Committee
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 100 of 150000
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Welcome to this meeting number 37 of the Standing Committee on International Trade. I'm thrilled to be able to call the meeting to order.
This meeting is being held pursuant to the order of reference of January 25, and the order of reference sent to the committee on March 10.
The committee is resuming its study of Bill C-216, an act to amend the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Act (supply management).
With us today we again have the officials from the Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Global Affairs Canada, and, of course, our House of Commons legislative clerk to assist us during clause-by-clause consideration of the bill.
We will start to deal with Bill C-216 now.
Therefore, I will call clause 1.
Shall clause 1 carry? Is there any debate on this clause?
Mr. Savard-Tremblay, did you want to speak to this or were you raising your hand to vote?
Bienvenue à la 37e séance du Comité permanent du commerce international. Je suis enchantée de pouvoir déclarer la séance ouverte.
Nous nous réunissons conformément à l'ordre de renvoi du 25 janvier et l'ordre de renvoi envoyé au Comité le 10 mars.
Le Comité reprend son étude du projet de loi C‑216, Loi modifiant la Loi sur le ministère des Affaires étrangères, du Commerce et du Développement (gestion de l'offre).
Nous recevons aujourd'hui encore des fonctionnaires du ministère de l'Agriculture et de l'Agroalimentaire et d'Affaires mondiales Canada, et, bien entendu, nous avons avec nous la greffière législative de la Chambre des communes pour nous aider pendant l'étude article par article du projet de loi.
Nous procéderons maintenant à l'examen du projet de loi C‑216.
Commençons par l'article 1.
L'article 1 est‑il adopté? Est‑ce que quelqu'un souhaite en débattre?
Madame Savard-Tremblay, voulez-vous parler du projet de loi ou levez-vous la main pour voter?
View Simon-Pierre Savard-Tremblay Profile
BQ (QC)
I was raising my hand to vote, Madam Chair.
Je levais la main pour voter, madame la présidente.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you.
Ms. Gray.
Je vous remercie.
Madame Gray, vous avez la parole.
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
I would request a recorded vote, Madam Chair.
Je demanderais un vote par appel nominal, madame la présidente.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
All right. Thank you very much.
Madam Clerk, would you please take a recorded vote on clause 1?
(Clause 1 agreed to: yeas 9; nays 2)
The Chair: Shall the title carry?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Some hon. members: On division.
The Chair: Shall the bill carry?
(Bill C-216 agreed to: yeas 9; nays 2)
The Chair: Shall the chair report the bill to the House?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Some hon. members: On division.
The Chair: Shall the committee order a reprint of the bill for the use of the House at report stage?
D'accord. Je vous remercie beaucoup.
Madame la greffière, pourriez-vous procéder à un vote par appel nominal pour l'article 1?
(L'article 1 est adopté par 9 voix contre 2.)
La présidente: Le titre est‑il adopté?
Des députés: Oui.
Des députés: Avec dissidence.
La présidente: Le projet de loi est‑il adopté?
(Le projet de loi C‑216 est adopté par 9 voix contre 2.)
La présidente: La présidence fera‑t‑elle rapport du projet de loi à la Chambre?
Des députés: Oui.
Des députés: Avec dissidence.
La présidente: Le Comité demandera‑t‑il une réimpression du projet de loi pour l'utiliser à la Chambre à l'étape du rapport?
Émilie Thivierge
View Émilie Thivierge Profile
Émilie Thivierge
2021-06-14 11:11
Madam Chair, I'm sorry to interrupt.
Since there were no amendments adopted, the committee doesn't need to order a reprint of the bill.
Madame la présidente, pardonnez-moi de vous interrompre.
Comme aucun amendement n'a été adopté, le Comité n'a pas besoin de demander de réimpression.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much, Émilie. I really appreciate that.
That completes the required votes on Bill C-216.
Madam Clerk, is there anything else on Bill C-216 that we need to do?
Je vous remercie beaucoup, madame Thivierge.
Voilà qui met fin aux votes relatifs au projet de loi C‑216.
Madame la greffière, y a‑t‑il autre chose que nous devions faire au sujet du projet de loi C‑216?
Émilie Thivierge
View Émilie Thivierge Profile
Émilie Thivierge
2021-06-14 11:11
No, Madam Chair.
We just need to suspend to go to the in camera part of the meeting.
Non, madame la présidente.
Nous devons simplement suspendre la séance pour passer au volet à huis clos de la séance.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
I want to thank the witnesses for taking the time to come out this morning.
In particular, I want to thank the analysts, the interpreters and our clerks for getting us through every one of these meetings. We are now finished with Bill C-216.
We are now going to suspend and rejoin via an in camera session.
[Proceedings continue in camera]
Je veux remercier les témoins d'avoir pris le temps de venir ce matin.
Je tiens particulièrement à remercier les analystes, les interprètes et nos greffières de nous avoir aidés à passer au travers de chacune de nos séances. Nous en avons maintenant terminé avec le projet de loi C‑216.
Nous suspendrons maintenant la séance pour reprendre nos travaux à huis clos.
[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
I call the meeting to order.
This is meeting number 36 of the Standing Committee on International Trade.
This meeting is being held pursuant to the order of reference of January 25, 2021, and the order of reference sent to the committee on March 10, 2021.
The committee is resuming its study of Bill C-216, an act to amend the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Act with regard to supply management.
Today we have the pleasure to welcome officials from the Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food and from Global Affairs Canada.
From the Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food, we have Marie-Noëlle Desrochers, acting executive director, strategic trade policy division, and Aaron Fowler, chief agriculture negotiator and director general, trade agreements and negotiations.
From the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development, we have Doug Forsyth, director general, market access, and Kevin Thompson, executive director, market access and trade remedies law.
You are people who have been before the committee many times, so you're familiar faces to us.
Mr. Forsyth, you have the floor, please.
La séance est ouverte.
Nous en sommes à la 36e séance du Comité permanent du commerce international.
Cette séance a lieu conformément à l'ordre de renvoi du 25 janvier 2021 et à l'ordre de renvoi envoyé au Comité le 10 mars 2021.
Le Comité reprend l'étude du projet de loi C-216, Loi modifiant la Loi sur le ministère des Affaires étrangères, du Commerce et du Développement (gestion de l'offre).
Aujourd'hui, nous avons le plaisir d'accueillir les porte-parole du ministère de l'Agriculture et de l'Agroalimentaire, ainsi que d'Affaires mondiales Canada.
Les témoins du ministère de l'Agriculture et de l'Agroalimentaire sont Marie-Noëlle Desrochers, directrice exécutive par intérim, Division de la politique commerciale stratégique, et Aaron Fowler, négociateur en chef pour l'agriculture et directeur général, Accords commerciaux et négociations.
Le ministère des Affaires étrangères, du Commerce et du Développement nous envoie Doug Forsyth, directeur général, Accès aux marchés, et Kevin Thompson, directeur exécutif, Accès aux marchés et recours commerciaux.
Vous avez comparu maintes fois devant notre Comité; donc, nous vous connaissons bien.
Monsieur Forsyth, vous avez la parole.
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:03
Thank you, Madam Chair and honourable members. Thank you for the invitation to appear before the Standing Committee on International Trade on its review of Bill C-216.
The bill amends the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Act so that the Government of Canada cannot make any commitment in an international treaty that would have the effect of increasing tariff rate quota volumes or reducing over-quota tariff rates for dairy products, poultry or eggs.
The intent of the bill is consistent with the long-standing Government of Canada policy to defend the integrity of Canada's supply management system.
I'd like to share with you some considerations regarding this proposed amendment to the departmental act.
First, by introducing specific policy objectives, proposed amendments would fundamentally change the nature of the departmental act. The act is an organizational statute that sets out, in general terms, the powers, duties and functions of the Minister of Foreign Affairs, the Minister of International Trade and the Minister of International Development.
It does not prescribe specific policy objectives. This way, the act sets up a framework that provides flexibility to the government of the day to implement its particular foreign, international trade and development policy without having to change the underlying legislation; thus, it accommodates the policy perspectives that different governments may bring to the management of foreign affairs over time.
As an example, in terms of international trade negotiations, paragraph 10.2(c) of the act provides that the Minister of Foreign Affairs is to conduct and manage international negotiations as they relate to Canada. Section 13 of the act elaborates on the specific duties of the Minister of International Trade, which include improving the access of Canadian products and services to external markets through trade negotiations.
Second, specific foreign international trade and development policy objectives, including how to address sectoral interests or specific constituent concerns, are generally established elsewhere. For international trade negotiations, negotiating objectives and how to accommodate specific sectoral interests are set in the negotiating mandates that are approved by cabinet. This allows the government of the day to develop specific policy objectives in response to evolving international circumstances.
Third, Parliament has the final say over the outcome of any international trade negotiations. Parliament ultimately decides whether or not to pass the legislation necessary to implement any free trade agreement. Additionally, moving forward, trade agreements will be subject to even more parliamentary oversight. The updated policy on tabling of treaties strengthens transparency of trade negotiations and provides additional opportunities for members of Parliament to review the objectives and economic merits of new free trade agreements. The new policy includes the tabling of a notice of intent to enter into negotiations towards a new FTA, objectives for negotiations and, finally, an economic impact assessment.
Fourth, amendment of the departmental act in the way in which Bill C-216 proposes carries risks. By limiting Canada's ability to engage on these issues, this amendment would invite negotiating partners to narrow the scope of their own potential commitments, taking issues off the table from the outset of negotiations, likely in the areas of commercial interest to Canada. This narrows possible outcomes, precludes certain compromises and makes it harder to reach an agreement.
Addressing the interest of any specific sector in the act would set a precedent that could lead to demands for additional amendments to reflect other foreign and trade policy objectives, including sectoral interests, further constraining the government's ability to negotiate and sign international trade agreements and, more generally, to manage Canada's international relations.
Lastly, maintaining the nature of the departmental act unchanged does not affect the government's policy to defend the integrity of Canada's supply management system, nor the ability of negotiators to defend this position at the negotiating table.
The government has made public commitments not to make further concessions on supply-managed products in future trade negotiations. In fact, Canada has been able to successfully conclude 15 trade agreements that cover 51 countries while preserving Canada's supply management system, including its three pillars: production control, pricing mechanisms and import controls.
Most recently, the Canada-United Kingdom Trade Continuity Agreement fully protects Canada's dairy, poultry and egg sectors and provides no new incremental market access for cheese or any other supply-managed product. Where new market access has been provided, specifically and exclusively in the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement, CETA; the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, or CPTPP; and the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement, CUSMA, the access was deemed necessary to include an agreement that was in Canada's interest.
While new access was provided in those agreements, the supply management system and its three pillars were maintained. These outcomes were part of the overall balance of concessions through which Canada maintained preferential market access to the United States and secured new access to the European Union, Japan, Vietnam and other key markets.
In conclusion, while the spirit of Bill C-216 is consistent with the government's policy of defending the integrity of Canada's supply management system, amending the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Act as proposed by the bill would change its nature and create risks.
Along with my colleagues here today, I welcome your questions. Thank you very much.
Merci, madame la présidente et distingués membres du Comité. Merci de l'invitation à comparaître devant le Comité permanent du commerce international dans le cadre de son examen du projet de loi C-216.
Le projet de loi a pour objet de modifier la Loi sur le ministère des Affaires étrangères, du Commerce et du Développement afin que le gouvernement du Canada ne puisse prendre d'engagement, par traité international, qui aurait pour effet d'augmenter les contingents tarifaires ou de réduire les taux tarifaires hors contingent pour les produits laitiers, la volaille ou les œufs.
L'intention du projet de loi est conforme à la politique de longue date du gouvernement du Canada qui vise à défendre l'intégrité du système canadien de gestion de l'offre.
J'aimerais vous faire part de certaines considérations touchant cette modification proposée à la loi du ministère.
En premier lieu, en introduisant des objectifs de politique précis, les modifications proposées changeraient fondamentalement la nature de la loi habilitante du ministère. La loi est un texte d'organisation qui définit, en termes généraux, les attributions du ministre des Affaires étrangères, de la ministre du Commerce international et de la ministre du Développement international.
Elle ne prescrit pas d'objectifs de politique particuliers. Ainsi, la loi fixe un cadre qui donne au gouvernement la possibilité de mettre en œuvre sa politique étrangère, de commerce international et de développement sans avoir à modifier la loi sous-jacente; elle couvre donc les perspectives de politique que les différents gouvernements peuvent apporter à la gestion des affaires étrangères au fil du temps.
Par exemple, pour les négociations commerciales internationales, l'alinéa 10(2)c) de la loi stipule que le ministre des Affaires étrangères mène les négociations internationales auxquelles le Canada participe. L'article 13 de la loi précise les obligations particulières de la ministre du Commerce international, qui sont notamment de faciliter, par voie de négociations, la pénétration des denrées, produits et services canadiens dans les marchés extérieurs.
En second lieu, les objectifs précis de la politique étrangère, de commerce international et de développement, y compris la façon de traiter des intérêts sectoriels ou les préoccupations particulières des intervenants, sont généralement établis ailleurs. Pour les négociations commerciales internationales, les objectifs de négociation et la façon de traiter les intérêts sectoriels particuliers sont établis dans les mandats de négociation approuvés par le Cabinet. Cela permet au gouvernement du jour d'adapter ses objectifs stratégiques à l'évolution de la situation internationale.
En troisième lieu, le Parlement a le dernier mot sur le résultat de toute négociation commerciale internationale. Au bout du compte, c'est le Parlement qui décide d'adopter ou non la loi nécessaire à la mise en œuvre d'un accord de libre-échange. Par ailleurs, les accords commerciaux feront désormais l'objet d'une surveillance parlementaire encore plus grande. La politique actualisée sur le dépôt des traités augmente la transparence des négociations commerciales et donne aux députés de nouvelles occasions de se pencher sur les objectifs et les avantages des nouveaux accords de libre-échange. La nouvelle politique comprend le dépôt d'un avis d'intention de négocier un nouvel accord de libre-échange, de même que les objectifs des négociations et, enfin, une évaluation des retombées économiques.
En quatrième lieu, la modification de la loi habilitante que propose le projet de loi C-216 comporte des risques. En limitant la capacité du Canada de s'engager sur ces questions, cette modification inviterait nos partenaires de négociation à cibler plus étroitement leurs engagements éventuels, excluant ainsi certains enjeux dès le début des négociations, vraisemblablement dans les domaines d'intérêt commercial pour le Canada. Cela restreint les résultats possibles, empêche certains compromis et rend plus difficile la conclusion d'un accord.
Traiter des intérêts d'un secteur particulier dans la loi serait créer un précédent susceptible de provoquer des demandes de nouvelles modifications pour refléter d'autres objectifs de politique étrangère et commerciale, comme les intérêts sectoriels, ce qui restreindrait la capacité du gouvernement de négocier et de signer des accords commerciaux internationaux et, de façon plus générale, de gérer les relations internationales du Canada.
Enfin, le maintien de la nature de la loi habilitante n'a pas d'incidence sur la politique gouvernementale de défense de l'intégrité du système de gestion de l'offre ni sur la capacité des négociateurs de défendre cette position à la table de négociation.
Le gouvernement s'est engagé publiquement à ne pas faire d'autres concessions sur les produits soumis à la gestion de l'offre dans les futures négociations commerciales. De fait, le Canada a réussi à conclure 15 accords commerciaux, qui couvrent 51 pays, tout en préservant son système de gestion de l'offre, y compris ses trois piliers: le contrôle de la production, le mécanisme de prix et le contrôle des importations.
Depuis tout récemment, l'Accord de continuité commerciale Canada-Royaume-Uni protège totalement les secteurs canadiens des produits laitiers, de la volaille et des œufs et ne donne pas de nouvel accès au marché pour le fromage ou quelque autre produit en gestion de l'offre. Là où un nouvel accès aux marchés a été accordé, en particulier et exclusivement dans l'Accord économique et commercial global entre le Canada et l'Union européenne, l'AECG, l'Accord de partenariat transpacifique global et progressiste, le PTPGP, et l'Accord Canada-États-Unis-Mexique, l'ACEUM, l'accès était jugé nécessaire pour un accord qui était dans l'intérêt du Canada.
Si ces accords ont ouvert de nouveaux accès, il reste que le système de gestion de l'offre et ses trois piliers ont été maintenus. Ces résultats faisaient partie de la balance globale des concessions grâce auxquelles le Canada a maintenu un accès préférentiel aux marchés des États-Unis et obtenu un nouvel accès aux marchés de l'Union européenne, du Japon et du Vietnam et à d'autres marchés clés.
En conclusion, bien que l'esprit du projet de loi C-216 soit compatible avec la politique du gouvernement visant à défendre l'intégrité du système de gestion de l'offre du Canada, la modification de la Loi sur le ministère des Affaires étrangères, du Commerce et du Développement que propose le projet de loi en changerait la nature et ne serait pas sans risques.
Mes collègues et moi répondrons à vos questions. Merci beaucoup.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much, Mr. Forsyth.
Ms. Desrochers, do you have opening remarks? You do not.
All right, we'll go to our committee members.
Welcome, by the way, to Mr. Hardie and Mr. Berthold. We're glad to have you joining the international trade committee today.
Mr. Aboultaif, go ahead for six minutes, please.
Merci beaucoup, monsieur Forsyth.
Madame Desrochers, avez-vous une déclaration préliminaire? Non.
Très bien, nous allons donner la parole aux membres du Comité.
En passant, je souhaite la bienvenue à M. Hardie et à M. Berthold. Nous sommes heureux de vous voir au Comité du commerce international aujourd'hui.
Monsieur Aboultaif, vous avez six minutes.
View Ziad Aboultaif Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Forsyth and other witnesses.
Thank you, Madam Chair.
With different markets and different conditions when you negotiate trade deals, you have to have flexibility and you have to have options in order to be able to achieve agreements. I know that Bill C-216 is aiming to somehow further protect supply management or preserve it, as Mr. Forsyth just said, but in the meantime, it carries risk, which Mr. Forsyth also stated in his opening remarks.
What I'm interested in is this. Although we've signed so many trade agreements without having to really jeopardize the supply management system and we have successfully done that throughout its history—and we have so many trade agreements that I don't have to mention it at the moment—the question is, are there any live examples out there that can advise us on what the consequences will be in the long run if Bill C-216 is implemented, since we know that we will lose that flexibility and we will be limiting our team of negotiators on the road when they try to achieve trade agreements with countries in the world?
Merci, monsieur Forsyth, et merci aux autres témoins.
Merci, madame la présidente.
Avec des marchés différents et des conditions différentes lorsque vous négociez vos accords commerciaux, vous devez avoir de la marge de manœuvre et disposer d'options pour pouvoir conclure des accords. Je sais que le projet de loi C-216 vise en quelque sorte à mieux protéger ou à préserver la gestion de l'offre, comme M. Forsyth vient de le dire, mais il n'est pas sans comporter des risques, que M. Forsyth a également indiqués dans sa déclaration préliminaire.
Voici ce qui m'intéresse. Nous avons conclu d'innombrables accords commerciaux sans avoir à vraiment mettre en péril le système de gestion de l'offre et nous avons résisté depuis le tout début —  nous avons tellement d'accords commerciaux qu'il est inutile de le rappeler à ce stade-ci. Pouvons-nous en tirer des exemples concrets susceptibles de nous éclairer sur les conséquences à long terme de la mise en œuvre du projet de loi C-216, sachant que nous perdrons cette marge de manœuvre et que nous limiterons notre équipe de négociateurs dans les efforts qu'ils font pour conclure des accords commerciaux avec les pays de la planète?
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:11
Thank you for the question.
Madam Chair, I will start, and perhaps my colleagues will join in afterwards.
From a trade negotiation perspective, Canada has a long history in negotiating free trade agreements and has been at the forefront of negotiating free trade agreements for the last 25 or 30 years.
I would just note off the top that our supply management system, as you've indicated, has not stopped us or hampered us from concluding any trade agreements, but I think what is certainly possible is that the wording proposed for this bill will give trade negotiating partners pause with respect to wanting to engage with Canada. From a trade negotiator's perspective, when we start a negotiation, we like to start with the full possibility of access in the back of our minds, whether or not that's where we end up. It's rarely the case that you would see 100% access in any free trade agreement, but you like to at least start with that notion in mind.
As you go through a negotiation with your various partners, you find that interests are enunciated, elaborated and narrowed down. You understand what's in the art of the possible, but you like to start as wide as possible when you do launch those negotiations. When you start from a very narrow band of possibilities and then that gets narrowed, the scope of the negotiations and the scope of the agreement is very much smaller than you would have seen otherwise.
If we were to end up with this bill as it is written, I think very much that we would start with a much smaller scope of negotiations with various partners. It wouldn't be unusual for them to say “That's fine. Canada has taken these issues right out of play. We will take issues that are of interest to Canada right out of play.” Then you're talking about negotiating from a smaller pie, as it were.
I'll turn it over to my colleague from AAFC to see if he has anything to add.
Je vous remercie de la question.
Madame la présidente, je vais commencer, et mes collègues se joindront peut-être à moi par la suite.
Dans une perspective de négociation commerciale, le Canada négocie depuis longtemps des accords de libre-échange et il est à l'avant-scène de la négociation d'accords de libre-échange depuis 25 ou 30 ans.
D'entrée de jeu, je vous dirai que notre système de gestion de l'offre, comme vous l'avez indiqué, n'a pas été un empêchement ni un obstacle à la conclusion de nos accords commerciaux, mais je suis d'avis que le libellé proposé dans le projet de loi pourrait certainement faire hésiter les partenaires de négociation commerciale à s'engager avec le Canada. Dans la perspective du négociateur commercial, lorsque nous entamons une négociation, nous aimons commencer avec plein de possibilités d'accès, peu importe où cela pourrait nous mener. Il est rare qu'un accord de libre-échange prévoie un accès à 100 %, mais on veut toujours au moins commencer par cette notion.
Pendant la négociation avec les divers partenaires, on constate que les intérêts sont énoncés, élaborés et rétrécis. On comprend ce qu'il y a dans l'art du possible, mais on aime ouvrir le plus large possible au début de ces négociations. Lorsqu'on part d'une fourchette très étroite de possibilités puis que celle-ci se referme, la portée des négociations et de l'accord devient beaucoup plus restreinte que ce qu'on aurait vu autrement.
Si nous devions adopter ce projet de loi tel quel, je suis bien certain que nous commencerions avec une portée de négociation beaucoup plus restreinte avec divers partenaires. Il ne serait pas inhabituel qu'ils disent: « Ça va. Le Canada a exclu ces questions. Excluons dans des questions qui intéressent le Canada ». Alors là, on parle de négocier à partir d'un plus petit gâteau, pour ainsi dire.
Je vais demander à mon collègue d'Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada s'il a quelque chose à ajouter.
Aaron Fowler
View Aaron Fowler Profile
Aaron Fowler
2021-06-11 13:13
Thank you very much. Thank you, Chair.
I would certainly agree with everything Doug has said so far and associate myself with his response.
I believe the question was whether there are examples of similar measures being imposed by some of our trading partners around the world and what the consequences of those might be. I have to say I am not aware of any legislative prohibition on our trading partners' ability to discuss an issue.
Were such a prohibition in place, I feel that depending on the level of commercial interest that Canada had in the matter that was covered by such a prohibition, we would use the exploratory stage of our trade negotiations to indicate that we see this as an important issue that needs to be discussed in the context of the negotiation.
Free trade agreements are really about changing the legislative and regulatory regime that our trading partners have in place in order to create commercial opportunities for Canadian exporters, so I suspect that were our interests sufficiently significant for us to want to discuss that issue in the negotiations, we would make that clear at the exploratory stage and base our decision on whether to move forward in the negotiations on our partners' indication of their capacity to have discussions in that area.
On the specific question of whether there are examples I could point to, I have to say offhand that I can't think of any similar prohibitions that are in place.
Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.
Je suis certainement d'accord sur tout ce que M. Forsyth vient de dire et m'associe à sa réponse.
Je crois que la question était de savoir si l'on a des exemples de mesures semblables imposées par certains de nos partenaires commerciaux dans le monde et quelles pourraient en être les conséquences. Je ne connais pas de lois qui empêchent nos partenaires commerciaux de discuter d'une question quelconque.
Selon moi, si une telle interdiction existait, selon le niveau d'intérêt commercial que le Canada aurait dans l'affaire visée, nous utiliserions l'étape exploratoire de nos négociations commerciales pour indiquer que nous y voyons un enjeu important à discuter dans le contexte de la négociation.
Les accords de libre-échange visent en fait à modifier le régime législatif et réglementaire de nos partenaires commerciaux afin de créer des débouchés commerciaux pour les exportateurs canadiens. Je soupçonne donc que, si nos intérêts étaient suffisamment importants pour que nous voulions discuter de l'enjeu dans les négociations, nous le ferions savoir clairement à l'étape exploratoire et que nous fonderions notre décision d'aller de l'avant ou pas dans les négociations sur ce que nous diraient nos partenaires de leur capacité de négocier sur ce point.
Pour ce qui est des exemples que je pourrais citer, je dois dire d'emblée que je n'arrive pas à penser à des interdictions semblables ailleurs.
View Ziad Aboultaif Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you.
Merci.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Keep it very short, Mr. Aboultaif.
Soyez très bref, monsieur Aboultaif.
View Ziad Aboultaif Profile
CPC (AB)
Okay.
There are other sectors. We offer a wide variety of products and solutions to the world. What would you see as the reaction of other sectors if something like Bill C-216 went forward? What would you see as the reaction as far as opportunities on the world stage with trade go?
D'accord.
Il y a d'autres secteurs. Nous offrons une vaste variété de produits et de solutions au monde entier. Quelle serait, selon vous, la réaction des autres secteurs si le projet de loi C-216 était adopté? Quelle serait, selon vous, la réaction en ce qui concerne les débouchés commerciaux sur la scène mondiale?
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:15
Do you mean reaction from Canadian stakeholders, or from—
Vous voulez dire la réaction des parties prenantes canadiennes ou de...
View Ziad Aboultaif Profile
CPC (AB)
Yes, I mean Canadian stakeholders.
Oui, je parle des parties prenantes canadiennes.
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:15
Honestly, I think if this did go forward, the reaction we would see would be other groups seeking to have their concerns, their issues, inserted into the departmental act as well.
Honnêtement, je pense que si cela se concrétisait, la réaction serait de réclamer que leurs préoccupations, leurs enjeux, soient inscrites dans la loi habilitante également.
View Ziad Aboultaif Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you.
Merci.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much.
We will move to Ms. Bendayan for six minutes. Go ahead, please.
Merci beaucoup.
Nous allons passer à Mme Bendayan pour six minutes. Allez-y, je vous prie.
View Rachel Bendayan Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you very much, Madam Chair.
I thank the witnesses, of course, but also the members who have joined us today for this important meeting. I particularly thank Mr. Plamondon for introducing this bill.
Before beginning, I would like to stress the importance of the supply management system here in Quebec and everywhere in Canada. It is important not only to our producers, but also to our food security. We must continue to be open to the world and encourage international trade while at the same time protecting this supply management system. I believe we have shown that this was entirely possible.
We have continually renewed that commitment. We upheld it in concrete terms in the new trade agreement with the United Kingdom, which does not grant any additional access, as you know. I have repeatedly said in the House: not one ounce more of cheese will enter the country under that agreement.
Perhaps, since I am addressing you, Mr. Forsyth, I will switch to English.
Mr. Forsyth, could you explain to us whether, in your view, the adoption of this bill is necessary for the government to continue to defend Canada's supply management system?
Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.
Je remercie bien entendu les témoins, mais également les députés qui se sont joints à nous pour cette rencontre importante. Je remercie particulièrement M. Plamondon d'avoir mis en avant ce projet de loi.
Avant de commencer, j'aimerais souligner l'importance du système de gestion de l'offre, ici, au Québec, et partout au Canada. C'est important non seulement pour nos producteurs, mais aussi pour notre sécurité alimentaire. Il faut continuer d'être ouvert sur le monde et de promouvoir le commerce international, tout en protégeant ce système de gestion de l'offre. Je crois que nous avons démontré que c'était tout à fait possible.
Nous avons continuellement renouvelé cet engagement. Nous avons pu le maintenir concrètement dans le cadre du nouvel accord commercial avec le Royaume‑Uni, qui n'accorde aucun accès supplémentaire, comme vous le savez. Je l'ai répété à maintes reprises à la Chambre, pas une once de plus de fromage n'entrera au pays en vertu de cet accord.
Puisque c'est à vous que je m'adresse, monsieur Forsyth, je vais passer à l'anglais.
Monsieur Forsyth, pourriez-vous nous expliquer si, à votre avis, il est nécessaire d'adopter ce projet de loi pour que le gouvernement continue de défendre le système de gestion de l'offre du Canada?
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:17
As I mentioned in my opening statement, since supply management was introduced, which was well over 50 years ago, various governments of various stripes have been very clear about defending the supply management system and ensuring that everyone understands how well it works for producers and farmers all across Canada.
I think the government has done a very good job of promoting and ensuring that all of our trading partners understand what supply management is. It's certainly part and parcel of all trade negotiators' mandates that we understand it well, that our trading partners understand it well, and that throughout the world, whether bilaterally or multilaterally—for example, at the World Trade Organization—it is well known what Canada's policy is.
To answer your question as to whether it would have any effect, I think that, as I said, the policy is well known and well understood, so I am not sure that there would be any.
Comme je l'ai mentionné dans ma déclaration préliminaire, depuis l'instauration de la gestion de l'offre, il y a plus de 50 ans, divers gouvernements de diverses allégeances ont été très clairs sur la nécessité de défendre le système de gestion de l'offre et de faire comprendre à tout le monde comment il fonctionne pour les producteurs et les agriculteurs à l'échelle du Canada.
Je pense que le gouvernement a fait un excellent travail de promotion de la gestion de l'offre et l'a très bien expliqué à tous nos partenaires commerciaux. En tout cas, les négociateurs commerciaux ont toujours pour mandat de veiller à ce que nous la comprenions bien, à ce que nos partenaires commerciaux la comprennent bien, et à bien faire connaître la politique canadienne dans le monde entier, en contexte bilatéral ou multilatéral — par exemple, à l'Organisation mondiale du commerce.
Vous demandez si cela aurait un effet. Je pense que, comme je l'ai dit, la politique est bien connue et bien comprise, de sorte que je ne suis pas sûr que cela aurait un effet.
View Rachel Bendayan Profile
Lib. (QC)
Sir, if I may follow up, I believe you mentioned in your introduction, and I have certainly heard from legal experts within government, that policy objectives are not normally found within the departmental act. This is not the usual instrument to include policy objectives like the one regarding supply management. Can you perhaps give us examples or let us know where these types of important policy objectives should be found, if not in this particular act?
Monsieur, si vous me permettez un commentaire complémentaire, je crois que vous avez mentionné dans votre introduction, et j'ai certainement entendu la même chose de la bouche d'experts juridiques au sein du gouvernement, que la loi habilitante ne fixe habituellement pas d'objectifs de politique. La loi n'est pas l'instrument habituel pour arrêter des objectifs de politique comme celui qui concerne la gestion de l'offre. Pourriez-vous nous donner des exemples ou nous dire où l'on peut trouver d'importants objectifs de ce type, ailleurs que dans ce texte particulier?
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:19
I think that assessment is correct. It would be unusual to find policy-prescriptive issues like this in a departmental act. I'm not aware of any departmental acts that include them.
I think that where we see policy prescriptions like this is in the words enunciated from the government. It's clear that this is a Government of Canada position, a policy position. You find it in speeches. You find it in departmental legislation, for example, at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, and you find it in various places like that. I think it would be unusual to put something like this within the context of the departmental act.
I'll just ask my colleague from Agriculture Canada if he has anything more to add.
Je pense que cette évaluation est juste. Il serait inhabituel de trouver des questions comme celles-là, qui prescrivent une politique, dans une loi habilitante. Je ne connais pas d'autres lois habilitantes qui les incluraient.
Je pense que c'est dans le discours politique du gouvernement que nous voyons des prescriptions de ce genre. Il est clair que c'est une position du gouvernement du Canada, une position stratégique. On la trouve dans les discours. On la trouve dans les documents internes, par exemple, à Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada, et à divers endroits comme cela. Il serait inhabituel d'inscrire ce genre de chose dans le contexte de la loi habilitante.
Je vais demander à mon collègue d'Agriculture Canada s'il a quelque chose à ajouter.
Aaron Fowler
View Aaron Fowler Profile
Aaron Fowler
2021-06-11 13:20
No, I would agree with the answer. I would say that generally this type of policy constraint would be found in the negotiating mandates we receive that inform our engagement with our negotiating partners. I would endorse the answer that Mr. Forsyth provided.
Non, je suis d'accord sur cette réponse. Je dirais qu'en général, ce type de contrainte ferait partie des mandats de négociation que nous recevons et qui guident nos discussions avec nos partenaires de négociation. Je ferais mienne la réponse que M. Forsyth a donnée.
View Rachel Bendayan Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
Just as a quick follow-up, Mr. Forsyth and Mr. Fowler, you referred to a negotiating mandate. Mr. Forsyth, you were at the negotiating table with the United Kingdom. Did you receive a mandate on behalf of our government not to hinder supply management in the negotiations that you undertook with the United Kingdom?
Merci, madame la présidente.
Rapidement donc. Monsieur Forsyth et monsieur Fowler, vous avez parlé d'un mandat de négociation. Monsieur Forsyth, vous avez participé aux négociations avec le Royaume-Uni. Notre gouvernement vous a-t-il donné mandat de ne pas nuire à la gestion de l'offre dans les négociations que vous avez eues avec le Royaume-Uni?
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:21
Yes, absolutely. In fact, the mandate that we received and that we put forward through the Minister of International Trade and that was approved by cabinet included words to the effect that there would be no incremental market access for supply-managed products. Words to that effect apply in every negotiating mandate that I'm aware of when we launch free trade negotiations. They are words to live by, I think—
Oui, absolument. De fait, le mandat que nous avons reçu et poursuivi par l'entremise de la ministre du Commerce international, et que le Cabinet avait approuvé, excluait toute possibilité d'augmentation de l'accès au marché pour les produits soumis à la gestion de l'offre. Ces mots reviennent dans chaque mandat de négociation que je connaisse lorsque nous entamons des négociations de libre-échange. Ils nous servent de guide, je pense...
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much, Mr. Forsyth.
I'm sorry, Mr. Perron; I had not acknowledged you earlier. I'm glad to see that you're joining our committee today.
We'll go on to Monsieur Savard-Tremblay, please.
Merci beaucoup, monsieur Forsyth.
Désolé, monsieur Perron, je ne vous avais pas donné la parole plus tôt. Je suis heureux de vous voir à notre comité aujourd'hui.
Nous allons passer à M. Savard-Tremblay, s'il vous plaît.
View Simon-Pierre Savard-Tremblay Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
Greetings to all the witnesses.
I will yield my speaking time to Mr. Perron for this first round of questions.
Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.
Je salue l'ensemble des témoins.
Je céderai mon temps de parole à M. Perron pour ce premier tour de questions.
View Yves Perron Profile
BQ (QC)
Madam Chair, thank you for your greetings. It is always a pleasure to be with you.
Thanks also to Mr. Savard-Tremblay.
I will address Mr. Forsyth first.
In your opening statement, you acknowledged that this bill was consistent with Canada's long-standing policy and its intention of protecting supply management.
Did I hear you correctly?
Madame la présidente, je vous remercie de vos salutations. C'est toujours un plaisir d'être avec vous.
Je remercie également M. Savard‑Tremblay.
Je m'adresserai d'abord à M. Forsyth.
Dans votre allocution d'ouverture, vous avez reconnu que ce projet de loi était conforme à la politique de longue date du Canada et à ses intentions de protéger la gestion de l'offre.
Vous ai-je bien entendu?
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:23
That's correct.
C'est juste.
View Yves Perron Profile
BQ (QC)
So it is part of a continuing process and is consistent with the intentions expressed orally. I believe this bill puts the election promises into concrete form.
You said that this might carry risks in the negotiations.
Whenever we enter into negotiations with a country for a free trade agreement, is there not always precisely such a risk, given that we need to be vigilant and protect our key sectors?
Il s'inscrit donc dans une continuité et il va dans le sens des intentions émises verbalement. Je considère que ce projet de loi concrétise des promesses électorales.
Vous avez mentionné que cela pourrait représenter un risque dans les négociations.
Chaque fois qu'on entame des négociations avec un pays pour une entente de libre-échange, n'y a-t-il pas toujours un risque, justement, dans la mesure où il faut être vigilant et protéger tous nos secteurs clés?
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:23
Yes, any time we enter into negotiation, we would have both offensive and defensive interests, and on the defensive interests side, it's absolutely about protecting and defending key sectors like, for example, supply-managed sectors.
Oui, chaque fois que nous négocions, nous avons des intérêts offensifs et défensifs. Côté défensif, nos intérêts sont absolument de protéger et de défendre les secteurs clés, par exemple, les secteurs soumis à la gestion de l'offre.
View Yves Perron Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you very much, Mr. Forsyth.
Some opponents of the bill argue that a change would not be prevented, because any act can be amended at a later date. So a government that had its negotiating mandate limited could always come back to Parliament to change it.
Is that correct?
Je vous remercie beaucoup, monsieur Forsyth.
Certains opposants au projet de loi soutiennent qu'un changement ne serait pas empêché parce que toute loi peut être modifiée ultérieurement. Ainsi, un gouvernement qui verrait son mandat de négociation limité pourrait toujours revenir devant le Parlement pour la modifier.
Est-ce exact?
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:24
Thank you for the question.
Yes, that is my understanding. If this bill were enacted, if they wanted to make changes to it, they could do that.
Merci de la question.
Oui, c'est ce que je comprends. Si le projet de loi était adopté et si l'on voulait y apporter des changements, cela pourrait se faire.
View Yves Perron Profile
BQ (QC)
Perfect, thank you.
If I understand correctly, a government that came after and wanted to make concessions would have to assume the political responsibility and have the courage to include it in its mandate and seek the permission of the House first.
So the power is delegated to the members of the House. That is the aspect that I find interesting. I don't think it conflicts with our interests.
There have been several references to the agreement with Great Britain. I would like to point out specifically that the market shares that had been allocated to Europe had also been allocated to Great Britain. It was obvious that we could not have expected new concessions on its part. Unfortunately, the agreement signed with Great Britain is temporary. There is therefore still a risk of fresh demands.
I would like to bring this point to the attention of the committee members, because I think it is important.
You spoke earlier of the negotiating mandates. When a representative of the government participates in negotiations, they have a mandate from the government. Would the law proposed in Bill C-216 not simply be part of the mandate? Would it not impose a limit to prevent the representatives from touching supply management?
Would that not have the same impact?
There seems to be a desire to dramatize the fact that it is a law, but it could simply be set out in the government's instructions. On the other hand, if it is in a law, we are sure it will be there, regardless of what government is in office.
C'est parfait, je vous remercie.
Si je comprends bien, un prochain gouvernement qui voudrait faire des concessions devrait en assumer la responsabilité politique et avoir le courage de l'inclure à son mandat et de demander l'autorisation à la Chambre au préalable.
On délègue donc du pouvoir aux députés de la Chambre. C'est cet aspect que je trouve intéressant. Je ne pense pas que cela soit en contradiction avec nos intérêts.
On a fait référence, à plusieurs reprises, à l'accord avec la Grande‑Bretagne. J'aimerais rappeler que, justement, des parts de marché qui avaient été données à l'Europe l'avaient aussi été à la Grande‑Bretagne. Il était évident qu'il ne fallait pas s'attendre à de nouvelles concessions de sa part. Malheureusement, l'accord conclu avec la Grande‑Bretagne est temporaire. Le risque de nouvelles demandes est donc toujours présent.
J'aimerais soumettre cet élément à l'attention des membres du Comité, car je pense que c'est important.
Vous avez parlé, plus tôt, des mandats de négociation. Quand un représentant du gouvernement participe à une négociation, il a un mandat du gouvernement. La loi proposée dans le projet de loi C‑216 ne ferait-elle pas tout simplement partie du mandat? N'imposerait-elle pas une limite pour empêcher les représentants de toucher à la gestion de l'offre?
Est-ce que cela n'aurait pas le même impact?
On semble vouloir dramatiser le fait que ce soit une loi, mais ce pourrait tout simplement se trouver dans les directives gouvernementales. Par contre, si c'est dans cette loi, on est certain que cela y sera, peu importe le gouvernement qui sera en poste.
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:26
If this bill were enacted, I would not see a need for it to be in the negotiating mandate. I mean, you would probably put it in anyway, but it would be to remind negotiators of what is in the legislation. However, I think it would be clear—
Si ce projet de loi était adopté, je ne verrais pas la nécessité d'inscrire cela dans un mandat de négociation. Cela s'y trouverait probablement de toute façon, mais seulement pour rappeler aux négociateurs ce qui est dans la loi. Par contre, je pense qu'il serait clair...
View Yves Perron Profile
BQ (QC)
You agree with me that it would be more or less equivalent, right?
It is simply defining a future government's negotiating mandate in advance, no matter what party is in power.
Vous convenez avec moi que cela serait un peu l'équivalent, n'est-ce pas?
On définit simplement à l'avance le mandat de négociation d'un futur gouvernement, peu importe le parti au pouvoir.
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:26
I think all governments of the day, as I mentioned in my earlier answer, have supported supply management since its inception. It has been part and parcel of Canada's trade negotiations and Canada's agriculture policy. I don't think that's anything new.
Tous les gouvernements, comme je l'ai mentionné tantôt, ont toujours appuyé la gestion de l'offre depuis le début. La gestion de l'offre est partie intégrante des négociations commerciales du Canada et de la politique agricole du Canada. Il n'y a rien de nouveau de ce côté-là.
View Yves Perron Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you. I will move on to my next question.
You say that all governments have expressed their support for supply management. That's true, but in the recent agreements, all governments, regardless of stripe, have made concessions, except in the case of the agreement with Great Britain, obviously, that we spoke about earlier.
So the goal of this bill is to cement that.
Someone cited the danger that other groups will be asking to have their interests entrenched in law. Is that not a slight exaggeration? We know that the other groups are not governed by supply management.
It must be understood that if we grant more concessions, then at some point, the supply management system will no longer be able to function. In order for a supply management system to function, supply has to be controlled. That is the very foundation of the system.
I would like to hear your thoughts on that subject.
I am putting the question to Mr. Fowler from the Department of Agriculture.
Je vous remercie. Je passe à ma question suivante.
Vous dites que tous les gouvernements ont manifesté leur soutien à la gestion de l'offre. C'est vrai, mais, dans les derniers accords, tous les gouvernements ont fait des concessions, peu importe leur couleur, sauf dans le cas de l'accord avec la Grande-Bretagne, évidemment, dont on a parlé plus tôt.
Ce projet de loi a donc pour but de cimenter cela.
Quelqu'un a évoqué le danger que d'autres groupes viennent demander que leurs intérêts soient inscrits dans la loi. Est-ce qu'il n'y a pas là un peu d'exagération? Nous savons que les autres groupes ne sont pas régis par la gestion de l'offre.
Il faut comprendre que si l'on augmente les concessions, le système de gestion de l'offre ne pourra plus fonctionner à un moment donné. Pour qu'un système de gestion de l'offre fonctionne, il faut que l’on contrôle l'offre. C'est le fondement même du système.
J'aimerais vous entendre à ce sujet.
Je pose la question à M. Fowler, du ministère de l'Agriculture.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Fowler, could we could get a somewhat short answer?
Monsieur Fowler, pourriez-vous nous répondre très brièvement?
Aaron Fowler
View Aaron Fowler Profile
Aaron Fowler
2021-06-11 13:28
I will endeavour to do so, Chair.
It is true that supply management rests upon three legs. One is on import controls, because we need to know the volume of product that's entering the country in these sectors in order for us to do the domestic administration and allocation of the system to ensure it continues to operate. It is important that we preserve import controls to ensure the smooth functioning of supply management.
I would say, though, similarly—
Je vais essayer, madame la présidente.
Il est vrai que la gestion de l'offre repose sur trois piliers. Le premier est le contrôle des importations, car nous devons savoir quel est le volume de produits entrant chez nous dans ces secteurs afin de gérer le système pour en assurer le bon fonctionnement. Il est important de préserver le contrôle des importations pour assurer le fonctionnement harmonieux de la gestion de l'offre.
Je dirais, toutefois, que c'est la même chose...
View Yves Perron Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you very much.
Je vous remercie beaucoup.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Fowler.
We will go on to Mr. Blaikie for six minutes, please.
Je vous remercie, monsieur Fowler.
C'est maintenant à vous, monsieur Blaikie, vous avez six minutes.
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
NDP (MB)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
I suppose I might start by expressing some sympathy for Mr. Forsyth, who has been sent here to defend the government's right to ultimately betray supply-managed producers in trade negotiations on what I think are frankly some specious grounds.
I don't think the bill was presented in ignorance of the fact that Canada's trade negotiating teams receive mandates from cabinet, but one has to wonder—and perhaps you could answer for the committee—whether the negotiating mandates for either CETA, the CPTPP or CUSMA included a prohibition on conceding market access in supply-managed sectors.
Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.
Je suppose que je pourrais d'abord exprimer ma sympathie à l'endroit de M. Forsyth qui a été envoyé ici pour défendre le droit du gouvernement d'avoir trahi les producteurs sous gestion de l'offre à la fin des négociations commerciales pour des motifs que je trouve franchement fallacieux.
Je ne pense pas que le projet de loi ait été présenté dans l'ignorance du fait que les équipes de négociation des accords commerciaux pour le Canada reçoivent leurs mandats du Cabinet, mais on peut se demander — et vous pourrez sans doute nous donner une réponse — si les mandats des équipes qui ont négocié l'AECG, le PTPGP ou l'ACEUM leur interdisaient de concéder l'accès au marché dans les secteurs sous gestion de l'offre.
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:29
Thank you for the question. Maybe I can answer it in a more general way, given that the mandates are for cabinet purposes.
I think it's very clear that each trade negotiator understands well his or her mandate. Whether it was under the CETA or CPTPP or CUSMA, that's where we started from. As I mentioned in my opening remarks, it was deemed necessary to reach agreement on those three key trade agreements, and those decisions were not made lightly. Those decisions were not made by just the chief trade negotiator at the time; they were done in close consultation with the government of the day, including the minister and beyond. Those were important decisions. They were made in the economic interest of Canada, and they were not made lightly.
Je vous remercie de votre question. Je vais vous répondre de manière générale, puisque les mandats relèvent du Cabinet.
Il est très clair, selon moi, que tous les négociateurs commerciaux connaissent bien leur mandat. Nous sommes partis de ce principe, que ce soit pour l'AECG, le PTPGP ou l'ACEUM. Comme je l'ai dit dans mon allocution préliminaire, il a été jugé nécessaire de trouver un terrain d'entente sur ces trois importants accords commerciaux et ces décisions n'ont pas été prises à la légère. Elles n'ont pas été prises seulement par le négociateur en chef de l'époque, mais en étroite consultation avec le gouvernement au pouvoir, notamment le ministre et les autres intervenants. Ces importantes décisions ont été prises dans l'intérêt économique du Canada, au terme d'une mûre réflexion.
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
NDP (MB)
That's fair enough, although I think that the concern of supply-managed producers has less to do with the feelings of government decision-makers in respect of their decision to betray them and more to do with the substantive consequences for their industry.
On that point, those three agreements were clearly failures to protect the supply-managed sector in a way that the government has indicated it would like to or that it would. It seems to me that there is a stark difference between legislation that takes making those concessions out of the purview of government and a mandate that restricts the government but that the government can change from day to day.
In your opening remarks, you said that Parliament has the ultimate say because it can pass or decline to pass the legislation that enacts these agreements, but I think you also know—and you can correct me if I'm wrong—that by the time enabling legislation comes to Parliament, the deal is already signed. If Parliament declined to pass enabling legislation for those agreements, Canada at that point would be in default of very serious international commitments already made on behalf of Canada by the government. Is that not true?
Très bien, mais je pense que l'intérêt des producteurs sous gestion de l'offre n'a pas tellement à voir avec les sentiments des décideurs gouvernementaux qui ont pris la décision de les trahir, mais davantage avec les conséquences importantes qui en découlent pour leur secteur.
À cet égard, il est clair que ces trois accords ont échoué à protéger le secteur sous gestion de l'offre, contrairement à ce que le gouvernement l'avait indiqué ou souhaité. Il me semble y avoir une différence marquée entre une loi qui retire au gouvernement le pouvoir de faire ces concessions et un mandat qui restreint le gouvernement, mais que ce dernier peut modifier à sa guise.
Dans votre allocution préliminaire, vous avez aussi dit que c'est le Parlement qui a le dernier mot, en ce sens qu'il peut adopter ou rejeter les lois de mise en œuvre de ces accords. Cependant, vous savez aussi — et corrigez-moi si je fais erreur — que l'accord est signé avant le dépôt au Parlement de la loi qui le met en oeuvre. Si le Parlement refusait d'adopter une loi de mise en oeuvre d'un accord, le gouvernement du Canada se retrouverait alors à ne pas respecter les très sérieux engagements internationaux qui ont été pris en son nom. N'est-ce pas exact?
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:32
I would say it's mostly true, but I think it is Parliament that votes on the final text, and if Parliament deemed it necessary to make those changes, we would have to return to the negotiating table based on that, absolutely.
Je dirais que c'est presque exact, mais je pense que c'est le Parlement qui se prononce sur le texte final; s'il jugeait nécessaire d'y apporter des changements, nous devrions alors retourner à la table des négociations pour cette raison, c'est vrai.
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
NDP (MB)
But to be clear, typically Parliament doesn't actually get to vote on the text of the agreement except in appendices to the enabling legislation, perhaps, and Parliament can't actually alter the wording of those agreements. It can change the wording of the enabling legislation, but it can't in fact alter the wording of the agreements. Is that not true?
Pour que ce soit bien clair, le Parlement ne se prononce généralement pas sur le texte de l'accord, sauf, peut-être, dans les annexes de la loi de mise en œuvre. Le Parlement ne peut pas modifier le texte de ces accords. Il peut changer le texte de la loi de mise en œuvre d'un accord, mais il ne peut modifier le texte des accords. Est-ce exact?
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:32
That is true. That's correct.
C'est vrai. C'est exact.
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
NDP (MB)
I think there's a bit of a deception in saying that Parliament has the final say when the agreement has already been signed, sealed and delivered. What Parliament is studying and making decisions about is how to enact that agreement within Canadian law, not whether to enact that agreement within Canadian law. That is why I began my remarks by expressing some sympathy for your having to be the ambassador of those arguments, because I don't think they really hit the nail on the head, frankly.
I think what we have here is a dispute. While I always appreciate the kind of information that officials can provide in the context of a debate, what we have here is actually a political debate. It is first and foremost about the role of supply-managed industry within Canada and the extent to which there is and ought to be political will to properly defend it within trade agreements, notwithstanding what appears from time to time in the mandate that can be changed by a particular government.
We also have a debate—I think a good one and an appropriate one, but not one that can be solved by technical expertise—about the role of the legislature in determining what kinds of international commitments Canada is going to undertake in respect of trade. This bill promotes a view that would have the legislature take a far more active role in determining what governments can and cannot do within a trade negotiation.
I've been clear many times before that this is something I support, so I don't agree with so-called principled objections to the legislature weighing in on these things. I think the treatment of the supply-managed sector in the last number of trade agreements—I'm thinking particularly of the three I mentioned earlier—shows there is a need for the legislature to get more involved, because we clearly can't trust the word of government, even when it has said that this is a priority for them. Even on the Canada-U.K. trade deal, we can talk about how there was no market access ceded under that agreement, but that's because there continues to be temporary market access for U.K. cheese makers under existing agreements. That's going to expire. In fact, the expiration of those agreements and the U.K.'s desire for Canadian market share has been cited by the government as a reason that the U.K. would be interested in coming to the table to negotiate a future agreement, so—
Je pense qu'il est un peu trompeur de dire que le Parlement a le dernier mot alors que l'accord a déjà été signé, scellé et livré. Ce que le Parlement examine et ce sur quoi il se prononce, c'est la manière de mettre en œuvre l'accord dans les lois canadiennes, et s'il sera, oui ou non, mis en œuvre. C'est pourquoi j'ai commencé mon intervention en vous exprimant ma sympathie d'avoir la tâche de nous présenter ces arguments, parce que je crois honnêtement qu'ils ratent la cible.
Je pense qu'il s'agit d'un différend. J'apprécie toujours que les fonctionnaires nous donnent des renseignements de cette nature dans le cadre d'un débat, mais nous sommes engagés ici dans un débat politique. Il porte d'abord et avant tout sur le rôle du secteur canadien sous gestion de l'offre et la volonté politique qui existe ou devrait exister pour défendre ce secteur dans le cadre des accords commerciaux, nonobstant ce qui est énoncé dans le mandat qui risque d'être modifié par un futur gouvernement.
Nous avons aussi un débat — je pense qu'il s'agit d'un débat sain et pertinent, mais qui ne peut se régler par l'expertise technique — au sujet du rôle du Parlement dans la détermination des engagements internationaux le Canada va prendre en matière de commerce. En vertu de ce projet de loi, le Parlement jouerait un rôle beaucoup plus actif pour déterminer ce que les gouvernements peuvent et ne peuvent pas faire dans le cadre d'une négociation commerciale.
J'ai déjà souvent fait savoir que je suis en faveur de cela. Je ne suis donc pas d'accord avec les soi-disant objections de principe concernant le rôle que pourrait jouer le Parlement à cet égard. Je pense que le traitement réservé au secteur assujetti à la gestion de l'offre dans les derniers accords commerciaux — en particulier dans les trois que je viens de mentionner — démontre qu'il est nécessaire que le Parlement intervienne davantage parce que nous ne pouvons manifestement pas nous fier à la parole du gouvernement, même lorsqu'il dit que c'est une priorité pour lui. Même dans le cadre de l'accord commercial entre le Canada et le Royaume-Uni, nous ne pouvons pas vraiment parler d'un accès au marché, mais c'est parce que les producteurs de fromage du Royaume-Uni continuent d'avoir un accès temporaire en vertu d'accords en vigueur. Ces accords vont bientôt prendre fin. En fait, l'expiration de ces accords et le souhait du Royaume-Uni d'obtenir une part du marché canadien sont les raisons invoquées par le gouvernement pour expliquer que le Royaume-Uni serait intéressé à venir à la table pour négocier un accord futur, alors...
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much, Mr. Blaikie. I'm sorry to cut you off, but your time is up.
We have Mr. Berthold for five minutes, please.
Merci beaucoup, monsieur Blaikie. Je suis désolée de vous interrompre, mais votre temps est écoulé.
Monsieur Berthold, vous avez cinq minutes. Allez-y.
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
Thank you very much, Madam Chair.
I am very grateful to the people from the departments for being with us today.
Mr. Forsyth, you said just now that the mandates assigned to the negotiators concerning the protection of supply management are reflected well in the intent of Bill C-216.
Can you explain what happened in the case of the Canada—United States—Mexico Agreement, CUSMA, not just so that we would concede another market to the Americans, but also so that we would permit them to limit Canadian exports, in particular for powdered milk?
How is it that at some point, despite those intentions on the government's part, the negotiating teams go even further than concessions that are not provided in BillC-216, as we have it before us today?
Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.
Je remercie grandement les gens des ministères d'être avec nous, aujourd'hui.
Monsieur Forsyth, vous avez mentionné tout à l'heure que l'intention du projet de loi C‑216 reflétait bien les mandats qui ont été confiés aux négociateurs concernant la protection de la gestion de l'offre.
Pouvez-vous nous expliquer ce qui s'est passé dans le cas de l'Accord Canada—États‑Unis—Mexique, soit l'ACEUM, non seulement pour que nous concédions un marché additionnel aux Américains, mais aussi pour que nous leur permettions de limiter les exportations canadiennes, notamment celles de lait en poudre?
Qu'est-ce qui fait que, à un moment donné, malgré ces intentions gouvernementales, les équipes de négociation vont même plus loin que des concessions qui ne sont pas prévues dans le projet de loi C‑216, comme nous l'avons devant nous aujourd'hui?
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:36
Maybe I can start and then turn to my colleague from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.
As I mentioned in my remarks, the intent of the bill is consistent with the long-standing Government of Canada policy to defend the integrity of the system. As I mentioned in my previous answer, whether it was with respect to the CUSMA negotiations, the TPP negotiations, the CPTPP negotiations or the CETA negotiations, it was deemed necessary by the government of the day to provide some concessions to our various trading partners in order to finalize each free trade agreement. It was not—
Je vais répondre en premier et je céderai ensuite la place à mon collègue d'Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada.
Comme je l'ai mentionné dans mes observations, l'intention du projet de loi est conforme à la politique de longue date du gouvernement de défendre l'intégrité du système. En réponse à la question précédente, j'ai expliqué que le gouvernement de l'époque avait jugé nécessaire de faire quelques concessions à nos divers partenaires commerciaux afin de finaliser chaque accord de libre-échange, qu'il s'agisse de l'ACEUM, du PTP ou de l'AECG. Ce n'était pas...
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
Excuse me for interrupting you, Mr. Forsyth.
What happened for those concessions to have been made at the last minute? We have seen that this was done at the very end. Did we not draw attention to supply management by saying at the outset that there would be no concessions? Is that not one of the points on which Canada had to give in, at the very end of the negotiations?
Pardonnez-moi de vous interrompre, monsieur Forsyth.
Qu'est-ce qui s'est passé pour que ces concessions aient été accordées à la dernière minute? Nous avons vu que cela s'est fait à la toute fin. N'avons-nous pas attiré l'attention sur la gestion de l'offre en mentionnant, d'entrée de jeu, qu'il n'y aurait pas de concessions? N'est-ce pas un des éléments sur lesquels le Canada a été obligé de céder, à la toute fin des négociations?
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:37
Thank you for the clarification.
In any negotiation, whether it's a trade negotiation or anything, the tough issues are really left until the very end. Nobody wants to concede any of the difficult issues up front, because your trading partner will just continue to ask for more. It was at the very end that these issues did get decided under the CUSMA. Again, those decisions were not taken lightly at all.
Maybe I'll turn to my colleague from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada to follow up on that.
Merci pour cette précision.
Dans toute négociation, que ce soit pour un accord commercial ou autre, les points sensibles sont vraiment abordés à la toute fin. Personne ne veut faire de concessions sur les points sensibles dès le début, parce que le partenaire commercial en profiterait pour en demander toujours plus. Dans le cadre des négociations de l'ACEUM, c'est à la toute fin que ces questions ont été tranchées. Je le répète, ces décisions n'ont pas été prises à la légère.
Je vais maintenant demander à mon collègue d'Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada de pousuivre.
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Fowler, to continue in the same vein, when we decide to make concessions like that one at the last minute, there are major repercussions for a sector. This was a sector that the Americans had targeted.
When we decide to protect a sector, if we keep our position like a card up our sleeve, are we not running less risk of having to give in at the end?
Monsieur Fowler, pour continuer dans la même veine, quand nous décidons de faire des concessions comme celle-là à la dernière minute, il y a des répercussions importantes pour un secteur. Il s'agissait donc d'un secteur que les Américains avaient ciblé.
Quand nous décidons de protéger un secteur, si nous gardons notre position comme une carte dans notre manche, ne courons-nous pas moins de risques de devoir céder à la fin?
Aaron Fowler
View Aaron Fowler Profile
Aaron Fowler
2021-06-11 13:38
First of all, I agree that difficult issues are often, if not always, resolved at the end of the trade negotiation. While this issue was resolved at the end of the trade negotiations, the plan management and access in particular on dairy was a feature of the negotiations throughout. The position of the United States, until well into September 2018, was that Canada should take on commitments that would have resulted in the eventual dismantlement of the supply management system in Canada. We did not accept the commitments that the United States wanted us to make. The provisions that applied to dairy that were in the CUSMA at the end were provisions that Canada's negotiators and government felt were warranted in light of the overall benefits and balance of the agreement and what it offered to the Canadian economy.
While it may have appeared to be late in the game, I assure you that the supply management sector and their representatives met with us daily in Washington as well as virtually. I would be surprised if the outcome of those negotiations, albeit late in the negotiating process, came as a huge surprise to those industries.
Premièrement, je confirme que les points sensibles sont souvent, voire toujours, abordés à la fin des négociations commerciales. Le point que vous évoquez a été tranché à la fin des négociations, mais les questions relatives à la gestion du plan et à l'accès aux produits laitiers, en particulier, ont été à l'ordre du jour tout au long des négociations. Jusqu'en septembre 2018, les États-Unis voulaient que le Canada prenne des engagements qui auraient éventuellement eu pour effet de démanteler le système canadien de gestion de l'offre. Nous avons refusé de prendre les engagements que les Américains nous demandaient de prendre. Les dispositions applicables aux produits laitiers qui ont été intégrées à l'ACEUM à la toute fin étaient celles que les négociateurs et le gouvernement du Canada estimaient justifiées, compte tenu des avantages globaux et de l'équilibre de l'accord et de ce qu'elles apportaient à l'économie canadienne.
Même si cette décision peut sembler avoir été prise tard dans le processus, je vous assure que nous avons eu des discussions tous les jours avec le secteur de la gestion de l'offre et avec ses représentants à Washington et aussi en ligne. Je serais étonné d'apprendre que le résultat de ces négociations, même si la décision a été prise tardivement, ait été une grande surprise pour ces entreprises.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much, Mr. Berthold.
Mr. Dhaliwal, you have five minutes.
Merci beaucoup, monsieur Berthold.
Monsieur Dhaliwal, vous avez cinq minutes.
View Sukh Dhaliwal Profile
Lib. (BC)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
Madam Chair, I would like to welcome all the presenters and my dear friends and colleagues. In particular, I know I missed saying my good morning from beautiful British Columbia to Christine, our clerk.
Madam Chair, contrary to what my dear friend Mr. Blaikie said—that Mr. Forsyth is here to defend the government—it's my understanding that he's here to provide professional non-partisan advice to the committee members on this particular act, which is Bill C-216.
My question is for Mr. Forsyth. He mentioned numerous times that there are some risks involved. One of them, he mentioned, is a narrow outcome. I would like to ask him to explain or elaborate on those risks and the potential impacts.
Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.
Madame la présidente, je souhaite la bienvenue à tous les témoins ainsi qu'à mes chers amis et collègues, en particulier à notre greffière Christine Lafrance, que je n'ai pas eu l'occasion de saluer ce matin de ma magnifique province de la Colombie-Britannique.
Madame la présidente, contrairement à ce qu'a dit mon bon ami M. Blaikie — soit que M. Forsyth est ici pour défendre le gouvernement —, je pense plutôt qu'il est ici pour donner des avis professionnels et non partisans aux membres du Comité sur le projet de loi C-216.
Ma question est pour M. Forsyth. Il a répété à maintes reprises qu'il y avait des risques. L'un de ces risques, a-t-il dit, est d'en arriver à un résultat à portée restreinte. J'aimerais qu'il nous explique plus en détail ces risques et les conséquences potentielles?
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:41
I'd be happy to elaborate on some of those risks and what would happen in a trade negotiation if one were to be negotiating with not the full basket of items on the table. I highlighted it in one of my earlier answers, but I'm happy to flag it again.
I think that as a trade negotiator you like to start the negotiation with as many items on the table as possible. It does potentially allow for trade-offs and allows for a broad discussion with your trading partner in order to understand what is within in the art of the possible.
It is incumbent on us as trade negotiators to make sure that our trading partners understand our key defensive interests and what our red lines are and what things we cannot do. As I've said, throughout my negotiating career, it's been clear that concessions made in the supply management sector are red lines. That is what was in my mandate for the Canada-UK TCA and that was what was respected.
If we were to start from the position that we would not be dealing with 100% of the items that we would negotiate on, it does risk having an agreement that's not necessarily completely beneficial to Canadian exporters and producers and it does risk being an agreement that does not necessarily provide the full economic benefits to Canada that one might have expected.
We have not faced that yet to date, but it is possible that if we were to go down the path provided in Bill C-216, that is in fact what we would do. It would be quite likely that our trading partners would take off the table something of interest to Canadian exporters and producers, and then we would be faced with the situation of negotiating an agreement that might not be as beneficial to Canada as it could be.
Maybe I'll turn to my colleague from Agriculture Canada to see if he'd like to add anything.
Avec plaisir. Je vais vous expliquer plus en détail certains de ces risques et ce qui pourrait arriver si les négociations commerciales se déroulaient sans que tous les points aient été mis sur la table. J'en ai déjà parlé dans une réponse précédente, mais je suis heureux de revenir là-dessus.
Je pense que tout négociateur souhaite commencer la négociation avec le plus de points possible sur la table. Cela permet de faire des compromis et d'élargir la discussion avec son vis-à-vis afin de comprendre tout ce qui est possible de faire.
Il nous revient, en tant que négociateurs commerciaux, de nous assurer que nos partenaires comprennent quels sont les intérêts que nous défendons, où sont nos lignes rouges et ce que nous ne pouvons pas faire. Comme je l'ai dit, tout au long de ma carrière de négociateur, il a toujours été clair que les concessions faites dans le secteur de la gestion de l'offre étaient des lignes rouges. Cela faisait partie de mon mandat pour l'Accord de continuité commerciale Canada-Royaume-Uni et cela a été respecté.
Si nous commençions avec l'idée que les points sur lesquels nous devons négocier ne seront pas abordés en totalité, nous risquerions d'en arriver à un accord qui ne serait pas forcément avantageux pour les exportateurs et les producteurs canadiens. Cela pose le risque que l'accord n'offre pas au Canada tous les avantages économiques auxquels on pourrait s'attendre.
À ce jour, nous ne nous sommes jamais retrouvés dans cette situation, mais cela pourrait arriver si nous suivons la voie proposée dans le projet de loi C-216. C'est en fait ce qui se produirait. Il est fort probable que nos partenaires commerciaux retireraient de la table un point d'intérêt pour les exportateurs et les producteurs canadiens; nous nous retrouverions alors en train de négocier un accord susceptible de ne pas être aussi avantageux pour le Canada qu'il pourrait l'être.
Je vais demander à mon collègue d'Agriculture Canada s'il veut ajouter quelque chose.
Aaron Fowler
View Aaron Fowler Profile
Aaron Fowler
2021-06-11 13:43
Thank you very much.
No, I fully agree [Technical difficulty—Editor] trade negotiation has reached what we call a balance of commitments or a balance of concessions or a commensurate level of ambition with your trading partner. To the extent there are issues that are of interest [Technical difficulty—Editor] that we're not in a position to discuss, the reasonable conclusion would be that the overall level of ambition of the agreement would necessarily be diminished as a result of that position.
Merci beaucoup.
Non, je suis tout à fait d'accord [Difficultés techniques] que les négociations commerciales ont atteint ce que nous appelons un équilibre des engagements ou des concessions, ou encore un niveau d'ambition égal entre les partenaires commerciaux. Dans la mesure où il y a des points d'intérêt [Difficultés techniques] que nous ne sommes pas en mesure de discuter, la conclusion raisonnable serait que le niveau global d'ambition de l'accord en serait forcément réduit.
View Sukh Dhaliwal Profile
Lib. (BC)
Madam Chair, it's also mentioned that in introducing specific policy objectives, the proposed amendments wouldn't fundamentally change the nature of the departmental act. I would like to hear an elaboration on that particular issue as well, please.
Madame la présidente, on a également dit que la formulation d'objectifs politiques particuliers ne permettrait pas que les amendements proposés changent vraiment le fond de la loi ministérielle. J'aimerais en savoir plus sur cette question également.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Could we have a brief answer, please?
Pouvez-vous répondre brièvement, s'il vous plaît?
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:44
Sure. Thank you, Madam Chair.
If you look at the act itself, it really does set out.... It is an organizational statute that sets out in general terms what the powers and duties and functions are for the ministers. It does not have any specific policies related to what the Minister of International Trade, the Minister of International Development or the Minister of Foreign Affairs ought to be doing. It doesn't elaborate on any government policies of the day. It's a general act that sets out the terms and conditions, if you will, for the department and for the ministers and the deputy ministers. It's not policy—
Bien sûr. Merci, madame la présidente.
Si vous examinez la loi, vous constaterez qu'elle énonce... Il s'agit d'une loi organisationnelle qui énonce, en termes généraux, les pouvoirs, les obligations et les fonctions des ministres. Elle n'énonce aucune politique particulière quant au rôle précis du ministre du Commerce international, du ministre du Développement international ou du ministre des Affaires étrangères. Elle n'énonce aucune politique du gouvernement en place. Il s'agit d'une loi de nature générale qui énonce les attributions du ministère, des ministres et des sous-ministres. Elle n'est pas de nature politique...
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Forsyth.
Mr. Savard-Tremblay, you have two and a half minutes.
Je vous remercie, monsieur Forsyth.
Monsieur Savard-Tremblay, vous avez deux minutes et demie.
View Simon-Pierre Savard-Tremblay Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
We know that in the United States, Congress can give a mandate, because it has authority over treaties. It is in the constitution. In Europe, also, it is the parliament that gives the mandates. Here, this is the Crown's responsibility, so it is the government that gives the mandates, as was observed earlier. This is a fair bit less democratic and less transparent.
In the United States, despite the constitution and the fact that Congress gives the mandates before the negotiations, some sectors are nonetheless protected by various laws, such as the maritime sector, government procurement and sugar. There are laws that prohibit touching those sectors in the negotiations.
You have had an opportunity to negotiate with the United States in recent years. My question is very simple. Around the table, did you feel that you had in front of you negotiating partners who were weakened, who had lost their bargaining power, and were condemned to lose in advance?
Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.
Nous savons que, aux États‑Unis, le Congrès peut donner un mandat puisque c'est de lui que relèvent les traités. C'est dans la Constitution. En Europe aussi, c'est le Parlement qui donne les mandats. Ici, cela appartient à la Couronne, donc c'est le gouvernement qui donne les mandats, comme cela a été dit plus tôt. Déjà, c'est pas mal moins démocratique et moins transparent.
Aux États‑Unis, malgré la Constitution et le fait que le Congrès donne les mandats avant les négociations, plusieurs secteurs sont tout de même protégés par plusieurs lois, comme le secteur maritime, les achats gouvernementaux et le sucre. Des lois interdisent de toucher à ces secteurs dans les négociations.
Vous avez eu l'occasion de négocier avec les États‑Unis, ces dernières années. Ma question est très simple. Autour de la table, sentiez-vous que vous aviez devant vous des partenaires de négociations affaiblis, ayant un rapport de force ruiné, condamnés à l'avance à être les perdants?
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:46
Madam Chair, maybe I'll start and then pass it over to my colleague from Agriculture Canada.
Canada and the United States have different systems by which we get our mandate out and they get their mandate out. I would just note off the top, in terms of Canada vis-à-vis the United States, how the review and oversight of the trade agreements takes place before they are launched. I did note them in my remarks, but I'm happy to highlight them once again.
There is the updated policy on tabling of treaties in Parliament, which includes 90 days in advance of the negotiations of a notice of intent to enter—
Madame la présidente, je vais commencer et je laisserai ensuite la parole à mon collègue d'Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada.
Le Canada et les États-Unis ont des systèmes différents qui définissent nos mandats respectifs. Je tiens d'abord à souligner que, tant au Canada qu'aux États-Unis, un processus d'examen et de surveillance des accords commerciaux a lieu avant leur mise en oeuvre. Je l'ai mentionné dans mes remarques, mais je suis heureux de les expliquer à nouveau.
La politique à jour sur le dépôt des traités devant le Parlement prévoit que, 90 jours avant le début des négociations, un avis d'intention d'entamer...
View Simon-Pierre Savard-Tremblay Profile
BQ (QC)
Excuse me, but I would like to clarify my question.
It we leave aside the different procedures for assigning negotiating mandates, did the fact that the American laws rule out certain sectors give you an advantage? Did you think that this was perfect, that you were going to have perfect losers in front of you, that you were going to take jump at the opportunity?
Pardonnez-moi, mais je vais quand même préciser ma question.
Si l'on fait abstraction des procédures différentes pour octroyer les mandats de négociation, le fait que des lois américaines excluent certains secteurs vous donnait-il un avantage? Considériez-vous que c'était parfait, que vous alliez avoir devant vous de parfaits perdants, que vous alliez sauter sur l'occasion?
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
I'm sorry; we need a very brief answer, Mr. Forsyth.
Je suis désolée, vous devez répondre très brièvement, monsieur Forsyth.
Doug Forsyth
View Doug Forsyth Profile
Doug Forsyth
2021-06-11 13:47
Maybe I'll turn to my colleague from Agriculture Canada for that answer.
Je vais demander à mon collègue d'Agriculture Canada de répondre à cette question.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Maybe we better—
Il serait peut-être préférable de...
Aaron Fowler
View Aaron Fowler Profile
Aaron Fowler
2021-06-11 13:48
I apologize, Chair; I'm not sure that I have a lot to add.
I think every country has its own internal processes that allow for consultation between legislatures, governments and negotiators at the table. I'm not sure I understood the question as to whether the U.S. system is better or different from ours.
Je suis désolé, madame la présidente; ce ne sera pas très long.
Chaque pays a ses propres processus internes qui prévoient une consultation entre les législatures, les gouvernements et les négociateurs. Je ne suis pas certain d'avoir bien compris si le député me demande si le système américain est meilleur ou différent du nôtre.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much.
We will go on to Mr. Blaikie for two and a half minutes, please.
Merci beaucoup.
Nous entendrons maintenant M. Blaikie. Vous avez deux minutes et demie.
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
NDP (MB)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
As I said earlier, I think the issues in the legislation are pretty clear-cut. It seems to me that committee members have a pretty good sense of where they're at on that.
Madam Speaker, I would simply move that we consider the bill to have passed clause-by-clause consideration and report it back to the House unamended so that the debate can continue on the floor of the House of Commons and the bill can make some more progress in the life of this Parliament.
Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.
Comme je l'ai dit tout à l'heure, le projet de loi est suffisamment clair. Je pense que les membres ont une bonne idée de quoi il en retourne.
Madame la présidente, je propose simplement que nous considérions que le projet de loi est réputé avoir fait l'objet d'un examen article par article et que le Comité en fasse rapport à la Chambre, sans amendement, afin que le débat se poursuive à la Chambre des communes et que le projet de loi puisse franchir les étapes suivantes au cours de la présente législature.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Blaikie, we have our officials here today, and that's the plan for today's meeting. On Monday we will deal with clause-by-clause study. That's the current plan. I suggest we continue with that.
There are members who still have questions and concerns that they have indicated they want answered.
Monsieur Blaikie, les fonctionnaires sont ici aujourd'hui, c'est ce qui était prévu pour la réunion d'aujourd'hui. Lundi, nous entamerons notre examen article par article. C'est le plan. Je propose que nous nous en tenions à ça.
Certains membres ont encore des questions à poser et des préoccupations à exprimer et souhaitent avoir des réponses.
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
NDP (MB)
I hear that, Madam Chair, but I'm moving the motion nevertheless. I think it would be a nice way to move on and perhaps use our time in other ways on Monday.
I'm satisfied that from the technical point of view, all the questions have been answered. I think it's really just a matter of committee members deciding whether they think the bill should proceed back to the House or not.
Je le sais, madame la présidente, mais je propose quand même la motion. Je pense que c'est une bonne façon d'avancer et peut-être de consacrer notre temps à autre chose lundi.
Je pense que du point de vue technique, nous avons eu des réponses à toutes nos questions. Les membres du Comité n'ont plus qu'à décider si le projet de loi doit être renvoyé à la Chambre ou non.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
If you're moving it in the form of a motion, with your time, Mr. Blaikie, would you make it clear?
Let me turn the clock off. Would you make it clear as to what you're suggesting? Then, we'll have to go....
Madam Clerk, is Mr. Blaikie's motion in order?
C'est ce que vous proposez sous forme de motion, monsieur Blaikie? Pouvez-vous le dire clairement?
Permettez-moi d'arrêter le chronomètre. Pouvez-vous dire clairement ce que vous proposez? Ensuite, nous devrons...
Madame la greffière, la motion de M. Blaikie est-elle recevable?
Christine Lafrance
View Christine Lafrance Profile
Christine Lafrance
2021-06-11 13:50
Madam Chair, I think so, but I would appreciate it if he could repeat it very clearly.
Madame la présidente, je pense que oui, mais j'aimerais qu'il la répète très clairement.
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
NDP (MB)
Sure. I move “that the bill be deemed to have passed clause-by-clause and be reported back to the House without amendment.
Bien sûr. Je propose « que le projet de loi soit réputé avoir été adopté article par article et qu'il soit renvoyé à la Chambre sans amendement. »
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
All right. Thank you very much, Mr. Blaikie.
Go ahead, Ms. Gray.
Très bien. Merci beaucoup, monsieur Blaikie.
Allez-y, madame Gray.
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
Based on what was brought forth by Mr. Savard-Tremblay, we agreed, as a committee, what the timeline was going to be. We designated certain days and what we would be doing on those days. We, as a committee, all voted for that.
I have questions to ask. I'm sure my other colleagues have questions to ask. I'd like to continue with the agreed timeline that we all voted on recently that sets out the work the committee would be doing each day.
Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.
Le Comité a convenu d'un calendrier pour examiner ce qui a été proposé par M. Savard-Tremblay. Nous avons réservé des jours pour cet examen. Tous les membres du Comité ont voté en faveur de cela.
J'ai une question à poser. Je suis certaine que mes collègues ont aussi des questions à poser. J'aimerais que nous respections le calendrier que nous avons tous accepté récemment et qui établit le travail que le Comité doit faire chaque jour.
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
NDP (MB)
Sorry, Madam Chair, you are on mute.
Désolé, madame la présidente, votre micro est en sourdine.
View Chandra Arya Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Chandra Arya Profile
2021-06-11 13:51
Madam Chair, you are muted. I guess that you're asking me to speak.
Madame la présidente, votre micro est en sourdine. Je crois comprendre que vous me donnez la parole.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Yes, I am. Pretty soon it will be hand signals for all of us.
Oui, c'est exact. Bientôt, il y aura des signaux de la main pour nous tous.
View Chandra Arya Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Chandra Arya Profile
2021-06-11 13:51
Madam Chair, I have not asked questions. I still have questions to ask. Some other members have maybe had their opportunity to ask questions to these officials and to get the answers they need, but I strongly object that my limited time is being curtailed.
Madame la présidente, je n'ai encore pu poser mes questions. Certains collègues ont peut-être eu la chance d'en poser aux fonctionnaires et ont obtenu les réponses dont ils avaient besoin, mais je m'oppose fermement à ce que mon temps de parole soit écourté.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you.
Go ahead, Mr. Savard-Tremblay.
Je vous remercie.
Allez-y, monsieur Savard-Tremblay.
View Simon-Pierre Savard-Tremblay Profile
BQ (QC)
What I proposed was to set the dates in question, because that would be a lesser evil.
As you know, I proposed that we make this study the priority, as is ordinarily the case for a bill. This is June, and we passed the bill at second reading in March. This kind of time frame seems somewhat unusual to me. The committee has put an enormous effort into not making any effort.
I am therefore going to vote in favour of Mr. Blaikie's motion.
J'ai effectivement proposé de fixer les dates en question, parce que c'était un moindre mal.
Comme vous le savez, j'ai proposé que nous menions cette étude en priorité, comme c'est normalement le cas lorsqu'il s'agit d'un projet de loi. C'est le mois de juin, et nous avons adopté le projet de loi en deuxième lecture au mois de mars. Ce type de délai me semble assez particulier. Le Comité a déployé des efforts formidables pour ne pas faire d'efforts.
Je vais donc voter en faveur de la motion de M. Blaikie.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Savard-Tremblay.
Ms. Bendayan is next.
Merci, monsieur Savard-Tremblay.
Madame Bendayan, vous êtes la prochaine.
View Rachel Bendayan Profile
Lib. (QC)
I simply want to clarify the situation.
With all due respect, Mr Savard-Tremblay, I tried to move the study of Bill C-216 forward. Then there was a discussion about the forestry industry and the possibility of holding an emergency debate on other equally important questions, I agree. Certainly not all of the committee members didn't want to have this discussion earlier.
I do not share Mr. Blaikie's opinion, given that some committee members still have questions to ask, but I will obviously respect the decision that the committee members make.
Je veux simplement clarifier la situation.
Sauf le respect que je vous dois, monsieur Savard‑Tremblay, j'ai essayé de devancer l'étude du projet de loi C‑216. Il y avait alors une discussion au sujet de l'industrie forestière et de la possibilité de tenir un débat d'urgence sur d'autres questions également très importantes, j'en conviens. Ce ne sont certainement pas tous les membres du Comité qui ne voulaient pas avoir cette discussion plus tôt.
Je ne partage pas l'opinion de M. Blaikie, étant donné que certains membres du Comité ont encore des questions à poser, mais je respecterai évidemment la décision que prendront les membres du Comité.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Ms. Bendayan.
Go ahead, Mr. Lobb.
Je vous remercie, madame Bendayan,
Allez-y, monsieur Lobb.
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2021-06-11 13:53
Thank you very much.
If Mr. Blaikie's motion is defeated, does the meeting on Monday still go on in regard to Mr. Savard-Tremblay's Bill C-216? If it's defeated here, is that the end of it, and then we go to a new topic on Monday? If that's the case, I can't imagine that Mr. Savard-Tremblay wants that to happen.
I'd like a clarification on what happens on Monday.
Merci beaucoup.
Si la motion de M. Blaikie est rejetée, est-ce que la réunion de lundi portera sur le projet de C-216 de M. Savard-Tremblay? Si elle est rejetée, est-ce que cela signifiera que c'est la fin du débat et que nous passerons à un nouveau sujet lundi? J'imagine que ce n'est certes pas ce que souhaite M. Savard-Tremblay.
J'aimerais savoir clairement ce qui se passera lundi.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Lobb. I believe if Mr. Blaikie's motion is defeated, we will continue the meeting today and Monday.
Madam Clerk, is that correct?
Merci, monsieur Lobb. Je crois que si la motion de M. Blaikie est rejetée, nous poursuivrons la séance aujourd’hui et lundi.
Madame la greffière, est-ce exact?
Christine Lafrance
View Christine Lafrance Profile
Christine Lafrance
2021-06-11 13:54
That's exactly what I'm checking right now. I will need maybe two minutes to make sure.
C’est exactement ce que je vérifie en ce moment. Il me faudra peut-être deux minutes pour m’en assurer.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
All right.
We will suspend for two minutes.
D’accord.
Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant deux minutes.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Committee members, this is a bit of an unusual motion, and the clerk needs a bit more time to get clarification. I'm going to suggest that we continue on with our speakers list until the clerk clarifies Mr. Blaikie's motion.
Mr. Aboultaif, you had your hand up before I suspended the meeting.
Mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, il s’agit d’une motion un peu inhabituelle, et la greffière a besoin d’un peu plus de temps pour obtenir des éclaircissements. Je propose que nous passions aux autres intervenants de la liste jusqu’à ce que la greffière tire les choses au clair au sujet de la motion de M. Blaikie.
Monsieur Aboultaif, vous aviez levé la main avant que je ne suspende la séance.
View Ziad Aboultaif Profile
CPC (AB)
In light of this development, I'm okay. Please continue.
Étant donné ce qui vient de se passer, il n'y a aucun problème. Veuillez continuer.
Results: 1 - 100 of 150000 | Page: 1 of 1500

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data