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Results: 76 - 90 of 99527
View James Maloney Profile
Lib. (ON)
You have about 15 seconds.
View Dane Lloyd Profile
CPC (AB)
Okay, I'll just thank the witness for our great back and forth. Thank you.
View James Maloney Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thanks, Mr. Lloyd.
We will go on now to Mr. Lefebvre.
View Paul Lefebvre Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Paul Lefebvre Profile
2021-04-12 12:00
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Before I ask my questions to the great panel we have today, I would maybe rephrase it.... As a member of the sitting government, we believe that climate change is real, and we see that clean energy—and certainly this study we are embarking on about critical minerals—is a huge opportunity for Canada. There is an economic opportunity. There are jobs. This is the way of the future, and we want to be leaders in this sector.
That being said, I really want to thank the panellists. It's been very informative.
I'll start with Ms. Houde. We haven't talked much with you, unfortunately, nor with your colleague Mr. Thibault. We know you have a lot to say. We want to hear from you about the solutions we can provide.
[Technical difficulty] the world leader that we should be in this sector. I'm talking about Sudbury today. Behind me, there are nine mines operating right now, with more coming on stream. There's more research, but at the same time, we realize the importance of nickel, copper and all the rare minerals that are found.
You talked about a Canada-wide alliance and a North American coalition. You talked about circularity and traceability. These are all extremely important things in terms of the national strategy that we are designing.
I would like you to give us some more examples of how important they are and then compare them to other countries or other regions, like Europe. I find all of this very interesting.
You have one minute; I'm listening.
Sarah Houde
View Sarah Houde Profile
Sarah Houde
2021-04-12 12:02
In Canada, several provinces are part of the answer. When the provinces are put together, we can win. That's why the federal government must coordinate each province's share to ensure that we have a complete set.
The nickel that comes from your mines in Sudbury and that you're talking about is an excellent example. You're producing nickel in Ontario, which could complement the Quebec mine supply and allow for cell production and all the components required for this production.
These same cells could then be assembled into battery packs and integrated into vehicles in Ontario. We could continue the research and development with all the expertise in Nova Scotia, for example.
In addition to automotive manufacturers, there are non-passenger vehicle and electric vehicle manufacturers in Quebec. There are also some in Manitoba. From this perspective, the role of the Canadian government is to coordinate the provincial shares in order to establish continental autonomy in North America. We could then ultimately emulate Europe's approach to battery production.
Europe is developing continental autonomy, and Asia has already established it. We mustn't be dependent on other parts of the world or dependent on various conditions, such as a pandemic or difficulties in trade relations. It's important to have full control over this strategic resource that will help millions of Canadians move into the future.
View Paul Lefebvre Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Paul Lefebvre Profile
2021-04-12 12:04
I completely agree.
A few weeks ago, we met with a witness from Europe. I asked him about the number of critical and rare minerals in Europe, which made him laugh.
I find it interesting that Europeans want to develop the chain there, but they'll come and get the minerals here. They'll take the minerals from somewhere else and bring them back there. We won't have any left.
My next question is for Mr. Cleary from BlackRock Metals.
You said that more federal and government support was needed for investment in the mining sector. We're talking about mineral extraction in particular.
In your business plan, in terms of the smelters and the whole process around that, where will this happen?
Are you planning to refine your rare minerals?
Sean Cleary
View Sean Cleary Profile
Sean Cleary
2021-04-12 12:05
In the case of the BlackRock project, the vanadium and titanium and the iron fraction will be refined in Saguenay. An important element of our project is that it's an integrated project and we will be able to send these to market.
We are fully permitted for an additional ferrovanadium plant to be located in Saguenay, which would supply both the steel industry and the battery industry. That is phase two of our overall construction plan. We would look to have that put in place a couple of years after the start of production. Initially, we will process some of these materials at existing facilities that are partnered with us out of Europe.
View James Maloney Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thanks, Mr. Cleary and Mr. Lefebvre.
Mr. Simard, you have two and a half minutes.
View Mario Simard Profile
BQ (QC)
View Mario Simard Profile
2021-04-12 12:06
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
My question is for the representatives of Propulsion Québec.
Mr. Thibault, you ended your brief remarks earlier by talking about value-added components.
A few weeks ago, we met with a representative from Torngat Metals, which processes rare earth oxides to make permanent magnets. This process is similar to the production of aluminum by electrolysis, which requires a great deal of electricity. I thought that this factor was quite interesting.
Can you give us other examples of value-added products that we can manufacture in Quebec?
Simon Thibault
View Simon Thibault Profile
Simon Thibault
2021-04-12 12:07
Yes. Torngat Metals is a good example. The company, which is also a member of Propulsion Québec, works in the rare earth industry.
There are several examples in the Quebec ecosystem alone. However, we can also look at the examples in the Ontario ecosystem, as Mr. Lefebvre suggested. There are lithium mines, such as Nemaska Lithium, Sayona Mining, Critical Elements Lithium Corporation, Galaxy Lithium and North American Lithium. As for graphite, there are Nouveau Monde Graphite and Mason Graphite. Lastly, there's nickel on the Ontario side, but some Quebec mines that supply Ontario nickel plants could re-supply plants on the Quebec side. There are several examples, such as Torngat Metals, whose process could easily be developed in Quebec or even across Canada.
Based on our studies and various meetings with our members, which are the mining companies, no projects in Quebec or Canada are unable to carry out secondary, tertiary or quaternary processing in Canada. Right now, no technological barriers prevent us from doing something of this nature in Canada. In my opinion, it's really a matter of incentives. We need to support companies in order to develop these types of processing here, in Canada.
View Mario Simard Profile
BQ (QC)
View Mario Simard Profile
2021-04-12 12:08
I believe that Ms. Houde pointed out earlier that the best way to put these incentives in place is for the federal government to play a coordinator role. Beyond that, in terms of funding, there's no Canadian strategy for the processing of these critical metals.
Simon Thibault
View Simon Thibault Profile
Simon Thibault
2021-04-12 12:08
The Investissement Québec model is quite good in Quebec. I would like to share it with you here.
Clearly, it would be very good to see a similar entity created in Canada, or an increase in the budgets of the Canada Infrastructure Bank, in order to strategically and specifically support flagship projects throughout the battery and critical and strategic minerals, or CSM, industries. Of course, this all fits in with the ultimate goal of having electric vehicles on our roads, and wind turbines and solar panels made entirely with Canadian materials.
View James Maloney Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Thibault and Mr. Simard.
Mr. Cannings.
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you.
Mr. Blondal, throughout this study, we have been hearing so much about the value-added chains that we need to create in Canada. You mentioned the battery value chain. I talked previously in this study about the graphite mine in my riding that really would like to produce graphite for battery anodes manufactured in Canada instead of in China.
Can you expand on your comments as to what the government can and should be doing to incentivize those value chains and integrate them? What really needs to be done in the short time we have to make this move?
Dan Blondal
View Dan Blondal Profile
Dan Blondal
2021-04-12 12:10
Thank you very much for the question, Mr. Cannings.
We hear a lot about the mining end of it. We hear a lot about the electric vehicles, charging and everything, but there's a lot of stuff that happens in between. That's all the value-added. You mine the ore and then it has to be refined into a useful metal. Then it has to be converted into a useful battery chemical, and all that comes together combined into a cathode material. The anode's a little bit simpler because it's just graphite. It might get mixed with silicone, but the same kind of thing happens on either of the electrodes. That's all before it ever gets into a battery cell, battery module or battery pack, and then into an electric vehicle. There are many transformation steps throughout this whole process.
I'm here as a witness to talk about critical minerals and the transformation of those critical minerals. My agenda, of course, is the transformation of those critical minerals into something useful in a battery. What I want to underscore is that we need to fix that middle supply chain. We need to be making cathode materials and anode materials for assembly into a battery cell here in North America, and preferably in Canada, if we're going to avoid shipping our raw materials overseas and having them come back in the form of a battery. I think, ultimately, that's critical.
What can the government do? The government is already supporting a company like Nano One through SDTC and a variety of other mechanisms to commercialize their technology, to pilot it and prove it. I believe we can do it with a pan-Canadian effort. We can bring together the nickel miners and the lithium miners, and the graphite miners for that matter on the other side of things, to form a completely integrated supply chain.
The value to integrating the supply chain is not only just creating the—
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