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View Christine Moore Profile
NDP (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I will ask only one question, and then I will yield the floor to Mr. Rankin.
As we know, many homes have never been tested for radon, although a number of them are at risk. Could it be appropriate for CMHC, when processing a file for a home purchase, to require that the new buyer test for radon? That way someone buying a new home would know whether it contains radon or not and whether they have to make improvements to remedy the problem.
View Christine Moore Profile
NDP (QC)
That's okay. I'm finished.
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2015-06-18 16:18
I want to just say thank you to everyone for being here, and I want to start by saying thank you to Mr. Lizon, my colleague, for bringing this to the attention of the committee. I confess I've never thought much about radon until the last few days, and it's very sobering. I intend to have my house tested and I want to ask others in my community to do it as well, so thank you for the education.
I just wanted to start with Ms. Cooper about the WHO report. I'm confused because I understood from Ms. Bush, if I heard properly, that there's a 100 to 300 range of becquerels per cubic metre, yet we are at 200 in Canada. I thought I heard you say, Ms. Cooper, that the standard recommended now by WHO is in fact 100. Have I got that right?
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2015-06-18 16:20
All right.
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2015-06-18 16:20
I understand now.
In order to go down from 200 to 100 becquerels per cubic metre, you indicated—I thought really properly—the direct and indirect costs are enormous given the existing radon. If we had done the work required to reduce that risk we'd save a lot of money. Then you said that we'd probably save twice as much if we went to 100. I'm not sure that's true. To get down from 200 to 100, it wouldn't in fact be a doubling. It might be much more expensive to get to a lower level, isn't that so?
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2015-06-18 16:21
Sorry for being short on time. I do understand that now.
Ms. Phipps, I wanted to just ask you to tell us a little bit more about your RentSafe program. How does it work?
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2015-06-18 16:22
Thanks very much.
View Mike Sullivan Profile
NDP (ON)
Thank you, sir. Thank you to the witnesses.
This is amazing information. If I take this home and talk to the folks in my riding, they'll get more scared than they already are. We've been fighting for the past 10 years to reduce the level of exposure to diesel exhaust, which the WHO has reclassified as a class A or class 1 carcinogen.
How does this compare with 464 diesel trains a day going past your house in terms of danger to the individual? Is this something we can wait on, or is it something we should be acting on immediately in a riding such as mine?
View Mike Sullivan Profile
NDP (ON)
I agree.
The charts and graphs you showed us had two striking pieces to them. One, this seems to affect women more than men. I'll jump to the conclusion that maybe it's because their lungs are smaller; I don't know. Second, this seems to be on the increase since 1985, yet people lived in homes with radon many more years prior to that.
What is driving those two things? Are there any guesses from the panel?
View Mike Sullivan Profile
NDP (ON)
You mentioned that only less than 10% have tested their homes and Manitoba is the only place where there is some kind of government position, through Manitoba Hydro, or aggressive position, I guess, on this whole notion of testing and remediation.
Are you recommending that the federal government also enter the fray and start to provide funding? I can think of many in my riding who couldn't even afford the test, let alone remediation. Is there something the panel is suggesting as something we ought to be doing nationally?
View Mike Sullivan Profile
NDP (ON)
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2015-06-18 17:35
Perhaps on behalf of the official opposition, I could say exactly the same thing to our analysts, and to thank you as well, Chair, for your leadership. It's been really terrific to have unanimous reports, thanks to you—something that we rarely see in Parliament.
Thank you very much, Mr. Clerk.
View Dennis Bevington Profile
NDP (NT)
Thanks, Mr. Chair.
Thanks to the witnesses for joining us here today.
Ms. Strom, the participation of communities in environmental efforts has not been consistent throughout the last two decades. Perhaps you could talk to us a bit about the Cumulative Environmental Monitoring Association that was set up to do that. What happened to that particular organization?
View Dennis Bevington Profile
NDP (NT)
Well, obviously people must be very concerned about penalizing environmental impacts, because that's one thing that does happen with any modern-day industrial work that goes on. Why would these groups have pulled out? Is it because they didn't feel that they had enough control over the direction this was taking?
View Dennis Bevington Profile
NDP (NT)
Okay, but it does point out that when you're engaging with groups outside of government, where there are regulations in place and where you're attempting to provide a cooperative basis, there is a great need for understanding between the groups. Is that not correct?
View Dennis Bevington Profile
NDP (NT)
Ms. Grondin, the dust on the access road had been identified as an issue. Has that issue with the community been resolved?
View Dennis Bevington Profile
NDP (NT)
Both with Baker Lake and, I'm sure, with your mine, there's a high cost of energy. What is your company's commitment to looking at sources of renewable energy?
We've been very successful in the Northwest Territories with Ekati mine installing wind turbines. Have you done any work in this direction yet at your mine site?
View François Choquette Profile
NDP (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
My thanks to the witnesses for being here.
My first question is for the representative of Agnico Eagle Mines Limited, Louise Grondin.
Looking at your 2014 report on sustainable development, I see that your annual reports are quite comprehensive. You have mines in Quebec, including in Abitibi, and I see you have a section on greenhouse gas emissions. Are you a participant in the Quebec-California carbon market that requires caps on emissions and carbon trading to which Quebec is a signatory? Is your company, or will it be, regulated by that carbon market?
View François Choquette Profile
NDP (QC)
My apologies, Ms. Grondin, but I have very little time at my disposal.
View François Choquette Profile
NDP (QC)
Sorry to interrupt, Ms. Grondin, but we have very little time. That is why I am rushing you a bit.
If I understand correctly, you are currently not subject to the carbon market, but what do you think about that idea in general? I see that you are making tremendous efforts. You have reduced your intensity by 28% in one year. That was last year, so from 2013 to 2014. You are making efforts. How interested is your company in participating in the carbon market? Why would that be a good idea for you?
View François Choquette Profile
NDP (QC)
The carbon market is a system for capping emissions. A reduction in emissions is requested each year. Afterwards, if someone is not able to achieve the reduction objectives, they can exchange or purchase credits. I think that could benefit you. Although the intensity of GHG emissions has greatly diminished, it is still difficult to control the emissions. Your company continues to grow, and GHG emissions in the mines are increasing in spite of of everything. Therefore, I think it is important to make all the necessary efforts, as you mentioned, to combat this GHG scourge.
I would like to say something to Ms. Strom.
In the analysis before us, we see that you have concluded an agreement with the Pembina Institute. I saw that the institute produced a report in 2010, and the report talked about some problems related to water retention ponds, for instance. I suppose it is based on—
View François Choquette Profile
NDP (QC)
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-18 9:47
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you, to both of our witnesses, for being here today.
Ms. Strom, I'd like to start with you and to talk to you about the use of a shadow carbon price. I know that Suncor is familiar with this. Different companies in the Canadian energy sector are using a shadow carbon price, and some companies use it to drive their performance or to create opportunities like technological innovation or increasing their market access. Other companies, I know, use it to just straight-up evaluate GHGs coming from particular projects. But it seems to me that the use of this shadow carbon price in the Canadian energy market lays a bit of the groundwork for the fact that companies are already thinking about a price on carbon, that a price on carbon wouldn't actually be that disruptive.
I know that Suncor is familiar with the shadow carbon price and uses it. I'd love to hear from you a bit about that, but I guess my question for you is this. If a company like yours is already engaged in a shadow carbon price, wouldn't there be a benefit in levelling the playing field and ensuring that all companies have certainty and build in that same price?
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-18 9:49
Understood.
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-18 9:50
Thanks very much. My second question is for Madame Grondin.
It seems to me, listening to your testimony and doing a little bit of research before coming here today, that AEM is really making an effort to be responsible in its operations when it comes to the environment.
Back to this idea of levelling the playing field, do you agree that a sound and consistent and well-funded regulatory structure would help keep out some bad actors? The mining sector has a bit of a cowboy reputation, rightly or wrongly. I certainly wouldn't include your company in that reputation.
We need some sort of consistent policy across the board. In that vein, would you support a national fund to ensure site remediation and cleanup that all operations would pay into? Again, it's this idea of levelling the playing field.
View Dennis Bevington Profile
NDP (NT)
Ms. Grondin, I just wanted to touch back on that energy issue, because in the Northwest Territories we built our communities around mines and we built hydroelectric facilities to service those mines. Out of that, we got an electrical system that is almost 100% renewable in the southern part of our territory, and that was really good.
When you talk about wind power, have you worked with the community of Baker Lake? That is the resource that they have in that area. Consider working with Baker Lake, with the federal government perhaps even as a partner because the federal government puts a lot of money into Nunavut, to start looking at the construction of these facilities that could be used in perpetuity as well by the community of Baker Lake.
View Dennis Bevington Profile
NDP (NT)
Thank you very much. I just have very limited time and I wanted to ask Ms. Strom a question as well.
In the process that you're using now for upgrading, you're coking the materials. Is that correct?
View Dennis Bevington Profile
NDP (NT)
The waste product from the coke-fired boilers is petro-coke. Are you using that for cogenerating electricity now in your facility?
View Dennis Bevington Profile
NDP (NT)
You're using one of the dirtiest products for cogeneration. This petro-coke really has the highest CO2 emissions level of any product that you could probably burn in this world to make electricity. Is there any sense that perhaps you should look at moving back to upgrading processes where you're adding hydrogen rather than taking it away, where you're not creating a product that has these very deleterious environmental concerns?
View Dennis Bevington Profile
NDP (NT)
How much time do I have left?
View Dennis Bevington Profile
NDP (NT)
Well, in the upgrading process, it's certainly one process where CO2 emissions are very high. What's Suncor's plan for upgrading in the future?
View Jack Harris Profile
NDP (NL)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you, gentlemen, for joining us.
I have to say, General Lawson, that you should get the medal for bravery for showing up today, after yesterday's incidents in the media.
But I do want to follow up on that, General, because we had a statement from Madam Justice Deschamps in her report, which I will read to you. The report says that the military is rife with discrimination, and abuse towards women starts from their first days in uniform while commanders write it off as part of life in the armed forces. Her conclusion is that “there is an undeniable problem of sexual harassment and sexual assault” in the Canadian Armed Forces, “which requires direct and sustained action”.
Do you agree with that statement in light of your comments last night, and in light of the fact that your own internal report, completed about a year ago, said there was nothing wrong with the policies and procedures in the Canadian Armed Forces?
View Jack Harris Profile
NDP (NL)
General, with regard to your statement last night, I don't know if what you issued would be characterized as an apology, although it has been called that. You recognized that it was an awkward statement, but the suggestion that the problem of sexual assault and sexual harassment in the army is something of a biological imperative, that men can't help themselves, seems to be archaic, at best.
Would you not agree that this kind of attitude, if it were pervasive in the military—particularly at the senior command level, like yourself—would in fact contribute to that problem, or even covertly excuse it?
View Jack Harris Profile
NDP (NL)
Mr. Kenney, in light of the report of Madam Deschamps and certainly the comments, even though he is taking them back today and apologizing for them, many Canadians feel that the military cannot solve its own problem. It seems to be that you, in your department, and your government, are implicitly taking the attitude that this is the military's problem, and that the military can go ahead and solve it.
Are you and your government prepared to take responsibility to ensure that women or the LGBT individuals who have also been identified and who joined the military are going to be safeguarded, safe, and in a safe place if they join the military? Are you going to take responsibility for that and are you and your government going to follow up on an ongoing basis to ensure that this is happening?
View Jack Harris Profile
NDP (NL)
That's a commitment I will assure you that this side of the House and many Canadians will want to follow up on, on a regular basis.
If I may, I will move to a couple of incidents and one recent one in particular. Who gave the authorization to risk the Canadian Forces members, officials, and the Prime Minister himself to go to the front lines of the activity and mission in Iraq, where the Prime Minister had said that Canadian Forces members would not be, for the sake of a photo op with no operational or public purposes, a stunt for publicity purposes?
Was that authorized by you, Minister Kenney, or by you, General Lawson? It seems to me that the additional special forces people who were brought there, as well as the officials who were there, along with the Prime Minister himself, would have been placed in a dangerous situation on the front lines where we know there have been incidents of return fire and fire. That seems to me to be reckless. It seems to have been done solely for the purpose of a photo op.
Why would you, Minister, or you, General Lawson, authorize that or did the authorization come from somewhere else?
View Jack Harris Profile
NDP (NL)
In light of the previous questioner, who asked a short question and got a long question and a long answer—
View Jack Harris Profile
NDP (NL)
Mr. Chairman, thank you.
I'll just read some headlines: “Canada and the West losing war against ISIS”, “ISIS poses bigger threat after nearly a year of coalition bombing”, and “Islamist group is now a more immediate risk to more people, larger centres than ever”.
Does Canada have any independent strategy in terms of understanding what's happening on the ground in Iraq with the three separate forces at work—the Shiites, the Sunni, and the Kurds—without any diplomatic presence other than one liaison officer in Iraq, in Bagdad, and nothing in Syria and nothing in Iran? Do we have an independent strategy? Are we just tagging along?
View Élaine Michaud Profile
NDP (QC)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
I know that the issue has been raised by several of my committee colleagues, but my first question is for General Lawson.
I would like some clarification about what you said yesterday. I don't want to focus on the controversial remarks, although they are quite frankly disgraceful. One thing worries me about the statement you made afterwards—which was supposed to be an apology for said comments. You said you wanted to examine very seriously the sexual misconduct issues in the Canadian Armed Forces using an action plan based on the 10 recommendations from the Deschamps report. However, there seems to be some ambivalence when it comes to the Canadian Armed Forces' willingness to implement all the recommendations from the report. That is something the NDP has been calling for since the report was published.
My mother is still actively serving in the Canadian Armed Forces, and I am worried about the safety in her work environment. I would like to know whether the Canadian Armed Forces will really adopt all the recommendations from the Deschamps report.
View Élaine Michaud Profile
NDP (QC)
Thank you.
I also heard the minister make a formal commitment to keeping an eye on the situation and to ensuring that outcomes will be achieved. For our part, my colleagues and I will make sure to ask the right questions and to check whether the work is being done. That is a priority for us. The Valcartier military base is in my riding. So this is a huge concern for me.
Let's come back to the topic at hand. I just mentioned the Valcartier base. As was said a little earlier, 220 military members from the Valcartier military base—mainly parachutists—will be in Poland as part of Operation Reassurance from June 28 to July 15. For the first time, in Poland, a rotation will last six months instead of three. Could you explain to us why the rotation will be longer in that specific case?
View Élaine Michaud Profile
NDP (QC)
I know there is currently no plan to send to Ukraine soldiers who will be deployed on that rotation. They will be in Poland and may have to travel to other Eastern European countries. I know that Ukraine is currently not in the plans. Can that change as part of the mission?
View Élaine Michaud Profile
NDP (QC)
View Jack Harris Profile
NDP (NL)
Would there be time for one quick question to the minister, Mr. Chair, asking for a timeline on the implementation of the Deschamps report?
View Jinny Jogindera Sims Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you very much.
First of all, let me say that my community in Surrey, B.C., in the Lower Mainland, and the Punjabi-speaking community across the country from coast to coast to coast are very disturbed and quite angry at the cuts they are seeing. The chat shows or the talk shows that you've just mentioned do not cut it and do not replace the news items that have been cancelled.
I also want to quote from a statement made by you on March 5, 2015:
Holding a...television licence is a privilege that comes with important obligations that are in the public interest, especially in regards to high-quality news coverage and reporting. An informed citizenry cannot be sacrificed for a company's commercial interests. Canadians can only wonder how many times corporate interests may have been placed ahead of the fair and balanced news reporting they expect from their broadcasting system. We expect Canada’s broadcasters...I'll save the rest. You can imagine the rest. We can send you the letter as well.
It is very clear that you have abandoned the very principles you put forward in there, where you specifically talk about news and how that cannot be sacrificed for commercial interests. What changed?
View Jinny Jogindera Sims Profile
NDP (BC)
Sorry, Mr. Pelley—
View Jinny Jogindera Sims Profile
NDP (BC)
I'm sorry, Mr. Pelley, but we only have seven minutes and we have a number of people.
My question was specifically on what had changed, but as you said, I am going to pass it on to Mr. Sullivan right now.
View Mike Sullivan Profile
NDP (ON)
As Mr. Fantino has already said, this issue is huge in the Italian community, both in my riding of York South—Weston and in Toronto generally, so much so that the Italian consul general called a meeting and brought in 70 representatives of the Italian community to complain about this decision, which had come as a shock to them.
Giuseppe Pastorelli, who is the Italian consul general, Emilio Battaglia, the new president of Comites, and the Honourable Joe Volpe, who publishes Corriere Canadese, all have said that this decision is a shock to the community. Many in the Italian community came to Canada years ago and speak little or no English, so they rely on OMNI to get their news of Canada in Italian.
That is now gone. It's not going to be replaced by anything until this fall, when some kind of lifestyle program is coming that's aimed at younger people. We have abandoned an entire demographic of the Italian community. They will no longer be receiving any news. With an election coming, it is like voter suppression. These people will not be able to be engaged in the electoral process.
At the licence hearings, you committed to adhere to the standard conditions of licence applicable to English language conventional television stations, which expect “the licensee”—I say the word “expect”, and I know that you are going to yell that it is not a condition, but an expectation—“to maintain a local presence”, and a local presence includes “providing seven-day-a-week original local news coverage distinct to the market; employing full-time journalists”, which you don't anymore, and “operating a news bureau or news gathering office in the market”.
That's what you committed to do to live up to those expectations, and I know there is a difference in the words, but with a federal election on the horizon, the Italian community is up in arms. They are fuming. They were talking about boycotting Rogers, which I don't believe you would want them to do. They are concerned that a big part of that community will no longer have access to be engaged in Canadian society in the way they were.
With all respect to all of the dire predictions, you can't take news in isolation and say that news doesn't make money and therefore you are cutting out news. All the broadcasters in Canada would stop producing news if that was the attitude, because nobody makes a ton of money doing news. That's not what the licences are for. The licences are a licence to give Canadians information as per the Broadcasting Act, and I'm sorry, but lifestyle programming for a younger audience doesn't cut it.
View Jasbir Sandhu Profile
NDP (BC)
Mr. Pelley, I do want to echo what my colleagues have said in regard to the ethnic news being cut, especially the Punjabi and the Cantonese news in the Lower Mainland. This serves as a vital link for people to get not only Canadian news in the language they understand but also news from abroad, whereby they're able to keep up links with whatever country they have come from.
Getting a licence is a privilege. It comes with a responsibility. I believe you're not living up to that responsibility of providing that content for the licence you got.
People are very upset in my community. I want to echo that here in this committee. As Mr. Sullivan has said, they're thinking about boycotting Rogers in regard to other services you provide. In one component you're going to make money and in others you're going to lose, but it's the whole package that you have to deliver. I have to convey this for my constituents: I think that in this case you guys have failed.
View Rathika Sitsabaiesan Profile
NDP (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you for being here.
I am going to read a quote from a letter that I think has already been mentioned. It was signed by the Urban Alliance on Race Relations, the National Congress of Italian-Canadians, the Canadian Ethnocultural Council, the Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants, the Metro Toronto Chinese and Southeast Asian Legal Clinic, the Urban Alliance on Race Relations past president, Ryerson University, and the Yee Hong foundation. A lot of these organizations and their members are represented in my constituency, and are very concerned about cuts.
View Rathika Sitsabaiesan Profile
NDP (ON)
Their letter states as follows:
On the 7th day of May—Asian Heritage Month—...Rogers announced the elimination of all newscasts on its OMNI TV stations. For over 30 years OMNI TV has played a vital and essential role in reflecting and connecting Canada’s culturally diverse and multilingual communities. OMNI TV news programming creates a voice for Canada’s ethnocultural communities to challenge social injustices; it provides programming that pertains to their needs; and more importantly it gives these communities information that the mainstream media does not provide.
From what we've learned, this decision was made without consultation of community members and leaders, who have watched and benefited from OMNI TV for decades. In my opinion, and I know in the opinion of many who have written to me specifically, Rogers has abandoned the spirit of OMNI TV's licence by eliminating the local Cantonese, Mandarin, Punjabi, and Italian news programming. We feel it's systematically dismantling OMNI's ability to meaningfully serve the multilingual audiences.
I know you said, Mr. Pelley, that you have a fiduciary responsibility to your shareholders. That means, quarter over quarter, trying to turn a profit. Your vice-presidents, in a conversation I had with them before, mentioned that not really much has changed: we still have services or programming in the same languages, it's just a pop-culture, news-ish kind of conversation show that's happening now.
But that's not what the communities are looking for. We know that well over a million people rely on OMNI for the news they're receiving on what is happening in this country. You may say that it's not making money....
Well, let me hear what you have to say. What is it you can say about the seniors and many people in my community in Scarborough who rely on the Mandarin, Cantonese, Punjabi, and Italian to get news—not just current events conversation but news on what's happening in our country—in their language?
View Rathika Sitsabaiesan Profile
NDP (ON)
I'm glad you brought up advertisers. I'm sorry to cut you off, but I don't have a lot of time.
View Rathika Sitsabaiesan Profile
NDP (ON)
My understanding from the local businesses in these language communities is that they haven't really been courted by OMNI. You're saying that you don't have the advertising revenue coming in from the communities, the Cantonese, Mandarin, Punjabi, or Italian communities, and yet I'm speaking with local chambers of commerce and individual entrepreneurs and they're saying that they really haven't been courted.
View Rathika Sitsabaiesan Profile
NDP (ON)
Maybe that's something to bring up with your advertising department.
View Rathika Sitsabaiesan Profile
NDP (ON)
I tend to disagree with your disagreement because I'm speaking with people on the ground and this is what they're telling me. It is what it is and I'm sure my 15 seconds are up now. Thank you, Mr. Chair.
View Pierre Nantel Profile
NDP (QC)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
Mr. Pelley, did you want to add anything to the answer you gave Mr. Young?
View Pierre Nantel Profile
NDP (QC)
View Pierre Nantel Profile
NDP (QC)
I see that your television is clearly a service television. That is why you are available on the air, as normal, and on cable.
To be honest, the situation is very comical. “Comical” is not really the right word to use. Instead, perhaps I should say that it is very ironic to get to the end of the parliamentary session and realize how much of a mess this government has made. All this time, it has been letting the situation get more toxic.
My comments seem to be very election-oriented, but the truth is that a report was produced in 2011 on challenges related to emerging digital media in Canada. The government shelved the report, and nothing happened. Today, people and communities are losing a news service with a CRTC licence. The CRTC was supposed to establish the process so that this would be available to people. But it turns out that business people have lost their business model and that media are organized vertically, which makes the situation difficult for you.
Mr. Vaughan told you that, given the number of sister companies you have, you could self-finance. I dislike the fact that there is no framework for such complex activities. I see that Rogers, which is one of our largest media families and plays a key role, is basically in the situation you are describing. I am sure that you have difficult choices to make. It is clear that the laxity of government policies and the lack of vision have led to a bankruptcy. I'm not talking about a financial bankruptcy, but about a problem for audiences and entrepreneurs.
You have my sympathies, as you have had an unpleasant quarter of an hour. We represent all our constituents. This is our job, and it's normal for us to ask you the question. I would like to express my sympathy to you over the fact that the government has ignored the arrival of a new platform, a new supply, the place of heritage and Canadian identity and content the news represents. That is a relevant editorial and a Canadian vision of things. What strikes me the most in this whole matter is that business people want to do business in a field useful to Canadians. Canadians are the ones who consume that service, but they can no longer do so because there have been no updates to keep pace with the proliferation of international platforms.
I feel the government has also neglected other aspects. Clearly, I will finish this Parliamentary season, but I hope the heritage committee will be able to meet next week. I would like to remind you that CBC/Radio-Canada has once again had a very questionable appointment, that of Robert Jeffery. Consequently, I would like to move the following motion:
That the Committee, pursuant to Standing Order 111, invite Mr. Robert Jeffery, newly appointed director of the Board of Directors of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, to examine his qualifications and competence to perform the duties of the post to which he has been appointed, and that this televised two-hour meeting be held before Tuesday June 23rd 2015.
View Pierre Nantel Profile
NDP (QC)
We are clearly putting forward this motion because it is appropriate to question that selection. I feel this government has once again shown negligence toward our public broadcaster, whose role is the same, whether we are talking about minority language communities across the country, about Quebec or about all Canadians, be they anglophones or francophones. As I saw strong parallels between those two situations, I used the opportunity to request a study on the matter.
Thank you for your testimony. I now yield the floor to my colleagues.
View Mike Sullivan Profile
NDP (ON)
You stated several times that people have other options. In fact the Italian community doesn't have another option for local news in Italian. It isn't there. Nor does the Punjabi community.
I agreement with you that generally in Canada, in English and in French, consumers are moving away from conventional television to receive their news, not in big enough numbers to cause the kind of abandonment of news that is happening now but certainly not in these languages.
There is no other Italian facility for persons who don't have English. I agree that some of them have English, and they may go somewhere else. They're certainly talking about going somewhere else for their cable and cellphone providers.
The other comment you made was that you were going to provide some kind of current affairs access to news. Correct me if I'm wrong, Ms. Watson, but what you said was that the Italian community would be served by a lifestyle program starting in the fall.
That's really not going to help the Italian community at all.
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