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, a great Quebecker passed away yesterday, an exceptional giant of a man.
One of the most important architects of modern Quebec, he was behind most major initiatives from the 1950s to the 1990s. Jacques Parizeau both transfixed and transformed Quebec society.
A renowned economist who knew how to break down complex issues, a special adviser, a member of the National Assembly, finance minister—without a doubt the best Quebec has ever had—then leader of the opposition and, finally, premier of Quebec, this man left an indelible mark on Quebec society and helped not only build it, but also define and expand it.
Jacques Parizeau is the man who brought Quebec the closest it has ever been to sovereignty. Separatists and federalists alike recognize Mr. Parizeau's contribution to Quebec society.
An exceptional man of conviction and action, he devoted his life to Quebec. May his political legacy, his vision and his determination guide us in the future.
I would like to offer my heartfelt condolences to his entire family.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, after six years of work, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada released its report and recommendations this morning. The report contains 94 recommendations, some of which the government can implement immediately.
When will the government recognize and implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and when will it work with aboriginal groups to develop and implement a first nations education funding plan, as outlined in the Bloc Québécois's Bill C-599 in 2010?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, this morning, more than 300 workers took part in a demonstration to protest the hiring of foreign workers at the new Jean Coutu Group distribution centre in Varennes. The problem is simple: these Austrian workers are doing work on the construction site that is usually done by industrial mechanics from Quebec. The labour market impact assessment in this case is problematic or non-existent, unless the foreign workers obtained entrepreneur visas in order to get around the law.
Can the Minister of Employment and Social Development tell us whether these workers are here under the temporary foreign worker program or the entrepreneur visa program, and whether he intends to address this matter quickly?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, last week, the National Assembly of Quebec adopted a unanimous motion refusing to accept any further federal interference in areas under municipal jurisdiction, which is what the NDP has committed to doing.
Whether we are talking about a department or a minister of municipal or urban affairs, it is the same thing. It all falls under Quebec's exclusive jurisdiction.
In the 1970s, the Liberals created a similar department of urban affairs. Quebec and the other provinces fought tooth and nail to defend their exclusive jurisdiction in that area, and the department was dismantled a few years later.
Quebec has always strongly defended its areas of jurisdiction. It will not let the federal government infringe on its jurisdiction, regardless of which party is in power.
The NDP wants to interfere and bypass the Parliament of Quebec in order to implement a pan-Canadian strategy in areas under Quebec's exclusive jurisdiction and centralize everything in Ottawa.
Working for Quebec means accepting the fact that Quebec is a nation.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, people who want to apply for permanent residence on humanitarian and compassionate grounds have until June 1 of this year. That date was set jointly with the Government of Quebec, but only 20% of the people involved have been able to take advantage of the measures in place. That is why Quebec asked the federal government to extend the deadline, but that request has been ignored.
Once again, federal neglect of humanitarian issues is putting thousands of Haitian families in Quebec in jeopardy. Will the government accommodate Quebec's request to extend the deadline until August 31, or will it respond with cold, callous bureaucracy?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, this morning, key stakeholders of Quebec's agri-food industry, along with Quebec's agriculture minister, expressed their concern to the federal government about the trans-Pacific partnership negotiations. They are concerned about the pressure applied by trading partners with regard to supply management. That is the program that ensures fair incomes for our dairy, egg, and poultry producers, and generates 92,000 jobs in Quebec.
Can the Prime Minister promise that Canada will not give up its supply managed markets and will refuse to make any concessions in these sectors, as spelled out in the Bloc Québécois motion unanimously adopted by the House?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the St. Lawrence is more than a waterway. It is a great conduit of Quebec's history and development, but the federal government could not care less about it.
For example, in Beauharnois, the wreck of the Kathryn Spirit has been on the verge of splitting open since 2011, but nothing is being done. Supertankers are docking at the Tracy terminal even though ships one-tenth their size have broken their moorings during loading. Moreover, neither safety at the handling facilities nor the storm lines are up to standard.
Will the Minister of Transport finally do something to protect the river, make up for the federal government's blatant carelessness and step up to her marine transportation responsibilities—
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, subsequent to a Bloc Québécois motion that was unanimously adopted in the House, for nearly 10 years, the Canadian negotiation policy required negotiators to keep the supply management system intact. The government said repeatedly that it would defend that position. However, now, the Prime Minister is saying that we will have to make sacrifices during the negotiations for the trans-Pacific partnership. Everything seems to indicate that the federal government is preparing to sacrifice supply management.
Can the Minister of International Trade confirm that the negotiators' mandate is still defined by the Bloc Québécois motion that received unanimous support?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, Quebeckers are unanimous in their opposition to the temporary foreign worker program reform. The reform does not take Quebec's unique circumstances into account. We are talking about jobs in agriculture as well as in engineering, high tech and medicine. The federal government is once again acting unilaterally. It could not care less about the impact of its decisions on the economy of Quebec and its regions. Things are so bad that companies are talking about relocating to the United States.
Can the government tell us if it will keep turning a deaf ear to Quebec's requests and let well-paid jobs go elsewhere?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the Couillard government, the National Assembly, the Quebec labour minister, the Conseil du patronat, unions, academics and research centres—everyone agrees that the government is headed in the wrong direction. Do the government and the minister understand that their actions suggest that they think they are right and everyone else is wrong?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the employment insurance program no longer meets the needs of Quebeckers and is having a negative impact on all of Quebec's regions. The latest federal budget does nothing for the development of our regions, nor does it offer anything to improve jobs there. The federal government would rather help itself to $8.2 billion over two years from the EI fund to finance the increased TFSA limit and income splitting instead of improving the lives of unemployed workers.
Is that the federal government's new social policy: stealing from the poor to give to the rich?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, after investing in Churchill Falls, which will be in direct competition with Hydro-Québec and Quebec's revenues, after imposing a toll on the new Champlain Bridge and after condoning the comments of a member who said he was fed up with the National Assembly's unanimous declarations, now the federal government is once again taking unilateral action with its reform of the temporary foreign worker program, despite repeated requests from Quebec's labour minister.
Does the federal government's new way of co-operating with Quebec involve imposing its way of doing things on the province and then sending it packing?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the Quebec budget, which was presented last week, contains a section on transfer payments that talks about the negative impact that Ottawa's unilateral decisions are having on Quebec's finances.
In a letter I tabled in the House, the Bloc Québécois proposed some measures that would allow the federal government to create the flexibility it needs to reconsider some of its decisions.
Will the Minister of Finance first acknowledge the negative impact of his unilateral decisions on Quebec's budget, and will he also pay back that money in the next budget, which he should be delivering any day now?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois would support an intervention if it put the humanitarian mission first and if it addressed the issues at the root of this crisis as well as the barbaric acts perpetrated by the self-proclaimed Islamic State.
However, the motion that the Conservatives are trying to adopt requires the blind trust of the House. The motion primarily calls for a military solution and is vague about the mission's objective and its assessment. The Bloc Québécois stands by its usual position and will not give this government a blank cheque.
This motion is even less clearly defined than the one moved six months ago in the House. Instead of restricting and better defining the type of intervention, the motion opens the door to a deeper and longer engagement. However, we can learn from experience, from our past successes and mistakes. For example, we can take lessons from the intervention in Kosovo, Canada's refusal to participate in the Iraq war, the deployment of troops in Afghanistan and the Libya intervention. We also have to take into consideration the complexity of the domestic and foreign policies of the countries in the Middle East. We have to consider the territories, countries, relations among the peoples living in the region and the religions practised there.
The motion proposes that we pursue our intervention in Iraq, true, but it also proposes that we intervene against the Islamic State and against terrorists aligned with the Islamic State, including the capacity to conduct air strikes in Syria. I will come back to Syria in a bit. However, we take the word “including” to mean that this motion would allow Canada to intervene against the Islamic State anywhere, regardless of borders, countries or political situations. The government is prepared to intervene everywhere. Who decides? No one knows.
However, the United Nations was created to provide a framework for international intervention. UN action is guided by its charter, which sets out the objectives of the United Nations. The objectives include “1. To maintain international peace and security”, which obviously includes sending troops, if necessary; “2. To develop friendly relations among nations”, which goes without saying; and “3. To achieve international co-operation in solving international problems of an economic, social, cultural, or humanitarian character”, which means solving problems by whatever means necessary, under the auspices of the United Nations.
Its action is based on some fundamental principles, including the “sovereign equality of all its Members”, which “settle their international disputes by peaceful means”, if possible, which “refrain in their international relations from the threat or use of force” and which give the United Nations “every assistance”. There is not a single provision in the Charter of the United Nations that authorizes the UN to intervene in affairs that essentially fall under national jurisdiction.
The Bloc Québécois believes in these principles, which form the basis of our analysis of any action taken by the international community in cases of conflict. Any action taken by Quebec and Canada as part of our commitment to international solidarity should be focused on humanitarian action. The Bloc opposes all unilateral action and opposes the notion of a pre-emptive war in the absence of an imminent, established threat.
The motion moved by the Conservative government demonstrates a one-dimensional approach that calls for air strikes and in which urgent humanitarian assistance plays a secondary role. The Bloc Québécois agrees with the UN Secretary-General in that we need to address the underlying causes of this crisis. Following the adoption of resolution 2178, the UN Secretary-General said that “terrorism must be defeated”, and that “this objective could only be achieved by mobilizing international solidarity and tackling the underlying conditions that provide fertile soil for extremism.” The Secretary-General stressed that “the most powerful weapons against this extremism are education, jobs and leaders who listen to their people and follow the rule of law”.
Although the motion is open to the protection of civilians, particularly by providing emergency humanitarian assistance, the Minister of Defence is rushing to close the door on such assistance, saying that Canada has given enough.
When the government says that it is prepared to take military action and that Canada has given enough in the same sentence, despite the millions of Syrian refugees, we are far from the multilateral approach proposed by the UN and the Bloc Québécois.
When the government is prepared to intervene in a country that did not ask for it, to interfere in a civil war where our intervention will inevitably favour one of the belligerents, who should already be facing war crime charges, there is cause for concern.
Using the right to self-defence granted by the UN to justify future bombings against the Islamic State in Syria is a misguided interpretation.
The Bloc Québécois has not changed its mind and will not hand out a blank cheque. The proposed motion would enable Canada to intervene everywhere. We say no to that.
The UN was founded to provide an intervention framework in international relations. That is what we are defending and that is why we will vote against this motion. Our position is clear: yes to an intervention under the UN banner, and only under the UN banner.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I agree with the hon. member when she says that Canada was late in intervening or asking the United Nations to intervene, when there was the debate on what was called “the revolution” there. This allowed the Islamic State to infiltrate that country.
Now we are faced with the problem of a rebel group and the fact that the Islamic State wants to overthrow the government. The rebels proposed democracy, while the Islamic State is proposing another form of dictatorship, perhaps one that is even worse than the current dictatorship.
To be honest, in the post-analysis of any conflict, we can always find a reason to say we should have done something sooner. Indeed, in the current conflict in Syria, Canada has been remarkably silent when it could have taken action to pressure the UN into intervening first through resolutions and then through a possible peace accord.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, in any mission, of course our military personnel should be informed and aware of all action they will be asked to take.
Initially, the intention the government articulated in this House was to carry out a mission to strengthen, train and advise Iraqi troops. Then it added air strikes on very specific targets, including ISIL munitions dumps and troop movements that could be blocked with air strikes.
However, the government went beyond the original intention of the mission when it sent in ground troops. It goes without saying that that was not part of the request put to the House. The mission will go ahead, since the Conservatives have a majority, but our military personnel definitely need to be told exactly what role they will be asked to play.
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2015-03-26 15:04 [p.12383]
Mr. Speaker, the number of credit card purchases is growing, but small businesses are still paying the highest fees in the world with rates ranging from 1.5% to 3%. This is costing many small retailers in my region and Quebec a lot of money.
Will the Minister of Finance use the next budget to regulate these excessive fees at last, as Australia and England have done by setting rates at 0.5% and 0.3%?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, last week the member for Beauce said that he was fed up with the National Assembly's unanimous declarations. The member, who is a minister, showed a clear lack of respect for Quebec's parliament.
Can the Prime Minister tell us whether his minister was speaking on behalf of the Conservative government? If he was, is the federal government's new policy to tell Quebec's government to take a hike? If he was not, will the Prime Minister reprimand his minister for his lack of judgment and apologize to the National Assembly?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, if the Conservative government is serious about preventing radicalization in Canada, it should listen to the people who are working on that, such as Montreal's police chief, who says that we need to focus on those who are most at risk. Surveillance is one thing, but guidance and deradicalization are important too. He says that in the fight against terrorism, preventing youth radicalization is key.
In Quebec, several measures have been implemented to address those needs. A number of police forces are working with communities, tapping into their expertise and knowledge of the field. In academia, for example, the Université de Sherbrooke's observatory on radicalization and violent extremism has set out to paint a picture of the situation with a view to developing prevention policies.
The next federal budget must include financial assistance for Quebec, which wants to implement an action plan to fight fundamentalism and prevent radicalization.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, rather than reward consumers who take action to reduce GHG emissions, Ottawa chose to help the auto industry even though the industry has put off bringing more economical cars to market.
The Bloc Québécois believes that an ecoauto program is essential to any serious plan to fight oil dependency. Norway has implemented such incentives, and they are working.
In its next budget, will the government follow Norway's example by reinstating the ecoauto rebate program and enhancing it to account for new developments, such as electric cars?
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2015-02-26 15:04 [p.11747]
Mr. Speaker, the minister and member for Lévis—Bellechasse said that the Davie shipyard should prove itself in order to get federal contracts. The Davie company just won the Lloyd's List North American Shipyard of the Year award.
The workers made major concessions to save the company. Will the government commit to ensuring that Quebec gets its fair share of future contracts, including the contracts for the Diefenbaker icebreaker and the Canadian navy's supply ships?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for his account of how the National Assembly, or the MNAs proceeded unanimously after much consultation. They reached a remarkable consensus on end-of-life care.
I want to remind the House that Ms. Lalonde, who was a member here—she passed away, unfortunately—championed this issue in the House for many months. This prompted a lengthy debate that ended with the defeat of her motion on dying with dignity. She was a trailblazer on this issue. She invited several witnesses, both from the medical profession and the social sciences, and from various former political parties. As a result, she had an exceptional wealth of knowledge. She had amassed extraordinary information.
I would say to the hon. member that since it was the Bloc Québécois that led this debate, I was a bit surprised that it was not invited to contribute to the motion or at least to pass on all the knowledge it gained at this committee and share it with everyone else.
I will close with my second point. The broad consensus achieved in Quebec must not be altered or challenged by a new Canada-wide committee that would come to a different conclusion. I believe that the debate in Quebec came to an almost unanimous conclusion and has now closed. When it comes to Quebec, that must be the policy.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, after refusing to have all of TransCanada's documents on the energy east project translated into French, the National Energy Board is now refusing to suspend the consultation process, as called for by the Union des producteurs agricoles du Québec.
We still do not know the final route of the project, and instead of asking TransCanada to go back to the drawing board, the board is now moving forward with no regard for the effects the route will have on Quebec's agricultural land.
Will the minister admit that this consultation is a sham and that the environmental process that must be respected is Quebec's?
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2015-02-20 12:02 [p.11474]
Mr. Speaker, while the current Quebec government is hurting the regions by making ill-advised decisions to supposedly improve public finances, the fiscal imbalance between Ottawa and the provinces continues to grow. Between 2009 and 2013, Quebec lost $6.5 billion in federal transfers.
Will the government stop lining its own pockets at the expense of Quebec and the provinces, and will it restore transfers based on people's needs?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, unlike the NDP, the Bloc Québécois is not ambivalent about the TransCanada pipeline project. Again, the National Assembly of Quebec already voted unanimously on a motion with regard to its environmental jurisdiction over this project.
The environmental aspect of the pipeline is very important to us. All the federalist parties in Ottawa need to understand that Quebec has to be able to decide what goes on in its province. It is Quebec's territory and Quebec assumes all the risks. It is up to Quebec and its regions to decide.
Will the government commit to respecting Quebec's environmental process and the choices of Quebeckers?
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2015-02-05 15:05 [p.11121]
Mr. Speaker, in January, the city of Saguenay's unemployment rate, at 9.6%, was the highest of all large Canadian cities. It is more urgent than ever that the government support resource regions like mine.
Will the government implement measures in its next budget to promote secondary and tertiary resource processing in the regions for industries like Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean's wood and aluminum industries?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I agree entirely with everything my colleague just said regarding the rights of members. I just wanted to add one thing. Security for MPs has been increased, but most of the additional security officers are not bilingual. However, under the Official Languages Act, anyone responsible for security and anyone who interacts with members of Parliament or the public must be bilingual. I think it is also the Speaker's duty to verify that and ensure that the RCMP assigns bilingual personnel to control access to Parliament. Perhaps this would also help the officers to recognize members more, as the previous speaker said.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I simply wanted to clarify that the contract of the police officers currently in the House of Commons requires them to recognize 98% of all members. RCMP officers, however, are not under the same obligation.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, over the weekend, the Conseil du patronat du Québec gave us lesson on how to lose touch with the regions. I should point out that the federal government has brought in austerity measures, such as the latest EI reforms, which have spurred the rural and regional exodus.
Do the Prime Minister and his minister not think that it is time to implement measures, such as the ones the Bloc Québécois has proposed, to target the regions and help create jobs, develop our communities and help these regions prosper?
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2015-01-30 12:02 [p.10860]
Mr. Speaker, the fact that the federal government is withdrawing its funding for social and affordable housing is shameful.
Agencies in my region are concerned about the end of federal assistance for underprivileged families. The waiting list with the Office municipal d'habitation de Saguenay may well get longer.
Will the government renew investments in social housing, or will it continue to make those less fortunate pay for its ideological budget cuts?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, first there was the uncertainty over the compensation Quebec's cheese and dairy producers would receive for the potential loss of millions of dollars as a result of the free trade agreement with the European Union. Now the federal government is attacking Quebec's dairy producers once again.
Instead of doing business with local companies, federal penitentiaries will now serve powdered milk shipped by truck from Winnipeg to the penitentiaries in Quebec. For decades, the Chagnon dairy delivered 12,000 cartons of milk a week to the Cowansville and Drummondville penitentiaries.
Will the minister make Correctional Service Canada listen to reason and take it to task for this unreasonable decision?
This not about what tastes better in coffee. It is about the economic consequences that this federal decision will have for this region and Quebec and the job losses that will result.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, now that oil prices are dropping, we can see just how fragile the Canadian economy really is. We have been living in an oil bubble created by the federal government.
The Bloc Québécois and its partners have already proposed an economic recovery plan that would have allowed and would still allow the federal government to diversify and modernize its economy. However, yesterday, the Prime Minister said that he wanted to put a strong focus on the manufacturing industry in order to promote the interests of Ontario and appeal to voters.
What does he intend to propose for Quebec other than a pipeline for which the province will have to assume all the environmental risks without reaping any of the financial benefits?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, there are two striking facts that sum up this most recent parliamentary session: a strong resurgence of the fiscal imbalance and the federalist parties' complete lack of consideration for Quebec's environmental concerns.
The pipeline, which has sparked a wave of concern throughout Quebec, does not seem to upset the three federalist parties in Ottawa. They all spoke out in favour of the route. The National Energy Board sees Quebec as just another lobbyist. We are not the masters of our own destiny. The Bloc Québécois, of course, knows that it is not up to the National Energy Board to make decisions on behalf of Quebeckers.
It is now clear that Quebec's concerns are being ignored. The federal government prefers to boost the auto and oil industries and does not seem to believe in the principle of boosting and protecting the forestry and cheese industries.
We know we have our work cut out for us. We are the only party that cares about and defends Quebec's interests at all times, without compromise.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, in August 2014, the Conference Board predicted that in 20 years, the federal surplus will be $110 billion, while the provinces will face cumulative deficits of $172 billion. This trend was confirmed by last month's update. We have a fiscal deficit.
Let us not kid ourselves: this obscene surplus is being built up at the expense of the unemployed, seniors, veterans, provincial transfers—basically, because the federal government refuses to do its job.
Given that the federal government is swimming in a surplus, will the Minister of Finance commit to significantly increasing transfers to Quebec and the provinces?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
moved for leave to introduce Bill C-645, An Act to amend the Broadcasting Act (independence of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation).
He said: Mr. Speaker, I am honoured to introduce the bill to amend the Broadcasting Act regarding the independence of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
The CBC ombudsman recently informed us that the Prime Minister's Office and Canadian Heritage pressured the crown corporation, thereby threatening its independence. Since we do not want to have state television, but rather a neutral, independent public broadcaster, I am introducing this bill today in order to oblige CBC to take the necessary measures to preserve its freedom of expression and its independence.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the political component of the Lima conference begins tomorrow. The UN Secretary-General had to set aside his usual diplomacy to reprimand Canada for its environmental policy. Quebec, which is already integrating the economy with the environment, has created a plan to reduce its dependency on oil, a carbon exchange and its own environmental assessment authorities, which are studying the west-east pipeline.
Will the government take note of the Secretary-General's comments, be inspired by what is happening in Quebec and respect the efforts made by all Quebeckers to reduce greenhouse gas emissions?
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-12-05 11:13 [p.10241]
Mr. Speaker, for 25 years now, Quebec has been coping with a wound that will not heal, grief that will not end, and unease that will not go away: 14 female students were killed because they were women.
We must always speak out against all forms of violence against women and never let our guard down. We need to work constantly to promote gender equality. We also have a duty to reflect and take action to ensure that all men and women can live in safety and free from violence.
This House needs to do everything in its power to ensure that such events never happen again. Out of respect for the victims and our children, let us work together to ensure that there will never be another incident like the one that occurred at École Polytechnique.
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-12-05 12:04 [p.10251]
Mr. Speaker, this week, north shore mayors sounded the alarm about the terrible plight of Quebec's forestry industry. Today, more plant closures are being announced.
Rather than standing idly by and rejecting measures to develop new products and markets, why does the government not take action to support this important sector of Quebec's economy?
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-12-05 12:05 [p.10251]
Mr. Speaker, Greenpeace is lobbying for a review of the FSC certification standards.
Nevertheless, Quebec has some of the best forestry practices in the world. The Government of Quebec has been talking to industry clients, particularly in Europe and the United States, to show how exemplary the industry's practices are.
Does the federal government plan on joining the Government of Quebec in supporting Quebec's forestry industry?
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-12-04 13:59 [p.10190]
Mr. Speaker, for 25 years Quebec has been nursing a wound that will not heal and has been in perpetual mourning.
Today, we grieve for the 14 victims of the École Polytechnique massacre as though the tragedy just happened. We feel the same sadness and shame that we felt 25 years ago for letting such a tragedy take place in Canada.
That is why, since that day, Quebeckers have been staunch advocates for gender equality. That is also why there is strong support among Quebeckers for gun control.
Let us work together to prevent a tragedy like the December 6, 1989, massacre from ever happening again. Let there never be another École Polytechnique.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the Minister of Finance said that the National Energy Board alone would determine if the west-east pipeline project is safe for Canada's environment and Canadians.
In Quebec, we are not counting on the board. We are counting on the Bureau d'audiences publiques sur l'environnement. That is the organization that is responsible for the environmental and safety assessments of this pipeline. It will take into consideration whether Quebeckers feel the project is acceptable and the repercussions in terms of greenhouse gas emissions.
Will the Minister of Finance stop aligning himself with pipeline lobbyists and commit to respecting Quebec's environmental process?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, according to the Quebec finance minister, the increase in child care costs for families caused by a special tax when they file their income tax, and not by an increase in the basic rate of child care, will be compensated by Ottawa through an increase in the federal child care tax deduction.
Can the Minister of Finance confirm that he will make the additional taxes to be paid by thousands of Quebec parents eligible for the federal child care tax deduction when they fill out their provincial tax returns?
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-11-28 12:01 [p.9947]
Mr. Speaker, the beneficiaries to unemployed ratio is now less than 40%. It leaves not only unemployed workers but also their families and their regions out in the cold. That is an appalling record. Over six out of 10 unemployed workers are not entitled to benefits. That is unacceptable.
Why is the government deliberately leaving these workers out in the cold without jobs and why does it not help them by improving access to employment insurance?
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-11-28 12:01 [p.9947]
Mr. Speaker, over the next three years, the government will help itself to $14.2 billion from the employment insurance fund. That is over $4.5 billion a year.
Rather than imposing a tax on jobs, why does the government not want to help unemployed workers with the money that belongs to them?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, on November 18, the Canada Council for the Arts announced that Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois had won the 2014 Governor General’s Literary Award and $25,000 in prize money for his book titled Tenir tête. The Bloc Québécois wishes to sincerely congratulate him.
What is even more worthy of our congratulations is the fact that the author decided to donate his winnings to the “Coule pas chez nous” campaign, run by a group of citizens who are standing up to the oil companies that are threatening to turn Quebec into a highway for oil from the oil sands.
Since November 18, Quebeckers have donated more than $300,000 to this cause. Why? Because Quebec civil society cannot count on the House to protect its interests. Quebeckers know that if they cannot count on their governments' support, they can count on one another.
The people of Quebec have been clear about what they want, but I will say it again: we do not want your oil from the oil sands if it is at our own risk and peril.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, on November 9, in a symbolic vote, more than 80% of voters—2.2 million Catalans—voted on the independence of Catalonia. I seek the unanimous consent of the House to move this short motion: that the House of Commons recognize the right of the people of Catalonia to hold a referendum on its political future.
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-11-26 19:26 [p.9858]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank all my colleagues of every political affiliation in the House of Commons for participating in the debate, whether or not they support Bill C-574. This bill was introduced in the House in 2010 and was defeated at second reading.
The forestry sector has been devastated by massive job losses across Canada and Quebec, caused mainly by the recession, the global economy, the stronger Canadian dollar and the structural decline in the demand for paper documents. These no longer exist today because newspapers are going online.
Why did we introduce this bill? It is because in my area, many sawmills and plants have closed and many paper machines have been shut down. In Chambord, a plant has been closed for years. That is why we brought back this bill.
Today, there are many things on the market that promote innovation, new products and new technologies. I realize that the Conservative government has helped the forestry industry, but it could do more.
If the government has given many millions of dollars to this sector, why have so many plants in Canada closed? I do not see how Bill C-574 would violate Canada's obligations under national and international trade agreements such as NAFTA, the WTO Agreement and the Agreement on Internal Trade.
Canadian wood was never specifically identified in the bill, because we did not want the bill to be prejudicial to anyone. Today, we want to use it to construct buildings that are less than seven storeys high and to repair federal buildings.
For example, if the House of Commons chamber were renovated, I would like wood to be used instead of steel. That is the goal of our bill: we want to use wood.
On the weekend I went to watch a hockey tournament in a building made of steel, concrete that had beautiful wood ceilings. All three materials can be used together to build nice buildings. Back home, such buildings are built for tourism and industry. People who come to La Baie on cruise ships can see these beautiful concrete and wood buildings. The materials can be used together.
We never asked that the government be required to choose wood during the bidding process. We simply want it to choose the least expensive option from among wood, steel and concrete. If steel is the least expensive, the decision will not be a hard one.
Back home, a lot of buildings have been built using all of the materials. This has created jobs for a number of employees of plants that were shut down. This contributes to sustainable development. The government should take into account costs and greenhouse gas emissions when Public Works and Government Services Canada solicits bids.
The Conservative government said that it would oppose the bill, but I would like to quote from a 2011 interview with my colleague from Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean, who is also a minister. He said that he wanted to promote the use of wood in the construction of public buildings. I will quote the whole paragraph:
In the coming months, it will be important to introduce bills to encourage the use of wood in public buildings, while also ensuring that current federal and provincial codes can fully meet requirements. That way, our engineers and architects can take wood into account when doing their calculations and the professionals already in operation will have the means, tools, software and techniques to safely carry out these projects using wood.
The Conservatives are opposing the bill, but in 2011 the minister said that the government needed to encourage the use of wood.
We need to encourage the use of wood throughout Canada and Quebec. The plants that have closed could reopen, there could be renovations and the industry could get up and running again. Instead of investing millions that only translate into closures, the government should require that people use wood for their repairs. Anything is possible. The bill's wording may not be very broad, but that was our intention. The same bill was introduced in 2010. MPs rejected the bill at second reading, but in any case, I am pleased to have discussed this topic with my work colleagues.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, with its cuts, the federal government is forcing CBC/Radio-Canada to make unfortunate decisions. We thought that the government would allow the public broadcaster to maintain its freedom with respect to creativity and programming.
However, it seems that the former heritage minister personally intervened to get more time for the monarchy, to support Canadian nation-building, and to ensure that the former leader of the Bloc Québécois would not be hired.
Will the Prime Minister launch an independent review to ensure that the crown corporation's journalistic independence is protected and to build a thick wall between the news staff and politicians?
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-11-07 11:57 [p.9336]
Mr. Speaker, the Minister of State for Small Business and Tourism, and Agriculture will meet with dairy and cheese producers next week in Quebec City.
Will the minister take this opportunity to announce that he will compensate cheese producers, as he promised to do when the free trade agreement was signed with the European Union?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, yesterday President Hollande saluted the vitality of Quebec culture in North America. However, the bankruptcy of La courte échelle publishing house is a reminder that the Quebec nation does not have control over its culture. It is subject to Canadian priorities, and tough luck for Quebec’s creators.
After years of fighting to have a model that was respected by all stakeholders, now some 500 authors and illustrators have discovered that because of a federal law, the interests of the bankruptcy trustee will prevail over those of the artists.
What does the government plan on doing to give Quebec creators what is rightfully theirs?
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-10-31 12:00 [p.9059]
Mr. Speaker, U.S. trade representative Michael Froman is complaining about the supply management system, describing it as an obstacle to concluding the trans-Pacific partnership free trade agreement.
The United States is not shy about saying that it just needs Japan to make concessions to try to put pressure on Canada.
Will the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food promise not to give in to U.S. pressure, and protect the 7,200 family farms under supply management in Quebec?
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-10-30 15:04 [p.9005]
Mr. Speaker, while scientists and the forestry industry are rightly concerned about the spread of the spruce budworm epidemic in Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean, the federal government is doing virtually nothing to address a problem that could become very serious.
Instead of waiting for the industry to be seriously affected, why does the government not invest more, as it did for the pine beetle epidemic in British Columbia?
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-10-24 11:56 [p.8775]
Mr. Speaker, the FSC certification standards are apparently going to be revised by 2016, which could have a considerable impact on my region.
Quebec has some of the best forestry practices in the world. The Government of Quebec has been talking to industry clients, particularly in Europe and the United States, to show how exemplary the industry's practices are.
Does the federal government plan on joining the Government of Quebec in supporting Quebec's forestry industry?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, as dean of the House and on behalf of the Bloc Québécois, I would also like to pay tribute to the dedication and courage demonstrated by the police officers, the members of the military, the security team and all the staff of the House, all the parties, as well as our dedicated Sergeant-at-Arms.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and I thank my colleagues.
Our thoughts, of course, are with the family of Corporal Cirillo, who unfortunately passed away. We extend our sincere condolences to his family.
Although it is difficult for us to return to work today, we must never forget that, yes, we represent the people, but we also represent democracy. We have a duty to protect this democracy and to pursue our fight so that it continues to exist and to grow.
Today, more than ever, we must continue to debate openly and transparently here in Parliament.
However, we also need to show solidarity in how we respond to terrorism, how we shape our international policy, what we do with our armed forces and how we implement security measures.
We believe in democracy and we remain vigilant. Let us act responsibly and not allow panic to prevail over good judgment.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, a march is planned for next Sunday in Sorel-Tracy to protest the presence of supertankers on the St. Lawrence between Quebec City and Montreal. The St. Lawrence is becoming an oil shipping superhighway, and the federal government refuses to improve standards for dealing with a massive spill.
This is despite the fact that the Lake Saint-Pierre part of the river is a world biosphere reserve. The Council of Canadians has even lodged a complaint against Canada with UNESCO.
Why is the minister ignoring the repeated demands of the municipalities located along the St. Lawrence, which are worried about the lack of an adequate response plan?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, next Sunday, another megaship will transport several tonnes of oil from the oil sands down the St. Lawrence. In a unanimous resolution, the City of Sorel-Tracy called on the federal government to increase safety and inspection measures for these ships to require that they be prepared for a spill and that they draft a list of all of the liquids they are transporting on the river. In short, they are calling for anyone who uses the St. Lawrence to be socially, environmentally and financially responsible.
Will the minister finally take action and suspend the transportation of dangerous goods on the river until she can ensure that the process is safe and that there are emergency response measures in place?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the members of the Bloc Québécois are committed pacifists. However, we cannot turn our backs on massive human rights abuses. The Quebec nation, Canada and the entire international community have a responsibility and a duty to protect those who are suffering barbaric acts.
Quebec and Canada must step up and provide a humanitarian response as a show of human and international solidarity. That is the only way to legitimize the use of force.
The motion moved by the Conservative government demonstrates a one-dimensional logic that calls for air strikes and in which urgent humanitarian assistance plays a secondary role.
The Bloc Québécois agrees with the UN Secretary-General: we need to address the underlying causes of this crisis.
The Conservatives are asking for the House's blind trust in a military mission but are vague about its objective and how it will be assessed. The Bloc Québécois will not give the government carte blanche.
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-10-03 13:52 [p.8240]
moved that Bill C-574, An Act to amend the Department of Public Works and Government Services Act (use of wood), be read the second time and referred to a committee.
He said: Mr. Speaker, today I am pleased to begin debate on my bill to promote the use of wood in the construction of federal public buildings.
Bill C-574, An Act to amend the Department of Public Works and Government Services Act (use of wood) is quite simple. It reads as follows:
1. Section 7 of the Department of Public Works and Government Services Act is amended by adding the following after subsection (1):
(1.1) Despite subsection (1), before soliciting bids for the construction, maintenance or repair of public works, federal immovables and federal real property, the Minister shall give preference to the concept that promotes the use of wood, while taking into account the factors of cost and greenhouse gas emissions.
My bill amends the Department of Public Works and Government Services Act and calls on the federal government to give preference to projects that increase the use of wood products in construction. A number of governments have realized that using more wood in their buildings is not only a way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but it also provides direct support to the industry. The long list of governments that have their own policies on wood use includes Quebec, France, Sweden, Norway, Austria and Finland.
Bill C-574 was introduced by the Bloc Québécois, which would like to see the House of Commons pass it. A similar bill introduced by the Bloc Québécois in 2010 passed second reading stage in the House. Only the Conservatives refused to support it.
The forestry industry needs help to adjust to changes in the pulp and paper market. The Conservative government must stop stalling and follow the lead of other countries that have adopted a policy to use wood as a building material in public buildings.
Given the Conservative government's failure to support the Quebec forestry industry, the Government of Quebec had to be proactive by putting in place a wood charter. With the adoption of that charter, construction projects that are funded wholly or in part by the Government of Quebec must now systematically demonstrate that a wood solution was evaluated.
Not only will this strategy help revitalize the forestry industry, but it will be an excellent way to combat greenhouse gas emissions, something that is of little consequence to the Conservative government. Renewing our forests will also help with carbon capture and improve Quebec's record in that regard and, by extension, that of the federal government, which prefers to promote the expansion of the oil sands industry.
The Quebec forestry industry is in need of urgent help. To date, the Conservative government has given forestry companies nothing but crumbs. Meanwhile, it has given billions of dollars to the Ontario automotive industry.
It is imperative that the House support Quebec's initiative in this regard and pass Bill C-574 in order to follow suit in the construction of its public buildings.
The bill that we are proposing would provide immediate assistance to forestry companies and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The use of wood in federal buildings would help our businesses develop new secondary and tertiary products and find new markets for local products.
Furthermore, given that timber products are alternatives to energy inefficient products, such as steel, which takes a lot of energy to process, the use of wood is a tangible way of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. In addition to capturing carbon dioxide, wood is also a green alternative to energy-intensive construction materials.
In 2011, Canada's forestry industry represented approximately $23.7 billion of the Canadian economy, which is about 1.9% of the total gross domestic product.
Canada is the second largest exporter of raw forest products in the world, after the United States. It is the fourth largest exporter of all the wood products considered. Canada is the largest exporter of pulp and paper, newsprint and softwood lumber in the world and the fourth largest exporter of wood panels.
A total of 65% of Canadian forestry products are exported to the United States. China is an increasingly important market for Canadian forestry products, particularly pulp and softwood lumber.
In 2011, the forestry industry generated approximately 233,900 direct jobs for Canadians. If we include indirect jobs, such as those in construction, engineering and transport, the forestry industry is responsible for almost 600,000 direct and indirect jobs across the country.
The forestry industry is important to Quebec. Quebec has 2% of the world's forests, an area of 760,000 square kilometres—the equivalent of Sweden and Norway combined.
The industry provides 50,500 manufacturing jobs—26,800 in wood processing and 23,700 in pulp and paper—and more than 10,500 forestry jobs. There are also 630 engineers who work in forest management and logging operations.
The forestry industry generates more than $7 billion in sales outside Quebec, which is about 13% of all Quebec exports. The forestry industry is currently the economic driver of 140 Quebec municipalities. Forests represent the heritage of all Quebeckers, and 90% of them are public land, while 10% belong to private interests—more than 130,000 owners. In Quebec, the potential for public forests is 29 million cubic metres a year, and it is 12 million cubic metres a year for private forests.
For years, the forestry industry has been going from one crisis to the next. First, there was the softwood lumber conflict with the United States from May 2002 to fall 2006. During that period, Quebec's forestry industry lost more than 10,000 jobs.
Even though the Conservatives promised during the 2005 election campaign to create a loan guarantee program for forestry companies that were suffering as a result of the conflict, they reneged on their promise once they came to power. The Prime Minister, who wanted to sign a softwood lumber agreement with the Americans, chose instead to starve the industry to ensure that it would accept any old agreement. Since the industry was short of cash during that period, it was not able to invest money to improve its productivity, and it emerged from the conflict substantially weakened and ill-equipped to face challenges. The consequences are still being felt today.
Then, there was the rising dollar. Boosted by Alberta oil, the Canadian dollar rose by about 60% in four years, compared to the American dollar. Forestry companies lost their competitive edge on foreign markets, especially the American market. PricewaterhouseCoopers estimates that Canada's forestry industry loses $500 million in revenue for every 1¢ increase in the value of the dollar. The Quebec Forest Industry Council estimates that loss at $150 million in Quebec.
In addition, the paper market is saturated and in slow but steady decline, partly because of improved communication technologies. What is more, companies are being hit with higher oil prices, which increase their production and transportation costs. To top it all off, the construction market in the United States collapsed because of the financial and housing crisis. Not only are sales down, but prices are down and companies are in poor financial shape, which diminishes their ability to invest, innovate, modernize and develop new products. Today, while the higher dollar should allow forestry companies to buy new equipment at a reasonable price to improve and diversify their production, they are often unable to invest because they emerged from the crisis crippled with debt.
The forestry crisis that hit Quebec was very serious. From 2005 to 2011, the forestry industry lost nearly 30% of its workforce. The industry went from 130,000 workers in 2005 to 99,659 in 2011. From 2004-05 to 2012-13, there was a 38.7% drop in jobs in silviculture and timber harvesting, which reduced job numbers to a little more than 10,000 in those areas. Approximately 26,000 direct jobs were lost in the wood product manufacturing sector from 2005 to 2010. Just over 3,000 more were lost in 2011 and 2012. In total, there was a 29% decrease. At the same time, the pulp and paper industry lost 33% of its jobs.
In 2011, Quebec's softwood lumber production dropped by 10% and deliveries were down by nearly 6%.
Quebec and Canada have a long history of using wood in housing construction. Most single family homes are built of wood. Commercial and industrial buildings, however, are usually built out of concrete and steel. Recent technological breakthroughs in engineered wood like finger-jointed wood and glued laminated timber have helped facilitate the development of wood construction. At the same time, many government building codes allow the use of wood in a wider range of situations. For instance, British Columbia allows the construction of buildings of up to six storeys in wood, compared to past norms, which allowed for only three or four storeys. Sweden has buildings of up to 10 storeys with wooden frames.
What have other governments done to encourage the use of wood to build public buildings?
Quebec is already relying on increased use of wood in construction in the province, particularly in public buildings, other non-residential buildings and multi-family dwellings. This strategy aims to maximize Quebec's dominant position in high value-added products.
On April 30, 2013, the Government of Quebec passed its wood charter, which compels contractors to consider using wood in any project paid from public funds. In its own projects, the Government of Quebec is setting an example by promoting the increased use of wood in the construction of large-scale buildings.
By changing the rules in the Régie du bâtiment du Québec, the wood charter allows five and six storey buildings to be built out of wood. In general, this new tool aims to increase the use of wood in construction in Quebec, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and develop higher value-added wood products.
The wood charter also seeks to promote the use of a combination of wood and other materials and the use of appearance wood. To achieve that goal, educational institutions and centres of expertise will be called upon to provide training related to the use of wood in structures. These institutions will also promote this use so that professionals, such as architects and engineers, will have the latest information on the use of wood as a structural component.
Wood products can be substituted for products with high embodied energy that are at the mercy of rising fuel costs. Environmental concerns have led a number of countries to develop a strategy for the use of wood products, which is an important part of their strategy to combat greenhouse gas emissions.
British Columbia would like to develop the domestic wood market by requiring all new public buildings to use British Columbia wood, if possible, and by making changes to the Building Code that would allow for the construction of six-storey wooden buildings. British Columbia worked with the other provinces to make the same changes.
France's Wood, Construction, Environment plan is designed to increase the market share of wood in the construction industry by 25%. This increase, achieved by replacing products such as concrete and steel with wood, could allow the country to meet nearly 14% of its target under the Kyoto protocol.
Under its carbon neutral public service program, the New Zealand government requires wood and wood products to be considered as the main construction materials for new government buildings of three stories or less in height.
In Norway, the strategy to increase the use of wood involves promoting and showing the possibilities for the increased use of wood.
The use of wood can help combat climate change. Forest renewal makes it possible to capture and store carbon. Once mature trees are harvested, young trees absorb more carbon as they grow than trees that are at the end of their life cycle. Moreover, wood products will continue to store carbon throughout their useful life.
As long as the carbon remains stored in the wood, any increase in the overall volume of timber supply will reduce the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. Thus, an increased use of wood in construction is a simple way to combat climate change.
Since wood products store carbon, the atmosphere will remain free of that carbon as long as the wood product is being used and even after, if the product is re-used or recycled as a secondary raw material or for energy production.
The use of wood materials in construction can reduce CO2 emissions because they require less energy to manufacture than other building materials.
The use of wood will kick-start the forestry and wood industry. We are seeing more and more buildings made of wood. Furthermore, wood is also being used together with steel and concrete. In my riding, an increasing number of tourism buildings are being built with concrete, steel and wood, which is becoming more popular. It will revitalize the wood industry.
The minister, my colleague from Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean, has already said in an interview that more federal government buildings should be built with wood in order to revitalize the wood industry.
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-10-03 14:07 [p.8242]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague for his question.
This has been talked about since 2005 or 2006 and bills were introduced in 2010. However, nothing has been done. The government should invest more.
It is a good thing that they invested heavily in the automobile industry in Ontario, but they should also have invested heavily in the forestry industry. In fact, they invested very little in this area.
If they invested more and there was more development, we could have secondary and tertiary processing, which would allow the industry to get back on its feet and rest a little easier.
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-10-03 14:09 [p.8243]
Mr. Speaker, I do not need to have my vision checked. The government invested billions in Ontario's automotive industry, while Quebec and the rest of Canada received just a few million dollars. That is not very much.
The Conservative government abandoned the forestry sector and we are paying for it now. The mills are barely hanging on. There is a mill in my Liberal colleague's area that is closing its doors. In the Saguenay, there is a mill that is still for sale because there are no takers for the sawmill.
If the government made investments, I am not sure where. It must be in Ontario.
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-10-03 14:10 [p.8243]
Mr. Speaker, indeed, Canada has lost a lot of jobs in this industry. I have a list here and it is frightening.
Between 2009 and 2012, nearly 8,600 jobs were lost in Quebec alone, and between 2003 and 2008, more than 11,329 jobs were lost. In British Columbia, more than 6,000 jobs were lost. I did not just make these figures up. They come from Natural Resources Canada.
These jobs were lost and nothing was done to create diversity, invest in these companies and help them through the crisis. We are not just talking about conflicts over stumpage fees. We need to invest in research into new processes, build and give people jobs.
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-10-03 14:11 [p.8243]
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for her question.
I think it is really difficult to do anything back home. A sawmill has been up for sale for six months, and no one is buying. There are closures all over the place. For example, a few years ago, we lost machine No. 6 at the Kénogami mill. They are looking at starting the machine up again.
Furthermore, there is a conflict over stumpage fees and other details, but that is another complex issue. I think that we should do secondary and tertiary processing. With this new engineered wood, companies are making wood beams that are just as solid as steel beams. That is what we need to develop.
People back home are starting to do it, but it is not easy.
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-10-02 15:01 [p.7653]
Mr. Speaker, $33 billion has been handed over to some shipyards, yet the Davie shipyard has received nothing.
The Diefenbaker icebreaker promised to Vancouver is going to cost more than forecast, and it will be eight years late. The Davie shipyard offered to build the icebreaker on budget and on time.
On Tuesday the National Assembly of Quebec passed a unanimous motion calling on Ottawa to reconsider the Vancouver contract and let the Davie shipyard build the icebreaker.
Will the government face the facts and give the contract to the Davie shipyard, thereby saving jobs in the Quebec City region?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, in 2015, the government will be eliminating the federal tax credit for labour-sponsored funds even though it has not carried out any real impact studies or consultations.
According to one study, the gradual withdrawal of the tax credit will halve annual investment in Quebec businesses from $521 million to $250 million in three years.
Rather than eliminate the tax credit, will the minister here commit to carrying out a closer review of the labour-sponsored funds' new proposal to create a new partnership with the federal government based on mutual interests?
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-09-24 15:13 [p.7780]
Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the Quebec Superior Court issued an injunction to halt work on the Cacouna oil terminal until October 15. Quebec called on Fisheries and Oceans Canada to provide clarification on the scientific analysis that raised concerns about the project, but those requests were ignored.
What is more, the company refuses to commit in writing to protecting the belugas' natural habitat. The federal government is so confused that it seems to be more concerned about supporting TransCanada than protecting our environment. Will the government wait and comply with the studies and findings of the Bureau d'audiences publiques sur l'environnement, the BAPE, before proceeding with the project?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, a year ago, the federal government prohibited ships wider than 32 metres from going up the St. Lawrence River any further than Quebec City. Today there is a 44-metre-wide ship docked at Sorel-Tracy to take on tens of thousands of tonnes of crude oil.
In 2010, the Auditor General was very critical of the federal government's ability to respond in the event of a marine oil spill.
Can the minister tell us whether the federal government's response capability meets the Auditor General's requirements and prove that it is prepared to respond in the event of a spill, before increasing the frequency of this kind of—
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-09-19 11:57 [p.7601]
Mr. Speaker, nearly a year after the announcement of a free trade agreement with the European Union, the federal government's promise to compensate the cheese producers of Quebec is still nothing but hot air, and the producers in my region are worried about potential losses—and rightly so.
When will the government keep its promise and deliver a compensation plan that meets the needs of cheese producers in Quebec?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, while work has begun to determine where the future oil port in Cacouna will be located, a public announcement on the Fisheries and Oceans Canada website—and not on Google, as the minister said yesterday—states that there is a considerable risk of harming the belugas.
What is more, the BAPE has not yet started an environmental review and the consequences are inadequately documented, yet the project has been accelerated. Everything seems to be happening too quickly and behind closed doors.
Knowing that Quebeckers were seen as carriers of water in the past, will the government wait and act in accordance with the BAPE's studies and conclusions, or will it now simply see Quebeckers as carriers of bitumen?
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-06-18 15:07 [p.7075]
Mr. Speaker, forestry workers in my region, Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean, are concerned about the spread of the spruce budworm. This caterpillar is going to have a devastating effect on the region.
A Quebec biologist has raised the alarm and is concerned that this could be catastrophic for the region's forests. It is clear that Ottawa is not doing enough to stop this insect.
When will the minister, the member for Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean, demand that his government do more to protect forestry workers in his region, Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean?
View Jean-François Fortin Profile
(QC)
Mr. Speaker, on one hand, we have the Liberal and NDP leaders who are hiding under the robes of the Supreme Court justices to avoid having to acknowledge the merits of the Quebec bill that allows those who are suffering and close to death to die with dignity.
On the other hand, we have the Minister of Justice, who is fearmongering and threatening criminal action against Quebec doctors who obey Quebec law.
Quebec does not care about the minister's threats. It clearly stated that Quebec prosecutors would not prosecute doctors who obey Quebec law, which falls under health care.
Will the Minister of Justice stop using scare tactics and misleading Quebec doctors and Quebeckers who are terminally ill?
View Claude Patry Profile
BQ (QC)
View Claude Patry Profile
2014-06-12 14:00 [p.6735]
Mr. Speaker, I have recently had the honour of being appointed, with 17 other public figures in my region, to the Club des ambassadeurs d'Arvida, the historic capital of aluminum. The objective of the Club des ambassadeurs is to have UNESCO recognize and protect Arvida.
This small labour city, which stands out for its urban planning and industrial infrastructure, is unique in the world. Its first 270 houses were built in 135 days. In 2012, Arvida was recognized as a national historic site of Canada.
Like all my constituents, I wish to help showcase the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region on the international stage. A good way to do this would be to ensure the sustainability of Arvida, a place steeped in our collective history that exhibits the beauty and style of the so-called French-Canadian houses.
To conclude, I invite all my colleagues in the House to come and admire this industrial city that was built on our natural resources and the courage of the workers in my region.
View Jean-François Fortin Profile
(QC)
Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Conservatives said that federal penitentiaries have the tools to prevent helicopter-assisted escapes. That is true. What they did not say is that Quebec prisons do not have the same tools. That is entirely the Conservatives' fault.
I have a letter dated October 24, 2013, in which the Quebec minister asks Ottawa to regulate airspace over Quebec prisons. Because the government ignored Quebec's request, three dangerous criminals escaped from prison and are now on the run.
How could the Minister of Transport ignore the letter from the Government of Quebec and its request?
View Jean-François Fortin Profile
(QC)
Mr. Speaker, I seek the unanimous consent of the House to move the following motion: Given the National Assembly of Quebec's passage of Bill 52, the end-of-life care act, that this House reaffirm Quebec's exclusive right to legislate on health matters, including end-of-life care.
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