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Results: 106 - 120 of 103103
View Heather McPherson Profile
NDP (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Olsen.
I just want to get one quick clarification.
I know this doesn't explicitly talk about algorithms, but I just want to clarify something with Mr. Ripley.
It was my understanding that you had told the committee that decisions made by algorithms were meant to be included in this bill. Is that accurate?
Thomas Owen Ripley
View Thomas Owen Ripley Profile
Thomas Owen Ripley
2021-04-16 13:43
Thank you for the question, Ms. McPherson. It's a good one, in the sense that, as the committee knows, there are elements of Bill C-10 that give the CRTC powers to impose discoverability requirements on online undertakings. Certainly we understand that in those contexts, the ways that recommender algorithms are working are very relevant to the CRTC's work.
It's not a question of saying yes, they're within the scope of the act, and the CRTC would be able to ask for information from online undertakings such as Netflix or Crave about the way their algorithms are prioritizing or servicing Canadian content as part of those processes. The implication in this particular context is where the term “programming control” is used elsewhere in the act. For example, proposed paragraph 10(1)(c) says:
standards for programs over which a person carrying on a broadcasting undertaking has programming control
I think there's another regulatory power that also references it, so my previous comments were speaking to the potential implication of this—that again the committee would be extending the scope of those powers in potentially requiring companies that are simply in the business of retransmitting or distributing content made by others to suddenly be responsible for the standards or the content of that content.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Mr. Champoux, you have the floor.
View Martin Champoux Profile
BQ (QC)
View Martin Champoux Profile
2021-04-16 13:45
Perhaps my interpretation requires an adjustment.
I'd like to make a clarification with regard to Mr. Ripley's response to Ms. McPherson's question.
In terms of retransmission undertakings, you gave the example of an undertaking that will rebroadcast or provide content on its platform. The programming undertakings still have some control over the recommendation and prioritization of programs. We aren't necessarily talking about the programs in a programming schedule, but about the available and accessible services.
In my opinion, these elements should be added to the definition of “programming control.”
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Seeing no more discussion, we'll proceed to the vote.
Shall BQ-3 carry?
View Julie Dabrusin Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Hearing “no”, we'll now go to a vote.
(Motion negatived: nays 6; yeas 5 [See Minutes of Proceedings])
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
We now move to NDP-2.
Go ahead, Ms. McPherson.
View Heather McPherson Profile
NDP (AB)
Thank you.
The purpose of this amendment is to delete this article of the bill, which allows social media such as YouTube and Facebook to escape regulation. It is also to prevent the situation that occurs when some broadcasters decide to supplement their own online broadcasting and thus circumvent the requirements to which traditional broadcasters would be subject.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Okay.
Go ahead, Ms. Dabrusin.
View Julie Dabrusin Profile
Lib. (ON)
We respect that the matter of online harms is an important thing, and we're going to be dealing with it in upcoming legislation.
My concern about this amendment, in particular, is that it seems that it would actually extend the CRTC's ability to regulate social media users. The users piece is particularly important, because this is the Broadcasting Act. I don't believe any of us have the intention of actually, within the Broadcasting Act, starting to regulate what users choose to upload to social media. When I say “users”, I mean individuals like any one of us, or people in our families and communities.
I would oppose this amendment.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Seeing no further discussion on this amendment, we now proceed to the vote. Shall NDP-2 carry?
View Julie Dabrusin Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
I'd like to call on the clerk for a vote, please.
(Amendment negatived: nays 10; yeas 1[See Minutes of Proceedings])
Before I go to the next one, I wanted to give you an alert. In 10 minutes, we have a health break. We have a lot of excited faces. Welcome to the world of Zoom.
We now go to PV-4.
Go ahead, Mr. Manly.
View Paul Manly Profile
GP (BC)
I'll try to keep it short so we can get to that health break.
This bill excludes social media users from being subject to the act, but the act's application to social media providers is not defined. This amendment adds text to clarify that social media are subject to the act when undertaking broadcasting activities, without removing the exemption for social media users.
Further, the bill states that all persons who carry on broadcasting undertakings have a responsibility for the programs that they are broadcasting and over which they have programming control. Social media platforms should have responsibility for what is posted on their sites, and this amendment would at least make social media providers, not users, responsible for what they broadcast.
Thank you.
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