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Results: 1 - 60 of 12287
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-18 9:47
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you, to both of our witnesses, for being here today.
Ms. Strom, I'd like to start with you and to talk to you about the use of a shadow carbon price. I know that Suncor is familiar with this. Different companies in the Canadian energy sector are using a shadow carbon price, and some companies use it to drive their performance or to create opportunities like technological innovation or increasing their market access. Other companies, I know, use it to just straight-up evaluate GHGs coming from particular projects. But it seems to me that the use of this shadow carbon price in the Canadian energy market lays a bit of the groundwork for the fact that companies are already thinking about a price on carbon, that a price on carbon wouldn't actually be that disruptive.
I know that Suncor is familiar with the shadow carbon price and uses it. I'd love to hear from you a bit about that, but I guess my question for you is this. If a company like yours is already engaged in a shadow carbon price, wouldn't there be a benefit in levelling the playing field and ensuring that all companies have certainty and build in that same price?
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-18 9:49
Understood.
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-18 9:50
Thanks very much. My second question is for Madame Grondin.
It seems to me, listening to your testimony and doing a little bit of research before coming here today, that AEM is really making an effort to be responsible in its operations when it comes to the environment.
Back to this idea of levelling the playing field, do you agree that a sound and consistent and well-funded regulatory structure would help keep out some bad actors? The mining sector has a bit of a cowboy reputation, rightly or wrongly. I certainly wouldn't include your company in that reputation.
We need some sort of consistent policy across the board. In that vein, would you support a national fund to ensure site remediation and cleanup that all operations would pay into? Again, it's this idea of levelling the playing field.
View Robert Chisholm Profile
NDP (NS)
Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
Mr. Zealand, thank you very much for your patience in finally getting here to speak to our committee, but also for your work in this important area of the recreational fishery. I am interested in the management relationship between DFO and the co-management boards that are established under the land claim settlements. I wonder if you could speak to how effective that is and how it works.
View Robert Chisholm Profile
NDP (NS)
The department mainly provides technical support to the boards in its decisions and issues around development and habitat management and protection, those sorts of things.
View Robert Chisholm Profile
NDP (NS)
Right. Do you get a lot of out-of-territory sports fishermen coming in? Do you have a system of guides and so on?
View Robert Chisholm Profile
NDP (NS)
Do out-of-territory fishermen have to have a guide to come to fish?
View Robert Chisholm Profile
NDP (NS)
Okay, interesting.
I'm going to pass it on to my colleague Mr. Cleary. Thank you, Mr. Zealand, for your participation.
View Robert Chisholm Profile
NDP (NS)
It's too bad that we didn't go out of in camera to say this.
I've enjoyed working with you, Randy, over the past three years. You've been a good parliamentary secretary to work with, given the constraints under which you work. Of course your demeanour has always been such that you were able to put me in my place in the nicest possible way without raising your voice, something I've never learned how to do. Anyway, I know this is an issue you've always been pretty dedicated to and I wish you the best.
Thanks.
View Robert Chisholm Profile
NDP (NS)
Is this our last meeting?
View Robert Chisholm Profile
NDP (NS)
If it happens to be, I wanted to thank the clerk and the analyst and the staff who have supported this committee, as I'm sure others would. We really appreciated all the work and support and we've always felt well served.
Thanks very much.
View Robert Chisholm Profile
NDP (NS)
I want to change what I said.
Some hon. members: Oh, oh!
View Peter Stoffer Profile
NDP (NS)
In closing, on our side, seeing that this may be our last committee, I just want to wish you very good health this summer.
View Peter Stoffer Profile
NDP (NS)
To all of you, have a great summer and a good run in the campaign. We'll see you all back here, maybe on the other side. You never know.... I'm just kidding. I wish you all the best.
To our folks and everyone else, thanks for your great work.
Mr. Galipeau, thank you very much for your service. Well done. Good health, buddy.
Some hon. members: Hear, hear!
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-16 9:14
Thanks, Mr. Chair.
Hello, Mr. Butler. It's nice to see you here from Ottawa instead of at home.
I'm actually going to pick up a little bit from where Mr. Woodworth left off on the fisheries issue and Off the Hook, the community-supported fishery, which is a fantastic initiative. I've had the occasion to go and meet some of the fishermen down Brier Island way, down Digby Neck. I think it's an interesting project because you are working with the private sector, obviously. There are fishermen involved. It's sort of formed like a co-op. I buy a share and every week I get fresh fish. It's amazing.
You're working with the private sector there, but then the work that's happening through Off the Hook stands in pretty stark contrast to the bigger fisheries in our region that are taking a different approach to the fisheries, one that is perhaps less sustainable. There's the community-supported fishery. I know the EAC also does a lot of work on trying to get changes to legislation so that we can have more initiatives like community-supported fisheries versus the big bottom-trawling fishery, which is dragging the nets and leaving this empty sort of dead highway behind them where they've scooped up everything.
How does that work, this working with the private sector, sort of small-scale private sector, if that's a phrase, but then also needing to work with government to change legislation for a fundamental shift in how we do fishing in this country?
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-16 9:18
Of course, and it should be for all of us.
I guess the point I'm hoping to make here is that Off the Hook is this incredible program and it should be celebrated, but it exists because of this huge legislative mess that we have. It's tricky because you want to work on the innovative projects that are working, but at the same time you want to put attention to working with government to actually transform policy, in the fishery in this case, but in other areas around environment as well.
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-16 9:19
Thanks.
I'll do my part by inviting everybody at committee, should you be in Halifax this summer, to come to my house for some the Off the Hook Community Supported Fishery fish. I'll cook it up, we'll invite Mark over, and we'll talk fisheries policy.
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-16 9:20
To Mr. Fortune from Ducks Unlimited, thank you so much for the recommendations you made at the end of your presentation. I would really like to explore all of them, but I can't in the time I have. Expand funding for core investment programs, legislate guidelines, make it easier to conserve habitat rather than destroy—those are good recommendations.
Take the first one, perhaps, the investment for core programs. Could you expand on that? Why is that an issue? Why is that a problem right now?
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-16 9:21
Sorry to interrupt. They're oversubscribed?
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-16 9:57
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Mr. Fortune, we have such a short period of time to ask questions that we try not to use up our time doing other things, but I do really want to congratulate Ducks Unlimited for some of the work you're doing. In particular, I've had a chance to look at the document you put together on climate change and the amount of carbon that's actually sequestered thanks to wetlands. It's a really good calculation of the importance of our wetlands when it comes to combatting climate change. Congratulations on that.
On its website Ducks Unlimited says the North American waterfowl management plan is one of the most successful conservation initiatives in the world, which is a pretty broad statement. I find it interesting because it's one of these situations where you have NGOs, the private sector, and government all working together—under a piece of policy—to make something happen. You're certainly one of the organizations that is working there.
In terms of the success of that plan, would it be possible if one of those stakeholders didn't exist? We're here to talk about private sector and environment groups. Would it be possible if government, if that stakeholder, were not involved?
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-16 9:59
Okay, thanks.
Mr. Butler, I think about funding. I get the Ecology Action Centre's newsletter Between the Issues.; they just renamed it Ecology & Action. I try to stay up to date with what the Ecology Action Centre is doing and what kinds of projects are happening, and I do see when the private sector is involved in the EAC's work. I don't know this to be true, but it seems to me that private sector involvement with the Ecology Action Centre is for fun things, the easier things, the things we can see and touch, for example, coastal development. I see less involvement on the stuff that is more behind the scenes, a little tougher, things we can't touch.
I think about the fact that you have all these committees working on different issues. You have a marine committee, a coastal committee, and an energy committee. The energy committee works on everything from renewables to energy efficiency. It appears to me that it's tougher to get the private sector involved with that work. Is it just my interpretation of Between the Issues, or am I picking up on something there?
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-16 10:01
I would have expected you to say it's from government funding as well.
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-16 10:03
Yes, thanks.
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-11 9:25
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thanks very much to all of our witnesses. This has been really informative.
Mr. Puddister, when you were mentioning your recommendations, I was writing furiously and I didn't manage to get them. Could you quickly tell me them again? Was one a government role to attract corporate donors?
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-11 9:27
Thanks. I completely missed that one. When you have recommendations, it's good that those of us who are here on committee understand what they are.
Ms. Barocas, I thought it was interesting that you led into some recommendations as well about the role of the federal government. You talked about facilitating more private sector engagement, a little bit like what Mr. Puddister said, but then you talked about the role of regulating. Can you expand on that? I wasn't quite sure what you meant by that.
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-11 9:28
I completely understand that.
Thanks to both of you. Those are great recommendations.
Ms. LeRoux, you talked quite a bit about some of the benefits but also some of the challenges of working with companies, with the private sector. You talked about how some organizations have marketing agreements where they'll help you out but they get to have their logo on things, and stuff like that. I thought your analysis that they are more reactive than proactive was really interesting. You said that they will respond to requests, but they're not out there saying, “Oh, gosh, what can we get involved in?”
I can only imagine that takes a lot of management on your part and that there are folks in your organization who are actively monitoring, making those outreach requests, asking for those funds, and applying for those grants. How exactly does your organization manage all of this?
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-11 9:29
It's interesting that you talked about that groundswell, that way into an organization through individuals and building those relationships.
When you talked about employee engagement, your example was how some companies actually want to roll up their sleeves and plant trees. We had another organization here on another day of this study and I asked some questions about that tough balance where you want to engage individuals at a company, for example, and let them get their hands dirty and plant trees, but at the same time they're often not the most efficient people to be doing that project. The people working in your organization probably have a lot more expertise.
How do you get that balance of having corporate engagement while at the same time actually accomplishing your goals and not just creating more work for you?
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-11 9:31
It makes sense that you're laying the foundation by working with individuals, letting them come and put their rubber boots on for a day and plant some trees.
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-11 9:31
Ms. Barocas, can you talk a little bit about the experience with Earth Rangers in terms of organizations that want to be involved? How do you get them involved? Is it you who's always asking? Do you have that feeling of businesses being reactive rather than proactive?
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-11 10:14
Thanks, Mr. Chair.
There's a lot of stuff coming out today about the tensions that exist for NGOs when they work with the private sector, some of the dangers and pitfalls, some of the opportunities, some of the challenges. I like where that conversation is going, sort of teasing out those tensions, because we can't figure out how to work with them or around them unless we know exactly what's going on.
Mr. Puddister, during your testimony, you brought up the roles of residents, businesses, institutions, and government in conservation. I liked that you named the individual residents, you talked about institutions and businesses, and you also named government. I think, from what I'm hearing from the testimony today, all those players need to be at the table and all those players need to be engaged. I want to ask you and Ms. LeRoux, but also Ms. Barocas, about how those relationships work. Can you take one out?
I think it's important that you mentioned government because the role of this study is to look at the private sector working with non-governmental organizations, but I really do see that government has a fundamental role to play with those relationships when it comes to conservation, when it comes to protecting the environment.
Maybe, Mr. Puddister, I can start with you and your thoughts about how all those relationships work together and who really needs to be there.
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-11 10:17
Your role is key. You talked about being the watershed experts. You talked about the fact that you have that scientific knowledge. You certainly don't want the private sector to just say, “Oh, I have a great idea. Why don't we dox”, and it actually is not based on science and doesn't have good environmental outcomes.
Ms. Barocas, how do you see all these players working together, and what are the roles of each?
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-09 9:37
Actually, Madam LeBlanc....
Sorry, but we're trying to be fair. Madam LeBlanc isn't here all the time and it's nice to have her here, but I do have a couple of questions, so thanks.
I want to start with Ms. Patterson. You said some really intriguing things in your testimony. Where do I start?
I want to explore this idea of a retrofit coach that you talked about. Also, I can't remember which organization it was, but you talked about another organization starting to focus on the commercial side because they felt they could get there and make some progress on the commercial side versus the residential side.
All of that is to say that I have a long background in energy efficiency. I was part of the community group of stakeholders for the EGLIH, the EnerGuide for low-income households, program that never actually saw the light of day. I'm very familiar with EnerGuide and ecoENERGY—I don't care what people call it—retrofits that are supported by the federal government.
When you talked about the need for a retrofit coach and about moving to the commercial instead of residential side, it really made me think about why people aren't just doing this. Why do they need an organization to help them? Why do they need incentives? Why do they need a retrofit coach? Even for the commercial side, you always hear this line that if businesses can save money, they're going to do it. But they're not. They're not engaging in energy efficiency without the help of incredible organizations on the ground. Why do we need these energy efficiency organizations?
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-09 9:44
Thanks very much.
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
I'll begin with clause 2 on the registered retirement income funds or RRIFs. These rules apply to Canadians who are at least 71 years old. The new rules are expected to cost $670 million over the next five years, but many baby boomers won't turn 71 until 2020.
Have you examined how much this will cost once the bulk of the baby boom has turned 71 and falls under the new rules? How much will this measure cost in 10 years?
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you.
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
What was the original policy rationale in 2012 for excluding foreign charitable foundations from being qualified donees under the Income Tax Act?
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
What was an unintended consequence of the change in 2012? Were there any unintended consequences of the change in 2012?
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
Could you provide the committee with an example of a foreign charitable foundation that was a qualified donee prior to 2012 but became excluded because of the 2012 rule change? Could you give us an example?
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
Are there any others, just to help illustrate?
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
What was the nature of the work that the Aga Khan Foundation was doing in Canada?
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
Are there any environmental organizations?
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
On May 26 officials told this committee that they had examined how these changes to TFSAs would impact the provinces.
Can you share with us how these changes will impact the provinces? Do you have that information in terms of the fiscal impact?
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
Can you share more of the information? As you know, this impact analysis is no longer a cabinet confidence since the legislation has been introduced, so can you provide us with more granularity around the cost to provinces?
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
It's no longer a cabinet confidence because the legislation's been introduced, and further to that, members of Parliament of all parties have a fiduciary obligation to Canadians to have this information.
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
Can you provide us with that?
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
Now?
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
I'm saying this respectfully. I have great regard for our public servants, but that information ought to be provided to committee and should be provided in a timely manner. It would have been helpful to have it today.
Have you examined the long-term impact to these changes on OAS? We were told by the parliamentary budget office that this change is going to have some unintended consequences on OAS cost.
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
But some financial advisers are telling their wealthier clients that they can continue to get the maximum guaranteed income supplement for three years while living off their TFSAs. They are being told to maximize their annual TFSA contributions, delay their CPP benefits and pension plans as well as RRSP withdrawals until the age of 70, and this way they can collect the maximum in OAS and GIS for three years from 67 to 69 while supplementing their income with their TFSA accounts.
Is the government, or are you, aware of this loophole that will allow quite wealthy people to qualify and receive a guaranteed income supplement?
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
But would you agree that the policy objective of the guaranteed income supplement is not to benefit wealthy...?
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
TFSAs provide an opportunity for people to shelter income or to shelter wealth in a manner that enables them to qualify for GIS.
Would you agree that's inconsistent with the objectives of the GIS?
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
Prior to my raising it with you, were you aware of this potential loophole?
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
It is germane to that, Mr. Chair, because increasing the TFSA limits exacerbates this problem in that there will be a greater capacity for wealthier people to shelter income in such a way that they qualify for the GIS.
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
Have you studied the impact of the increase to TFSAs on this possibility of people to effectively shelter income and qualify for GIS? You're aware. You've read the same articles I've read, whereby financial advisers are saying this is something wealthier people ought to do.
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you.
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
Mr. Chair, in terms of an accelerated capital cost allowance on the longer-term horizon, I'd like to thank the NDP for having decided to support what was a Liberal position, and of course, indirectly thank the Conservatives for having decided to support an NDP and originally Liberal position.
In the spirit of cooperation exemplified by Mr. Rankin's intervention, I want to thank the NDP as well for having supported the Liberal position.
Thank you.
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