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Results: 1 - 30 of 1949
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
Thank you, folks.
It's nice to sit in at a fisheries committee for a meeting. I think it's fair to say that the conservation measures implemented as long ago as 15 years have been successful in the lobster fishery, if not almost too successful from a fisherman's point of view, in terms of pricing at the moment.
I’m probably the only one around this committee who remembers the escape mechanisms, nicknamed the Mifflin spawn scraper due to the opposition to Fisheries Minister Mifflin’s putting in those escape mechanisms. Fishermen were strongly opposed at the time, but now they think they're one of the best things ever invented.
Adam, to your comments on whether there is a crisis, I would say there certainly is at the fishermen's level. I met with a fisherman on Saturday, an established fisherman who owes absolutely no money on his boat’s gear. He said he was able to pay the fuel and pay his labour bill, but he doesn't expect to have money left over for his own labour—there's still a week left—or if he had debt, to pay it.
One of his colleagues is a young guy who paid $340,000 for a fishing boat last year. I can tell you that when the banker comes calling, asking that young fisherman…there's a very big crisis. So I want to establish that there is a crisis, and a very serious one, on the water.
Isn't the real problem this year one of too many lobsters and not enough processing capacity, and a lack of market?
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
But, Nadia, the situation this year is this. When a crisis was evident from the beginning, we have seen the federal government, instead of decreasing costs to fishermen, downloading costs to them—including gear tag charges, lack of observers. There is an endless downloading of costs by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, by the Government of Canada, through budget cuts and everything else. These are additional costs to fishermen when they can least afford them.
You heard me talk about this 15 years ago. Why is the federal government not trying to establish some safety nets in the fishery as we have for farmers, such as AgriStability and AgriInvest? In the good years, you set money aside in some programs that are shared with government to help you in a financial crisis.
You know that in the natural resource sector you're going to have boom and bust, supply and demand, so how come, after all this time, there is no safety net program to protect the income of fishermen and their families when you have a crisis such as this? Now we're against the wall, and some people are likely going to go broke.
The second area I think the federal government has a responsibility in is not just Canadian lobster, but it's also Maine. Are there any discussions taking place with the Americans on the cross-border issue of how we feed the market rather than dump into the market?
Is there anything happening in those areas?
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
I want to come back to the situation in oversupply and how it relates to or involves Maine as well. Are there any cross-border discussions happening to look at how to manage supply?
I'm a little worried by some of the things you have said. They kind of lead me to believe that you may be leaning towards a quota system.
I think in your own words, Kevin, you indicated that there hasn't been a precipitous decline in lobsters that you know of, and that has been with the effort fishery. I know there's a tendency towards DFO management by DFO management, because it would make it easier for them if there was a quota system, but the effort fishery has worked well in lobsters. It's one of the most healthy fish stocks out there. So the effort fishery has worked out.
Our problem isn't conservation at the moment. Our problem is oversupply. To go to a quota system is not necessarily going to solve that problem.
Have any discussions taken place on the cross-border issues—because we can't do it alone in Canada, I'll admit that—to look at somehow managing supply to feed the market?
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
I know it's likely well known around this table, Mr. Chair, that carapace size increase is a little bit of a sensitive issue for fishermen where I come from. New Brunswick and Nova Scotia are a little bit more prone to increasing carapace size than we are, because we do have a canner market, which is the smaller lobsters.
From a federal government perspective, have any discussions been held or is anything taking place in terms of looking at further processing capacity, further marketing, into Asia or Japan?
I'm on the trade committee, and I know we've been looking at some of those issues. There's certainly an opportunity in China. There have been trade delegations go to China to promote sales of seafood, but the market certainly hasn't opened up to the extent of taking the surpluses yet.
What's happening there from Fisheries and Oceans Canada's perspective?
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
I don't want to interrupt you, Nadia, but then you can tell them, based on this meeting, that we think they should get off their butt and do a little more marketing, and get it done.
View Sean Casey Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Sean Casey Profile
2013-06-13 16:02
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Mr. Kenney, I am replacing Mr. Stéphane Dion. I am going to quote a few of his comments that have appeared in the newspapers and I would invite you to respond.
First of all, I need to give you a little bit of background.
The new Roadmap indicates that your department intends to refocus its official languages activities in order to take the modernization of the immigration system into account. Here is a comment made by Mr. Dion on this issue:
There is always the danger that the Roadmap be used as a showcase enabling the Conservative government to hide its program cutbacks. We see an example of this with the use of part of its plan to finance another government objective, an objective other than the one to promote the vitality of our official language minority communities.
Do you have a response to this issue?
View Sean Casey Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Sean Casey Profile
2013-06-13 16:03
It is a big challenge. I started learning French immediately after the election.
View Sean Casey Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Sean Casey Profile
2013-06-13 16:06
I want to focus in on the concern that this $120 million and the change in emphasis is going to result in teaching the official language of the majority to economic immigrants.
Mr. Minister, you know that this subject was raised at this committee by the Commissioner of Official Languages. He expressed concern that the road map had gone through a change of name, from being a road map for linguistic duality to being a road map for official languages. He shared Mr. Dion's concern that this is exactly what would happen. His concern was that this fund for official language training would end up being spent on something other than the promotion of linguistic duality.
View Sean Casey Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Sean Casey Profile
2013-06-13 16:09
If, as you say, we're being realistic and this isn't necessarily about linguistic duality, is the funding really aimed at majority language training as opposed to minority language training?
View Sean Casey Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Sean Casey Profile
2013-06-13 17:08
Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
After hearing some of the questions from my colleagues from the NDP, I'm very, very tempted to ask you about the closure of the CIC office in Charlottetown, and to explain to you how devastating it has been. I do hope that at some point I will be able to get you to listen to me on that.
Today, I have an obligation to carry out my marching orders issued by Mr. Dion.
Minister, you don't need me to tell you that under the Official Languages Act and under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, your department has certain positive obligations with respect to official language minority communities.
Now we have a road map. The title has changed from emphasizing linguistic duality to different wording. We know that the financial commitment under the old road map and the new road map has gone up really only because of this $120-million fund, which you admitted today is demand-based, and will likely very well be used for purposes other than promoting the languages of the minority.
I guess my question for you is, do you not see that this is not only not fulfilling the role you are statutorily obliged to fulfill, but it is actually taking away from it, given the change in emphasis and the fact that the funding that is in there now, based on your frank admission, is likely to be used to teach people the language of the majority?
View Sean Casey Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Sean Casey Profile
2013-06-13 17:12
You candidly indicated in the first round of questions, though, that you fully expect that people who go to Calgary are going to be looking to learn English—
View Sean Casey Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. I appreciate you recognizing me.
Welcome, Minister Ramsay, and your backup team.
First of all, the fair price for your fur impressed me. I'm pleased to hear that, I want to tell you.
That's a traditional industry that I would expect is doing quite well. Am I correct?
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
Now that's great.
You also indicated that the fish are returning to Yellowknife Bay and Great Slave Lake. About 40 years ago, you had an excellent fishery there and it was overfished.
What is the major reason for the decline in stocks there? Was it overfishing? Was it environmental issues? What happened? Was it just overfishing or was it not handled properly?
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
Thank you very much.
I also expect that you'd be very strong, just looking at what happened over the years, on a very intensive environmental review before mining operations were put in place. Am I correct?
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
We hope not.
You mentioned the Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation. How is that viewed in your community? Does it have good rapport? What's the situation with this marketing corporation?
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
That's a good political answer. I appreciate it.
I'd like to ask you a couple of things first. My time is short.
I'd like you to speak first on your rapport with the first nations.
Another thing that interests me a lot, not knowing a lot about your area, is that you talk about fishing lodges and outdoor experiences. To me, it would be a great marketing tool for your area. You told me, if I understood correctly, that it has declined somewhat.
I would wonder why. Is it because of the promotion? You would think that people worldwide, for the likes of an experience that you can provide, like Mr. Sopuck had when he was up there, would pay a lot of money just to experience what you take for granted.
Thank you.
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
Well, I would believe you could too.
I'd also like you to.... It's interesting, of course, in that there are certain invasive species....
But before you answer that, on the first nations, what's the rapport?
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
I want to thank you very much. I hope we see you soon. You have a very interesting area.
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
Yes, Mr. Chair.
I want to present my motion on the lobster fishery, that, due to the current crisis—
View Sean Casey Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Sean Casey Profile
2013-06-10 18:51
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Mr. Carmody, at the outset you gave us some sense of the size of the department and the budget. I want to make sure that I heard you correctly.
You have about 320,000 clients, is that right?
View Sean Casey Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Sean Casey Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Sean Casey Profile
2013-06-10 18:52
Interesting. You have 50% more clients than we do, but your budget is 3.5 times ours. The cost to run your department is about the same, so good for you. It's quite an interesting comparison.
At our last session we heard from some officials from the United Kingdom. There was a stark difference in their disability award, so I'll talk to you about that for a moment. There's quite a debate raging in this country over a decision that was taken with the agreement of all parties some time ago to introduce the new Veterans Charter and to replace a pension system with a lump-sum payment as a disability award for a certain class of veterans.
Do you have something like that in your country, or are disability awards in the form of a pension as opposed to a lump sum?
View Sean Casey Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Sean Casey Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Sean Casey Profile
2013-06-10 18:55
That's interesting. In this country it's $300,000 and in Britain it's $900,000.
All governments in recent years have gone through some austerity measures, and we also had quite a debate in this country as to whether the Department of Veterans Affairs' budget should be included or exempted from the austerity measures. Did you have a similar debate, and how did you resolve it?
View Sean Casey Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Sean Casey Profile
Lib. (PE)
Mr. Rutter, I want to start with a bit of a broader question. I noticed that your department's Service Personnel & Veterans Agency is actually part of the Ministry of Defence, which is unique among the countries we're studying because Australia, United States, and Canada each have a stand-alone department. I am also aware there was a bit of a merger done back in 2007 that gave rise to the structure that you have.
Can you offer any comment on the benefits or the challenges to being a part of the Ministry of Defence as opposed to being a stand-alone department?
View Sean Casey Profile
Lib. (PE)
In this country one of the biggest issues we hear about from veterans' groups is this whole idea of a lump-sum payment versus an ongoing pension allowance. I notice that in your country the lump-sum payment was doubled from £285,000 to £570,000—about $900,000 Canadian—back in 2008. Can you tell us the reason for the original lump sum? What was the rationale for it, and what was the discussion and debate around the increase?
Why was it at the level it was and why was it increased?
View Sean Casey Profile
Lib. (PE)
Still on the subject of compensation, I know that you had a 2010 review of your compensation scheme. There has been a suggestion that promotions in service be factored into the amount of compensation that a veteran receives, such that, if they start from a certain level and you assume that over the course of their military career they would have been promoted but for their injury, that assumption is factored into their compensation. I know that was one of the recommendations.
Can you tell me whether it has been implemented?
Results: 1 - 30 of 1949 | Page: 1 of 65

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