Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 100 of 228
View Soraya Martinez Ferrada Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Soraya Martinez Ferrada Profile
2021-06-17 20:34 [p.8723]
Mr. Speaker, on June 9, the member for Calgary Midnapore submitted a notice of opposition regarding Vote 1, “Operating expenditures”, in the main estimates, under Department of Transport, in the amount of $741,693,237.
The notice of opposition calls on Nav Canada executives and managers to pay back $7 million in bonuses they received in the last fiscal year, supposedly during the pandemic, while the private not-for-profit organization was receiving government assistance and issuing layoff notices. To protest those bonuses, the member is suggesting that $7 million be cut from the Transport Canada budget.
Let me begin my remarks by discussing what such a cut would mean for Transport Canada's programs and, by extension, for Canadians. A $7‑million reduction to Transport Canada's main estimates funding for 2021-22 would significantly reduce its ability to deliver on its commitments. This reduction would have undesirable consequences, such as weakening the implementation of monitoring, testing, inspection and subsidy programs across all modes of transportation, including air, marine, rail and road. It would also result in reduced enforcement activities that could increase the potential risk to the safety and security of Canadians.
Furthermore, reduced surveillance of equipment, operations and facilities in the transportation industry could lead to accidents, malfunctions and loss of life. It would also have a negative impact on the department's efforts to support the economic recovery of the air sector and other transportation sectors affected by the pandemic. This reduction would set a precedent for departments to pay for organizations that operate at arm's length from the Government of Canada.
Allow me, for greater emphasis, to reiterate some of these points in English.
The impact of a $7-million reduction to Transport Canada's 2021 main estimates funding would significantly reduce its ability to deliver on its commitments. Undesirable consequences could include reduced levels of inspections across all transportation modes: air, land and marine. It could include reduced enforcement activities and reduced surveillance of the transportation industry's equipment, operations and facilities.
How would these cuts impact ordinary Canadians? I will give some examples. Transport Canada recently announced the funding of $7 million in Lethbridge for the rehabilitation of runways, $5 million through the national trade corridors fund to improve the efficiency of rail logistics in Alberta's industrial heartland; $2 million to the remote air services program to British Columbia to ensure essential air services to remote communities in the province; a combined $8 million to the communities of Smithers and Terrace in the riding of Skeena—Bulkley Valley to rehabilitate airport infrastructure; and $11 million to the community of Mont-Joli in the electoral district of Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia to rehabilitate the airport.
Which of these projects would the opposition cancel in order to recuperate the $7 million it is purporting to cut?
The cuts also negatively impact the department's efforts to support the economic recovery of the air sector, as well as other transportation sectors affected by the pandemic. It would also set a precedent for government departments to pay for organizations that are operating at arm's length from the Government of Canada.
In short, this would be a very unwise way to protest Nav Canada's financial decision, which again has nothing to do with the supply vote in front of us.
I would like to say a few words about Nav Canada. Nav Canada is a private, not-for-profit corporation tasked with managing Canada's air navigation services. This model was introduced for the first time in 1996 to replace the air navigation services that were previously provided by Transport Canada. All subsequent governments kept that model in place.
Nav Canada oversees air traffic in Canada through a sophisticated network of area control centres, air traffic control towers, flight service stations, maintenance centres, flight information centres and navigation aids across the country.
Its customers include airlines, business aviation and air cargo operators, air charters and air taxis, helicopter operators and general aviation pilots and owners.
Nav Canada is independent from the Government of Canada because it does not report to the Minister of Transport or Parliament. Nav Canada is not part of the Minister of Transport's main estimates. As a result, it is not included in Transport Canada's Vote 1 estimates of $741,693,237 for 2021-22. What is more, Nav Canada's financial statements are not included in the Government of Canada's main estimates process.
As a not-for-profit corporation, Nav Canada invests directly in its operations, people and infrastructure to keep Canada's air navigation system as safe, efficient and innovative as it can be.
Nav Canada's governance structure is composed of federal government representatives, users and unionized employees. In turn, these representatives select the members of Nav Canada's board of directors.
Now I will turn to the bonuses paid out to Nav Canada executives. Nav Canada bonuses are paid to senior executives and exempt staff, who are managers. Bonuses are usually between 5% and 20% of an employee's total compensation. They are accounted for in Nav Canada's vision, which is to pay wages equivalent to the market average.
Bonuses are normally paid to about 550 employees, but they are not distributed evenly. The average amount paid out from that $7 million would be $13,000, but the amount varies from one person to the next.
Recent media reports stated that Nav Canada was planning to issue layoff notices to 49 employees. Those notices have since been rescinded. Nav Canada chose not to publicize its senior executives' compensation because of its policies stating that disagreements with the unions are not resolved immediately.
Now I would like to talk about Nav Canada's independence from Transport Canada. Once again, there is no connection between the payment of Nav Canada bonuses and Vote 1 of the main estimates for Transport Canada in the amount of $741,693,237. Nav Canada receives no direct funding from Transport Canada and is not accountable to either the Minister of Transport or Parliament.
Nav Canada is primarily funded by the fees it receives for managing more than 18 million square kilometres of airspace. Additional revenue is generated through technology sales and other related business activities. The company operates with a break-even business model, balancing costs and revenues by borrowing to meet cash flow requirements.
I want to make a few points about the $7 million in bonuses paid by Nav Canada while the company was receiving government assistance and issuing layoff notices. The bonuses reported in the news were paid for the first half of the company's fiscal year, from September 2019 to February 2020, before the industry suffered significant negative impacts from COVID‑19. Budget 2021 proposed requiring that publicly listed corporations repay the wage subsidy for any qualifying period after June 5, 2021. The Nav Canada bonuses were paid outside of the period set out in budget 2021.
In response to COVID‑19, Nav Canada executives agreed to significant reductions to salary and benefits, and there is no immediate plan to restore them before the airline industry recovers.
Note that salaries were reduced by 3% to 5%. Pensions were restructured and became less generous. The annual salary review for senior executives to reconsider possible raises was cancelled. The management team was also cut in half and, during that time, the company issued layoff notices to 49 employees. As I was saying earlier, these notices were rescinded.
Like other Canadian companies, the employees at Nav Canada can receive wage subsidies through the Canada emergency wage subsidy, or CEWS. Nav Canada noted that its employees had benefited from the CEWS and that the company had not received the large employer emergency financing facility, or LEEFF, nor had it received any special financing under favourable terms.
As far as the rule around the wage subsidy is concerned, budget 2021 stated that the wage subsidy should be paid back in certain cases where senior executives' compensation increased.
Budget 2021 proposes to require a publicly listed corporation to repay wage subsidy amounts received for a qualifying period that begins after June 5, 2021, in the event that its aggregate compensation for specified executives during the 2021 calendar year exceeds its aggregate compensation for specified executives during the 2019 calendar year.
For the purpose of this rule, a publicly listed corporation's specified executives will be its named executive officers whose compensation is required to be disclosed under Canadian securities law in its statement of executive compensation.
This generally includes its chief executive officer, chief financial officer, and three other most highly compensated executives. A corporation's executive compensation for a calendar year will be calculated by prorating the aggregate compensation of its specified executives for each of its taxation years that overlap with the calendar year.
The amount of the wage subsidy required to be repaid would be equal to the lesser of the following: the total of all wage subsidy amounts received in respect of active employees for qualifying periods that begin after June 5, 2021, and the amount by which the corporation's aggregate specified executives' compensation for 2021 exceeds its aggregate specified executives' compensation for 2019.
This requirement to repay would be applied at the group level and would apply to wage subsidy amounts paid to any entity in the group.
I hope that my remarks have clarified some of the questions about the bonuses paid to Nav Canada executives. I think that what should be quite clear is that the proposed $7‑million reduction to Transport Canada's operating budget is an ill-advised and irresponsible way to protest these bonuses. The funds used to pay these bonuses did not come from Transport Canada's budget.
Furthermore, the cuts would hurt Transport Canada's ability to carry out its mandate. As I mentioned earlier, this would weaken the implementation of monitoring, testing, inspection and subsidy programs across all modes of transportation. It would also result in reduced enforcement activities that could increase the potential risk to the safety and security of Canadians.
In addition, reduced surveillance of the transportation industry's equipment, operations and facilities could result in accidents, malfunctions and, of course, loss of life.
I will give the member who proposed these cuts the benefit of the doubt and assume that she did not consider some of their potential consequences.
It is very easy to fan the flames of anger about executive compensation, and in some cases, this is often completely justified. However, as legislators, we must also act responsibly when making decisions and ensure that we do not inadvertently hurt Canadians.
I urge all members to vote in favour of Vote 1, “Operating expenditures”, in the main estimates, under Department of Transport, in the amount of $741,693,237.
Transport Canada worked very hard to maintain the safety and security of our transportation system throughout the COVID-19 crisis. This work must continue, and the department needs the resources required to do that.
Monsieur le Président, le 9 juin, un avis d'opposition a été donné en ce qui concerne le crédit 1 — Dépenses de fonctionnement, du budget principal des dépenses, sous la rubrique ministère des Transports, au montant de 741 693 237 $, par la députée de Calgary Midnapore.
Dans l'avis d'opposition, on demande aux cadres supérieurs et aux gestionnaires de NAV Canada de rembourser les primes de 7 millions de dollars reçues au cours du dernier exercice, supposément pendant la pandémie, alors que l'organisation privée à but non lucratif recevait de l'aide gouvernementale et remettait des avis de mise à pied. Pour protester contre ces primes, la députée propose de supprimer 7 millions de dollars dans le budget de Transports Canada.
Je me permets de commencer mes remarques en discutant de ce que cette coupe signifierait pour les programmes de Transports Canada et, sauf prolongation, pour les Canadiens. Une diminution de 7 millions de dollars du financement du budget principal des dépenses de Transport Canada pour 2021‑2022 réduirait considérablement sa capacité à respecter ses engagements. Cette réduction engendrerait des conséquences indésirables, telles que l'affaiblissement de la mise en œuvre des programmes de contrôle, d'essai, d'inspection et de subvention dans tous les modes de transport, soit l'aviation, la marine, les réseaux ferroviaires et routiers. Il en résultera également une réduction des activités de contrôle qui pourrait accroître le risque potentiel pour la sécurité et la sûreté des Canadiens.
En outre, une réduction de la surveillance des équipements, des opérations et des installations de l'industrie de transport pourrait entraîner des accidents, des défaillances et des pertes de vie. Elle aurait également un impact négatif sur les efforts du ministère à soutenir la reprise économique du secteur aérien et des autres secteurs du transport touchés par la pandémie. Cette réduction établirait ainsi un précédent par lequel les ministères seraient tenus de financer des organismes qui fonctionnent de manière indépendante du gouvernement du Canada.
Je me permets d'insister en répétant certains de ces points en anglais.
Une diminution de 7 millions de dollars du financement du budget principal des dépenses de Transport Canada pour 2021 réduirait considérablement sa capacité à respecter ses engagements. Cette réduction engendrerait des conséquences indésirables telles que l'affaiblissement de la mise en œuvre des programmes d'inspection pour tous les modes de transport, soit l'aviation, la marine, les réseaux ferroviaires et routiers. Elle pourrait aussi entraîner une réduction des activités d'application de la loi et de la surveillance des équipements, des opérations et des installations de l'industrie du transport.
Quelle incidence ces compressions auraient-elles sur les Canadiens ordinaires? Voici quelques exemples. Transports Canada a récemment annoncé un financement de 7 millions de dollars à Lethbridge pour la remise en état des pistes; 5 millions de dollars, par l'intermédiaire du Fonds national des corridors commerciaux, pour accroître l’efficacité de la logistique en matière de transport ferroviaire du centre industriel de l’Alberta; 2 millions de dollars pour le Programme de transport aérien en régions éloignées afin d'assurer la continuité des services aériens essentiels dans les collectivités éloignées de la Colombie-Britannique; un montant total de 8 millions de dollars aux collectivités de Smithers et Terrace, dans la circonscription de Skeena—Bulkley Valley, pour la remise en état des infrastructures de l'aéroport; et 11 millions de dollars à Mont‑Joli, dans la circonscription d'Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia, pour la remise en état de l'aéroport.
Lequel de ces projets l'opposition voudrait-elle annuler afin d'obtenir les 7 millions de dollars qu'ils veulent récupérer?
Les compressions ont aussi un effet négatif sur les efforts du ministère pour appuyer la relance économique du secteur aérien et des autres secteurs de transport touchés par la pandémie. En outre, cela établirait un précédent en faisant payer les ministères pour les organismes qui sont indépendants du gouvernement du Canada.
Bref, ce serait une façon bien mal avisée de protester contre la décision financière de Nav Canada, qui, encore une fois, n'a rien à voir avec le crédit dont nous sommes saisis.
Je me permets de dire quelques mots au sujet de NAV Canada. NAV Canada est une société privée à but non lucratif ayant pour mandat de gérer les services de navigation aérienne au Canada. Ce modèle a été introduit pour la première fois en 1996, en remplacement des services de navigation aérienne qui étaient auparavant fournis par Transports Canada. Il a été maintenu par tous les gouvernements subséquents.
NAV CANADA est chargée de superviser la circulation aérienne au Canada au moyen d'un réseau sophistiqué de centres de contrôle régionaux, de tours de contrôle de la circulation aérienne, de stations d'information de vol, de centres d'entretien, de centres d'information de vol et d'aides à la navigation, partout au pays.
Parmi ses clients, elle compte des transporteurs aériens, des exploitants de fret, des exploitants d'avions d'affaires, de vols nolisés, de taxis aériens et d'hélicoptères, ainsi que des pilotes et des propriétaires d'aéronefs d'aviation générale.
La société NAV CANADA est indépendante du gouvernement du Canada puisqu'elle ne rend pas de comptes au ministre des Transports ni au Parlement. NAV CANADA ne fait pas partie du budget principal du ministre des Transports. Par conséquent, elle n'est pas comprise dans le budget du crédit 1 de Transports Canada de 741 693 237 $ pour 2021-2022. De plus, les états financiers de NAV CANADA ne sont pas inclus dans le processus du budget principal des dépenses du gouvernement du Canada.
En tant que société à but non lucratif, NAV CANADA investit directement dans ses activités, ses employés et ses infrastructures pour que le système de navigation aérienne du Canada soit aussi sécuritaire, efficace et innovateur que possible.
La structure de gouvernance de NAV CANADA est composée de représentants du gouvernement fédéral, des usagers et des employés syndiqués. À leur tour, ces représentants nomment les membres du conseil d'administration de NAV CANADA.
J'aimerais maintenant aborder la question des primes versées aux cadres de Nav Canada. Les primes de Nav Canada sont versées aux cadres supérieurs et au personnel exonéré, qui sont les gestionnaires. Les primes se situent normalement entre 5 et 20 % de la rémunération globale d'un employé. Elles sont prises en compte dans l'objectif général de Nav Canada, qui est de verser des salaires équivalents à la moyenne du marché.
Les primes sont habituellement distribuées à environ 550 employés, mais ne sont pas réparties également. Ainsi, le montant moyen versé pour les 7 millions de dollars rapportés dans l'immédiat serait de 13 000 $, bien que le montant varie d'une personne à l'autre.
Les médias ont récemment rapporté que Nav Canada avait l'intention d'émettre des avis de mise à pied à 49 employés. Ces avis ont depuis été annulés. Nav Canada a choisi de ne pas communiquer publiquement la rémunération de ses cadres supérieurs en raison de ses politiques selon lesquelles les divergences avec les syndicats ne sont pas réglées dans l'immédiat.
J'aimerais à présent aborder la question de l'indépendance de Nav Canada par rapport à Transports Canada. Encore une fois, il n'y a aucun lien entre le versement des primes de Nav Canada et le financement du crédit 1 du budget principal des dépenses de Transports Canada de 741 693 237$. Nav Canada ne reçoit aucun financement direct de la part de Transports Canada et ne rend pas de comptes au ministre des Transports ni au Parlement.
Le financement de Nav Canada provient essentiellement des frais imposés pour ses services liés à la gestion de plus de 18 millions de kilomètres carrés d'espace aérien. Des revenus additionnels sont générés par les ventes liées à la technologie et d'autres activités commerciales connexes. Le modèle d'affaires de la société repose sur un seuil de rentabilité et consiste à harmoniser les coûts et les revenus en ayant recours aux besoins à l'emprunt pour répondre aux besoins de trésorerie.
En ce qui concerne le versement par Nav Canada de 7 millions de primes pendant que la société recevait de l'aide gouvernementale et émettait des avis de mise à pied, je note quelques points. Les primes rapportées dans les médias ont été versées pour la première moitié de l'exercice financier de la société, qui va de septembre 2019 à février 2020, c'est-à-dire avant les importantes répercussions négatives de la COVID‑19. Le budget de 2021 proposait d'exiger que les sociétés cotées en bourse remboursent la Subvention salariale pour la période admissible après le 5 juin 2021. Les primes de Nav Canada ont donc été versées en dehors de la période citée dans le budget de 2021.
En raison de la COVID‑19, la direction de Nav Can a accepté des réductions importantes de salaires et d'avantages sociaux et aucun plan immédiat ne prévoit le rétablissement de ceux-ci d'ici la reprise du secteur aérien.
Notons que les salaires ont été réduits de 3 % à 5 %. Les régimes de retraite ont été restructurés pour être moins généreux. L'examen annuel du salaire des cadres supérieurs visant à reconsidérer des possibles augmentations a été annulé. L'équipe de direction a également été réduite de moitié et, pendant cette période, la société avait émis des avis de mise à pied à l'intention de 49 employés. Comme je le disais tout à l'heure, ces avis ont été annulés.
À l'instar d'autres sociétés canadiennes, les employés de Nav Canada peuvent recevoir des subventions salariales par le truchement de la Subvention salariale d'urgence du Canada, ou SSUC. Nav Canada a souligné que ses employés avaient bénéficié de la SSUC et que la société n'avait pas reçu le Crédit d'urgence pour les grands employeurs, ou CUGE, ni de financement spécial assorti de conditions avantageuses.
En ce qui concerne la règle entourant la subvention salariale, à cet égard, le budget de 2021 a prévu que la subvention salariale devrait être remboursée dans certains cas où la rémunération des cadres supérieurs a augmenté.
Le budget de 2021 propose d'obliger une société cotée en bourse à rembourser les montants de subvention salariale versés pour une période d'admissibilité commençant après le 5 juin 2021, si la rémunération globale pour les cadres précisée au cours de l'année civile 2021 dépassait sa rémunération globale pour les cadres précisée au cours de l'année 2019.
Pour l'application de cette règle, les cadres qui sont dans une société cotée en bourse seront ses membres de la haute direction. Ils sont visés dans la rémunération qui est tenue déclarée en vertu du droit canadien des valeurs mobilières dans sa déclaration de la rémunération de la haute direction.
Ces membres sont généralement composés d'un premier dirigeant, d'un directeur financier et de trois autres cadres les mieux rémunérés. La rémunération des cadres d'une société pour une année civile sera calculée au prorata de la rémunération globale versée à ses membres de la haute direction visés pour chacune des années d'imposition qui chevauche l'année civile.
Le montant du remboursement de la subvention salariale serait égal au moins élevé des montants suivants: le total des montants de la subvention salariale versés à l'égard des employés actifs pour les périodes d'admissibilité commençant après le 5 juin 2021; le montant de la rémunération globale des cadres supérieurs de la société pour 2021 qui excède sa rémunération globale des cadres supérieurs pour 2019.
Cette obligation de rembourser serait appliquée au niveau du groupe et serait applicable à la subvention salariale reçue par chaque entité du groupe.
J'espère que mes remarques ont clarifié certaines des questions entourant les primes qui ont été versées aux cadres de Nav Canada. Je pense que ce qui devrait être tout à fait clair, c'est que la réduction proposée de 7 millions de dollars du budget de fonctionnement de Transports Canada est une façon très mal avisée et irresponsable de protester contre ces primes. Les fonds utilisés pour payer les primes ne provenaient pas du budget de Transports Canada.
De plus, les compressions nuiraient à la capacité de Transports Canada de s'acquitter de ses fonctions. Notamment, comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, cela va affaiblir la mise en œuvre des programmes de contrôle, d'essai et d'inspection et des subventions dans tous les modes de transport. Il en résultera également une réduction des activités de contrôle qui pourrait accroître les risques pour la sûreté et la sécurité des Canadiens.
En outre, une réduction de la surveillance de l'équipement, des opérations et des installations de l'industrie du transport pourrait entraîner des accidents, des défaillances et, bien sûr, des pertes de vie.
Je vais accorder à la députée qui a proposé ces réductions le bénéfice du doute et supposer qu'elle n'a pas tenu compte de certaines des conséquences qui pourraient en découler.
Il est très facile d'attiser la colère au sujet de la rémunération des dirigeants et, dans certains cas, cela est souvent pleinement justifié. Cependant, en tant que législateurs, nous devons également être responsables dans les décisions que nous prenons et veiller à ne pas nuire aux Canadiens par inadvertance.
J'encourage tous les députés à voter en faveur du crédit 1 — Dépenses de fonctionnement, du budget principal des dépenses, sous la rubrique ministère des Transports, au montant de 741 693 237 $.
Transports Canada a travaillé très fort pour maintenir la sûreté et la sécurité de notre système de transports tout au long de la crise de la COVID‑19. Ce travail doit se poursuivre et le ministère a besoin des ressources nécessaires pour le faire.
View Larry Maguire Profile
CPC (MB)
View Larry Maguire Profile
2021-05-12 14:09 [p.7102]
Mr. Speaker, later this afternoon we will have the final vote on my private member's bill, Bill C-208. The purpose of this bill is straightforward. It will level the playing field by giving families the exact same tax treatment when they transfer their businesses or operations to their children as when they transfer it to a stranger. It would result in more locally owned and operated businesses, the type of businesses that are deeply involved in their communities and provide steady employment for countless individuals.
Bill C-208 sends a message of hope to young farmers who want to carry on what their families started. No longer will parents be given the false choice of having to choose between a larger retirement package after selling to a stranger, or a massive tax bill after selling to a family member, their own child or grandchild.
I urge all members to vote in favour of Bill C-208 and bring tax fairness to the Income Tax Act for all qualifying small businesses.
Monsieur le Président, plus tard cet après-midi, nous procéderons au vote final sur mon projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire, soit le projet de loi C-208. L'objectif du projet de loi est simple. Il uniformisera les règles du jeu en accordant aux familles le même traitement fiscal, peu importe qu'elles transfèrent leur entreprise à leurs enfants ou à un étranger. Il en résultera un nombre accru d'entreprises locales, c'est-à-dire le type d'entreprises qui s'impliquent dans la communauté et qui fournissent des emplois stables à d'innombrables personnes.
Le projet de loi C-208 envoie un message d'espoir aux jeunes agriculteurs qui veulent poursuivre ce que leur famille a commencé. Les parents ne seront plus forcés de faire un choix entre vendre leur entreprise à un étranger et obtenir un meilleur fonds de retraite ou vendre leur entreprise à un membre de la famille, leur propre enfant ou petit-enfant et être lourdement pénalisés sur le plan fiscal.
J'exhorte tous les députés à voter en faveur du projet de loi C-208 et à rendre la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu plus équitable pour toutes les petites entreprises admissibles.
View Yves Perron Profile
BQ (QC)
View Yves Perron Profile
2021-05-11 14:04 [p.7053]
Mr. Speaker, every year, hundreds of farms are closing down in Quebec. It is obvious that there is an urgent need to encourage the next generation of farmers. However, the federal government is making it more profitable for a farmer to sell their business to outside shareholders than to their own family. The farmer can either sell their land to a third party and secure a decent retirement, since the sale will qualify for the lifetime capital gains exemption, or sell it to their family and forgo a comfortable retirement.
Tomorrow we will have the opportunity to rectify this situation that the Bloc Québécois has opposed for 15 years now. Bill C-208, which aims to facilitate the transfer of businesses, will be put to a vote. I personally co-sponsored this bill, because the Bloc Québécois votes in favour of initiatives that are good for Quebec farmers. That is what being reliable is all about. This vote will be a moment of truth for the future of farming in Quebec, and I urge all parties to truly support the next generation of farmers.
Monsieur le Président, chaque année, des centaines de fermes disparaissent au Québec. La nécessité d'encourager la relève en agriculture est aussi urgente qu'évidente. Pourtant, le fédéral rend plus avantageux pour un agriculteur le fait de céder son entreprise à des actionnaires extérieurs plutôt qu'à sa propre famille. En effet, un agriculteur peut vendre sa terre à un étranger et s'assurer une retraite convenable, puisque la vente sera admissible à l'exonération cumulative des gains en capital, ou la vendre à sa famille et renoncer à une retraite confortable.
Demain, nous aurons l'occasion de corriger cette situation que le Bloc québécois dénonce depuis maintenant 15 ans. Le projet de loi C-208, qui vise à faciliter le transfert des entreprises, sera soumis au vote. J'ai personnellement coparrainé ce projet de loi, parce que le Bloc québécois vote en faveur des initiatives qui sont bonnes pour les agriculteurs québécois. C'est cela, être fiable. Ce vote sera un moment de vérité pour l'avenir de l'agriculture québécoise et j'invite tous les partis à véritablement soutenir la relève agricole.
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2021-05-05 17:56 [p.6705]
Madam Speaker, I am very pleased to get the opportunity to speak a little further on Bill C-208, an act to amend the Income Tax Act regarding transfer of a small business, a family farm or a fishing corporation, which is sponsored by the member for Brandon—Souris.
Madame la Présidente, je suis très heureux d'avoir l'occasion de parler un peu plus longuement du projet de loi C-208, loi modifiant la Loi de l’impôt sur le revenu concernant le transfert d’une petite entreprise ou d’une société agricole ou de pêche familiale, parrainé par le député de Brandon—Souris.
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
As members know, Bill C-208 is now at third reading stage. How did it get here? Simply put, Bill C-208 has had considerable debate in the House and was referred to the finance committee, which I chair. I will make a few comments on what witnesses had to say before committee in a moment. The finance committee referred the bill back to the House without amendment.
Bill C-208 has a long history, and it criss-crosses the political landscape. It was first introduced by the current member of Parliament for Bourassa, a Liberal, two parliaments ago. In the last Parliament, the same bill was brought forward by Guy Caron, an NDP member. Now, in this current Parliament, it is sponsored by the member for Brandon—Souris, a Conservative member.
This long history, across all major political parties in the House, certainly shows that there is a need to bring fairness and equity from a taxation perspective to the transfer of family farm corporations, fisheries enterprises and small family businesses. Quite honestly, it is long past time that this problem was fixed.
During an earlier discussion at third reading, it was suggested by the government spokesman that just maybe the bill could provide opportunities for tax avoidance. I would agree that tax avoidance is a legitimate concern. However, I must point out that at the finance committee we heard from 17 witnesses, and every opportunity was given to address the concern of tax avoidance. We called on the public and Finance Canada to provide witnesses and propose amendments, to anybody who had those kinds of concerns.
I certainly appreciate that the assistant deputy minister of the tax policy branch and the senior director of the tax legislation division in the tax policy branch appeared and answered questions, and their comments appear in the transcript for the finance committee for anybody who wants to see it. To be fair, they did outline some concerns, especially as it relates to what is called “surplus stripping” for the purpose of tax avoidance.
Where does that leave us? On the one hand, we have concerns being expressed by officials, and I do take their concerns seriously. On the other hand, we have a broad section of witnesses who expressed a serious and immediate need for a way to transfer a small business, farming corporation or fishing enterprise without facing unfair taxation when transferring to a family member. We do not see amendments to the bill that would fix this alleged problem.
I would even agree with those who might say that private members' bills are not the best vehicle to change tax policy. They are not. However, we simply cannot allow this inequity disadvantaging intergenerational transfers to family members to continue. It is time to accept the only change that is on the table to fix the problem, and that happens to be Bill C-208.
The sponsor of the bill, the member for Brandon—Souris, gave about the most concise and clear example of this inequity in the tax system. He said:
The second example was a father wanting to sell his farm to his son to fund his retirement. If the father were to sell his farm to a stranger, he could use his capital gains exemption on the sale, resulting in an effective tax rate of 13.39%. However, if the farmer sold his farm to his son, that sale would be recorded as a dividend rather than a capital gain, and the farmer would pay 47.4% in tax. That is a huge difference, and I think we can all agree that it is completely unfair.
The second quote is from Ms. Robyn Young, president-elect of the Insurance Brokers Association of Canada.
She said this:
In closing, this is an issue of equity and fairness. Business owners should not be penalized for selling their business to a family member. Tax implications should never be a consideration when making the decision to sell a business to a family member.
There were many other good witnesses I could quote and make the point on this serious inequity, including the UPA, the Canadian Federation of Agriculture, other farming and fishing organizations, the tax manager at Deloitte, underwriting companies and more, but I think members get my point.
The backbone of many communities are small businesses, farmers and fishermen. Those who can pass a business down from generation to generation create the history and the character of many of our communities in the country. We need to give every opportunity for those families to make that transfer.
It is absolutely true that during this pandemic the federal government has been there in every way possible to support Canadians, businesses, farmers and fishermen. Tax policy, however, should not cause a disincentive to transfer to the next generation. Tax fairness should be the cornerstone on which to encourage intergenerational transfers. This bill would move tax policy in that direction.
Finance Canada, and the government for that matter, always have the option to put forward corrections in a ways and means motion if concerns expressed before committee do arise in reality. That, in itself, is a safeguard. They have the ability to do that fairly quickly through a ways and means motion. However, farmers, fishermen and small business owners, with respect to the unfairness of this taxation system, have been waiting for this change for years.
We have to put the shoe on the other foot. Instead of having those families that want intergenerational transfers sitting in the wings waiting for something to happen, we have to pass this bill and put the shoe on the other foot. If there is a problem, then government has the ability to fix that problem. I am encouraging others to recognize this problem.
I, for sure, will be supporting Bill C-208, and I hope others can do the same.
Comme mes collègues le savent, le projet de loi C-208 en est maintenant à l’étape de la troisième lecture. Comment s’est-il rendu là? Bref, le projet de loi C-208 a fait l’objet d’un long débat à la Chambre et a ensuite été renvoyé au comité des finances que je préside. Dans un moment, je dirai quelques mots sur ce que nous ont dit les témoins. Le comité des finances a ensuite renvoyé le projet de loi à la Chambre, sans amendement.
Le projet de loi C-208 a une longue histoire qui traverse le paysage politique. Il a d’abord été présenté par l’actuel député de Bourassa, un libéral, il y a deux législatures. Au cours de la dernière législature, le même projet de loi a été présenté par Guy Caron, député néo-démocrate. Dans la présente législature, il est parrainé par le député conservateur de Brandon—Souris.
Cette longue histoire, façonnée par les principaux partis politiques à la Chambre, illustre combien il est urgent de traiter avec justice et équité, d’un point de vue fiscal, le transfert de sociétés agricoles familiales, de sociétés de pêche et de petites entreprises familiales. Honnêtement, il est plus que temps de régler ce problème.
Au cours d’un débat antérieur tenu à l’étape de la troisième lecture, le porte-parole du gouvernement a laissé entendre que ce projet de loi risquait de permettre l’évitement fiscal. Je conviens que l’évitement fiscal est une préoccupation légitime. Je dois cependant souligner qu’au comité des finances, nous avons entendu 17 témoins et nous avons eu toutes les occasions possibles de nous pencher sur la question de l’évitement fiscal. Nous avons demandé au public et au ministère des Finances, bref, à quiconque avait ce genre de préoccupations, de nous proposer des témoins et des amendements.
Je remercie la sous-ministre adjointe de la Direction de la politique de l’impôt et la directrice générale de la Division de la législation de l’impôt d’avoir comparu et répondu à nos questions; ceux et celles qui souhaitent lire leurs témoignages les trouveront dans le compte rendu des travaux du comité des finances. Pour être juste, les témoins ont abordé certaines questions préoccupantes, surtout en ce qui concerne ce que nous appelons le « dépouillement des surplus » aux fins d’évitement fiscal.
Où en sommes-nous maintenant? D’abord, les fonctionnaires nous ont fait part de leurs préoccupations que je prends très au sérieux. Ensuite, de nombreux témoins nous ont dit qu’il était urgent de trouver un moyen efficace de faciliter le transfert d’une petite entreprise ou d’une société agricole ou de pêche sans avoir à payer un impôt injuste lorsque le transfert a lieu entre membres d’une même famille. Nous ne voyons aucun amendement au projet de loi qui réglerait ce prétendu problème.
Je dirais même que je suis d'accord avec ceux qui disent qu'un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire n'est pas le meilleur moyen pour modifier les politiques fiscales. C'est vrai. Or, nous ne pouvons pas rester les bras croisés devant cette inégalité qui désavantage les familles qui souhaitent transférer leur entreprise à la prochaine génération. Il faut maintenant accepter la seule proposition de modification qui ait été faite pour corriger la situation, soit le projet de loi C-208.
Le parrain du projet de loi, le député de Brandon—Souris, a donné un exemple on ne peut plus clair et précis pour expliquer cette iniquité du régime fiscal. Il a dit:
Le second exemple est celui d'un père qui envisage de vendre son exploitation agricole à son fils pour financer sa retraite. S'il vendait plutôt à un étranger, il pourrait bénéficier d'une exonération des gains en capital liés à la vente, ce qui donnerait un taux d'imposition réel de 13,39 %. Toutefois, si l'agriculteur vend sa ferme à son fils, cette vente sera enregistrée sous forme de dividende, plutôt que comme gain en capital, et il devra payer 47,4 % d'impôts. La différence est énorme, et je crois que nous pouvons tous convenir que c'est carrément injuste.
La deuxième citation que je voudrais faire reprend les paroles de Mme Robyn Young, présidente désignée de l'Association des courtiers d'assurances du Canada.
Elle a dit:
En conclusion, c’est une question d’équité et de justice. Les propriétaires d’entreprise ne devraient pas être pénalisés pour avoir vendu leur entreprise à un membre de leur famille. La décision de vendre une entreprise à un membre de la famille ne devrait jamais être fonction des répercussions fiscales.
Je pourrais citer de nombreux autres excellents témoins qui ont fait valoir cette grave injustice, y compris l'UPA, la Fédération canadienne de l'agriculture, d'autres organismes d'agriculteurs et de pêcheurs, le directeur principal de la fiscalité de Deloitte, des sociétés de souscription et plus encore. Je pense toutefois que les députés ont compris où je voulais en venir.
Les petites entreprises, les agriculteurs et les pêcheurs sont l'épine dorsale de nombreuses localités. Les familles qui transmettent une entreprise d'une génération à l'autre façonnent l'histoire et la personnalité d'un grand nombre des collectivités du pays. Nous devons offrir à ces familles toutes les chances de le faire.
Il est tout à fait vrai que, pendant la pandémie, le gouvernement fédéral n'a ménagé aucun effort pour soutenir les Canadiens, les entreprises, les agriculteurs et les pêcheurs. Cependant, la politique fiscale ne devrait pas dissuader les gens de transmettre leur entreprise à la nouvelle génération. L'équité fiscale devrait servir de base pour encourager les transferts intergénérationnels. Le projet de loi ferait progresser la politique fiscale dans cette direction.
Le ministère des Finances du Canada et le gouvernement ont toujours la possibilité de proposer des corrections dans le cadre d'une motion de voies et moyens si les préoccupations exprimées devant le comité se concrétisent. C'est en soi une mesure de protection. Ils peuvent agir assez rapidement en ayant recours à une motion de voies et moyens. Cependant, les agriculteurs, les pêcheurs et les propriétaires de petites entreprises attendent depuis des années ces modifications qui permettront de remédier à l'injustice du système fiscal.
Nous devons changer la façon dont les choses se passent. Plutôt que de faire attendre les familles qui souhaitent effectuer des transferts intergénérationnels, nous devons adopter le projet de loi et changer les choses. S'il y a un problème, le gouvernement doit le régler. J'encourage les autres députés à reconnaître le problème.
Je vais certainement appuyer le projet de loi C-208 et j'espère que les autres députés feront de même.
View Xavier Barsalou-Duval Profile
BQ (QC)
Madam Speaker, I want to congratulate my colleague on his speech, which was interesting. My speech will be along the same lines as his, as it was all very sensible.
In his speech, my colleague said that Bill C-208, an act to amend the Income Tax Act, is not partisan. The bill does not belong to the Liberal Party, the Conservative Party, the NDP or the Bloc Québécois.
In fact, since there were no questions and comments following the remarks by the previous speaker, I would like to point out an oversight. I believe it was an oversight. Perhaps not, but I hope it was.
He mentioned some of the previous versions of this bill intended to facilitate the transfer of family businesses. Yes, the hon. member for Bourassa did in fact introduce legislation to facilitate the transfer of family businesses when he was in opposition a few years ago. Yes, it is also true that the former member for Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, Guy Caron, had also introduced legislation to facilitate the transfer of family businesses.
However, my colleague may have forgotten that the member speaking right now, in other words me, also had the opportunity to introduce Bill C-275, which sought to facilitate the transfer of family businesses. I introduced it at roughly the same time as my former colleague from Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques. In fact, as we were announcing the introduction of this bill, my former colleague from Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques thought it was such a good idea that he quickly introduced his bill as well.
There was a bit of a friendly competition about doing the right thing. We wanted parents who want to hand down their business to their children to stop being penalized. This only makes sense, because it is good to see a family's achievement carry on.
Now it is the Conservatives' turn to introduce a similar bill. At the time, when they were in government, the Conservatives were against it, but now they support the cause. Of course we are very pleased to see that, but we are still disappointed to see that the current Liberal government does not seem to want to support the bill. It is hard to understand. How is it that when the Liberal and Conservative parties are in the opposition they want to do the right thing, but when they are in power they do not? That is quite disappointing, to say the least.
When this type of bill is introduced, many people pay attention to the ongoing debates. When the bill was introduced, and then when we began debating it, I immediately alerted certain businesses in my riding as well as some people I went to school with who also wanted to take over their family businesses. After seeing so many bills fail, they were all excited and hoped that this one would come to fruition.
In the meantime, after so many bills failed to pass in previous parliaments, the Quebec government decided to act. Quebec changed its tax legislation to allow the transfer of family businesses. It would seem that the federal government is frozen and incapable of moving forward. When either the Liberals or the Conservatives come to power, everything suddenly stops and fails to move forward.
I am making a heartfelt plea, which I believe echoes the pleas of the people who have been contacting me. They want to know what progress has been made on this bill and whether it will pass. Sometimes I tell them that even if my bill does not pass, some measures might well be included in a budget. In several economic updates and even in some budgets, the government stated that it would work to facilitate the transfer of family businesses and that it would examine the legislation to make certain improvements.
Once again, the government is giving people hope. People are thinking that maybe the government is finally going to do something. It is disappointing, because year after year there is always a holdup. Is it an administrative problem or does the bill run counter to some kind of interest? I do not know who would have an interest in preventing families from passing their business from one family member to another.
Passing a business on to the next generation is not easy. It is rare. People often say that it is difficult to transfer a business and to encourage their children to take over the family business. When their children do want to take over, why are we stopping them from doing so? Why would we financially penalize those who pass their business on to family members but not penalize those who do not? Why is it more profitable to sell one's business to anyone other than one's own children?
For example, I could sell my business to a stranger and make more money. There are many parents who have to think about that option. Obviously, all parents want what is best for their children, but when they see that passing their business on to their children could, in some cases, cost them hundreds of thousands of dollars, many of them have to stop and think about whether doing so is financially viable for them. Not all business owners have millions of dollars put away. Often these business owners invested in their business thinking that they would use it for their retirement. They therefore want to be able to benefit from it.
This is creating quite the dilemma for people. If they pass their business on to their children, then they may have to forgo their retirement. It is really disappointing to see that this situation has not yet been resolved. That is why I wanted to speak today, to bring to light this issue, this problem.
We also have to look further ahead. What happens when there is no one in a family to take over the business? The owner has to seek out someone else, approaching businesses or people who are already well established, such as a competitor, a bigger company. That is what poses a problem.
Family farms can disappear when they are taken over by larger farms. I have nothing against large farms, by why not let small businesses exist and prosper, run by people who are working for themselves and being their own boss? I think that would be nice. However, we are faced with a bill that hinders that possibility.
If we let farms disappear, if we let small businesses disappear because there is nobody to take them over, we are making other people think it is not easy to start a business or start a farm. Ultimately, if we want to allow those transfers, if we want to avoid seeing mega-businesses and mega-farms that are held by shareholders and operated by absentee executives and managers who live who knows where or are very far away from the customer, the consumer, we have to be flexible and attentive to this concern.
I studied accounting. Business owners and I are not the only ones saying we are frustrated. We are also hearing that from accountants, accounting students and professors, who have been saying for ages that the government is not interested in listening or understanding. We were hearing it back in the early 2000s, when I was in university. Professors did not understand why the government was not doing something about this issue. All the students were appalled to learn that, by law, this kind of capital gain was considered a dividend, which meant at least twice as much tax had to be paid on that gain. Financially, that hurts. Like it or not, money influences these decisions and affects the young people who would like to take over.
As I see that my time is almost up and I do not want you to interrupt, Madam Speaker, I will conclude with a heartfelt plea. I implore the government to finally listen to the wishes of the business world, small businesses, members of the House and members of the Standing Committee on Finance and to do the right thing by supporting and passing this much-needed bill.
Madame la Présidente, je tiens d'abord à saluer le discours de mon prédécesseur qui était intéressant. Mon discours ira essentiellement dans le même sens que le sien, parce que cela relève du gros bon sens.
Dans son discours, mon collègue a mentionné que le projet de loi C-208, visant à modifier la Loi de l’impôt sur le revenu n'était pas partisan. Ce projet de loi n'appartient ni au Parti libéral ni au Parti conservateur, ni au NPD ni au Bloc québécois.
D'ailleurs, puisqu’il n'y a pas eu de questions et d'observations à la suite du discours de mon prédécesseur, je tiens à souligner un oubli. J'estime que c'est un oubli. Ce n'est peut-être pas le cas, mais j'espère que ce l'est.
Il a mentionné certains projets de loi qui visaient à permettre la transmission des entreprises familiales. En fait, il est tout à fait vrai que le député de Bourassa avait déposé un projet de loi visant à faciliter le transfert des entreprises familiales alors qu'il était dans l'opposition, il y a quelques années. Il est aussi tout à fait vrai que l'ancien député de Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques Guy Caron avait aussi déposé un projet de loi visant à faciliter le transfert d'entreprises familiales.
Cependant, mon collègue a peut-être oublié que le député qui prend la parole en ce moment, c'est-à-dire moi-même, a aussi eu l'occasion de déposer le projet de loi C-275, qui visait à faciliter le transfert des entreprises familiales. Je l'avais déposé à peu près au même moment que mon ancien collègue de Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques. En fait, au moment où nous annoncions le dépôt de ce projet de loi, mon ex-collègue de Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques avait trouvé que c'était tellement une bonne idée qu'il s'était dépêché lui aussi à déposer son projet de loi.
Il y avait une petite compétition sympathique relativement à la volonté de bien faire. Nous voulions que les parents qui veulent transmettre leur entreprise à leurs enfants cessent d'être pénalisés. Cela va de soi, car il est beau de voir l'œuvre familiale se perpétuer à travers le temps.
Aujourd'hui, c'est maintenant au tour des conservateurs de déposer un projet de loi qui va dans ce sens. À l'époque, alors qu'ils dirigeaient le gouvernement, les conservateurs s'y opposaient et, maintenant, ils sont sympathiques à la cause. Bien sûr, nous sommes très heureux de voir cela. Cependant, nous sommes encore déçus de voir que le gouvernement libéral actuel ne semble pas vouloir appuyer le projet de loi. C'est un peu difficile à comprendre. Comment se fait-il que, quand les partis libéral et conservateur sont dans l'opposition, ils veulent faire la bonne chose, alors que, quand ils arrivent au pouvoir, ils ne le veulent plus. C'est ordinaire.
Quand ce genre de projet de loi est déposé, beaucoup de gens suivent la progression des débats avec attention. Dès le dépôt du projet de loi et lors des premières occasions que nous avons eues d'en débattre, j'ai tout de suite averti certaines entreprises de ma circonscription, ainsi que des anciens collègues avec qui j'avais étudié, qui voulaient, eux aussi, prendre la relève de l'entreprise familiale. Après avoir vu tant de projets de loi ne jamais aboutir, ils étaient tous excités et espéraient que cette fois-ci serait la bonne.
Entretemps, après tant de projets avortés lors des législatures précédentes, il faut savoir que le gouvernement du Québec a décidé de bouger. Le Québec a changé la loi sur l'impôt pour permettre le transfert des entreprises familiales. Au fédéral, on dirait qu'ils sont figés et ne sont pas capables de bouger. Quand les libéraux ou les conservateurs arrivent au pouvoir, tout d'un coup, les choses bloquent et n'avancent plus.
Je lance un cri du cœur qui, je pense, qui se veut l'écho des gens qui me contactent. On me demande où on en est rendu avec ce projet de loi, s'il sera adopté. Parfois, je leur dis que, même si mon projet de loi n'a pas été adopté, il se pourrait qu'on retrouve certaines mesures dans un budget. Dans plusieurs mises à jour économique, et même dans certains budgets, le gouvernement dit qu'il va travailler à faciliter les transferts d'entreprises familiales, et qu'il va regarder le cadre législatif dans le but d'apporter certaines améliorations.
Encore une fois, on sème de l'espoir. On dit qu'enfin on va peut-être faire quelque chose. Or c'est décevant, parce que, d'année en année, il y a toujours un blocage. S'agit-il d'un blocage sur le plan administratif ou est-ce que ce projet va à l'encontre d'un intérêt quelconque? Je ne vois pas qui aurait intérêt à empêcher les familles de transmettre leur entreprise d'un membre à l'autre.
La relève entrepreneuriale n'est pas facile, elle est rare. On dit souvent qu'il est difficile de transférer une entreprise et de donner aux enfants le goût de prendre la relève. Quand ils ont le goût de le faire, pourquoi est-ce qu'on les en empêcherait? Pourquoi est-ce qu'on pénaliserait financièrement ceux qui le font par rapport à ceux qui ne le font pas? Comment se fait-il qu'il soit plus payant de vendre son entreprise à n'importe qui d'autre qu'à ses enfants?
Par exemple, je peux vendre mon entreprise à un étranger et je vais me faire plus d'argent. Il y a donc bien des parents qui doivent y penser. Évidemment, tous les parents souhaitent le mieux pour leurs enfants, mais, quand on voit que la différence peut parfois représenter des centaines de milliers de dollars, cela fait réfléchir bien du monde sur le plan financier. Ce ne sont pas tous les entrepreneurs qui ont mis des millions de dollars de côté. Souvent, ces entrepreneurs ont investi dans leur entreprise en se disant qu'elle serait leur retraite. Ils veulent donc pouvoir bénéficier de leur retraite.
On place les gens devant un gros dilemme, celui de transférer l'entreprise à leurs enfants et se priver de leur retraite. Il est vraiment décevant de voir que cette situation n'est pas encore réglée. C'est pour cela que je tenais à prendre la parole aujourd'hui, pour mettre l'accent sur cette question, ce problème.
Il faut voir plus loin aussi. Que se passe-t-il quand on ne trouve pas dans sa famille quelqu'un qui reprendra l'entreprise? On va chercher, on va se tourner vers des entreprises ou des gens qui sont déjà établis: un concurrent, une plus grosse compagnie. C'est là que survient un problème.
Pensons aux fermes familiales qui peuvent disparaître lorsqu'elles sont rachetées par de plus grosses fermes. Je n'ai rien contre les grosses fermes, mais pourquoi ne pas permettre à de petites entreprises de prospérer et d'exister, exploitées par des gens qui sont maîtres de leur propre emploi, qui sont leur propre patron? Il me semble que ce serait beau de voir cela. Cependant, nous sommes aux prises avec une législation qui nuit à cette possibilité.
Si on laisse les fermes disparaître, si on laisse les petites entreprises disparaître faute de relève, on force d'autres personnes à se dire que ce n'est pas facile de démarrer une entreprise et que ce n'est pas facile non plus de démarrer une ferme. Au bout du compte, si on veut permettre cette transmission, si on veut éviter de voir des méga-entreprises ou des méga-fermes, détenues par des actionnaires et exploitées par des dirigeants et des gestionnaires désincarnés dont on ignore où ils vivent ou qui sont très loin du client, du consommateur, il faut faire preuve de flexibilité et d'écoute par rapport à cette préoccupation qui nous est présentée.
J'ai fait des études de comptabilité. Les entrepreneurs et moi ne sommes pas les seuls à exprimer cette frustration. Elle est aussi exprimée par des comptables, des étudiants en comptabilité, des professeurs, qui disent depuis longtemps que le gouvernement ne veut ni comprendre ni écouter. On entendait déjà cela dès le début des années 2000, quand j'étais à l'université. Les professeurs ne comprenaient pas le blocage gouvernemental. Les étudiants étaient tous estomaqués de voir que la loi considérait ce gain en capital comme un dividende, obligeant à payer au moins le double d'impôt sur le gain réalisé. Cela fait mal financièrement. Qu'on le veuille ou non, l'argent influence les décisions et, malgré tout, ces jeunes qui aimeraient prendre la relève.
Comme je vois que mon temps de parole est bientôt écoulé et parce que je ne voudrais pas que vous m'interrompiez, madame la Présidente, je termine sur un appel du cœur. J'implore le gouvernement d'enfin entendre la volonté exprimée par le monde des affaires, les petits entrepreneurs, les députés à la Chambre et les membres du Comité permanent des finances et qu'il fasse la bonne chose en appuyant ce fameux projet de loi afin qu'il soit adopté.
View Alistair MacGregor Profile
NDP (BC)
Madam Speaker, it is a great honour to be standing virtually in the House and speaking to Bill C-208. I would like to thank the member for Brandon—Souris for being the sponsor of this bill. He is the latest in a fairly long line of MPs who have been trying to achieve this legislative proposal.
I was present in the 42nd Parliament when my former colleague, Guy Caron, brought in Bill C-274, and I remember his passionate speech in the House of Commons during its second reading. He was trying to illustrate the reasons why that legislation was so important. It was great to witness that speech, but ultimately it was very disappointing to see the vote results when the Liberal government at the time used its majority to prevent the bill from going any further.
I am glad to see this time it has been different, by virtue of the fact that we are in a minority Parliament and the opposition used its combined numbers to send this bill to the Standing Committee on Finance where it had a good airing. We got to hear from many witnesses, and ultimately the committee decided to send the bill back to us for our final consideration. It is my sincere hope that this bill will be sent off to the other place and that we can look forward to royal assent, hopefully in the near future.
When Bill C-274 was being considered in the previous Parliament, I had a meeting with the Port Renfrew Chamber of Commerce. I was given a 10-minute speaking spot during their AGM, and when I talked about Bill C-274 at that time and about what we were hoping to do, I got unanimous positive feedback from the members of that chamber. For those who do not know, Port Renfrew is on the southwest coast of Vancouver Island. Many people there depend on fishing for their livelihoods. They are either commercial fishermen or are in sport fishing, so they have small fishing corporations. To have the ability put forward to transfer their businesses to family members really meant a lot to them. There was overwhelmingly positive feedback. I ultimately had to give them bad news, but here we are with a real opportunity to try to bring about some positive change.
This bill is pretty much tailor-made for the types of small businesses that exist in the riding I represent, Cowichan—Malahat—Langford. Like so many members before me, I want to acknowledge the pain and suffering that small businesses have gone through over the last year. I think it is incumbent upon us not only to have support programs to help them through the pandemic, but also to bring about long-term systemic change to important statutes such as the Income Tax Act, so that we can make their business operations and their succession planning that much easier.
My riding is dominated by farming as well. Here in the Cowichan Valley we have a beautiful climate. It is, I think, Canada's only Mediterranean climate and we have a very long and storied agricultural history. We have generational family farms here. Some have the fifth generation of a family farming the same plot of land. If we can bring about legislative change that makes succession easier and gives them peace of mind, I think we are doing a good thing.
I also want to give a shout-out to the five chambers of commerce in my riding: Chemainus, Cowichan Lake District, Duncan Cowichan, Port Renfrew and WestShore. They have all been incredible advocates for their members. I have been staying in touch with them quite consistently over the last year and their feedback during this pandemic has been invaluable in helping me, as a member, advocate on their behalf in Ottawa to make sure that the federal government's policies and programs are reflecting their needs.
I will concentrate mostly on family farms, given the nature of my riding and the fact that I am the NDP's critic for agriculture and agrifood. When we look at family farms, we are looking at $50 billion in farm assets that are set to change hands over the next 10 years. History has shown us that roughly 8,000 family farms have disappeared over the last decade.
The National Farmers Union has done an incredible report on the status of Canada's farms, called “Tackling the Farm Crisis and the Climate Crisis”. It not only looks at agriculture in the context of climate change, but also the financial footing that many farms are on and how shaky it is. According to the NFU, Canadian farm debt has doubled since the year 2000. That is in 21 short years. It was listed at $106 billion in 2019.
Many farms have to chase income from off-farm work, taxpayer support programs and other farm sources. That is just a reality for so many small farms. What is really concerning is that we have lost two-thirds of our young farmers since 1991. The family farm is pretty much being systematically destroyed in Canada, and we need to put measures in place that are going to help.
Why is Bill C-208 so important? The owners of small businesses, family farms and fishing operations who want to retire want to be able to sell to their children because it is often their children who have been brought up in the family business and on the family farm. From a young age they have learned the culture of the business and what it does, and they often have a lot invested in that business continuing to succeed. The next generation often has very important ideas about where to take that business.
When parents decide to sell their business to their children, the difference between the sale price and the price originally paid is currently considered a dividend, but if they sell their business to an unrelated individual or corporation it is considered a capital gain. Unlike capital gains, a divided does not include the right to a lifetime exemption and is taxed more heavily. We can make a measurable improvement in allowing families to pass on businesses that might have been part of a family for generations to their children, making it easier for that work to get done.
I want to recognize the work done at the Standing Committee on Finance. I appreciate the witnesses who appeared. Many of them also appeared at the agriculture committee. We heard important testimony from the CFIB, the Grain Growers of Canada, L'Union des producteurs agricoles and, of course, the Canadian Federation of Agriculture, which has been such an incredibly important voice for farmers from coast to coast to coast.
They noted at committee that the average age of Canadian farmers is now above 55, and the opportunities these businesses face will carry into the next generation. It is a sector in which the vast majority of businesses remain family owned, and maintaining the financial health of those businesses across generations is critical. At committee, the CFA very clearly said that it supported Bill C-208 because it would ensure that real family farm transfers could access the same capital gains treatment as businesses selling to unrelated parties, rather than treating the difference as a dividend that was taxed at a higher rate and not being able to access the lifetime capital gains exemption.
We have an important opportunity before us. During the vote at second reading, I was sad to see that 145 Liberal MPs voted against this bill. Two Liberal MPs supported it. It is my sincere hope that when this bill comes to a final vote to be sent to the Senate, Liberals can finally see this as an important opportunity and can represent the interests of small businesses, family farms and fishing corporations by making this much-needed change to the Income Tax Act and doing right by their constituents.
I, for one, will be proud to vote in favour of Bill C-208 and send it on its journey. I look forward to the day when we can finally see it receive royal assent.
Madame la Présidente, c’est pour moi un grand honneur de m’adresser de façon virtuelle à la Chambre et de parler du projet de loi C-208. Je remercie le député de Brandon–Souris qui parraine le projet de loi. Il est le dernier d’une très longue lignée de députés qui ont essayé de faire adopter cette mesure législative.
J’étais présent à la 42e législature lorsque mon ancien collègue, Guy Caron, a présenté le projet de loi C-274. Je me souviens du discours passionné qu’il avait prononcé à la Chambre des communes à la deuxième lecture du document. Il essayait de faire comprendre les raisons pour lesquelles le projet de loi était si important. Le discours était formidable, mais, au bout du compte, nous avons eu la très grande déception de voir le gouvernement libéral de l’époque se servir de sa majorité pour empêcher son adoption.
Je suis heureux de constater que, cette fois-ci, les choses sont différentes du fait que le gouvernement est minoritaire et que l’opposition a pu ainsi renvoyer le projet de loi au Comité permanent des finances, où il a fait l’objet d’une bonne discussion. Nous avons pu entendre de nombreux témoins. Finalement, le comité a décidé de nous renvoyer le projet de loi pour l’examen final. J’espère sincèrement que le projet de loi sera soumis à l’autre endroit et qu’il recevra la sanction royale dans un avenir prochain.
Lorsque le projet de loi C-274 a été examiné à la législature précédente, j’ai assisté à l’assemblée générale annuelle de la Chambre de commerce de Port Renfrew au cours de laquelle on m’a accordé un temps de parole de 10 minutes. Lorsque j’ai parlé du projet de loi C–274 et de ce que nous espérions faire, la rétroaction a été unanimement positive. Pour ceux qui ne le savent pas, Port Renfrew se situe sur la côte sud-ouest de l’île de Vancouver. Beaucoup de gens là-bas vivent de la pêche, que ce soit de la pêche commerciale ou de la pêche sportive, et ils ont tous de petites entreprises. Il est donc réellement important pour eux de pouvoir transférer leur entreprise à un membre de la famille. La rétroaction a été extrêmement positive. Toutefois, j’ai dû finalement leur annoncer une mauvaise nouvelle, mais nous avons maintenant une possibilité réelle d’apporter un changement positif.
Le projet de loi est pas mal taillé sur mesure pour le type de petites entreprises installées dans ma circonscription, Cowichan—Malahat—Langford. Comme tant d’autres députés avant moi, je désire rappeler que les petites entreprises ont traversé une période très douloureuse au cours de la dernière année. Il nous incombe donc non seulement de fournir des programmes de soutien pour les aider tout au long de la pandémie, mais également d'apporter un changement systémique à long terme à des lois importantes, comme la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu, pour permettre à ces entreprises de fonctionner et de planifier leur succession beaucoup plus facilement.
Ma circonscription compte également beaucoup d’agriculteurs. Nous jouissons d’un magnifique climat dans la vallée de la Cowichan. C’est, je crois, le seul climat méditerranéen du Canada, et nous avons une très longue et très riche tradition agricole. Nous avons des fermes familiales transmises de génération en génération; certaines appartiennent à la même famille depuis cinq générations. Si nous pouvons faire adopter ce projet de loi qui facilitera les successions et qui assurera aux intéressés la tranquillité d’esprit, nous aurons fait une bien bonne chose.
Je veux également saluer les responsables des cinq chambres de commerce de ma circonscription: Chemainus, Cowichan Lake District, Duncan Cowichan, Port Renfrew et WestShore. Ils ont tous merveilleusement bien défendu leurs membres. J’ai été en liaison avec eux très souvent au cours de la dernière année et leur rétroaction pendant la pandémie m’a été précieuse, comme député, pour défendre leurs intérêts à Ottawa et veiller à ce que les politiques et les programmes du gouvernement fédéral répondent à leurs besoins.
Je vais parler principalement des fermes familiales, étant donné la réalité de ma circonscription et le fait que je suis le porte-parole du NPD pour l’agriculture et l’agroalimentaire. On estime que des actifs agricoles d’une valeur de 50 milliards de dollars changeront de mains au cours des dix prochaines années. On sait maintenant qu’environ 8 000 fermes familiales ont disparu au cours de la dernière décennie.
L’Union nationale des fermiers a produit un excellent rapport intitulé « Lutter contre la crise agricole et la crise climatique », sur la situation à laquelle le monde agricole est confronté au Canada. On n’y parle pas seulement de l’agriculture dans le contexte des changements climatiques, mais également des difficultés financières avec lesquelles nombre d’agriculteurs sont aux prises. Selon l’Union, la dette des fermes canadiennes a doublé depuis l’an 2000, c'est-à-dire en seulement 21 ans. La dette s’élevait à 106 milliards en 2019.
Beaucoup d'agriculteurs dépendent d’un travail à l’extérieur, de programmes de soutien des contribuables et d’autres sources de revenus. Telle est la réalité pour beaucoup de petites fermes. Ce qui est vraiment préoccupant, c’est que nous avons perdu les deux tiers de nos jeunes agriculteurs depuis 1991. La ferme familiale est pas mal en train de disparaître au Canada, et nous devons mettre en place des mesures qui vont aider à redresser la situation.
Pourquoi le projet de loi C-208 est-il si important? Les propriétaires de petites entreprises, de fermes familiales et de compagnies de pêche désireux de prendre leur retraite veulent être en mesure de vendre leur propriété à leurs enfants parce que les enfants ont souvent été élevés dans l’entreprise ou la ferme familiale. Depuis leur jeune âge, ils ont appris le mode de fonctionnement de l’entreprise et ce qu’elle fait et ils y ont souvent beaucoup investi pour en assurer le succès. De plus, la génération suivante a souvent des idées très importantes sur l’orientation à donner à l’entreprise.
Lorsque les parents décident de vendre leur entreprise à leurs enfants, la différence entre le prix de vente et le prix payé à l’origine est actuellement considéré comme étant un dividende, mais s’ils vendent leur entreprise à un étranger ou à une société, le montant est considéré comme un gain en capital. Or, contrairement aux gains en capital, il n’y a pas de droit à une exemption à vie pour un dividende et le montant est alors imposé plus lourdement. Nous pouvons apporter une amélioration mesurable en permettant aux familles de transmettre à leurs enfants les entreprises qui sont les leurs depuis des générations et faciliter ainsi la succession des propriétés.
Je désire souligner le travail effectué au Comité permanent des finances. Je remercie les témoins qui ont comparu. Nombre d’entre eux ont également comparu devant le Comité de l’agriculture. Nous avons entendu des témoignages importants de la Fédération canadienne de l’entreprise indépendante, des Producteurs de grains du Canada, de l’Union des producteurs agricoles et, naturellement, de la Fédération canadienne de l’agriculture qui ont été des porte-parole extrêmement importants des agriculteurs de partout au Canada.
Ils ont fait observer au comité que l’âge moyen des agriculteurs canadiens dépasse 55 ans, et que les possibilités qui s’ouvrent à ces entreprises se maintiendront à la génération suivante. Dans ce secteur, la vaste majorité des entreprises demeurent familiales et se transmettent d’une génération à l’autre, et il est donc extrêmement important d’assurer leur santé financière. À la réunion du comité, la Fédération canadienne de l’entreprise indépendante a déclaré très clairement qu’elle appuyait le projet de loi C-208 parce que la différence entre le prix payé et le prix vendu serait alors traitée comme un gain en capital, comme cela est le cas lorsqu’une entreprise est vendue à un étranger, au lieu d’être traitée comme un dividende imposable à un niveau plus élevé et sans être admissible à l’exemption à vie consentie pour les gains en capital.
Voici une occasion à ne pas rater. Au cours du vote à la deuxième lecture, j’ai été attristé de voir que 145 députés libéraux ont voté contre le projet de loi. Deux députés libéraux l’ont appuyé. J’espère sincèrement que lorsque le projet de loi sera soumis au vote final pour être envoyé au Sénat, les députés libéraux pourront finalement voir qu’ils ont là l'occasion à ne pas rater de servir les intérêts des petites entreprises, des fermes familiales et des entreprises de pêche en apportant ce changement grandement nécessaire à la Loi de l’impôt sur le revenu et faire ainsi ce qu’il faut pour ces gens.
Ce sera pour moi un honneur de voter pour le projet de loi C-208 et de le faire cheminer au Sénat. J’attends avec impatience le moment où il recevra finalement la sanction royale.
View Ted Falk Profile
CPC (MB)
View Ted Falk Profile
2021-05-05 18:24 [p.6708]
Madam Speaker, what a privilege and honour it is to speak to Bill C-208. Not often in the House do we find a private member's bill that has all-party support, and this is one of those unique situations.
For many small business owners, business succession is an important factor to consider when planning for the future. This is no surprise. When they spend so much of their time and energy pouring hour after hour into running their operation, what happens to the fruits of their labour when it is time for them to retire or move on matters to them.
However, surveys tell us that only about half of small businesses have a succession plan. I suspect that is because they are caught up in the day-to-day running of their businesses. However, whether they are thinking about succession early on or are confronting succession decisions near the time of transition, somewhere along the line these entrepreneurs face a frustrating reality: It is more expensive to sell an incorporated small business, or a family farm or fishing enterprise, to a family member than to a stranger.
What is behind this? When a business is sold to a family member, it is considered a dividend. When sold to a stranger, it is considered a capital gain and is eligible for capital gains exemption. In its simplest form, when selling to a family member the tax rate is higher for the seller than when selling to a stranger. That tax rate is significantly lower.
This is not right, and it is not fair. About half of small business owners are hoping to sell or transfer their operations to family members when it is time for them to move on. If members have spent even a little time around family-run businesses, the “why” becomes clear. Sometimes kids are raised in the business and learn the ropes at a young age. They come to know the ins and outs of the business better than anyone. They put in the time, they know the customers and they are established figures in their communities. When the time comes for succession, they are an obvious option for so many reasons.
This is where Bill C-208 comes in. It seeks to achieve tax fairness for business succession by amending the Income Tax Act to level the playing field. It would allow a small business owner the same tax rate when selling their operation to a family member as when selling to a third party. It would correct the injustice within the act that unfairly punishes individuals when they sell their qualifying small business, farm or fishing operation to their own family.
During the finance committee's study of the bill, Brian Janzen, a senior tax manager with Deloitte, gave an example to help members understand just how stark the financial difference currently is between selling to a family member and selling to a stranger. He said:
Right now, if you have a $1-million business and you sell your shares—in a restaurant, let's say—to your neighbour, you will walk away with after-tax proceeds from a $1-million sale of about $971,000. That's only $29,000 of leakage....
There are various ways to sell your shares to your kids under the current regime of section 84.1, but I'll just use the worst-case scenario. The worst-case scenario is that your kid sets up a holding company, or holdco, and buys your shares from you. In Manitoba, that will cost you $466,000 because of the deemed dividend. That's a difference, between the two scenarios, of $437,000. That's just crazy.
He is right. That is crazy, especially when we consider the value small business continuity can have in our communities. Small business owners have often built strong relationships with their customers over the long term. They have employees, whether a couple or a couple dozen, whom they care about and have invested in. They are plugged into their communities in multiple ways. Whether by supporting local food banks, sponsoring sports clubs or donating to construct a new community centre, small businesses are there.
Handing that over to a stranger, perhaps someone from out of town, may not be the best situation for the business owners or their communities. When they have built something and invested plenty of sweat equity in their operation, it is understandable to want to hand it off to someone who can carry on that legacy.
Robyn Young, president-elect of the Insurance Brokers Association of Canada, told the finance committee about her experience of purchasing the family business from her parents. She said:
When my parents decided to sell their business, they received an offer from a large direct writer. They ultimately chose to sell the business to me and my brother, because it was important to them to keep the business they had built within the family. They also wanted to ensure that their clients would continue to receive the same expert advice and personal touch they had come to expect.
She went on to say:
Family-run brokerages are the pillars of the community and the lifeblood of the economy. They serve and support their communities in good times and bad by creating employment and donating time, money and other resources.
These are the considerations for many small business owners looking at succession planning. There needs to be a level playing field that empowers owners to make the best choice for them and their communities.
The current inequity is a reality that impacts a variety of types of small businesses, but I want to take a moment to talk about farm families specifically.
Agriculture is incredibly capital intensive, and as Scott Ross of the Canadian Federation of Agriculture told the finance committee, “effective succession planning is critically important, particularly for a sector that will transfer tens of billions of dollars in assets to the next generation in this decade alone.” Uniquely, the agriculture sector continues to be one where the vast majority of farms, even though they are incorporated, still remain family owned. This has considerable advantages for all Canadians since, as Mr. Ross highlighted, “studies show that family farming encourages sustainable growth, environmental stewardship and increased spending within one’s local community, not to mention its contributions to the social fabric of rural Canada.”
I share several commonalities with the bill's sponsor, the member for Brandon—Souris. For one, we were both elected in the same 2012 by-election. More importantly for today's discussion, we both have “farmer” on our resumes. We are very familiar with the immense benefits that farming and agriculture provide to the communities we represent. By passing Bill C-208, the House can acknowledge the tremendous contributions that our farmers make and can help ensure tax fairness for farm succession.
Throughout debate on this bill, we have heard some members suggest that this change will just benefit the rich or create opportunities for tax avoidance. I want to address this head-on because that is a mischaracterization that finance committee testimony swiftly put to rest.
The bill includes tax-avoidance safeguards mandating that the family member who purchases the operation must maintain their shares for a minimum of five years to avoid penalization. As Deloitte senior tax manager Brian Janzen confirmed, “This bill is helping the lower end of the small business community. It is not helping the huge, rich companies, even if they're family owned.” He also told the finance committee that Bill C-208 has enough guardrails to prevent tax avoidance, even as he urged vigilance so that tweaks could be made if required.
Like all colleagues, I wanted to make sure that the bill did not providing an undue benefit to large corporations. I therefore asked Mr. Jansen very specifically about those concerns. He said it did not benefit large corporations, “partly because of the guardrails you have in this bill, but also because for the larger companies...section 84.1 and the capital gains exemption didn't even come into play. The numbers are big enough that this is just...not material to the larger private businesses. This is really helping the small private business.”
It is clear that this bill strikes the right balance between providing tax fairness and preventing abuse. I encourage any members who feel differently to review the testimony before the finance committee. They will see experts addressing these concerns and urging the bill's swift passage.
There were 145 Liberal members who voted against this common-sense bill at second reading. Meanwhile, members of all the opposition parties supported it, and so did two Liberal MPs. I sincerely appreciate the two Liberal members who voted in favour of this bill. They recognized the positive impact that it would have on their constituents. I hope that the testimony we have heard since that time will help other Liberal MPs better understand why they ought to lend their support to Bill C-208. Their constituents deserve tax fairness.
I want to wrap up by saying thanks to the member for Brandon—Souris for introducing this pertinent legislation. His efforts are going to make a real difference in the lives of many small business owners and farm families. We have seen iterations of this bill brought forward by multiple parties over the years, and this goes to show that there is cross-party support for this bill. It is time to get it over the finish line.
I invite all my colleagues to support small business and vote in favour of Bill C-208. Let us get it passed and get it to the Senate. Hopefully it will deal with it as expeditiously as the House has. I am thankful for the opportunity to speak to the bill.
Madame la Présidente, quel privilège et quel honneur de prendre la parole au sujet du projet de loi C-208. Il n’arrive pas souvent à la Chambre de tomber sur un projet de loi d’initiative parlementaire qui a l’appui de tous les partis, et nous sommes dans l’une de ces situations uniques.
Pour de nombreux propriétaires de petite entreprise, la relève est un élément important dont il faut tenir compte au moment de planifier l’avenir. Cela n’a rien de surprenant. Comme ils consacrent une très grande partie de leur temps et de leur énergie à exploiter leur entreprise, qu’arrive-t-il au fruit de leur travail lorsqu’ils doivent prendre leur retraite ou s’occuper d’eux-mêmes?
Cependant, les sondages nous indiquent qu’environ la moitié seulement des petites entreprises ont un plan de relève. Je soupçonne que c’est parce que les propriétaires sont pris dans le quotidien de leur affaire. Qu’ils songent à leur relève tôt ou qu’ils doivent prendre des décisions concernant la relève à l’approche de la transition, ces entrepreneurs font face à une réalité frustrante. Ils s’aperçoivent qu’il est plus coûteux de vendre une petite entreprise constituée en société, une exploitation agricole ou encore une entreprise de pêche familiale à un membre de la famille qu’à un étranger.
Pourquoi? Eh bien, le produit de la vente d’une entreprise à un membre de la famille est considéré comme un dividende. Quand l’affaire est vendue à un étranger, elle donne plutôt lieu à un gain en capital qui est admissible à l’exonération des gains en capital. C’est simple: le taux d’imposition est plus élevé pour le vendeur qui vend à un membre de sa famille plutôt qu’à un étranger. Dans ce dernier cas, le taux d’imposition est nettement inférieur.
Ce n’est pas normal et ce n’est pas juste. La moitié environ des propriétaires de petite entreprise espèrent vendre ou transférer leurs activités à des membres de leur famille quand le temps sera venu pour eux de passer à autre chose. Il suffit d’avoir passé un peu de temps au sein d’une entreprise familiale pour comprendre cette aspiration. Les enfants qui sont élevés dans l’entreprise familiale apprennent les ficelles du métier à un jeune âge. Ils en viennent à connaître les tenants et aboutissants de leur secteur d’activité mieux que quiconque. Ils investissent du temps dans l’affaire, ils connaissent les clients et ils sont établis dans leurs collectivités. Quand vient le temps de la relève, ils représentent une option évidente pour de nombreuses raisons.
C'est là où le projet de loi C-208 entre en jeu. Il vise à établir l'équité fiscale pour la succession des entreprises en apportant des modifications à la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu afin que tout le monde soit sur un pied d'égalité. Un propriétaire de petite entreprise serait assujetti au même taux d'imposition, qu'il vende son entreprise à un membre de sa famille ou à un tiers. Cela redresserait l'injustice au sein de la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu qui punit de façon injuste les personnes qui vendent une petite entreprise, une société agricole ou une société de pêche admissibles à un membre de leur propre famille.
Durant l'étude du projet de loi par le comité des finances, Brian Janzen, directeur principal de la fiscalité chez Deloitte, a fourni un exemple pour aider les membres du comité à bien saisir l'ampleur de la différence, sur le plan financier, qui existe actuellement entre vendre à un membre de la famille ou à un étranger. Il s'est exprimé comme suit:
À l’heure actuelle, si vous avez une entreprise de 1 million de dollars — un restaurant, par exemple — et que vous vendez vos actions à votre voisin pour ce prix, vous vous retrouverez avec un produit après impôt d’environ 971 000 $. Cela ne représente que 29 000 $ de pertes.
[…] il existe bien des façons de vendre vos actions à vos enfants en vertu du régime actuel de l’article 84.1, mais je vais utiliser le pire des scénarios. Dans le pire des cas, votre enfant crée une société de portefeuille et achète vos actions. Au Manitoba, cela vous coûtera 466 000 $ à cause du dividende réputé. La différence entre les deux scénarios est de 437 000 $. C’est tout simplement fou.
Il a raison, c'est complètement dingue, surtout quand on pense à tout ce que la continuité des petites entreprises peut apporter à nos communautés. Les propriétaires de petites entreprises tissent souvent des liens solides avec leurs clients au fil des ans. Que leurs employés se comptent sur les doigts de la main ou par dizaines, ils tiennent à eux et ont investi dans ces gens. Ils sont intégrés à leur communauté de plusieurs façons. Qu'il s'agisse de soutenir les banques alimentaires locales, de commanditer des équipes sportives ou de faire un don pour la construction d'un nouveau centre communautaire, les petites entreprises sont de la partie.
Pour les propriétaires d'entreprise et la communauté, le transfert d'une entreprise à un étranger, peut-être même à un étranger qui vient d'une autre ville, n'est pas nécessairement une solution idéale. Ils ont bâti une entreprise à la sueur de leur front. On peut donc comprendre qu'ils souhaitent la transmettre à une personne qui pourra perpétuer cet héritage.
Robyn Young, présidente désignée de l'Association des courtiers d'assurances du Canada, a racheté l'entreprise de ses parents. Quand elle a parlé de cette expérience au comité des finances, elle a dit ceci:
Quand mes parents ont décidé de vendre leur entreprise, ils ont reçu une offre d’un gros assureur direct. En fin de compte, ils ont décidé de nous vendre l’entreprise, à moi et à mon frère, parce qu’ils estimaient important de garder au sein de la famille ce qu’ils avaient bâti. Ils voulaient également s’assurer que leurs clients continueraient de bénéficier des mêmes conseils d’experts et de la même touche personnelle auxquels ils s’attendaient.
Elle a ajouté:
Les maisons de courtage familiales sont les piliers de nos collectivités et le moteur de l’économie. Elles servent les collectivités et les soutiennent dans les bons et les mauvais moments en créant des emplois et en donnant du temps, de l’argent et d’autres ressources.
C'est ce que vivent de nombreux chefs de petite entreprise lorsque vient le temps de penser à leur succession. Les règles du jeu doivent être équitables pour leur permettre de faire le meilleur choix, pour eux et pour la collectivité.
Les iniquités actuelles ont des répercussions sur divers types de petites entreprises, mais c'est des fermes familiales que j'aimerais surtout parler aujourd'hui.
L'agriculture exige beaucoup de capitaux, et comme l'a dit Scott Ross, de la Fédération canadienne de l'agriculture, au comité des finances, « une planification efficace de la relève est essentielle, d'autant plus que ce secteur transférera des dizaines de milliards de dollars d'actifs à la prochaine génération au cours de la présente décennie seulement ». Ce qui est particulier, c'est que le secteur agricole demeure l'un des seuls où la vaste majorité des entreprises, quoique constituées en personnes morales, demeurent des entreprises familiales. Il s'agit d'une situation nettement avantageuse pour les Canadiens, car comme le soulignait M. Ross, « des études montrent que l'agriculture familiale encourage la croissance durable, la bonne gestion de l'environnement et l'augmentation des dépenses dans la collectivité, sans parler de sa contribution au tissu social du Canada rural ».
J'ai plusieurs points communs avec le parrain du projet de loi, le député de Brandon—Souris. D'une part, nous avons tous deux été élus lors de la même élection partielle de 2012. Toutefois, ce qui est plus important encore pour la discussion d'aujourd'hui, c'est que nous avons tous les deux été agriculteurs. Nous connaissons très bien les énormes avantages que l'agriculture et l'élevage apportent aux collectivités que nous représentons. En adoptant le projet de loi C-208, la Chambre peut reconnaître les immenses contributions des agriculteurs et elle peut assurer l'équité fiscale pour la relève agricole.
Tout au long du débat sur le projet de loi, nous avons entendu certains députés nous dire que les modifications apportées ne profiteront qu'aux riches ou qu'elles créeront des possibilités d'évasion fiscale. Je veux aborder la question de front, car il s'agit d'une mauvaise interprétation que les témoignages devant le comité des finances ont rapidement démentie.
Le projet de loi comprend des mesures de protection contre l'évasion fiscale qui exige que le membre de la famille qui achète l'entreprise conserve ses actions pendant au moins cinq ans pour éviter d'être pénalisé. Comme le confirme Brian Janzen, directeur principal de la fiscalité chez Deloitte, le projet de loi « aide les plus petites entreprises, pas les grandes sociétés riches, même si elles sont familiales ». Il a également dit au comité des finances que le projet de loi C-208 comportait suffisamment de garde-fous pour empêcher l'évitement fiscal. Il nous appelle néanmoins à la vigilance parce qu'il sera peut-être nécessaire d'ajuster les garde-fous plus tard.
Comme tous mes collègues, je voulais m’assurer que le projet de loi n’offrait pas d’avantage indu aux grandes entreprises. J’ai donc posé des questions très précises à M. Janzen à ce sujet. Il a dit que cela ne profitait pas aux grandes sociétés, « en partie grâce aux garde-fous prévus dans le projet de loi, mais aussi parce que, pour les grandes entreprises [...] l'article 84.1 et l'exemption pour gains en capital n'entrent même pas en ligne de compte. Les chiffres sont suffisamment élevés pour que ce soit simplement... Ce n'est pas important pour les grandes entreprises privées. Cela aide vraiment les petites entreprises privées ».
Il est clair que ce projet de loi établit un juste équilibre entre l’équité fiscale et la prévention des abus. J’incite tous les députés qui ne partagent pas cet avis à examiner les témoignages entendus par le comité des finances. Ils y verront que des experts se penchent sur ces préoccupations et exhortent le gouvernement à adopter rapidement le projet de loi.
À l’étape de la deuxième lecture, 145 députés libéraux ont voté contre ce projet de loi par ailleurs très sensé. Pendant ce temps, les députés de tous les partis de l’opposition l’ont appuyé, de même que deux députés libéraux. Je suis sincèrement reconnaissant envers les deux députés libéraux qui ont voté en faveur de ce projet de loi. Ils ont reconnu les effets positifs que cette mesure aurait sur leurs concitoyens. J’espère que les témoignages que nous avons entendus depuis lors permettront à d’autres députés libéraux de mieux comprendre pourquoi ils devraient appuyer le projet de loi C-208. Les électeurs de leur circonscription méritent l’équité fiscale.
Je conclurai en remerciant le député de Brandon—Souris d’avoir présenté cette mesure législative pertinente. Ses efforts vont vraiment améliorer la vie de nombreux propriétaires de petites entreprises et de familles agricoles. Au fil des ans, différents partis ont présenté des versions de ce projet de loi, ce qui montre que celui-ci bénéficie de l’appui de tous les partis. Il est temps de lui faire franchir la ligne d’arrivée.
J’invite tous mes collègues à appuyer les petites entreprises et à voter en faveur du projet de loi C-208. Adoptons-le et renvoyons-le au Sénat. J’espère qu’il sera adopté aussi rapidement qu’à la Chambre. Je suis heureux d’avoir eu l’occasion d’en parler.
View Sébastien Lemire Profile
BQ (QC)
Madam Speaker, it is an honour and a privilege for me to speak to this bill at third reading stage.
At its annual general meeting, the Syndicat de la relève agricole d'Abitibi-Témiscamingue called on MPs from the Abitibi-Témiscamingue area to support Bill C-208 and to actively contribute to its passage before the next election. That is my role today in bringing debate to a close at third reading.
The resolution of the Syndicat de la relève agricole d'Abitibi-Témiscamingue speaks of fairness when transferring agricultural farms. At present, when an individual sells their shares in their small business or family farm corporation to a family member, the difference between the sale price and the initial purchase price is treated as a dividend. However, if the business or corporation is sold to someone other than a family member, this transaction is treated as a capital gain.
Bill C-208 would give small businesses, farming families and fishing families the same tax treatment whether they sell their business to a family member or a third party. The economic landscape of our region is made up of a growing number of incorporated farms and family fishing corporations, which is why the Syndicat de la relève agricole d'Abitibi-Témiscamingue adopted this resolution, and I am here to honour it.
I had the opportunity to take part in the debate on this bill in November 2020, and I remember that my presentation centred on the fact that, incredible as it may seem, a business owner is currently better off selling their business to outside shareholders than to members of their own family. As I said, under the existing legislation, the transfer of a business to a family member is treated as a dividend and not as a capital gain, unlike a sale to a third party. As a result, owners are not entitled to the lifetime capital gains exemption if they decide to sell the business to their children.
The Bloc Québécois is in favour of Bill C-208. For several years now, my party has been calling for measures to encourage and facilitate the transfer of family businesses, especially in the agriculture and fisheries sectors. I would also like to acknowledge the work of my colleague, the member for Pierre-Boucher—Les Patriotes—Verchères, who had the opportunity to speak before me and who introduced Bill C-275 back in the day.
The Bloc Québécois has been calling for measures to encourage and facilitate the transfer of family businesses for over 15 years. For Quebeckers, the Bloc Québécois and myself, business succession is important. It is also important for our SMEs in general, but especially for family farms in the regions, like the Abitibi-Témiscamingue region. Perhaps we will soon have the opportunity to speak of Bill C-208 and its consequences in the past tense, a thought that fills me with excitement.
The existing legislation makes no sense at all. What is prompting the Liberal Party to vote against Bill C-208? They are raising the possibility of tax abuse and tax fraud, but we know that the Parliamentary Budget Officer questioned the amount of money that the Liberal government estimated would be lost, calculating that it would be tens or hundreds of millions instead of billions of dollars. Speaking of losses, I still do not understand why the government is not cracking down on tax havens.
I would like to share the comments of a farmer from my riding, a friend of mine named Simon Leblond, who was the president of the Fédération de la relève agricole du Québec when I was working for the union. With regard to the transfer of family farms, he said that it is important to maintain a large enough pool of farmers to maintain services for farms and, more generally, to ensure the vitality of the industry, make it known to those outside the world of agriculture, and ensure interest.
Farmers face major challenges, and I think it is important to point that out. Some of the challenges faced by farmers in Abitibi-Témiscamingue and everywhere else include land grabbing, farmland financialization, the whole issue of income security, vet services for farm animals, crop insurance and agricultural drainage. These are major challenges, and improving access to land and quality of life for Quebec's young farmers is one way to ensure a future in agriculture for Quebec's youth.
The more people we have who are willing to take over farms, the more services we will be able to provide. It is a cycle, but unfortunately that cycle has been broken. I hope that we can get that cycle going again and that we will see more and more young people taking over farms. Land prices, quota prices and new forms of agricultural production are leading to higher costs every year, and the red tape is becoming increasingly cumbersome, making it harder and harder for farmers to access land and operate their business. As politicians, we have a responsibility in that regard. I repeat: It is not right that a business owner is better off selling the business to a third party than to their own family members.
The Government of Quebec included measures in its 2016 budget to facilitate the transfer of family businesses in the primary and manufacturing sectors. A change to Quebec's Taxation Act relaxed the rule that prohibited the seller from using the capital gains tax exemption. Quebec has addressed this issue, while the federal government still lags behind, or at least it was lagging until now. I remind members that the Parliamentary Budget Officer assessed the cost of these measures, and his figure was lower than what the federal government was claiming.
I want to get back to the speech my colleague from Berthier—Maskinongé made about Bill C-208 at second reading. I want to make a little aside, though, and I want to acknowledge and commend our colleague, the member for Brandon—Souris, for his leadership. I would like to congratulate the Conservative Party for its leadership in this debate, because Bill C-208 has been given priority on two occasions at third reading. That is why we are debating it today. I hope that we will be able to vote on this bill by next week so that it can be sent to the Senate and then get royal assent. That would be the blessing that so many have hoped for. I will give some examples soon, but I just wanted to mention that.
The member for Berthier—Maskinongé said:
...what we are really talking about are small and medium-sized businesses, which are the backbone of our economy. We need to keep these businesses alive and make sure they survive. We need to make sure that these small businesses can keep going and that they are not put at a disadvantage where they will end up being bought out by big corporations. The survival of these small businesses is directly connected to the survival of our regions. This is why I am appealing to all of my colleagues.
I second my colleague from Berthier—Maskinongé's appeal because the Bloc Québécois stands for human-scale enterprises.
I also want to say that I got to be part of the debates that took place when Bill C-208 was sent to the Standing Committee on Finance. On March 9, Julie Bissonnette, a dairy farmer in L'Avenir and the president of the Fédération de la relève agricole du Québec, and Philippe Pagé, the FRAQ's general director and mayor of Saint-Camille, had this to say:
Bill C-208 is significant for young farmers because we believe it will encourage the transfer of farms to family members and go a long way towards correcting tax unfairness, while supporting a strong farming community.
As an organization whose mission is to protect the interests of the next generation of farmers and improve conditions for those starting out, it has taken a clear position. The FRAQ representatives also wanted the committee to know that some young Canadians are seeing their dreams evaporate because of ill-conceived tax rules. They said:
The numbers speak for themselves. A business that is transferred to a family member is six times more likely to succeed than a business transferred to someone outside the family. What's more, 70% of all entrepreneurs in Quebec would prefer to keep their businesses in the family. Even today, selling a business to a related party is the preferred way to transfer a farm. Our tax system should support all young farmers, no matter their path to business ownership, something the system does not currently do.
Marcel Groleau, from the Union des producteurs agricoles, echoed these comments. During the same meeting, he mentioned the pride that comes from completing a successful transfer, saying:
Some 98% of the country's farms are family owned and operated. That business model is a source of pride for Canadians. Family farming promotes sustainable growth, environmental stewardship and reinvestment in local economies.
He added:
According to a 2017 study by the Business Development Bank of Canada, nearly 40% of small businesses will be transferred or sold by the end of 2022 as owners near retirement.
There is an urgent need for action. Obviously, the reference to subsection 84(1) of the Income Tax Act is one of the things that needs to be revised. The act has not evolved to reflect the context and the demographic pressure that applies to farms.
I also want to mention the support of Daniel Kelly, the president and CEO of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business, or CFIB, who appeared before the Standing Committee on Finance and was quite happy to express CFIB's very favourable position on the bill. I should note that 17% of business owners are seriously considering shutting down, that Bill C-208 would facilitate business transfers and, most importantly, that it is time for a resolution and for significant action.
I will conclude by recalling two points raised by Mr. Groleau, who shared some data from the Commission de protection du territoire agricole, Quebec's farmland protection commission. He pointed out that everything is documented and that we are seeing an increasing number of transactions involving farmland being carried out by investors rather than by producers. The investors' interest lies in renting out the land while they wait to potentially do something else with it.
The devil is in the details, and it will be important to move on in order to meet the needs of the next generation of farmers.
Madame la Présidente, c'est un honneur et un privilège pour moi de pouvoir prendre la parole à l'étape de la troisième lecture de ce projet de loi.
Lors de son assemblée générale annuelle, le Syndicat de la relève agricole d'Abitibi-Témiscamingue a donné comme mandat aux députés fédéraux de la région d'Abitibi-Témiscamingue d'appuyer le projet de loi C-208 et de contribuer activement à son adoption avant les prochaines élections. C'est donc un peu le rôle que je joue aujourd'hui alors que je clos le débat en troisième lecture.
La résolution du Syndicat porte sur l'équité dans les transferts de fermes agricoles. À l'heure actuelle, lorsqu'une personne vend ses actions dans sa petite entreprise ou sa ferme incorporée en société à un membre de sa famille, la différence entre le prix de vente et le prix initial d'achat est considérée comme un dividende. Par contre, si l'entreprise ou la ferme incorporée est vendue à une personne qui n'est pas membre de la famille, cette transaction est considérée comme un gain en capital.
Considérant que le projet de loi C-208 accordera aux petites entreprises, aux familles d'agriculteurs et aux familles de pêcheurs le même traitement fiscal qu'elles vendent leur exploitation à un membre de la famille ou à un tiers, et considérant que le paysage économique de notre région est composé de plus en plus de fermes incorporées et de sociétés de pêche familiales, le Syndicat de la relève agricole d'Abitibi-Témiscamingue a adopté cette résolution et je suis là pour l'honorer.
J'ai eu l'occasion de participer au débat sur ce projet de loi en novembre dernier et je rappelle un peu l'esprit de ma présentation: aussi incroyable que cela puisse paraître, il est aujourd'hui plus avantageux pour un entrepreneur de céder son entreprise à des actionnaires extérieurs plutôt qu'à des membres de sa propre famille. En effet, comme je l'ai dit, selon la loi en vigueur actuellement, le transfert d'une entreprise à un membre de la famille est traité comme un dividende et non comme un gain en capital, contrairement à la vente à un tiers. Par conséquent, le propriétaire n'a pas le droit à l'exonération cumulative des gains en capital s'il décide de vendre son entreprise à ses enfants.
Le Bloc québécois est favorable au projet de loi C-208. Ma formation politique milite depuis plusieurs années déjà pour encourager et faciliter le transfert d'une entreprise familiale, surtout dans le domaine de la pêche et de l'agriculture. J'aimerais aussi souligner le travail de mon collègue, le député de Pierre-Boucher-Les Patriotes-Verchères, qui a eu l'occasion de parler avant moi etqui avait déjà déposé à une autre époque le projet de loi C-275.
Encourager et faciliter le transfert d'entreprises familiales est donc une demande du Bloc québécois depuis plus de 15 ans. Pour les Québécois, le Bloc québécois et moi-même, la relève entrepreneuriale est importante. Elle est importante aussi pour l'avenir de nos PME en général, mais surtout pour les entreprises agricoles en région, notamment en Abitibi-Témiscamingue. Peut-être aurons-nous bientôt l'occasion de parler au passé du projet de loi C-208 et de ses conséquences, une idée qui me remplit d'enthousiasme.
La législation actuelle n'a aucun bon sens. Qu'est-ce qui motive le Parti libéral à voter contre le projet de loi C-208? On parle de possibilités d'abus fiscal et de fraude fiscale, mais on sait que le directeur parlementaire du budget a remis en question le montant des pertes qu'estimait le gouvernement libéral, l'évaluant à plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de millions de dollars au lieu de milliards de dollars. À ce sujet, je ne m'explique toujours pas pourquoi le gouvernement ne lutte pas contre les paradis fiscaux.
J'aimerais relater le commentaire d'un agriculteur de chez nous, un ami, Simon Leblond, qui était président de la Fédération de la relève agricole du Québec à l'époque où je travaillais pour le syndicat. Il mentionne, dans le cas de transferts de fermes apparentées, l'importance de maintenir un bassin de producteurs suffisant pour conserver les services qui gravitent autour des entreprises agricoles et, plus globalement, pour assurer le dynamisme du secteur, le faire découvrir à du monde déconnecté de l'agriculture, et assurer l'intérêt.
Les défis sont grands, et je trouve important de le mentionner. En Abitibi-Témiscamingue, comme partout ailleurs, existent l'accaparement des terres, la financiarisation des terres agricoles, toutes les questions de la sécurité du revenu, les services vétérinaires pour les animaux de ferme, l'assurance-récolte de céréales, le drainage agricole, etc. Ces défis sont grands, et améliorer l'accès à la terre et les conditions de vie des jeunes producteurs et productrices du Québec est une façon d'assurer un avenir agricole à la jeunesse québécoise.
Plus il y aura de relève sur les terres agricoles, plus on va pouvoir offrir de services. C'est une roue qui tourne et elle a malheureusement tourné dans le mauvais sens. J'ai cependant espoir qu'elle pourra revenir du bon côté et que l'on verra de plus en plus de jeunes s'installer. Le prix des terres, le coût des quotas et les nouvelles formes de production entraînent chaque année une augmentation des coûts et la bureaucratie est de plus en plus lourde, rendant l'accès à la terre et le quotidien des agriculteurs de plus en plus difficiles. Nous, politiciens, avons une responsabilité à ce chapitre. Je le répète: il n'est pas normal qu'il soit plus avantageux de vendre à un tiers qu'à sa propre famille.
Dans son budget de 2016, le gouvernement du Québec avait présenté des mesures pour favoriser le transfert d'entreprises familiales des secteurs primaires et manufacturiers. Ces mesures, par un changement à la Loi sur les impôts, assouplissent la règle qui empêche d'utiliser l'exemption de l'impôt sur le gain en capital par le vendeur. Le Québec a réglé cette affaire, alors que cela tarde toujours au fédéral — du moins cela tardait jusqu'à maintenant. On rappelle que le directeur parlementaire du budget a évalué les coûts de ces mesures, et ils sont bien moindres que ce que prétendait le gouvernement fédéral.
J'aimerais revenir sur l'allocution de mon collègue de Berthier—Maskinongé au sujet du projet de loi C-208 en deuxième lecture. Tout en saluant le leadership de notre collègue de Brandon—Souris, que je salue aussi d'ailleurs, je me permets une parenthèse. J'aimerais féliciter le Parti conservateur pour son leadership dans ce débat, parce qu'on a vu, en troisième lecture, le projet de loi C-208 se faire accorder la priorité à deux reprises. C'est pour cette raison que nous en débattons aujourd'hui. J'ai espoir que, d'ici une semaine, nous pourrons voter ce projet de loi pour qu'il soit enfin envoyé au Sénat et qu'il puisse ensuite recevoir la sanction royale. Ce serait une bénédiction enfin souhaitée par tout le monde. Je donnerai des exemples bientôt, mais je tenais à le souligner.
Le député de Berthier—Maskinongé a dit:
[...] cependant, il est vraiment question ici de nos petites et moyennes entreprises, de notre tissu économique. Il faut les maintenir en vie, il faut assurer la survie de nos entreprises, il faut que nos petites entreprises continuent d'exister et ne se retrouvent pas dans une situation désavantageuse qui fera qu'elles seront achetées par de grosses entreprises. Si ces petites entreprises continuent d'exister, ce sont nos régions qui vont continuer d'exister. C'est pour cela que, ce soir, je lance l'appel à tous mes collègues.
Je maintiens donc cet appel de mon collègue de Berthier—Maskinongé, parce que, au Bloc québécois, nous défendons les entreprises à échelle humaine.
J'aimerais aussi mentionner que j'ai pu m'intéresser aux débats qui ont eu lieu quand le projet de loi C-208 a été renvoyé au Comité permanent des finances. Le 9 mars dernier, la présidente de la Fédération de la relève agricole du Québec, Julie Bissonnette, productrice laitière à L'Avenir, et Philippe Pagé, directeur général de la FRAQ et maire de Saint-Camille, ont notamment mentionné:
Le projet de loi C-208 est important pour la relève, puisque nous sommes persuadés qu'il facilitera les transferts de ferme apparentés et règlera plusieurs problèmes d'équité, en plus de favoriser le maintien d'un milieu agricole fort
Pour un organisme qui a comme mission de défendre les intérêts de la relève et d'améliorer leurs conditions d'établissement, la position est très claire. Les représentants de la Fédération avaient aussi comme objectif de sensibiliser le Comité au fait que plusieurs jeunes au Canada voient leur rêve s'envoler à cause de règles fiscales mal adaptées. Ils ont ajouté:
Les chiffres parlent d'eux-mêmes. Un transfert familial a six fois plus de chances de réussir qu'un transfert externe. De plus, 70 % des entrepreneurs québécois, tous secteurs confondus, disent souhaiter voir leur entreprise demeurer dans la famille. Encore aujourd'hui, le transfert apparenté reste le moyen privilégié pour les transferts de ferme. Notre système fiscal devrait cependant soutenir l'ensemble de la relève, et ce, peu importe le mode d'accès à l'entreprise, ce qu'il ne fait pas actuellement.
Ces propos ont aussi été défendus par Marcel Groleau, de l'Union des producteurs agricoles. On parle aussi de la fierté de réussir un transfert, évidemment. Au cours de la même rencontre, Marcel Groleau a mentionné:
[...] 98 % des fermes au pays appartiennent à des familles qui sont des propriétaires exploitants. Ce modèle fait la fierté des Canadiens. L'agriculture familiale favorise la croissance durable, la bonne gestion de l'environnement et le réinvestissement dans l'économie locale.
M. Groleau a aussi mentionné:
Selon une étude que la Banque de développement du Canada a menée en 2017, près de 40 % des petites entreprises seront transférées ou vendues d'ici la fin de 2022, car les propriétaires vont atteindre l'âge de la retraite.
L'urgence d'agir est également là. Évidemment, la référence au paragraphe 84(1) de la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu fait partie des choses qu'on doit réviser. La Loi n'a pas évolué en fonction du contexte et de la pression démographique qui s'applique aux fermes.
Je veux aussi mentionner l'appui de Daniel Kelly, président-directeur général de la Fédération canadienne de l'entreprise indépendante, ou FCEI, qui est venu au Comité permanent des finances et qui était très heureux de pouvoir exprimer la position très favorable, par ailleurs, de la FCEI sur le projet de loi. On rappelle que 17 % des entreprises envisagent activement de mettre fin à leurs activités, que le projet de loi C-208 permettrait un meilleur transfert et, surtout, qu'il est temps que la question soit résolue et que des mesures importantes soient prises.
Je termine en rappelant deux éléments mentionnés par M. Groleau, qui a fait part de données provenant de la Commission de protection du territoire agricole. Il a mentionné que tout est répertorié et que l'on constate que de plus en plus de transactions qui concernent des terres agricoles sont réalisées par des investisseurs plutôt que par des producteurs, que leur intérêt est de louer les terres en attendant de passer à autre chose.
Le diable est dans les détails, et il faudra s'assurer de passer à autre chose pour répondre aux besoins de la relève agricole.
View Dan Mazier Profile
CPC (MB)
Madam Speaker, I rise today to speak to a very important bill that would positively impact countless farmers and small business owners across Canada if passed.
I want to sincerely thank my colleague, the member for Brandon—Souris, for introducing the bill to Parliament and making so much progress on this issue. I am fortunate to work with my Manitoba colleague, who gained my profound respect for representing his constituents in an exceptional manner throughout his tenure as a member of Parliament.
Bill C-208, an act to amend the Income Tax Act, would provide tax fairness for farmers and small business owners across our nation.
This may surprise most Canadians, but selling a farm or a small business to an unknown third party receives better tax treatment than selling that same business to a family member. The current structure of the Income Tax Act penalizes farm and small business owners from transferring their operations to a member of their own family. This discrepancy in tax treatment can result in hundreds of thousands of dollars in more taxes if sold to family as opposed to a stranger.
For example, imagine a couple who has owned a local auto repair shop in Manitoba for decades and is ready to retire. These owners have worked hard to support their family and community and their business is now worth $1 million. The couple is approached by a multinational auto repair company that has no roots in the community but wants to buy the business. If owners were to sell their business to this unknown third party, they would incur $29,000 in taxes.
Their son is also interested in buying the local business as he looks to raise a family and make a living in the community in which he grew up. However, if their son were to purchase the same company at the same price, his parents could pay up to $466,000 in taxes, a tax difference of $437,000.
Now the couple who owns the auto repair shop must make a decision. Do the owners sell to the multinational company and maximize their retirement fund or do they sell to their son and keep the business in the family? Why should small business owners be placed in a position to choose between sacrificing their retirement fund or sacrificing the word family in their family business? The answer is obvious: they should not.
However, thousands of business owners spend their entire careers operating their businesses with the expectation of passing it to their children. They do not realize the staggering tax difference they will be indebted with until they part ways with their business. This puts retirement and business plans at risk.
The constituency of Dauphin—Swan River—Neepawa is built on the foundation of small business and agriculture. These sectors are the lifeblood to the vibrant rural communities of our region. I was raised and spent my entire life in rural Manitoba. I understand how these businesses support our communities and the families within.
Last year, I spent a year touring rural Manitoba to meet specifically with small businesses to hear their priorities and concerns. One of the most prominent things I heard was the concern of what the future would look like in rural populations as aging and younger generations moved to urban centres. Many rural communities rely on a single business to provide a good or service.
I think of the No. 5 Store in the rural town of Riding Mountain, located between the community of Neepawa and Ste. Rose. This family run business is the only supplier of essential goods and services to the Riding Mountain community. Locals rely on the No. 5 Store for their everyday essentials like groceries and mail.
Small businesses like these provide families with goods and services needed to successfully make a living in rural communities. If businesses like these close their doors, communities suffer.
Large multinational companies will never replace the locally owned family businesses that are the engines of rural Canada. Family owned small businesses are what give rural communities their identity. We must support them in transferring their businesses to future generations so they can endure. Without small businesses, rural Canada evaporates.
Agriculture is another pillar to our country and to the region I represent. Family farms contribute immensely to the social and cultural fabric of rural Canada. However, by 2025, one in four farmers will be 65 or older and over 110,000 farmers are expected to retire within the coming decade. This means thousands of farmers will be transferring their farm operations as they retire.
I should remind the members of the House that farmers are the people who have a strong connection to the land. They care deeply about keeping their farm in the family in the hopes of watching their children take the same care of the land in the manner they did.
There something to be said about the family farm. The family farm is not just a business, it is not just an operation; it is generational and sentimental. It is a way of life for hundreds of thousands of Canadians and their families. The family farm is an ideal and it is an ideal worth preserving. However, it is clear that agriculture is approaching a demographic revolution and as parliamentarians, it is our duty to support such a massive transition to ensure the future prosperity of Canadian agriculture.
Unfortunately, under the current tax regime, farmers are unable to transfer their family farm to the family without experiencing unfair tax treatment. As parliamentarians, we need to work creating more sustainable rural Canada through job creation and economic prosperity. Bill C-208 would do that.
Bill C-208 would keep the family in the family business. It would provide a future for the family farm. It would create fairness for countless Canadians as well as preserve the rural communities that are the bedrock to our nation.
Madame la Présidente, je prends la parole aujourd'hui au sujet d'un projet de loi très important qui pourrait, s'il est adopté, avoir des effets positifs pour d'innombrables agriculteurs et propriétaires de petite entreprise au pays.
Je remercie sincèrement le député de Brandon—Souris d'avoir présenté le projet de loi et accompli tant de progrès dans ce dossier. J'ai la chance de travailler avec mon collègue du Manitoba, que je respecte profondément pour la manière exceptionnelle dont il a représenté les gens de sa circonscription tout au long de sa carrière de député.
Le projet de loi C-208, Loi modifiant la Loi de l’impôt sur le revenu, assurerait l'équité fiscale aux agriculteurs et aux propriétaires de petites entreprises du pays.
La plupart des Canadiens s'étonneront peut-être d'apprendre qu'en vendant une ferme ou une petite entreprise à un tiers inconnu, on bénéficie d'un meilleur traitement fiscal que si on vendait la même entreprise à un membre de la famille. La structure actuelle de la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu pénalise les fermiers et les propriétaires de petite entreprise qui transfèrent leurs opérations à un membre de leur propre famille. La différence dans le traitement fiscal, si on vend à la famille plutôt qu'à un étranger, peut se chiffrer à des centaines de milliers de dollars en impôt additionnel.
Par exemple, imaginez un couple qui possède, depuis des décennies, un atelier local de réparation d’automobiles au Manitoba et qui souhaite prendre sa retraite. Ces propriétaires ont travaillé dur pour soutenir leur famille et leur communauté. La valeur de leur entreprise atteint maintenant 1 million de dollars. Une multinationale de réparation d’automobiles qui n’a pas de racines dans la communauté approche le couple, car elle souhaite acheter l’entreprise. Si les propriétaires vendent leur entreprise à ce tiers inconnu, ils devront payer 29 000 $ en impôts.
Leur fils aussi aimerait acheter l’entreprise locale, car il souhaite fonder une famille et gagner sa vie dans la communauté où il a grandi. Cependant, si le fils achète la même entreprise au même prix, ses parents pourraient payer jusqu’à 466 000 $ en impôts. C'est une différence de 437 000 $.
Le couple qui possède l’atelier de réparation d’automobiles doit maintenant prendre une décision. Vend-il à la multinationale, ce qui lui permettra de maximiser son fonds de retraite? Ou vend-il à son fils, ce qui permettra de garder l’entreprise au sein de la famille? Pourquoi les propriétaires de petite entreprise se trouvent-ils dans une situation où ils doivent choisir entre sacrifier leur fonds de retraite et supprimer le mot « familiale » de leur entreprise familiale? La réponse est évidente. Ils ne devraient pas avoir à faire un tel choix.
Cependant, des milliers de propriétaires d’entreprise passent l’ensemble de leur carrière à exploiter leur entreprise en pensant en confier un jour les rênes à leurs enfants. Avant de vendre leur entreprise, ils ne réalisent pas la différence dans l'impôt qu'ils devront payer. Cette situation met à risque leur retraite et leurs plans d’entreprise.
La circonscription de Dauphin-Swan River-Neepawa s'est bâtie grâce à l'apport de petites entreprises et du secteur agricole. Ces secteurs sont le moteur des communautés rurales dynamiques de notre région. J’ai grandi en région rurale au Manitoba et j’y ai passé ma vie entière. Je sais à quel point ces entreprises soutiennent nos communautés et les familles qui y vivent.
J’ai passé l’année dernière à visiter les régions rurales du Manitoba, afin de rencontrer les exploitants de petites entreprises pour connaître leurs priorités et leurs préoccupations. Parmi les préoccupations les plus importantes que j’ai entendues, il y avait le fait que les gens se demandent à quoi ressemblera l’avenir dans les régions rurales, alors que les générations âgées et plus jeunes déménagent dans les centres urbains. De nombreuses communautés rurales dépendent d’une seule entreprise pour se procurer un bien ou un service.
Je pense au magasin No. 5 Store, situé dans la ville rurale de Riding Mountain, qui se trouve entre la communauté de Neepawa et Sainte-Rose. Cette entreprise familiale est le seul fournisseur de biens et de services essentiels de la communauté de Riding Mountain. Les résidents locaux dépendent du magasin No. 5 Store pour les choses essentielles de la vie quotidienne, comme la nourriture et le courrier.
Des petites entreprises comme celles-là offrent aux familles les biens et services dont elles ont besoin pour gagner leur vie dans des collectivités rurales. Si de telles entreprises ferment leurs portes, les collectivités en souffriront.
Les grandes multinationales ne remplaceront jamais les entreprises familiales locales qui sont le moteur des collectivités rurales canadiennes. Les petites entreprises familiales donnent leur identité aux collectivités rurales. Nous devons faciliter leur transfert aux générations futures pour qu'elles puissent survivre. Sans les petites entreprises, le Canada rural disparaîtrait.
L'agriculture est aussi l'un des piliers de notre pays et de la région que je représente. En effet, les sociétés agricoles familiales contribuent énormément au tissu social et culturel du Canada rural. Toutefois, d'ici 2025, 25 % des agriculteurs auront 65 ans ou plus, et plus de 110 000 agriculteurs devraient prendre leur retraite au cours de la prochaine décennie. Cela signifie que des milliers d'agriculteurs transféreront leur société agricole au moment de leur retraite.
Je tiens à rappeler aux députés que ce sont les agriculteurs qui entretiennent les liens les plus forts avec la terre. Ils ont profondément à cœur de pouvoir garder leur exploitation agricole dans la famille en espérant voir leurs enfants prendre soin de la terre aussi bien qu'eux.
Il y en aurait long à dire sur la ferme familiale. C'est plus qu'une entreprise et une exploitation; elle a une dimension générationnelle et sentimentale. C'est un mode de vie pour des centaines de milliers de Canadiens et leurs familles. La ferme familiale reflète un idéal qui mérite d'être préservé. Cependant, il est évident que l'agriculture doit faire face à de profonds changements démographiques. En tant que parlementaires, nous avons le devoir de faciliter cette transition de taille pour assurer la prospérité future du secteur agricole canadien.
Malheureusement, sous le régime fiscal actuel, les agriculteurs ne peuvent transférer la ferme familiale à leur famille sans subir un traitement fiscal injuste. En tant que parlementaires, nous devons assurer un avenir durable aux collectivités rurales en prenant des mesures pour créer des emplois et promouvoir la prospérité économique. C'est ce que ferait le projet de loi C-208.
Le projet de loi C-208 permettrait à la famille de rester dans l'entreprise familiale. Il assurerait l'avenir de la ferme familiale. Il assurerait un traitement équitable à d'innombrables Canadiens tout en préservant les collectivités rurales, qui sont la pierre d'assise de notre pays.
View Larry Maguire Profile
CPC (MB)
View Larry Maguire Profile
2021-05-05 18:51 [p.6712]
Madam Speaker, my colleagues have outlined all the details at second reading, third reading and previous iterations of this bill, so I will not go into those right now.
Tonight, I want to begin by thanking all those who have helped get Bill C-208 to this point. Without my Conservative colleagues trading the speaking spots for their private members' bills, we would never have gotten to third reading before the summer recess. I am immensely thankful to them for that.
For my colleagues from Prince Albert, Saskatoon—Grasswood and Regina—Qu'Appelle, I am eternally grateful for their support and assistance. For that support, I want them to know we are on the cusp of passing the legislation and sending it to the Senate.
I have spoken to numerous MPs over the past year about the importance of correcting this massive injustice within the Income Tax Act. The purpose of this bill is straightforward. It will level the playing field by giving families the exact same tax treatment whether they transfer their businesses or operations to their children or to a stranger. It will result in more locally owned and operated businesses, as has been outlined by many of my colleagues who have spoken to the bill, the types of businesses that are involved in their communities and provide steady employment for countless individuals. It will help keep farms and fishing operations in the family as well as any other qualifying small business.
Bill C-208 would send a message of hope to young farmers who want to carry on what their families started. Most of all, it would bring tax fairness to the Income Tax Act. No longer will parents have given a false choice of having to choose between a larger retirement package by selling to a stranger or a massive tax bill because they have sold to a family member, their own son, daughter or grandchildren. Every single community in Canada will be positively impacted by the passage of the bill.
As I said in my speech two weeks ago, there is bipartisan support for the legislation. I want to recognize and thank not only my colleagues from Provencher and Dauphin—Swan River—Neepawa for their kind words and informational speeches, but also the members of other parties for their speeches and support at second reading, third reading and at committee as well as all the witnesses who gave testimony.
In particular, I want to thank my colleague from Malpeque, who also happens to be the chair of the finance committee, who announced he would be voting in favour of Bill C-208. I thank him for his kind presentation in the House today as well.
While I know my Liberal colleague from Winnipeg North, and I know him very well, is well-intentioned, I found that during his speech a on the legislation a couple of week, his comments were quite off base. I know, had he taken the time to read the evidence and testimony provided at the finance committee, he would have known his speaking points and the concerns given to him by the finance department were all truly addressed.
For my Liberal colleagues, who, for the most part, all voted against the bill at second reading, I know the process. I know the party whips and the powers that be have likely told them to vote against the bill. However, I implore them to listen to their constituents who want this legislation passed, review what the tax experts have said and reach out to their businesses, farms or organizations in their ridings and ask them if they support the bill. I can assure all my colleagues that if they do reach out, they will find almost universal support for Bill C-208.
Once and for all, we can finally resolve this long-standing problem that countless families have had to endure when selling their businesses or operations to their immediate children or grandchildren.
I look forward to the final vote next week and kindly ask all my colleagues to support the bill, thus allowing for the debate in the other place and passage of it into law.
Madame la Présidente, étant donné que mes collègues ont énoncé tous les détails aux étapes de la deuxième et de la troisième lecture et lors de l'étude des versions antérieures du projet de loi, je n'y reviendrai pas maintenant.
Ce soir, je veux commencer par remercier tous ceux qui ont contribué à amener le projet de loi C-208 à cette étape-ci. Si mes collègues conservateurs n'avaient pas accepté d'échanger les périodes d'intervention qui leur étaient réservées pour leurs projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire, nous n'aurions jamais atteint l'étape de la troisième lecture avant l'ajournement d'été. Je leur en suis extrêmement reconnaissant.
En ce qui concerne mes collègues de Prince Albert, de Saskatoon—Grasswood et de Regina—Qu'Appelle, je leur suis éternellement reconnaissant de leur soutien et de leur aide. D'ailleurs, je veux qu'ils sachent que nous sommes sur le point d'adopter le projet de loi et de le renvoyer au Sénat.
Au cours de la dernière année, j'ai discuté avec de nombreux députés à propos de l'importance de corriger cette injustice flagrante de la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu. Ce projet de loi vise un objectif simple. Il va rendre les règles du jeu équitables en accordant le même traitement fiscal aux familles, peu importe qu'elles transfèrent leur entreprise à leurs enfants ou à un étranger. Il en résultera un nombre accru d'entreprises locales, comme l'ont souligné beaucoup de députés qui se sont exprimés à propos du projet de loi, c'est-à-dire le type d'entreprise qui s'implique dans la communauté et qui procure de l'emploi stable à quantité de personnes. Ce projet de loi fera en sorte que des entreprises agricoles et de pêche pourront rester dans le cercle familial, de même que d'autres petites entreprises admissibles.
Le projet de loi C-208 enverrait un message d'espoir aux jeunes agriculteurs qui veulent poursuivre le travail amorcé par leur famille. Par-dessus tout, il rendrait la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu plus équitable. Les parents ne seront plus forcés de faire un choix entre s'assurer une retraite confortable en vendant à un étranger ou être lourdement pénalisés sur le plan fiscal en vendant à un membre de leur famille, qu'il s'agisse de leur fils, de leur fille ou de leurs petits-enfants. Chacune des communautés du Canada profitera des retombées positives de l'adoption de ce projet de loi.
Comme je l'ai indiqué dans mon allocution il y a deux semaines, le projet de loi jouit d'un appui bipartite. Je salue mes collègues de Provencher et de Dauphin—Swan River—Neepawa et je les remercie de leurs bonnes paroles et de leurs allocutions. Je remercie aussi les députés des autres partis qui ont prononcé un discours en appui au projet de loi aux étapes de la deuxième lecture, de la troisième lecture et de l'étude en comité, ainsi que toutes les personnes qui ont témoigné.
En particulier, je remercie le député de Malpeque, qui se trouve à être le président du comité des finances, d'avoir annoncé qu'il voterait en faveur du projet de loi C-208. Je le remercie également de son intervention bienveillante à la Chambre aujourd'hui.
Bien que, comme nous connaissons tous les bonnes intentions qui animent le député de Winnipeg-Nord, que je connais bien, j'ai trouvé que les observations formulées dans son discours sur le projet de loi il y a quelques semaines étaient à côté de la plaque. Je sais que s'il avait pris le temps de lire les mémoires et les témoignages recueillis par le comité des finances, il aurait su que l'on avait véritablement répondu à toutes les préoccupations qui figuraient dans ses notes ou qui avaient été exprimées par le ministère des Finances.
Je dirai à mes collègues libéraux, qui ont quasiment tous voté contre le projet de loi à l'étape de la deuxième lecture, que je sais comment cela se passe. Je me doute que les whips des partis et les autorités leur ont dit de voter contre le projet de loi. Je les implore quand même d'écouter les habitants de leurs circonscriptions qui veulent que ce projet de loi soit adopté, de passer en revue ce que les fiscalistes ont dit et de demander aux entrepreneurs, aux agriculteurs et aux membres des organisations de leurs circonscriptions s'ils appuient ce projet de loi. Je peux assurer à tous mes collègues que, s'ils le font, ils constateront que le projet de loi bénéficie d'un consensus quasi universel.
Nous résoudrons, une fois pour toutes, ce problème de longue date, auquel un grand nombre de familles sont confrontées quand elles veulent vendre leur entreprise ou leur exploitation à leurs enfants ou à leurs petits-enfants.
J'attends avec impatience le vote final, la semaine prochaine, et je demande amicalement à tous mes collègues d'appuyer le projet de loi pour qu'il puisse être débattu à l'autre endroit et adopté.
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
Pursuant to an order Monday, January 25, the division stands deferred until Wednesday, May 12, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions.
Conformément à l'ordre adopté le lundi 25 janvier 2021, le vote par appel nominal est reporté au mardi 4 mai 2021, à la fin de la période prévue pour les questions orales.
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I believe, if you seek it, you will find unanimous consent to carry this at report stage.
Monsieur le Président, je crois que vous constaterez qu'il y a consentement unanime pour que le projet de loi soit adopté à l'étape du rapport.
View Anthony Rota Profile
Lib. (ON)
Is there unanimous consent?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
The Speaker: When shall the bill be read the third time? By leave, now?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Y a-t-il consentement unanime?
Des voix: D'accord.
Le Président: Quand le projet de loi sera-t-il lu pour la troisième fois? Avec la permission de la Chambre, maintenant?
Des voix: D'accord.
View Larry Maguire Profile
CPC (MB)
View Larry Maguire Profile
2021-04-21 18:04 [p.5946]
moved that the bill be read the third time and passed.
He said: Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my colleagues for bringing this to third reading because it is a privilege to speak in the House to Bill C-208, an act to amend the Income Tax Act, transfer of small business or family farm or a fishing corporation.
I want to begin my remarks by thanking a few of my colleagues who helped get my private member's bill to third reading much quicker than originally planned. Particularly, I want to thank my good friend, the hon. member for Saskatoon—Grasswood, who traded his private member's bill spot during the second reading, which allowed a vote to occur a few weeks earlier than scheduled. I also want to thank my colleague from Regina—Qu'Appelle, who traded his private member's bill spot. That is the reason we are debating Bill C-208 this evening.
The reason I am highlighting and thanking these two specific members is that time is of the essence. No one knows what the future holds or when an election is going to occur. These matters are outside of my control, so I want to focus on getting this legislation passed to support all small businesses. We must correct this massive injustice within the Income Tax Act that unfairly punishes individuals when they sell their qualifying small business, farm or fishing operation to their own family.
For those members who have not been closely following the debate, I will give a brief overview. As it stands, when a qualifying small business, farm or fishing operation is sold to a member of the owner's own family, the Income Tax Act treats the sale differently than if it were sold to an absolute stranger.
Yes, members heard that right. There are currently two sets of rules, and in some cases, it can result in the difference of hundreds of thousands of dollars. For some, that might not sound like a lot, but in many cases it could result in a parent making the tough decision to sell their business to a complete stranger rather than to their own children. That is wrong, and I intend on fixing it once and for all.
During my first hour of debate, I gave two examples of why Bill C-208 is needed.
The first involved a family wanting to sell their bakery to their daughter. If they sold the bakery to a stranger rather than their daughter, they would have an effective tax rate of 10%, after using their lifetime capital gains exemption. However, if they sold their bakery to their daughter, she would be obligated to repay their loan with personal tax dollars, which is a significant tax penalty.
The second example was a father wanting to sell his farm to his son to fund his retirement. If the father were to sell his farm to a stranger, he could use his capital gains exemption on the sale, resulting in an effective tax rate of 13.39%. However, if the farmer sold his farm to his son, that sale would be recorded as a dividend rather than a capital gain, and the farmer would pay 47.4% in tax. That is a huge difference, and I think we can all agree that it is completely unfair.
Since I introduced this legislation, I have been contacted by numerous agricultural and business organizations. People across the country have contacted my office to let me know how important this legislation is to their family. Every single constituency in Canada would be positively impacted by this legislation, and it would result in more locally owned and operated businesses, the type of businesses whose owners are deeply involved in their communities and provide steady employment for countless individuals, and it would help keep farms and fishing operations in the family.
Bill C-208 sends a strong message of hope to young farmers who want to carry on what their family started and to other young family entrepreneurs included with them. Most of all, it would bring tax fairness to the Income Tax Act. No longer would parents have to be given a false choice of having to choose between a larger retirement package by selling to a stranger, which has no charge, or a massive tax bill because they sold to a family member.
Other than Finance Canada officials, I received zero push-back from any of the expert witnesses who appeared in front of the finance committee. Witness after witness came to support the bill and to answer the questions put to them. All my colleagues who sit on the finance committee did their due diligence and asked insightful questions. I want to thank the chair of the finance committee, who helped shepherd this legislation, for scheduling ample time for witnesses.
I am pleased to report that the concerns put forward by the Liberal MPs were fully answered. While I do not know how they will vote at third reading, I would kindly ask for their support. Now that we have had hours of debate and a thorough committee study, there is sufficient evidence to justify the changes I am proposing.
The Income Tax Act is complex. It has been changed and amended over the years, and in many circumstances one needs a lawyer or accountant to decipher its intent. With that in mind, the finance committee prudently invited multiple tax experts. In many cases, they gave real-world examples, so members were able to better grasp the implications of the bill. Due to the member for Kingston and the Islands laying out Finance Canada's concerns during second reading, we knew exactly what questions the Liberal MPs were going to ask. Because the government outlined its argument during second reading, the tax experts and I had time to prepare in order to put its fears to rest.
We know what the bill will cost, due to the Parliamentary Budget Officer's analysis, as I have said in previous speeches. We know there are safeguards built into the legislation to ensure people do not skirt tax rules. We know the legislation is squarely focused on small and medium-sized qualifying businesses. We know the legislation, as drafted, will achieve its intended aim, which is to level the playing field in such transactions.
For those members who want further reasons to support the bill, I will highlight some specific comments and evidence provided to the finance committee.
Brian Janzen, who is a senior tax manager at Deloitte, appeared at the finance committee. As someone who has been handling business transfers for close to 30 years, he understands the Income Tax Act and the implications of section 84.1, which he said has been a thorn in the industry's side for many years.
In his opening remarks, he provided an example of what would happen with or without the current wording of section 84.1 regarding the sale of a business. He gave the example of a restaurant that is worth a million dollars. If the owner sells the restaurant to a stranger, he, according to Mr. Janzen, “will walk away with after-tax proceeds...of around $971,000.” He would pay roughly $29,000 in taxes, but if the restaurant were to sell to a family member, the taxes paid would be roughly “$466,000 because of the deemed dividend. That's a difference, between the two scenarios, of $437,000.”
I think Mr. Janzen summed it up quite nicely when he said, “That's just crazy.” I agree with him. It is crazy. This sort of scenario is playing out every single day, and it needs to stop.
Mr. Janzen also said in his opening remarks, “This bill is helping the lower end of the small business community; it is not helping the huge, rich companies even if they're family owned.”
Cindy David, who is the chair of the board for the Conference for Advanced Life Underwriting in Canada appeared at the finance committee and spoke about the necessity of getting this bill passed. She said:
...there's some urgency around the need for the government to act in amending 84.1.... [as] small businesses employ 70% of the private sector and have been major contributors to employment growth over the past decade. A vast majority of those businesses have fewer than 20 employees.
The last comment I want to highlight was made by Dustin Mansfield, who is a chartered professional accountant at BDO Canada. Mr. Mansfield knows first hand the challenges the current wording of section 84.1 causes for families and how it unfairly taxes them at a different rate.
Of Bill C-208, he said, “the legislation would put a successor child of a business in the same shoes as an unrelated party upon the transaction of the business. Why does a stranger receive better tax treatment than a child, when the purpose is to keep businesses within the family?” I do not think Dustin posed this as a rhetorical question.
The fact remains that there are some who do not want this legislation to pass. However, we were elected to lead, to improve the quality of life of those we represent and to make sure that we pass down a stronger nation than the one we inherited. We cannot take our prosperity for granted.
I urge my colleagues to carefully review the testimony provided at the finance committee; call their chambers of commerce, or local farmers and fishers; go make a few phone calls to local accountants or other tax experts; and speak to those who have been impacted to ask them if they think it is fair that they had to pay more taxes for the business to stay in the family. Members will find almost universal support for this bill. They will also find there is bipartisan support. We need to pass this bill and send it to the Senate.
Private Members' Business gives all of us an opportunity to set aside our political allegiances, and I would kindly ask my Liberal colleagues to allow this legislation to go to a vote. If the debate carries on, it will be even further pushed back. Once again, I thank all my colleagues who supported Bill C-208 and helped to get it this far. Out of all the attempts made to fix this unfair tax treatment, we have made it the furthest in Parliament.
By working together, we can support our entrepreneurs, small businesses, farmers and fishers who make up the backbone of our economy, so let us roll up our sleeves and get this job done.
propose que le projet de loi soit lu pour la troisième fois et adopté.
— Monsieur le Président, je tiens à remercier mes collègues d'avoir fait avancer l'étude de ce projet de loi jusqu'à l'étape de la troisième lecture, car c'est un privilège de prendre la parole à la Chambre des communes au sujet du projet de loi C-208, Loi modifiant la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu (transfert d'une petite entreprise ou d’une société agricole ou de pêche familiale).
Avant de passer à mes observations, j'aimerais remercier quelques-uns de mes collègues qui m'ont aidé à faire avancer l'étude de ce projet de loi jusqu'à l'étape de la troisième lecture bien plus rapidement que je ne l'avais prévu. Je remercie plus particulièrement mon bon ami le député de Saskatoon—Grasswood, qui m'a cédé sa place lors de la période réservée à l'étude des projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire à l'étape de la deuxième lecture, de telle sorte qu'un vote a pu se tenir quelques semaines plus tôt que prévu. Je remercie également le député de Regina—Qu'Appelle, qui a aussi cédé sa place lors de la période réservée à l'étude des projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire. C'est pour cette raison que nous pouvons débattre du projet de loi C-208 ce soir.
La raison pour laquelle je suis reconnaissant à ces deux députés est que le temps presse. Personne ne sait ce que le future nous réserve ni quand les prochaines élections seront déclenchées. Ces enjeux sont hors de mon pouvoir, alors je veux mettre mes efforts sur l'adoption de ce projet de loi pour soutenir toutes les petites entreprises. Il faut redresser cette injustice majeure au sein de la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu, qui punit de façon injuste les personnes qui vendent une petite entreprise, une société agricole ou une société de pêche admissibles à un membre de leur propre famille.
Pour la gouverne des députés qui n'auraient peut-être pas suivi de près le débat qui nous occupe, je vais faire un résumé. Présentement, lorsqu'une personne vend une petite entreprise, une société agricole ou une société de pêche admissibles à un membre de sa famille, la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu traite la transaction différemment que si l'acheteur avait été un parfait étranger.
Les députés ont bien entendu. Les règles sont différentes selon l'acheteur, et, dans certains cas, cela signifie un écart de centaines de milliers de dollars. Pour certains, cette somme peut sembler minime, mais dans de nombreux cas, c'est ce qui peut pousser certaines personnes à vendre à contrecœur leur entreprise à un étranger plutôt qu'à leurs propres enfants. C'est inacceptable, et je veux corriger la situation une fois pour toutes.
Pendant la première heure du débat sur le projet de loi C-208, j'ai donné deux exemples qui montrent pourquoi ce projet de loi est nécessaire.
Le premier exemple est celui d'entrepreneurs qui souhaitent vendre leur boulangerie à leur fille. Or, en vendant leur boulangerie à un étranger plutôt qu'à leur fille, ils obtiendraient un taux d'imposition réel de 10 % après avoir utilisé leur exonération cumulative des gains en capital. De plus, s'ils vendent la boulangerie à leur fille, elle devra rembourser leur prêt de sa poche, ce qui constitue une lourde pénalité fiscale.
Le second exemple est celui d'un père qui envisage de vendre son exploitation agricole à son fils pour financer sa retraite. S'il vendait plutôt à un étranger, il pourrait bénéficier d'une exonération des gains en capital liés à la vente, ce qui donnerait un taux d'imposition réel de 13,39 %. Toutefois, si l'agriculteur vend sa ferme à son fils, cette vente sera enregistrée sous forme de dividende, plutôt que comme gain en capital, et il devra payer 47,4 % d'impôts. La différence est énorme, et je crois que nous pouvons tous convenir que c'est carrément injuste.
Depuis que j'ai présenté ce projet de loi, de nombreuses organisations du milieu agricole et de celui des affaires ont communiqué avec moi. Des gens de partout au pays ont communiqué avec mon bureau pour souligner l'importance de cette mesure pour leur famille. Des gens de toutes les circonscriptions au Canada bénéficieraient de cette mesure qui, par surcroît, ferait en sorte que davantage d'entreprises soient détenues et exploitées par des intérêts locaux. Or, il est bien connu que les propriétaires de ce type d'entreprises sont vigoureusement engagés dans leur collectivité et fournissent de l'emploi à de très nombreuses personnes. Qui plus est, cette mesure contribuerait à ce que les activités agricoles et de pêche restent dans le cercle familial.
Le projet de loi C-208 envoie un fort message d'espoir aux jeunes entrepreneurs, notamment dans le secteur agricole, qui souhaitent prendre les rênes d'une entreprise fondée par leur famille. Surtout, il rétablirait une certaine équité fiscale dans la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu. Les parents ne seraient plus forcés de faire un choix entre un meilleur fonds de retraite en vendant à un étranger, transaction qui n'entraîne pas de surcharge fiscale, ou d'être lourdement pénalisés sur le plan fiscal pour avoir vendu leur entreprise à un membre de la famille.
À l'exception des représentants du ministère des Finances, aucun des témoins experts qui ont comparu devant le comité des finances ne s'est montré réticent à ma proposition. Les uns après les autres, les témoins ont appuyé le projet de loi et répondu aux questions. Tous mes collègues qui siègent au comité des finances ont fait preuve de diligence raisonnable et ont posé des questions réfléchies. Je tiens à remercier le président du comité, qui m'a aidé à faire progresser cette mesure législative, d'avoir prévu amplement de temps pour entendre les témoins.
Je suis heureux de pouvoir affirmer qu'on a pleinement répondu à toutes les préoccupations soulevées par les députés libéraux. Je ne sais pas comment ils voteront à l'étape de la troisième lecture, mais je leur demande de m'accorder leur soutien. Après un débat de plusieurs heures et une étude approfondie du comité, nous disposons maintenant de suffisamment d'éléments justifiant les modifications que je propose.
La Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu est complexe. Elle a été modifiée au fil des ans et, très souvent, le recours à un avocat ou à un comptable est nécessaire pour comprendre son intention. Dans cette optique, le comité des finances a fait preuve de prudence en invitant de multiples fiscalistes. Dans de nombreux cas, ils ont donné des exemples bien concrets. Les députés pouvaient donc mieux comprendre les répercussions du projet de loi. Étant donné que le député de Kingston et les Îles avait présenté les préoccupations du ministère des Finances à l'étape de la deuxième lecture, nous savions exactement quelles questions les députés libéraux allaient poser. Parce que le gouvernement avait fait valoir ses arguments à l'étape de la deuxième lecture, les fiscalistes et moi avons eu le temps de nous préparer pour apaiser ses craintes.
Grâce à l'analyse du directeur parlementaire du budget, nous savons combien le projet de loi coûtera, comme je l'ai dit précédemment lors de diverses interventions. Le projet de loi contient des mesures qui visent à empêcher les gens de contourner les règles fiscales et il vise directement les petites et moyennes entreprises admissibles. Nous savons que, tel qu'il est rédigé, il atteindra son objectif, qui est d'uniformiser les règles du jeu dans ce type de transactions.
Pour les députés qui auraient besoin d'un peu plus de persuasion, je vais répéter certains des commentaires et des témoignages bien précis entendus au comité des finances.
Brian Janzen, qui est directeur principal, fiscalité, chez Deloitte, a comparu devant le comité des finances. Il s'occupe de transferts d'entreprises depuis près de 30 ans; il comprend donc bien la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu et les implications de l'article 84.1, qui, selon lui, est une source d'irritation dans l'industrie depuis de nombreuses années.
Dans ses remarques préliminaires, il a illustré ce qui se passerait, avec ou sans l'article 84.1 tel qu'il est libellé aujourd'hui, dans le cas de la vente d'une entreprise. Il a pris l'exemple d'un restaurant d'une valeur de 1 million de dollars. Selon M. Janzen, si le propriétaire vend le restaurant à un étranger, il aura touché, après impôts — quelque 29 000 dollars — environ 971 000 $. Si le restaurant, par contre, est vendu à un membre de la famille, les impôts qu'il devra payer s'élèveront à environ 466 000 dollars en raison du dividende réputé. C'est une différence de 437 000 $.
Je pense que M. Janzen a bien résumé la situation quand il a déclaré: « C’est tout simplement fou. » Je suis d'accord avec lui. C'est fou. Des situations de ce genre surviennent chaque jour, et il faut y mettre un terme.
Dans son allocution d'ouverture, M. Janzen a dit ceci, en parlant du projet de loi: « Et puis, il aide les plus petites entreprises, pas les grandes sociétés riches, même si elles sont familiales. »
Mme Cindy David, présidente du conseil d'administration de la Conference for Advanced Life Underwriting, a témoigné devant le comité des finances et expliqué les raisons pour lesquelles il est nécessaire d'adopter ce projet de loi. Elle a dit ceci en faisant référence aux petites entreprises:
[…] Nous estimons urgent que le gouvernement modifie l’article 84.1. […] celles-ci emploient 70 % des travailleurs du secteur privé et [...] elles ont grandement contribué à la croissance de l’emploi ces 10 dernières années. La grande majorité de ces entreprises comptent moins de 20 employés.
Le dernier commentaire dont j'aimerais vous faire part a été formulé par M. Dustin Mansfield, comptable professionnel agréé chez BDO Canada. M. Mansfield est bien placé pour comprendre à quel point le libellé actuel de l'article 84.1 occasionne des défis pour les familles et à quel point la différence des taux d'imposition leur est injuste.
À propos du projet de loi C-208, il a dit: « […] la modification proposée à la loi placerait l’enfant successeur d’une entreprise dans la même situation qu’une partie non liée au moment du transfert de l’entreprise. Pourquoi un étranger bénéficie-t-il d’un meilleur traitement fiscal qu’un enfant, alors que l’objectif est de garder les entreprises au sein de la famille? » Je ne crois pas que M. Mansfield pose la question de façon hypothétique.
Toutefois, il n'en demeure pas moins que certaines personnes ne veulent pas que ce projet de loi soit adopté. Or, nous avons été élus pour diriger le pays, améliorer la qualité de vie de nos concitoyens et veiller à ce que le pays soit meilleur après notre passage. Nous ne pouvons pas tenir notre prospérité pour acquis.
J'encourage vivement les députés à examiner attentivement les témoignages présentés au comité des finances; à téléphoner à la chambre de commerce ou à des agriculteurs et des pêcheurs de leur région; à faire quelques appels à des comptables et à d'autres experts en fiscalité; et à parler à des gens qui ont subi les effets des règles actuelles, pour leur demander s'ils trouvent juste d'avoir dû payer plus d'impôt pour que l'entreprise reste dans la famille. Les députés constateront que ce projet de loi bénéficie d'un accueil presque unanimement favorable, en plus d'un appui bipartisan. Nous devons l'adopter et l'envoyer au Sénat.
Les projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire nous donnent l'occasion de mettre de côté nos allégeances politiques. J'invite donc gracieusement mes collègues libéraux à faire en sorte que ce projet de loi puisse être mis aux voix. Si le débat continue, il faudra attendre encore pour que l'adoption ait lieu. Encore une fois, je remercie tous les députés qui ont appuyé le projet de loi C-208 et lui ont permis de se rendre jusqu'ici. Parmi toutes les démarches entreprises en vue de corriger cette règle fiscale inéquitable, aucune ne s'est rendue aussi loin dans l'étude par le Parlement.
En travaillant de concert, nous pouvons soutenir les entrepreneurs, les petites entreprises, les agriculteurs et les pêcheurs du pays, qui constituent le moteur de notre économie. Il est donc temps de retrousser nos manches et d'agir.
View Yves Perron Profile
BQ (QC)
View Yves Perron Profile
2021-04-21 18:16 [p.5948]
Madam Speaker, I want to congratulate my colleague on his excellent speech and, most importantly, on his excellent bill. I also thank him for approaching me right after this bill was introduced and for giving me the opportunity to endorse this bill on behalf of the Bloc Québécois.
I would like to know whether my colleague has spoken with Liberal members.
I also want to know what reasons he has been given for the lack of support for Bill C-208, when this is something that everyone wants.
Madame la Présidente, je tiens à féliciter mon collègue de son excellent discours et, surtout, de son excellent projet de loi. Je tiens aussi à le remercier de m'avoir approché dans les premiers instants du dépôt de ce projet de loi afin que je puisse signer un formulaire en guise d'appui du Bloc québécois à ce projet de loi.
J'aimerais savoir si mon collègue a eu des discussions avec les gens du Parti libéral.
J'aimerais également savoir quels prétextes on lui donne pour ne pas approuver le projet de loi C-208, alors que, comme il l'a mentionné dans son discours, cela est réclamé par tout le monde.
View Larry Maguire Profile
CPC (MB)
View Larry Maguire Profile
2021-04-21 18:17 [p.5948]
Madam Speaker, I cannot answer for the government in regard to those areas. There was some discussion of tax cheats earlier in some of the discussions that were going on, and I heard things such as we cannot allow wealthy people to get loopholes in the Income Tax Act, but that is clearly not the issue here.
Small business is the backbone. As the person from the Conference for Advanced Life Underwriting indicated, 70% of small businesses provide 70% of the employment in that area. There are, as I mentioned, clauses built into this particular legislation that would prevent things like fraud. There is nothing to stop the Canada Revenue Agency from auditing anyone, as they would normally in any other time, and so we feel strongly about a lot of those questions, and that is why I congratulated the finance committee. It is because its members gave very good questions at the committee, and the answers were very clearly in support of the bill.
Madame la Présidente, je ne peux pas répondre à la place du gouvernement à cet égard. Il y a eu mention de la fraude fiscale dans certaines discussions qui ont eu lieu précédemment, et j'ai entendu certaines personnes dire qu'il fallait empêcher les riches de profiter des échappatoires dans la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu, mais, de toute évidence, ce n'est pas de cela qu’il est question dans le projet de loi.
Les petites entreprises sont l'épine dorsale de l'économie. Comme l'a souligné la représentante de la Conference for Advanced Life Underwriting, 70 % des petites entreprises assurent 70 % des emplois dans ce domaine. Comme je l'ai dit, le projet de loi comprend des dispositions qui préviennent les problèmes comme la fraude. Rien n'empêche l'Agence du revenu du Canada de faire des vérifications, comme elle le ferait normalement. Nombre de ces questions nous tiennent donc à cœur, et c'est pourquoi j'ai félicité le comité des finances. Les membres du comité ont posé de très bonnes questions, et les réponses étaient très clairement favorables au projet de loi.
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
NDP (MB)
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
2021-04-21 18:18 [p.5948]
Madam Speaker, I want to congratulate my colleague on the progress of his bill. One of the first conversations I had with another member of Parliament upon my arrival in Ottawa after the last election, before the pandemic, was with the sponsor of this bill in a cab, if members can imagine sharing a taxicab now. There were no masks or anything.
Our conversation was about his interest in former member Guy Caron's bill. He was letting me know he was going to be taking that on and bringing it forward, so I am glad to see the progress made in Parliament on this bill.
I am just wondering if he could expand a bit more on some of those measures that would help make sure that this is not about tax evasion, but is really about facilitating the transfer of family businesses between generations.
Madame la Présidente, je tiens à féliciter le député de l'avancement de son projet de loi. Une des premières conversations que j'ai eues avec un autre député, en arrivant à Ottawa après les dernières élections, avant la pandémie, était avec le parrain de ce projet de loi, dans un taxi. Les députés peuvent-ils s'imaginer partager un taxi, de nos jours? Il n'y avait ni masques ni rien de la sorte.
Notre conversation portait sur l'intérêt du député à l'égard du projet de loi de l'ancien député Guy Caron. Il m'a fait savoir qu'il allait le parrainer et le présenter. Je suis donc heureux de voir l'étude du projet de loi progresser au Parlement.
Je me demande si le député peut donner plus d'explications sur les mesures qui font que le projet de loi ne favorise pas l'évasion fiscale, mais a plutôt comme effet de faciliter le transfert d'une entreprise familiale entre deux générations.
View Larry Maguire Profile
CPC (MB)
View Larry Maguire Profile
2021-04-21 18:19 [p.5949]
Madam Speaker, I want to congratulate my colleague from the NDP. He is very correct on that. It was very gracious of Mr. Caron to come to my office to discuss this particular bill with me, my colleague and my chief of staff. It is a very good bill, and it is exactly the same bill that he brought forward. I have mentioned that in previous debates in the House, and I want to thank him for doing that. Unfortunately, that bill was defeated at the time. I felt, being drawn early in the program this time, I would move it forward.
It is very self-explanatory. There is a huge difference in the tax rules that create a huge disincentive to sell someone's small business to their own family, as opposed to a complete stranger. Most small business owners I know of use those funds for retirement because they have invested their earnings back into the business throughout those 10, 20, 30 or sometimes 40 years to build it to the point—
Madame la Présidente, je tiens à féliciter mon collègue du NPD. Il a tout à fait raison. C'était très aimable de la part de M. Caron de venir à mon bureau pour discuter du projet de loi avec mon collègue, mon chef de cabinet et moi. C'est un très bon projet de loi, et c'est exactement le même projet de loi que le député a présenté. Je l'ai mentionné lors d'un débat précédent à la Chambre et je tenais à remercier le député de l'avoir présenté. Malheureusement, il avait été rejeté à l'époque. Étant donné que mon nom a été tiré rapidement cette fois-ci, j'ai jugé bon de le présenter.
Le projet de loi se passe d'explications. Il existe une énorme différence dans les règles fiscales qui décourage les gens de vendre une petite entreprise à leur propre famille plutôt qu'à un parfait inconnu. La plupart des propriétaires de petite entreprise que je connais utilisent ces fonds pour prendre leur retraite parce qu'ils ont réinvesti leurs revenus dans leur entreprise pendant 10, 20, 30, voire 40 ans pour la développer au point...
View Ziad Aboultaif Profile
CPC (AB)
View Ziad Aboultaif Profile
2021-04-21 18:20 [p.5949]
Madam Speaker, I congratulate my colleague. This is amazing. The first time I heard about this problem was in the last Parliament when I was serving on the finance committee. There is a fair bit of farmland in Edmonton Manning, and people there have concerns all the time about this issue.
Why does the hon. member think it is important for the bill to pass? We must secure the continuation of family ownership among small businesses, which is part of our tradition in this country in an industry that is very close to the heart of many Canadians.
Madame la Présidente, je félicite mon collègue. C'est extraordinaire. La première fois que j'ai entendu parler de ce problème, c'est à la législature précédente, lorsque je faisais partie du comité des finances. Il y a beaucoup de terres agricoles dans Edmonton Manning, et ce problème refait constamment surface.
Pourquoi le député croit-il qu'il est important qu'on adopte ce projet de loi? Il faut s'assurer que les petites entreprises familiales restent dans la famille. Cela fait partie de la tradition dans ce pays, et ce, dans un secteur qui tient à cœur à de nombreux Canadiens.
View Larry Maguire Profile
CPC (MB)
View Larry Maguire Profile
2021-04-21 18:21 [p.5949]
Madam Speaker, the bill is supported by the Canadian Federation of Agriculture, the Grain Growers of Canada, the Chicken Farmers of Canada, many of the canola growers and wheat growers, many keystone agricultural producers in my province, general farm organizations across the country and fishers. However, I think the big thing here is that all small businesses support it as well, whether that means a shoe store, dress shop, bakery or corner store in a small town or a big city. It is very supportive of making sure that we can transfer small businesses—
Madame la Présidente, ce projet de loi jouit de l'appui de la Fédération canadienne de l'agriculture, des Producteurs de grains du Canada, des Producteurs de poulet du Canada, de nombreux producteurs de canola et de blé, de nombreux membres de l'association Keystone Agricultural Producers de ma province, d'organismes agricoles généraux de partout au pays et de pêcheurs. Je crois par ailleurs que le plus important, dans le cas présent, c'est qu'il bénéficie aussi de l'appui de l'ensemble des petites entreprises, qu'il s'agisse d'une boutique de chaussures ou de vêtements, d'une boulangerie ou du dépanneur du coin, que ce soit dans une petite localité ou une grande ville. Ce projet de loi vise vraiment à faire en sorte qu'il soit possible de transférer une petite entreprise...
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2021-04-21 18:22 [p.5949]
Madam Speaker, it is a pleasure to speak to my colleague's bill. I can appreciate that he has put in a great deal of effort to get it to this particular point.
There are some very serious concerns in regard to the bill and the impact it will have. I am not 100% convinced that this is the best direction to go. I find it interesting that the member says, for example, that this is all about the family farm and that the family farm needs this particular break. My understanding is that parents can already sell a family business directly to their child, while claiming the lifetime capital gains exemption on the resulting capital gain. I would be interested in hearing my colleague's comments in regard to that aspect.
The issue at hand, in the eyes of many, is not about passing on the family business; rather, it is about corporations. There are all sorts of other issues that come to mind when we talk about corporations.
I am not as familiar with the farming community as the member would be, given his background versus mine. However, what I can say is that I have had the opportunity to visit many farms over the years. Growing up, I can remember being out in Saskatchewan and doing some cultivating on the big John Deere four-wheel tractors on a family farm. There was a belief that the farmers running the farms had them handed down and that they intended to hand them down to their children.
Even though I have some personal, first-hand experience, I do not want to say that I have a complete understanding of all aspects of farming. However, I do support family farms, and I would like to see us enhance them and give them strength.
A lot of family farms are like small businesses, and I think the Government of Canada has very clearly shown its support for small businesses. We have seen that in a variety of ways. A lot of them have been highlighted during the pandemic. We often talk about some of the benefits the government has brought forward, and I suspect that rural communities and even farmers would have been afforded the opportunity to participate in some of the programs. This highlighted the need that is there. It is very real.
Bill C-208 proposes amendments that could easily be misused by corporations, which could look for tax planning opportunities. I do not believe that the member has addressed that issue head on and provided the types of changes necessary to provide assurances.
My New Democratic friends in particular talk a lot about tax avoidance. I would be very interested in hearing them provide their thoughts on that specific issue. Have they looked into that aspect of the legislation? Are we creating opportunities, by passing this legislation, that could provide for tax avoidance?
This is a legitimate question, and it is an area of concern that was not addressed to the degree it could have and should have been addressed at the committee stage. It is a legitimate concern. I would be very interested in hearing what the New Democrats have to say about it.
The former small business minister, who I got to know well because she was the House leader of the government, often talked about the importance of small businesses. I have said in the past that they are the backbone of the economy. We can further add to that to show how important our farmers are. They are the ones putting food on our tables and contributing to Canada's overall GDP and exports. They feed the world. The crops we are able to provide around the world are very impressive. The growth in the Province of Manitoba of the canola industry has been very impressive. It has gone from virtually nowhere years ago to a major crop recognized around the world. We often hear about the importance of prairie wheat and that it is feeding people around the world. We can take a sense of pride in that and look at ways to support it.
In the budget, we heard about a number of initiatives. One that comes to mind right offhand is in the area of drying grains. The budget attempts to deal with that particular issue by supporting farmers.
We could talk about how we supported small businesses through the development of programs during the pandemic, such as the Canada emergency wage subsidy program, which has been very helpful to small businesses in general. We came up with the Canada emergency business account too. Another one I often reference for small businesses in particular is the Canada emergency rent subsidy program. These things are very real and tangible.
We know that many businesses continue to face stress and uncertainty as a direct result of COVID-19. That is why in many ways the government has stepped up to the plate to make sure there is support during these unprecedented times. I referenced the Canada emergency business account, which helped somewhere in the neighbourhood of three-quarters of a million small businesses. We are talking about tens of billions of dollars in loans. The Canada emergency wage subsidy program affected several million people, and, again, tens of billions of dollars were spent on it. There is the additional lockdown support. There was support for the agriculture and agri-food sector. The government recognized it as an essential service and provided support to it. We are committed to supporting producers and businesses so they can continue to provide for Canadians.
We have taken unprecedented action to support farmers, ranchers, food businesses and food processors across the value chain, and have provided support for vulnerable populations. For example, we quickly unlocked the $5 billion in additional Farm Credit Canada lending capacity and launched $100 million for a new agriculture and food business solutions fund to ensure that businesses in the sector have the support they need. We also increased the Canadian Dairy Commission's borrowing capacity by a couple of hundred million dollars. That was to allow us to support costs associated with the temporary storage of things like cheese and butter to avoid food waste.
A number of programs were put into place to support our producers. Programs provided dollars to foreign workers—
Madame la Présidente, je suis heureux de prendre la parole au sujet du projet de loi de mon collègue. Je sais qu'il a déployé de grands efforts pour en arriver à ce point.
Néanmoins, j'ai de sérieuses préoccupations au sujet du projet de loi et des conséquences qu'il pourrait avoir. Je ne suis pas entièrement convaincu que ce soit la meilleure voie à suivre. Je trouve intéressant que le député dise, notamment, que le projet de loi concerne les fermes familiales et que celles-ci ont besoin de cet allégement fiscal. Si je comprends bien, des parents peuvent déjà vendre une exploitation familiale directement à leur enfant et réclamer l'exonération cumulative des gains en capital sur le gain en capital qui découle de cette transaction. J'aimerais savoir ce que mon collègue pense à ce sujet.
Pour bien des gens, le problème ne concerne pas le transfert d'une entreprise familiale: il concerne plutôt les sociétés. Or, toutes sortes d'autres problèmes viennent à l'esprit quand on parle des sociétés.
Je ne connais pas aussi bien le monde de l'agriculture que mon collègue, étant donné la différence entre nos parcours de vie. J'ai par contre eu la chance de visiter de nombreuses fermes au fil des années. Durant mon enfance en Saskatchewan, je me rappelle d'avoir participé à des travaux sur une ferme familiale à bord d'un gros tracteur à quatre roues de la marque John Deere. Selon la croyance, les fermes étaient transmises d'une génération à l'autre, de père en fils.
Malgré mes souvenirs personnels de mes journées à la ferme, je ne peux pas prétendre connaître tous les aspects de la vie dans une exploitation agricole. Cependant, je suis entièrement favorable aux fermes familiales et je souhaite que le gouvernement contribue à améliorer leur sort et à les rendre plus fortes.
Un grand nombre de fermes familiales sont comparables à de petites entreprises, et je sais que le gouvernement du Canada a clairement démontré qu'il soutient les petites entreprises. Nous l'avons constaté de diverses façons, notamment depuis le début de la pandémie. Il est souvent fait mention des programmes d'aide que le gouvernement a mis en place, et je serais porté à croire que les communautés rurales, voire même les agriculteurs, ont eu la possibilité de bénéficier de certains de ces programmes. Cela démontre que les besoins sont bien réels.
Le projet de loi C-208 propose des modifications qui pourraient facilement être employées à mauvais escient par des sociétés qui cherchent des occasions aux fins de leur planification fiscale. Je ne crois pas que le député ait tenu compte de ce problème ni qu'il ait fait les ajustements nécessaires pour l'éviter.
Mes collègues néo-démocrates, en particulier, parlent beaucoup d'évitement fiscal. J'aimerais bien entendre ce qu'ils pensent de ce problème. Ont-ils examiné cet aspect du projet de loi? En adoptant ce dernier, créons-nous des occasions qui risquent de faciliter l'évitement fiscal?
C'est une question légitime, une préoccupation dont on n'a pas tenu compte comme il aurait fallu et à laquelle on aurait dû remédier à l'étape de l'étude en comité. J'aimerais savoir ce qu'en pensent les néo-démocrates.
L'ancienne ministre de la Petite entreprise, que j'ai appris à bien connaître lorsqu'elle était leader du gouvernement à la Chambre, a souvent parlé de l'importance des petites entreprises. J'ai déjà dit que ces dernières forment l'épine dorsale de l'économie. On pourrait faire une analogie similaire pour souligner l'importance des agriculteurs. Ce sont eux qui produisent les aliments que nous consommons. Ils contribuent de manière considérable au PIB du Canada et à ses exportations. Ils nourrissent le monde. Il est impressionnant de voir tous les produits cultivés au Canada pour approvisionner les pays étrangers. Au Manitoba, l'industrie du canola a connu une croissance incroyable. Elle est pratiquement partie de rien il y a quelques années pour devenir une culture majeure reconnue dans le monde entier. On entend souvent parler de l'importance du blé des Prairies et du fait qu'il nourrit des gens partout sur la planète. Nous pouvons en être fiers. Nous devons trouver des moyens de soutenir cette industrie.
Le budget contient une foule d'initiatives. La première qui me vient à l'esprit a trait au séchage des grains. Le budget contient des mesures qui aideront les agriculteurs dans ce domaine.
Nous avons créé des programmes pour les petites entreprises dès le début de la pandémie. Pensons par exemple à la Subvention salariale d'urgence du Canada, qui a été bénéfique pour toutes les entreprises, les petites comme les grandes. Il y a aussi le Compte d'urgence pour les entreprises canadiennes, ainsi que la Subvention d'urgence du Canada pour le loyer. Il s'agit de mesures aussi réelles que tangibles.
La COVID-19 continue de causer des soucis et de l'incertitude à de nombreuses petites entreprises. Voilà pourquoi le gouvernement a multiplié les mesures afin de les aider à traverser cette période encore inédite. Le Compte d'urgence pour les entreprises canadiennes, dont je viens de parler, a permis d'aider quelque trois quarts de million de petites entreprises. On parle ici de dizaines de milliards de dollars en prêts. Plusieurs millions de Canadiens ont pu bénéficier de la Subvention salariale d'urgence du Canada, et là encore, les sommes dépensées se comptent en milliards. C'est sans oublier les mesures supplémentaires de soutien en cas de confinement. Le gouvernement tenait à soutenir le secteur agricole et agroalimentaire, car il est conscient qu'il s'agit d'un service essentiel. Les producteurs et les entreprises pourront toujours compter sur notre soutien pour continuer de répondre aux besoins des Canadiens.
Nous avons pris des mesures sans précédent pour soutenir les agriculteurs, les éleveurs, les entreprises alimentaires et les transformateurs d'aliments le long de la chaîne de valeur, et nous avons apporté notre aide aux populations vulnérables. Par exemple, nous avons augmenté rapidement de cinq milliards de dollars supplémentaires la capacité de prêt de Financement agricole Canada et lancé le Fonds pour des solutions d’affaires en agriculture et en alimentation de 100 millions de dollars afin que les entreprises du secteur aient l'aide dont elles ont besoin. Nous avons aussi augmenté la limite d'emprunt de la Commission canadienne du lait de 200 millions de dollars pour couvrir les coûts liés au stockage temporaire de fromage et de beurre afin d'éviter le gaspillage.
Un certain nombre de programmes ont été mis en place pour soutenir nos producteurs. Certains programmes ont facilité l'arrivée de travailleurs étrangers...
View Yves Perron Profile
BQ (QC)
View Yves Perron Profile
2021-04-21 18:32 [p.5950]
Madam Speaker, I am very pleased to speak to Bill C-208, which would significantly help businesses in Quebec and Canada with succession planning.
I once again want to congratulate my colleague from Brandon—Souris for introducing this bill. The Bloc Québécois considers succession planning to be essential to agriculture and all other sectors. We have supported this sector for a very long time. In fact, we started advocating for this idea back in 2005, after the Union des producteurs agricoles and the Fédération de la relève agricole du Québec issued a joint report that talked about the survival of our fishing businesses and farms.
We are talking about taxation, exemptions and various other topics, but what we are really talking about are small and medium-sized businesses, which are the backbone of our economy. We need to keep these businesses alive and make sure they survive. We need to make sure that these small businesses can keep going and that they are not put at a disadvantage where they will end up being bought out by big corporations. The survival of these small businesses is directly connected to the survival of our regions. This is why I am appealing to all of my colleagues.
I will never get used to it, but unfortunately, I once again sense that there is partisanship at play. It does not matter which party introduced the bill. What matters is that members look at the bill and ask themselves whether it is good for people. If it is good for people, then they should vote in favour of it. We need to correct this serious injustice. By protecting our small businesses, we are protecting our economic vitality. This is about sustainability, saving jobs and keeping knowledge in the community. As I just mentioned, it is about stopping the exodus of young people to urban centres. If they are able to take over the family business, then they will stay in the region.
Before I go on, I would like to give a nod to my colleague from Pierre-Boucher—Les Patriotes—Verchères, who introduced a similar bill in a previous Parliament. I commend him for that.
The Bloc Québécois defends the human-scale business model. I talk a lot about agriculture because I am very biased in favour of the farming community, but this is about all kinds of businesses. Human-scale businesses are the ones that keep regions vibrant and schools filled with children because there are families living in the community. We are not talking about a mega-farm that bought the land from eight of its neighbours, leaving only one family. Instead, there are eight families. That is the model we want to promote. In order to defend that model, we need to pass this bill. That is imperative. We have already been talking about it for too long.
Our SMEs are what keep us alive. It is a sector that has not received enough encouragement. I talk a lot about agriculture, but we want to protect innovative SMEs that could also sell their products abroad.
According to a 2018 estimate, between 30,000 and 60,000 Quebec businesses will not find new owners in the years to come. If they do not find new owners, they will die. If they die, 150,000 jobs and $8 billion to $10 billion in revenue will disappear.
In agriculture, it has long been said that every day, a farm disappears. That has not been the case this past year because there has been a slight increase in the number of businesses, which is great. We are happy about that, but it was no thanks to the government. It was because dynamic people started from scratch and created micro-farms. That is a good thing. We are happy about that, but we still see farms disappearing when they should be staying in business. We could do better. We can do better. Why are we not doing better?
I want us to take that step and move forward. Many of my colleagues have talked about numbers and statistics. I have lots of numbers too, but I am once again not sticking to my notes, which is just fine by me.
I want to talk about real people, real cases like the certified organic, 23,000-tap maple syrup operation owned by parents who are paying accountants a fortune to figure out how they can set up the transfer. Does another business have to buy the business? This is the parents' pension fund, and they want to pass it on to their children. They have to make a cruel choice. It makes no sense. That is the kind of example people keep sharing with me to this very day.
The dairy farm in Lac-Saint-Jean is another example. They keep postponing transferring the farm because they cannot come up with a solution, because there is no solution.
I would like to correct something my Liberal colleague said a moment ago. It is not true that the capital gains exemption can be used, otherwise we would not be voting on Bill C-208. I really hope my colleague will have a closer look at this file because in the cases brought to my attention, people are racking their brains for days, weeks and months, even paying a fortune to accountants.
On the other hand, the Liberal government likes to make people fill out complicated paperwork, to the point where they are forced to hire others to fill it out; that is how complicated it is. This seems to make the Liberals happy.
The Bloc Québécois does not think like that. We want to simplify people's lives and support the next generation, our youth and the people who want to live in our regions.
I want to share another example, and this is a true story.
A young person was nearing the end of negotiations to take over the family farm when he left on a trip. While he was away, his parents received an offer from someone outside the family that they could not refuse. The person offered ten times as much. The parents ended up selling the farm to the stranger. That type of situation destroys families and leaves permanent scars.
There are other examples of parents who hand over their business to their children out of a sense of obligation because they would lose sleep if they did not allow their son to take over the farm. As a result, they end up bitter and living in poverty. This also leaves scars. There are inn owners who resign themselves to paying a fortune in taxes. The father resigns himself to living on half of what he anticipated for his retirement. If that is not disgusting then what is?
Come on. We are the government. We have no right not to change this. Bill C-208 is very simple. It amends the Income Tax Act to give people who hand over their business to a relative the same privileges as someone who sells their business to a stranger. That is the right thing to do. Where is the problem? Where is the tax evasion?
Seriously, I sometimes find it difficult to remain calm when I hear the Liberals tell us that this could lead to tax evasion. We have been talking to them forever about tax havens and nothing has happened. Are they kidding me? Are they talking about tax evasion and SMEs? It does not happen often, but I am pretty much speechless. I could not even speak earlier. I told myself that it was not true, that my colleague did not say that, but he just did. We are talking about millions of dollars in tax havens. What about the web giants? How long have the Liberals been waffling to avoid taxing them? The idea is to ensure the survival of other smaller companies, such as our regional media, but they prefer it big and complicated. They favour their friends.
I am tired of a system that goes after and punishes the little guy. Small businesses are forced to fill out 28 forms, which stifles any economic momentum. Let us talk about the money. The Liberals have said that this will cost more than $1 billion, but that is not true. If I recall correctly, in 2017, the cost was estimated at $256 million. This really gets to me.
People thinking in terms of microeconomics see this issue only as a business that ceases to exist. Say the farm is sold to someone outside the family and is merged with a larger company. There is much more at stake here because the suppliers, the employees and the creditors are losing a business partner.
Family transfers are good because they allow for stability and familiarity. People know the business they have been dealing with for 25 or 35 years. When the son takes over the business, it is still the same business. He will keep it going.
Quebec changed its tax laws in 2016, yet another example of how Quebec is ahead. This week, the example was day care. This is good news, as long as we get the money.
I would like the House to come to that realization in this case too. Once again, the federal government is trying to catch up with Quebec laws. I am not saying that in a derogatory way. It is the truth.
Independent studies have shown that 47% of SME owners intend to exit their business within the next five years and 72% of them plan to exit within the next decade. In the fishing industry, a very high percentage of business owners are over the age of 50. Some might say that 50 is the prime of life. It is for me. However, that also means that the next generation needs to take over.
I am making a heartfelt plea and I want to send another message. To the government members who use doublespeak and make promises in private or during meetings by saying that this cause is important and that they are going to work on it, I want to say that now is the time to prove it. This is a good bill, and I am asking members to pass it.
Young people in Quebec and Canada are watching us. Business owners, those who support us and pay taxes are watching the government and waiting for results.
This is the first time that this bill has made it this far. Let us pass it.
Madame la Présidente, c'est un grand plaisir de me prononcer sur le projet de loi C-208, extrêmement important pour favoriser la relève de nos entreprises aux Québec et au Canada.
J'aimerais à nouveau féliciter mon collègue de Brandon—Souris d'avoir proposé ce projet de loi. Au Bloc québécois, nous sommes convaincus que la relève dans l'agriculture et dans tous les autres secteurs est primordiale. Cela fait très longtemps que nous appuyons ce secteur. En fait, nous avons commencé à appuyer cette idée en 2005, à la remise d'un rapport commun de l'Union des producteurs agricoles et de la Fédération de la relève agricole du Québec, entre autres pour assurer la survie de nos entreprises de pêche et d'agriculture.
On parle de fiscalité, d'exemptions et de plusieurs autres sujets. Dans le fond, cependant, il est vraiment question ici de nos petites et moyennes entreprises, de notre tissu économique. Il faut les maintenir en vie, il faut assurer la survie de nos entreprises, il faut que nos petites entreprises continuent d'exister et ne se retrouvent pas dans une situation désavantageuse qui fera qu'elles seront achetées par de grosses entreprises. Si ces petites entreprises continuent d'exister, ce sont nos régions qui vont continuer d'exister. C'est pour cela que, ce soir, je lance un appel à tous mes collègues.
Je ne m'y habituerai jamais, mais, encore une fois, je sens malheureusement qu'il y a de la partisanerie. L'important, ce n'est pas le parti qui a déposé le projet de loi. Ce qui est important, c'est de regarder le projet de loi et se demander s'il est bon pour les gens. S'il est bon pour les gens, on vote pour. Il faut régler cette grave injustice. Protéger nos petites entreprises, c’est protéger le dynamisme économique, c'est la pérennité, c'est la sauvegarde des emplois, c'est le maintien des connaissances chez nous. C'est freiner, comme je viens de le mentionner, l'exode des jeunes vers les centres urbains. S'ils sont en mesure de reprendre l'entreprise familiale, ils vont rester dans la région.
Avant d'aller plus loin, je fais un clin d'œil à mon collègue de Pierre-Boucher—Les Patriotes—Verchères, qui avait déjà déposé un projet de loi semblable dans une législature antérieure, et je le salue.
Au Bloc, nous défendons le modèle d'entreprises à échelle humaine. Je parle beaucoup d'agriculture à cause d'un parti pris très prononcé en faveur du monde agricole, mais il est question ici de toutes sortes d'entreprises. Les entreprises à échelle humaine sont des entreprises qui permettent des régions dynamiques et des écoles remplies d'enfants, parce qu'il y a des familles qui habitent les rangs. On ne parle pas ici d'une mégaferme qui a acheté les terres de ses huit voisins, ce qui ne laisse qu'une seule famille. À la place, il y a huit familles. C'est cela, le modèle que nous voulons promouvoir. Or, pour défendre ce modèle-là, il faut absolument que ce projet de loi soit adopté. C'est impératif, cela fait déjà trop longtemps qu'on en parle.
Nos PME, c'est ce qui nous tient vivants. C'est un secteur qui n'est pas suffisamment encouragé. Je parle beaucoup d'agriculture, mais nous voulons protéger de petites et moyennes entreprises qui ont fait de l'innovation et qui pourraient aussi vendre à l'étranger.
En 2018, on estimait que, dans les années à venir, entre 30 000 et 60 000 entreprises québécoises ne trouveraient pas de repreneurs. Si elles ne trouvent pas de repreneurs, elles vont mourir. Si elles meurent, c'est 150 000 emplois, c'est 8 à 10 milliards de dollars de chiffres d'affaires qui vont disparaître.
En agriculture, on a longtemps utilisé ce slogan voulant qu'une ferme par jour disparaisse. Cela n’a pas été le cas dans la dernière année puisqu'on a constaté une légère augmentation du nombre d'entreprises. Bravo! On est content, mais ce n'est pas parce qu'on a encouragé cela: c'est plutôt parce que des gens dynamiques sont partis de zéro et ont créé des microproductions. C’est positif. On en est content, mais cela ne veut pas dire qu'il n'y a pas encore des fermes qui disparaissent alors qu'elles pourraient demeurer en exploitation. On pourrait faire mieux. On en est capable. Pourquoi ne fait-on pas mieux?
Moi, je veux qu'on fasse le pas et qu'on aille de l'avant. J'ai beaucoup de collègues qui ont parlé de chiffres et de statistiques. Moi aussi, j'ai plein de chiffres, mais, encore une fois, je ne suis pas en train de suivre mes notes et cela me fait plaisir.
Je veux parler de cas humains, de cas réels, comme cette entreprise acéricole de 23 000 entailles, certifiée biologique, et propriété des parents. Ces derniers sont en train de faire des démarches et paient des fortunes aux comptables pour essayer de voir comment formuler le transfert: est-ce qu'il faudrait qu'une autre entreprise achète l'entreprise? Il s'agit du fonds de pension des parents et ils veulent le léguer aux enfants. On a un choix cruel à faire. Cela n'a pas de sens. Ce sont les exemples qu'on me donne, aujourd'hui même.
La ferme laitière au Lac-Saint-Jean est un autre exemple. Le transfert de ferme est constamment repoussé parce qu'ils ne sont pas capables de trouver une solution, parce qu'il n'y en a pas.
J'aimerais d'ailleurs corriger une chose qu'a dite mon collègue libéral qui a parlé avant moi. Présentement, ce n'est pas vrai qu'on peut avoir le gain de capital, sinon nous ne serions pas en train de voter sur le projet de loi C-208. J'aimerais bien que mon collègue étudie le dossier plus en profondeur parce que, dans les cas qu'on me soumet, les gens se creusent la tête pendant des jours, des semaines et des mois et paient des fortunes en faisant appel à des comptables.
Par contre, le gouvernement libéral aime bien faire remplir des papiers compliqués aux gens qui sont obligés d'engager des personnes pour remplir leurs papiers tellement ceux-ci sont complexes. Dans ce temps-là, on est content.
Au Bloc québécois, nous ne pensons pas comme cela. Nous voulons simplifier la vie des gens et favoriser la relève, notre jeunesse et les gens qui veulent occuper nos régions.
Je peux parler d'un autre exemple, qui est une histoire vraie.
Un jeune avait pratiquement terminé les négociations en vue de reprendre la ferme familiale; il est ensuite parti en voyage. Pendant qu'il était en voyage, ses parents ont reçu une offre d'une personne qui n'était pas apparentée et qu'ils ne pouvaient pas refuser. L'offre équivalait à un boni multiplié par 10. Les parents ont donc vendu la ferme à l'étranger. Ce genre de situation détruit des familles et laisse des traces permanentes.
Il existe d'autres exemples de parents qui vont céder l'entreprise à leur enfant s'y sentant obligés, car ils ne pourraient pas dormir jusqu'à la fin de leurs jours s'ils refusaient à leur fils de reprendre la ferme. À cause de cela, ces gens vont vivre dans plus de pauvreté et dans l'amertume. Cela aussi laisse des traces. Il y a des propriétaires d'auberge qui se résignent à payer une fortune en impôt. Le père se résigne à vivre avec la moitié de ce qu'il aurait comme retraite. Si cela n'est pas révoltant, qu'est-ce que c'est?
Voyons donc. Nous sommes le gouvernement. Nous n'avons pas le droit de ne pas changer cela. Le projet de loi C-208 est très simple. Il vient modifier la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu pour donner les mêmes privilèges fiscaux à ceux qui cèdent leur entreprise à des acheteurs apparentés qu'à ceux qui cèdent la leur à des acheteurs non apparentés. C'est correct. Où est le problème? Où se trouve l'évasion fiscale?
Sérieusement, j'ai parfois du mal à garder mon calme quand J'entends les libéraux nous dire que cela pourrait donner lieu à de l'évasion fiscale. Pourtant, nous leur parlons à longueur de semaine des paradis fiscaux et il ne se passe rien. Voyons donc, y a-t-il quelqu'un qui me niaise, ici? Me parle-t-on vraiment d'évasion fiscale pour des PME? Cela ne m'arrive pas souvent, mais je suis presque sans mot. J'ai manqué de souffle tantôt. Je me suis dit que ce n'était pas vrai, que mon collègue n'avait pas dit cela, mais, effectivement, il venait de le dire. On parle de millions de dollars dans les paradis fiscaux. Quant aux entreprises de Web, depuis combien de temps est-ce qu'on taponne pour ne pas les taxer? L'idée est de faire en sorte que survivent d'autres entreprises plus petites, nos médias régionaux, mais on aime cela quand c'est gros ou compliqué. On favorise des amis.
Je suis un peu tanné du système où on fait payer le petit et où on tape sur le petit. On demande au petit de remplir 28 formulaires et on nuit au dynamisme économique. Même si cela coûte de l'argent, parlons du coût. Les libéraux ont déjà dit que cela coûtait plus de 1 milliard de dollars, mais cela n'est pas vrai; de mémoire, en 2017, cela avait été estimé à environ 256 millions de dollars. C'est une chose qui vient me chercher jusque dans les tripes.
Sur le plan microéconomique, les gens pensent que la seule répercussion est que l'entreprise cesse d'exister. Admettons que la ferme est vendue à un étranger et qu'elle est jumelée à une plus grande entreprise. Cela coûte beaucoup plus cher que cela. Dans ce cas, ce sont les fournisseurs, les employés et les créanciers qui perdent un partenaire d'affaires.
Le transfert familial est avantageux, car c'est la promesse d'une stabilité et d'une proximité. Les gens connaissent l'entreprise avec laquelle ils font affaire depuis 25 ou 35 ans. Lorsque le fils reprendra l'entreprise, ce sera la même entreprise. Il va continuer à la faire rouler.
Au Québec, on a changé les lois de la fiscalité en 2016. Encore une fois, le Québec est en avance. Cette semaine, on s'en est rendu compte pour les garderies. C'est une bonne nouvelle, tant que l'argent nous revient.
J'aimerais qu'on s'en rende compte ici aussi. Encore une fois, on essaie de rattraper les lois québécoises. Ce n'est pas péjoratif, c'est la vérité.
Des études indépendantes le disent: 47 % des PME vont être cédées d'ici cinq ans, et 72 % d'entre-elles le seront dans les 10 prochaines années. Dans le secteur de la pêche, un très fort pourcentage des propriétaires ont plus de 50 ans. Certains diront que 50 ans, c'est la fleur de l'âge — c'est d'ailleurs le mien. Cela veut dire aussi que la relève doit arriver.
Je lance un cri du cœur et je vais lancer un autre message. Je dis aux gens du gouvernement qui tiennent des doubles discours et qui font des promesses, en privé ou dans des rencontres, en disant que cette cause est importante et qu'ils vont y travailler, que c'est le moment de nous le prouver. Cette loi est bonne, et je demande à ce qu'on l'adopte.
La jeunesse du Québec et la jeunesse du Canada nous regardent. Les entrepreneurs, ces gens qui nous font vivre et qui paient les taxes et les impôts regardent le gouvernement et attendent des résultats.
C'est la première fois que ce projet de loi se rend si loin. Adoptons-le.
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
NDP (MB)
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
2021-04-21 18:44 [p.5952]
Madam Speaker, I am pleased to rise to speak to Bill C-208 on the transfer of small businesses, family farms and fishing corporations between family members.
It is no secret to members in the House that the New Democrats definitely believe that the ultra-rich and wealthy ought to be paying their fair share, and we have done a very good job of making a case for that in this Parliament. We have proposed some concrete measures for how that might be done.
We have also been champions for small businesses in Canada. We know they are the backbone of the Canadian economy, with 80% of the jobs in our economy created by small business owners. We appreciate farmers and fishers and what they contribute to the Canadian economy and to the world, with all the food they export outside of Canada the world over.
These are important industries. The businesses within them, whether it is a farm or business, are developed by families and become part of the family. Those families are known in their communities. As the former member said, they have relations with suppliers and others within their communities. Being able to pass that family business on to their children is important. It is important for the family from an identity point of view and from the family's economic point of view. However, it can also be important to communities as well, that sense of stability and to ensure that the people who are employed at those businesses and people who do business with those businesses continue to enjoy those relationships and the economic benefits of them. This is why I am quite pleased to stand in support of the bill before us.
Earlier, the member for Winnipeg North talked about the NDP's concern for tax evasion, and he is absolutely right. We can talk about tax havens. New Democratic members have had private members' bills before the House, members who are serious about taking action on the biggest tax evaders. However, some of the small businesses in our communities, and I think of a small business I know, a sign company that a husband and wife developed over 30 or 40 years, want to pass the business to their children. They are not the people who are shunting money out to the Barbados, Cayman Islands and other such places.
The fact is that if business owners choose to sell to their children, under the current tax rules, they will pay considerably more than if they sell to a complete stranger, so there is a principle of fairness here. It just does not make sense that by selling a business that is the life's work of a family within the family that it would be penalized and have to pay more. That is what we are trying to address here.
I think the member for Winnipeg North misunderstands the bill, frankly, when he mentions the capital gains exemption. Of course, the very point of the bill is that if people are selling to immediate family members, they do not benefit from the capital gains exemption. That sale is not taxed as a capital gain; it is taxed as a dividend. The whole point of the legislation is to allow those family members to benefit from the very capital gain lifetime exemption to which the member for Winnipeg North was speaking.
I think some members do not necessarily expect that when the member for Winnipeg North gets up to speak, that he will have a very detailed knowledge of what he is speaking about, but that is no excuse for his government, or the ministry or other members of his party for that matter. They should hold themselves to a higher standard and really come to have an appreciation of what is in the legislation.
Why, when the New Democrats are so concerned about tax evasion, do we support the bill? There are a couple of things.
One of measures in the bill is that to get this different tax treatment under capital gains as opposed to dividends, the family member who receives or purchases the business has to continue to be the owner of that business for five years as opposed to the current two years. That is my understanding. It is meant to promote the idea that if the sale is happening, it is happening because someone within the family genuinely wants to take over the business, not just flip it for sale. Therefore, if within those five years, the business is sold again, then it is retroactively treated as a dividend sale and taxed appropriately, taxed as it is under the current legislation. At that point, it is not about successorship within a family, it has become something else.
One of the things that gives me comfort is that the bill is not the product of one political party that might have a particular agenda. A former NDP member of Parliament, Guy Caron, developed this private member's bill. He put a lot of work into it. As the NDP finance critic, he was someone who did excellent work on tax evasion and was very concerned about it. It was one of the things that motivated him to get into politics. He did that not just as an amateur within politics who was assigned the finance portfolio, but he did it as somebody who worked as an economist his whole life prior to getting into politics.
He understood very well not just the issue of tax evasion but also the particular dynamics of the bill. He sought to craft a bill that really would honour the idea of being able to pass a business down within generations of a family and to do that in the right way, so it did not just become a loophole or an excuse to evade taxes, something the New Democrats fiercely oppose.
Those are some of the elements, both concretely within the bill with respect to what the legislation would do but also where the legislation comes from, that give me confidence that this is not about introducing another means for tax evasion into the tax code. It really is about settling a fundamental unfairness, where people who spend their lives pouring their heart and soul into a business and make it a success, whose children have oftentimes been part of that success, and then want to ensure it gets passed on within the family and can do so without paying a large financial penalty. This also helps to ensure that these assets for our communities stay in local hands.
Sometimes the only people with the capital to buy a business are foreign investors, which sometimes happens, whether it is with small businesses or with farms. Either large corporations or foreign investors purchase these things. It makes more sense for the family, if the differential is $400,000 or $500,000 as we have heard in some cases, to come to the decision that it is in fact better off not doing what its heart wants to do, which is to keep that business or that farm within the family, but to make a more hard-nosed financial decision about the family's best interests. This would allow families to take off the table the factor that makes it far more profitable for them to sell to a stranger than to keep it within the family.
Those are some of the issues at play. As I said, this is something that New Democrats believe in, but it is also part of a package of advocacy that New Democrats have brought forward for a long time, and particularly within this Parliament. I have been really impressed with our small business critic, the member of Parliament for Courtenay—Alberni, a former small business owner himself, He was right out of the gate when the pandemic began, advocating for a 75% wage subsidy when the government said it would only be 10%. He knew how important it was to get beyond just covering payroll costs and providing wage replacement. He was the loudest voice out of the gate for the need for a commercial rent subsidy. He has been advocating for an extension of the Canada emergency business account loan program. We saw a small extension in the most recent budget. We are glad to see that, but there is more work to do.
The New Democrats believe in small business. We are advocating for small business. We see this as part of a package that is important for small business and farmers, so they can keep all the hard work of their families with in their families when the time comes to pass that business on.
Madame la Présidente, je suis heureux de prendre la parole au sujet du projet de loi C-208, qui porte sur le transfert des petites entreprises ainsi que des sociétés agricoles et de pêche familiales entre les membres d'une famille.
Les députés savent bien que les néo-démocrates croient fermement que les riches et les ultra-riches devraient payer leur juste part, car nous avons très bien réussi à défendre ce point de vue au cours de la présente législature. Nous avons aussi proposé certaines mesures concrètes sur la façon d'y arriver.
Nous avons aussi été les champions des petites entreprises canadiennes. Nous savons qu'elles sont l'épine dorsale de l'économie canadienne, car 80 % des emplois dans notre pays sont créés par les propriétaires de petites entreprises. Nous sommes reconnaissants envers les agriculteurs et les pêcheurs pour leur contribution à l'économie canadienne et au reste du monde, grâce à tous les aliments qu'ils exportent partout à l'étranger.
Il s'agit d'industries importantes. Les entreprises qui en font partie, qu'il s'agisse de fermes ou de commerces, sont créées par des familles et font partie de la famille. Ces familles sont connues dans leur collectivité. Comme l'a dit l'intervenant précédent, elles entretiennent des relations avec des fournisseurs et d'autres membres de la collectivité. Il est primordial que ces personnes puissent transférer l'entreprise familiale à leurs enfants. C'est important pour l'identité familiale et pour la situation financière de la famille, mais aussi pour les collectivités, car ces entreprises assurent une certaine stabilité économique pour les employés, les clients et les personnes qui entretiennent des relations commerciales avec elles. Voilà pourquoi je suis ravi de prendre la parole pour appuyer le projet de loi dont nous sommes saisis.
Tout à l'heure, le député de Winnipeg-Nord a mentionné la préoccupation du NPD concernant l'évasion fiscale. Il a tout à fait raison. Nous pouvons parler des paradis fiscaux. Des projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire ont été présentés à la Chambre par des députés néo-démocrates soucieux de sévir contre les plus grands fraudeurs fiscaux. Toutefois, certains propriétaires de petites entreprises au sein de nos collectivités veulent léguer leur entreprise à leurs enfants. Je pense en particulier à une entreprise d'enseignes qu'un couple de ma connaissance a mis 30 ou 40 ans à bâtir. Ces gens ne font pas partie de ceux qui cachent leur argent à la Barbade, aux îles Caïmans ou dans d'autres endroits du genre.
Le fait est que, selon les règles fiscales en vigueur, si des propriétaires d'entreprise décident de vendre leur entreprise à leurs enfants, il leur en coûtera considérablement plus cher que s'ils la vendaient à un pur étranger. C'est une question d'équité. Il est insensé que l'on soit pénalisé parce que l'on vend au sein de sa propre famille une entreprise qui est l'oeuvre de toute une vie et que l'on ait à payer davantage. C'est le problème que nous tentons de régler ici.
Je crois sincèrement que le député de Winnipeg-Nord démontre son incompréhension du projet de loi quand il parle de l'exonération des gains en capital. Le produit de vente d'une entreprise à un membre de la famille immédiate n'est pas traité comme un gain en capital, et c'est la raison d'être du projet de loi. Le produit de la vente est considéré comme un dividende, alors le vendeur ne peut se prévaloir de l'exonération pour gains en capital, et le taux d'imposition est celui des dividendes. L'objectif de la mesure législative est justement de permettre au membre de la famille en question de bénéficier de l'exonération cumulative des gains en capital, à laquelle le député de Winnipeg-Nord faisait allusion.
Je crois que certains députés ne s'attendent pas nécessairement, quand le député de Winnipeg-Nord prend la parole, à ce qu'il ait une connaissance très approfondie de ce dont il va parler, mais cela ne constitue pas une excuse pour le gouvernement, pour le ministère ou pour d'autres membres de son parti. Ils devraient s'assujettir à des normes plus élevées pour comprendre la mesure législative dans toute sa complexité.
Les néo-démocrates se soucient beaucoup de l'évasion fiscale. Alors, pourquoi appuyons-nous le projet de loi? Il y a quelques raisons à cela.
Le projet de loi prévoit notamment que, pour que la vente ou la cession de l'entreprise soit imposée comme un gain en capital plutôt que comme un dividende, le membre de la famille doit demeurer propriétaire de l'entreprise en question pendant cinq ans au lieu de deux ans, comme c'est le cas à l'heure actuelle. C'est ce que je crois comprendre. Cela vise à faire en sorte qu'en cas de vente de l'entreprise, le membre de la famille qui en fait l'acquisition souhaite véritablement en assurer la continuité, pas seulement la revendre à profit. De cette façon, si l'entreprise est vendue à nouveau durant cette période de cinq ans, la vente est alors traitée rétroactivement comme un dividende et imposée en conséquence, de la même manière qu'avec la loi actuelle. À ce moment-là, il ne s'agit plus de succession au sein d'une famille, mais il s'agit d'autre chose.
Ce qui me rassure, c'est que le projet de loi n'a pas été conçu par un parti politique dans un esprit partisan. C'est un ancien député du NPD, Guy Caron, qui l'a élaboré. Il y a consacré beaucoup d'efforts. En tant que porte-parole du NPD en matière de finances, il a fait un excellent travail dans le dossier de l'évasion fiscale; la question le préoccupait beaucoup. C'est l'une des raisons qui l'ont poussé à se lancer en politique. Il n'a pas élaboré le projet de loi comme un politicien à qui l'on aurait confié le dossier des Finances et qui se serait acquitté de la tâche en amateur. Il a plutôt fait ce travail en se servant de ses compétences d'économiste de carrière acquises avant de devenir député.
Il comprenait très bien non seulement la question de l'évasion fiscale, mais aussi la dynamique particulière du projet de loi. Il a donc cherché à élaborer un projet de loi qui allait permettre aux familles de transmettre une entreprise d'une génération à l'autre en évitant que cela serve d'échappatoire fiscale, ce à quoi les néo-démocrates s'opposent farouchement.
Donc, vu le contenu du projet de loi, ses objectifs et son origine, j'ai l'assurance qu'il ne s'agit pas d'introduire dans la loi un nouvelle brèche propice à l'évasion fiscale. Il s'agit plutôt de régler une injustice fondamentale, à savoir que des personnes qui consacrent leur vie à la réussite d'une entreprise, réussite à laquelle leurs enfants ont souvent participé, peuvent la leur transmettre sans se voir infliger une pénalité financière considérable. De cette façon, nous pouvons également nous assurer que la propriété des entreprises reste locale.
Il arrive parfois que les seules personnes ayant le capital nécessaire pour acheter une entreprise, qu'il s'agisse d'une petite entreprise ou d'une société agricole, sont des investisseurs étrangers. Ces entreprises sont achetées soit par des grandes sociétés, soit par des investisseurs étrangers. Si, comme nous l'avons entendu, la différence de prix est de 400 000 $ à 500 000 $ dans certains cas, il serait donc plus logique pour une famille de prendre une décision pragmatique dans l'intérêt financier de ses membres plutôt que d'écouter son cœur en gardant son entreprise ou sa société agricole. Le projet de loi à l'étude ferait en sorte qu'il ne soit désormais pas plus rentable pour une famille de vendre son entreprise à un étranger que de la conserver.
Ce sont là certains des enjeux. Comme je l'ai dit, les néo-démocrates y sont très favorables. C'est quelque chose que nous réclamons depuis longtemps, surtout au cours de la présente législature. J'ai été impressionné par notre porte-parole en matière de petites entreprises, le député de Courtenay—Alberni, qui est lui-même un ancien petit entrepreneur. Dès le début de la pandémie, il a recommandé une subvention salariale de 75 %, alors que le gouvernement voulait qu'elle soit seulement de 10 %. Mon collègue savait à quel point il était important de ne pas se contenter de couvrir les coûts salariaux et d'assurer un revenu de remplacement. Personne n'a insisté aussi fortement et rapidement que lui sur la nécessité d'une subvention pour le loyer commercial. Il a également réclamé une prolongation du Compte d'urgence pour les entreprises canadiennes. Dans le plus récent budget, nous avons vu une petite prolongation de cette initiative. Nous nous en sommes réjouis, mais il reste du travail à faire.
Les néo-démocrates croient aux petites entreprises et défendent leurs intérêts. Nous considérons que le projet de loi fait partie d'une série de mesures importantes destinées aux petits entrepreneurs et aux agriculteurs pour que, le moment venu, ils puissent léguer leur entreprise à des membres de leur famille afin que ces derniers puissent bénéficier de tous les fruits de leur labeur.
View Tamara Jansen Profile
CPC (BC)
Madam Speaker, if there is one group of Canadians that has been hard hit during the pandemic, it is small business owners, men and women who risked everything to build a dream, maybe a small boutique grocery store on main street, a specialty bakery featuring grandma's secret apple pie recipe, the butcher who was taught by his father how to make sausage like they did in the old country or a unique restaurant featuring a mix of Italian pasta and Lebanese kebabs. They all have one thing in common: They have all been holding on by a thread, trying to keep the business afloat long enough to make it to the other side of these restrictions.
Moms and dads work tirelessly besides sons and daughters, aunts and uncles, grandmothers and grandfathers, all leaning on each other to keep that dream alive. Even before COVID, these hard-working entrepreneurs laid it all on the line, hustling endless hours, with no sick leave, vacation pay, maternity benefits or RRSPs. They put every penny they made back into the business, investing in the future, building a legacy, something that made their community a better, more dynamic place to live.
A huge majority of these brave job creators and risk-takers work side by side with their families, guiding son or daughter in the art of providing services within their community. These are fathers showing sons how to grind the pork, beef and spices just so to create the perfect kielbasa coil; or a mother demonstrating the art of making fluffy pastry crusts for the next day's batch of fresh fruit apple pies, recipes and skills handed down by word of mouth, with a keen determination to pass on skills to the next generation, quietly passing on knowledge that would otherwise be lost. Shoulder to shoulder, the generations tend to customers and suppliers, making deals and creating jobs in their local neighbourhoods.
It is in this organic-style school of business that big government just cannot help but cause havoc by way of unfair taxes, taxes that disadvantage a father when selling the family farm to his son or a mother selling the French bakery to her daughter. After years of giving everything they had to build their dream, late nights washing dishes, early mornings mucking stalls, long hot summers sitting in the combine or cold hard winters packing tomatoes into crates, they finally are ready to lay down their tools and pass the business on to the next generation.
What do these owners find when they go to sell their firm? That the government considers them a tax cheat simply for wanting to sell to their children rather than a third party stranger. It has to be said that passing a business on from one generation to the next is no easy feat at the best of times. Many family businesses have had a hard time surviving the challenge, so the very last thing the government should be doing is making this more difficult by disadvantaging the transaction.
There are 1.1 million small businesses and farms across Canada looking, hopefully, to the passage of this bill, which would ensure they have a level playing field when it comes to transition of ownership between parents and children. In our own family, I know the many years of hard work that went into the planning for transition, and yes, we incorporated early on. That did not make us terrible, awful people.
First, owners need to ensure their bankers are confident that their children will be able to succeed going forward. They need to earn the trust of their customers and suppliers that the generation will be able to skilfully man the helm when they one step away. They need to negotiate the rough waters of family dynamics that play a huge role in family business succession. Quite honestly, passing a business on to our kids is far more difficult than just selling to a third party.
Selling to a stranger does not disrupt the harmony of family Christmas dinners. It will not damage people's ability to see their grandkids when bitterness creeps in between their kids. It will not cause rifts between fathers or brothers like a family business succession can do, yet government treats those who are willing to walk that hard road like uber-wealthy tax evaders who are only in it for the quick buck. Nothing can be further from the truth.
Family business succession is not for the faint of heart and takes years to accomplish, so why do we keep punishing families for wanting to pass on a legacy? Not only that, but the current system is totally disrespectful to the hard-working Canadians whose entire retirement savings are wrapped up in their small business. Currently, these savings are seriously impacted if they choose to try to keep the business in the family.
This bill appears to be very timely from the perspective of a COVID recovery plan, since we know our small businesses will be paramount in helping us get our economy back on track when we finally reopen.
We all know that family businesses are the lifeblood of our economy and our communities. Honestly, I cannot wrap my mind around why the government would punish parents and children for being willing to put their blood, sweat and tears into a small enterprise only to be considered tax cheats for the simple desire to pass it on to the next generation.
Consider the story of a couple who owns a business in a small town, wants to retire and relies on the sale as their retirement fund. This sort of thing happens all the time. Now imagine the couple was hoping to retire and sell the business to one of their daughters who has been working with them for years. She is excited to take over from her parents and continue building on their legacy.
In the meantime, they are approached by a much larger, non-related company that has no local ties. This larger corporation would want to produce the goods in the bigger urban centre where it is based, possibly even overseas. Ultimately, this would mean completely shifting jobs and economic activity out of the local community.
As happens often, when they did the math with their accountant, they discovered it would cost up to 67% more in taxes for their daughter to buy their business than for a stranger, simply because she was their daughter. It makes no sense that we do not have a level playing field here, especially considering how much communities gain from family farms and businesses run by successive generations. It is clear that a robust COVID-19 recovery will need healthy small businesses that are owned and operated by passionate local entrepreneurs, and that this bill would make a huge difference for local family-run businesses that want to keep their work in the family.
Because this bill is critical for small, family-owned businesses, how many people have actually opposed the bill? As we can imagine, it has overwhelming support across the country including from the Chicken Farmers of Canada, Grain Growers of Canada, Canadian Taxpayers Federation, the Canadian Federation of Independent Business and chambers of commerce, just to name a few, not to mention every Canadian small business owner who seeks to keep their business in the family.
For too long this situation has continued unabated, but why is that? Looking at similar bills that have come before Parliament in recent years, it seems that a significant reason they have never made it through Parliament is the advice that tax analysts give to the government of the day. The complexity of the Tax Act, which creates these disadvantages for family-owned businesses, was meant as an anti-avoidance measure.
I understand the need to safeguard against tax avoidance. That is why there are safeguarding measures built into the bill. However, the way the laws are currently set up, all business owners who seek to keep their businesses in the family are being punished because of the few who might try to game the system and avoid paying taxes. In typical fashion, we are punishing the wrong people. There will always be a chance that someone is trying to cheat, but contrary to the Prime Minister 's belief, most small business owners are not tax cheats. Most small businesses are not simply shell companies created for wealthy Canadians to avoid taxes. Only the wealthy elite who have never had to sweep the floor in their father's grocery store or sling bales on their uncle's farm would believe something like that.
Over 50% of Canadian small business owners wish to pass their businesses on to family members. Nobody in their right mind thinks that 50% of small business owners are looking to cheat on their taxes. I think we all agree that they deserve a level playing field. They do not deserve to be forced to choose between being hammered with extra taxes, which put their retirement in jeopardy, and selling their farms outside of the family and outside of the community.
Whoever is suggesting that we oppose this bill needs to remember that it is our job to serve the public, not the other way around. It is important for the government to remember it is time to show some political leadership and say, “Look, Canadians are being treated unfairly and we are going to fix it.”
If the government will refuse to show leadership on this, thankfully I am confident that Parliament will. We are, after all, the voice of the people. We need the bill to pass to ensure that our most valuable asset, the job creators and risk takers who make our communities strong and resilient even in the face of a devastating pandemic, are able to thrive. I call on all my colleagues to support this bill and bring fairness back for the little guy.
Madame la Présidente, s'il y a un groupe de Canadiens qui a été durement frappé par la pandémie, c'est bien celui des propriétaires de petite entreprise, ces hommes et ces femmes qui ont tout risqué pour réaliser leur rêve, qu'il s'agisse d'une petite épicerie spécialisée sur la rue principale, d'une boulangerie dont la spécialité serait la tarte aux pommes faite à partir de la recette secrète de grand-maman, du boucher dont le père lui a appris comment fabriquer de la saucisse comme on en faisait autrefois sur le vieux continent, ou encore d'un restaurant pas comme les autres où l'on sert des pâtes italiennes et des kébabs libanais. Ils ont tous une chose en commun: leur survie ne tient qu'à un fil, et ils tentent de se maintenir à flot assez longtemps pour survivre aux mesures de confinement.
Des mères et des pères travaillent sans relâche aux côtés de fils et de filles, de tantes et d'oncles, de grands-mères et de grands-pères, qui comptent tous les uns sur les autres afin de garder leur rêve en vie. Même avant la COVID, ces vaillants entrepreneurs étaient prêts à tout, enfilant d'interminables heures de travail sans congé de maladie, sans indemnité de vacances, sans prestations de maternité ni REER. Ils ont investi toutes leurs économies dans leur entreprise, dans leur avenir, pour se constituer un héritage, un commerce qui fera de leur collectivité un meilleur endroit, plus dynamique, où vivre.
La vaste majorité de ces courageux créateurs d'emplois et preneurs de risques travaillent côte à côte avec leur famille, ils enseignent à leurs fils ou leurs filles l'art de fournir des services au sein de leur collectivité. Ce sont des pères qui montrent à leurs fils comment hacher le porc et le bœuf et moudre les épices pour créer une saucisse kolbassa parfaite ou des mères qui enseignent l'art de faire des pâtes à tarte moelleuses pour la fournée de tartes aux pommes et aux fruits frais du lendemain. Ils transmettent des recettes et des compétences de bouche à oreille, très déterminés à léguer des compétences à la génération suivante et à transmettre en douceur des connaissances qui seraient autrement perdues. Côte à côte, les générations s'occupent des clients et des fournisseurs, concluent des marchés et créent des emplois dans leurs quartiers.
C'est dans cette école de commerce naturelle que la grosse machine gouvernementale ne peut s'empêcher de faire des ravages par le biais de taxes injustes qui désavantagent un père lorsqu'il vend la ferme familiale à son fils ou une mère lorsqu'elle vend sa boulangerie française à sa fille. Après avoir passé des années à faire tout leur possible pour réaliser leur rêve, des nuits à faire la vaisselle, des matins à nettoyer les étables, des étés longs et chauds à conduire la moissonneuse-batteuse ou des hivers froids et durs à emballer des tomates dans des caisses, ils sont enfin prêts à déposer leurs outils et à léguer l'entreprise à la génération suivante.
Tout ça pour s'apercevoir que le gouvernement les considère comme des fraudeurs simplement parce qu'ils veulent vendre leur entreprise à leurs enfants plutôt qu'à un étranger. Il faut dire qu'en partant, la passation d'une entreprise d'une génération à l'autre est loin d'être simple. De nombreuses entreprises familiales ont du mal à survivre à la situation, alors la dernière chose que le gouvernement devrait faire, c'est bien de leur compliquer la vie en pénalisant ce type de transaction.
Il y a 1,1 million de petites entreprises et de fermes, partout au Canada, qui espèrent que ce projet de loi sera adopté, car il leur permettra d'être traitées plus équitablement le jour où les parents voudront céder les rênes aux enfants. Je sais que, dans ma famille, la planification de la transition a nécessité beaucoup de travail et qu'elle a duré des années — et oui, nous avons constitué une société tôt dans le processus. Cela ne faisait pas de nous de mauvaises personnes pour autant.
Pour commencer, les propriétaires doivent convaincre la banque que leurs enfants connaîtront eux aussi le succès. Ils doivent aussi convaincre les clients et les fournisseurs que la prochaine génération saura mener la barque avec autant d'adresse qu'eux. Ils doivent aussi composer avec les aléas de la dynamique familiale, ce qui n'est jamais une mince affaire quand il est question de céder une entreprise familiale. Pour être honnête, il est nettement plus difficile de vendre son entreprise à ses enfants qu'à un pur étranger.
Lorsque l'on vend à un étranger, on ne risque pas de perturber l'harmonie des dîners de famille à Noël ou d'être privés de la présence de ses petits-enfants lorsque l'amertume se répand chez les enfants. On ne risque pas les déchirements que causent les successions d'entreprise entre un père et ses enfants. Pourtant, le gouvernement traite ceux qui sont prêts à emprunter cette voie difficile comme des fraudeurs fiscaux immensément riches qui ne cherchent qu'à faire de l'argent rapidement. Rien ne saurait être plus loin de la vérité.
La relève d'entreprises familiales, ce n'est pas pour ceux qui ont froid aux yeux et il faut y consacrer des années, alors pourquoi continuer à pénaliser les familles qui veulent laisser leur entreprise en héritage? Qui plus est, le système actuel est tout à fait irrespectueux envers les vaillants Canadiens dont toutes les économies de retraite sont investies dans leur petite entreprise. À l'heure actuelle, ces économies seront sérieusement touchées s'ils décident de garder l'entreprise dans la famille.
Le projet de loi semble tout à fait opportun du point de vue de la relance post-COVID, car nous savons que les petites entreprises joueront un rôle de premier plan pour remettre l'économie sur les rails lorsque nos activités reprendront enfin.
Nous savons tous que les entreprises familiales sont vitales pour notre économie et nos collectivités. Honnêtement, je n'arrive pas à comprendre pourquoi le gouvernement pénaliserait les parents et les enfants prêts à suer sang et eau pour leur petite entreprise en les considérant comme des fraudeurs du fisc simplement parce qu'ils souhaitent transférer cette entreprise à la prochaine génération.
Par exemple, un couple propriétaire d'une entreprise dans un village souhaite prendre sa retraite et compte sur la vente de l'entreprise comme fonds de retraite. Ce genre de situation se produit fréquemment. Imaginons maintenant que le couple espère vendre son entreprise à l'une de ses filles, qui travaille avec lui depuis des années. Celle-ci est ravie de prendre la relève et de perpétuer l'héritage laissé par ses parents.
Entretemps, une entreprise qui n'a rien à voir avec celle du couple, qui est beaucoup plus grosse et qui n'a aucune attache au village communique avec le couple. Elle souhaite acheter l'entreprise du couple et en transférer la production dans le grand centre urbain où elle est établie, voire à l'étranger. Bref, elle ferait entièrement sortir les emplois et l'activité économique du village.
Comme c'est trop souvent le cas, lorsqu'ils ont fait les calculs avec leur comptable, ils se sont rendu compte qu'il leur en coûterait jusqu'à 67 % plus d'impôt si c'était leur fille qui achetait l'entreprise plutôt qu'un étranger, simplement parce qu'elle est leur fille. Il est tout à fait insensé que les règles ne soient pas les mêmes pour tout le monde, surtout si on pense à tous les avantages que retirent les collectivités de la présence de sociétés agricoles et d'entreprises familiales et de leur passation de génération en génération. Il est évident que pour avoir une relance post-COVID-19 solide, nous aurons besoin de petites entreprises en santé détenues et dirigées par des entrepreneurs locaux passionnés, et le projet de loi à l'étude changera la donne pour les entrepreneurs locaux qui veulent que leur entreprise reste dans la famille.
Comme ce projet de loi est essentiel pour les petites entreprises familiales, qui s'y opposerait? Personne ne sera donc surpris d'apprendre que le projet de loi bénéficie d'un appui généralisé dans tout le pays et qu'il a notamment été appuyé par les Producteurs de poulet du Canada, les Producteurs de grains du Canada, la Fédération canadienne des contribuables, la Fédération canadienne de l'entreprise indépendante et les chambres de commerce du pays, pour ne nommer que ceux-là, sans parler de tous les petits entrepreneurs canadiens qui veulent que leur entreprise demeure dans la famille.
Cette situation perdure depuis trop longtemps, mais pourquoi? Lorsqu'on examine des projets de loi semblables qui ont été présentés au Parlement au cours des dernières années, on a l'impression qu'ils n'ont pas réussi à être adoptés au Parlement en raison surtout des conseils que les analystes fiscaux fournissaient au gouvernement du moment. La complexité de la loi de l'impôt, qui crée ces désavantages pour les entreprises familiales, se voulait une mesure anti-évitement.
Je comprends qu'il faille se prémunir contre l'évitement fiscal. C'est pourquoi le projet de loi contient des mesures de protection. Cependant, avec les lois actuelles, tous les propriétaires d'entreprise qui souhaitent garder celle-ci dans leur famille sont punis à cause d'une poignée de personnes qui pourraient tenter de déjouer le système pour éviter de payer des impôts. Comme d'habitude, nous punissions les mauvaises personnes. Il y aura toujours des personnes qui tenteront de tricher, mais contrairement à ce que croit le premier ministre, la plupart des propriétaires de petites entreprises ne fraudent pas le fisc. La plupart des petites entreprises ne sont pas que des sociétés fictives que de riches Canadiens ont créées pour éviter de payer des impôts. Seuls des riches issus de l'élite qui n'ont jamais dû balayer le plancher de l'épicerie de leur père ni attacher des bottes de foin à la ferme de leur oncle pourraient croire une telle chose.
Plus de 50 % des propriétaires de petite entreprise du pays veulent transmettre leur entreprise à des membres de leur famille. Aucune personne raisonnable ne pourrait penser que 50 % des propriétaires de petite entreprise veulent frauder le fisc. Je pense que nous convenons tous qu'ils méritent que les règles du jeu soient uniformes. Ils ne méritent pas qu'on les oblige à choisir entre un fardeau fiscal plus lourd, ce qui compromettrait leur retraite, et la vente de leur exploitation agricole à quelqu'un qui ne fait pas partie de leur famille et de leur collectivité.
Ceux qui proposent que nous rejetions ce projet de loi ne doivent pas oublier que c'est nous qui sommes au service de la population, et non le contraire. Le gouvernement ne doit pas oublier qu'il est temps de faire preuve de leadership politique et de s'engager à corriger la situation pour les Canadiens qui sont traités injustement.
Si le gouvernement refuse de faire preuve de leadership dans ce dossier, j'ai bon espoir que le Parlement le fera. Après tout, nous sommes la voix du peuple. Nous devons adopter le projet de loi pour assurer la prospérité des gens qui sont notre plus précieux atout, soit ceux qui créent des emplois et qui prennent des risques même lorsqu'ils doivent composer avec une pandémie désastreuse. J'exhorte tous mes collègues à appuyer ce projet de loi par souci d'équité envers les simples citoyens.
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2021-04-21 19:04 [p.5955]
Madam Speaker, the finance committee held a very intensive hearing into this. We passed it back to Parliament. We looked at the tax implications.
The bottom line is what this bill means for the community. The backbone of the community is small businesses, farmers and fishermen, and especially those who can pass a business down from generation to generation. This is an issue of tax fairness and should be supported fully.
If officials have a problem with this, then they should put their corrections forward in a ways and means bill in the future, but they should pass this necessary bill now and support farmers, fishermen and small business.
Madame la Présidente, le comité des finances a mené une étude très approfondie de ce projet de loi. Nous l'avons ensuite renvoyé à la Chambre. Nous avons examiné les répercussions fiscales en question.
Le point central, c'est ce que cela représente pour nos communautés. Les petites entreprises, les agriculteurs et les pêcheurs, particulièrement ceux qui transmettent une entreprise de génération en génération, sont l'épine dorsale de notre économie. L'objet du projet de loi est un enjeu d'équité fiscale qui devrait avoir notre soutien absolu.
Si des responsables sont d'un autre avis, il faudra qu'ils corrigent ce problème un jour dans un projet de loi de voies et moyens. Je leur recommande plutôt d'adopter ce projet de loi essentiel dès maintenant afin de soutenir les agriculteurs, les pêcheurs et les propriétaires de petites entreprises.
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
The time provided for the consideration of Private Members' Business has now expired and the order is dropped to the bottom of the order of precedence on the Order Paper.
La période réservée aux affaires émanant des députés est maintenant écoulée. L'article retombe au bas de la liste de priorité du Feuilleton
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2021-03-23 10:05 [p.5087]
Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the third report of the Standing Committee on Finance in relation to Bill C-208, an act to amend the Income Tax Act, transfer of small business or family farm or fishing corporation. The committee has studied the bill and has decided to report the bill back to the House without amendment.
Monsieur le Président, j'ai l'honneur de présenter, dans les deux langues officielles, le troisième rapport du Comité permanent des finances, qui porte sur le projet de loi C‑208, loi modifiant la Loi de l’impôt sur le revenu concernant le transfert d’une petite entreprise ou d’une société agricole ou de pêche familiale. Le Comité a étudié le projet de loi et a convenu d'en faire rapport à la Chambre sans proposition d'amendement.
View Sébastien Lemire Profile
BQ (QC)
Madam Speaker, the pandemic has changed people's habits and left many workers and their families in uncertainty. In order to maintain many jobs and promote recovery for various sectors, such as tourism, the federal government should make workers the focus of the recovery.
The next federal budget should provide for better, more flexible support programs that will help maintain good-quality jobs. The federal government should implement sector-specific measures to support workers in highly impacted sectors, such as charities and businesses in the tourism, hospitality, accommodation, arts, entertainment and major events sectors, which experienced major financial losses as a result of the lockdown and public health measures.
For example, the lockdown took a major toll on the tourism industry. International tourists stayed at home, and domestic tourists chose to be cautious. Revenues for seasonal businesses and organizations in the tourism industry are at an all-time low.
With regard to the hotel industry, the lack of international tourists means that hotels throughout Quebec, including those in Quebec City and Montreal, are sitting practically vacant. This was a very challenging season for thousands of inns in welcoming villages across Quebec, such as those along the St. Lawrence River.
The socio-economic impacts on workers in Quebec's major economic sectors have been numerous, including job losses for many young people and students, jobs at small- and large-scale events, bars, restaurants and summer camps. Losing a job is tough. People and families sometimes have to relocate or change careers entirely. This causes stress, especially financial stress. It can even lead to depression. Companies can also lose expertise as a result, putting stress on managers and owners. The topic of bankruptcy is also unavoidable. The health crisis has not affected everyone equally. Some sectors have literally been wiped out, while others will take many months to recover. COVID-19 must not result in a bankruptcy pandemic. Individuals and small and medium-sized businesses that owe the government money because of the assistance they have received must be given time. They must be offered an interest-free deferral. It is also important to support all the local businesses being crushed by multinational e-commerce companies. Improved support programs are therefore needed.
For the past year, the government has been generous. However, its one-size-fits-all programs are costly and ill suited for those hit the hardest. Today, the programs are still plagued by problems with their design, accessibility and processing times.
Job losses and insecurity impact people and their families, our workers and business owners. To minimize job losses and eliminate inadequate programs as much as possible, we need support measures that are effective, targeted and flexible. They are essential for providing support to workers. We must act quickly, because many polls have shown a deterioration in quality of life since March 2020, which is cause for concern.
The future of our small businesses, which are increasingly burdened by debt and must face stiff competition from major chains and multinationals, is also cause for concern. We must support our businesses and organizations better, particularly by reviewing the terms of the assistance measures. For the sectors that have been hit hardest by the crisis and that will be among the last to reopen, the Bloc Québécois is demanding improved support programs, including lending supports for small and medium-sized businesses. The lending supports must be accessible within 30 days of the passage of the motion, to prevent a wave of bankruptcies and layoffs on the horizon.
We also have to consider subsidies and tax credits, without putting businesses further in debt. As they say, an elastic will only stretch so far. If we want to help companies hang onto their jobs and expertise, then subsidies and tax credits are essential. We need skilled employees for the recovery, and we will need intelligence, innovation and experience. Companies should not have to recruit new people, new talent. I am thinking of the tourism and cultural industries, which are currently losing talent, from managers to guides, because they are temporarily closed. The Canada emergency wage subsidy and the Canada emergency rent subsidy, especially for the sectors that will take some time to recover, are necessary to enable tourism and cultural businesses to recover. These programs must be extended until at least the next tourist season to give the industry time to recover. That is an example of the kind of flexibility I am talking about.
This ecosystem has been gutted over the past year, and we will have to invest in human resources to help it rebuild. Tourism companies, festivals and other large-scale events will have to reinvent themselves and rethink the services they provide in the regions of Quebec.
To help Quebec's tourism and cultural businesses get back on their feet, the federal government should gradually move away from its one-size-fits-all programs and focus on programs that are better targeted and more flexible. These types of programs are more effective and promote innovation. For example, for this year only, the federal government should allow for a special $200 tax credit, 80% of which would be refundable, to support cultural and community organizations with their recovery and help them get back on track as soon as possible. Another example would be implementing a generous tax credit to encourage experienced workers to keep working if they want to, instead of retiring.
Speaking of tourism, to go a bit further, what about the allure of the regions? Why not use tourism as a way to spur personal and regional development by and for young people who are looking to settle in the regions for the healthy lifestyle and great quality of life?
We need to ensure that young people, and those who are not so young, feel proud to live in the regions and contribute to the development of not only the land and its natural beauty, but also its expertise and innovative cultural and tourism projects. Let us allow the next generation to show us the regions of Quebec and Canada at their best.
In order for the next generation to be able to settle in the regions, we need to promote the development of certain sectors. I am thinking in particular of the next generation of farmers. Right now, farmers are better off selling their farms to strangers than passing them on to a family member. The Government of Quebec has once again led the way by changing its own tax rules to encourage the transfer of family farms. Let us put an immediate stop to this injustice. The federal government needs to amend the tax rules so that the intergenerational transfer of farms is at least as profitable as selling to strangers. Obviously, I am thinking about Bill C-208, which is currently being examined by the Standing Committee on Finance.
When it comes to agri-food, Quebec has known for a long time, since Confederation, that the federal government is hindering the development of Quebec's agricultural model, particularly today, when it is favouring other export sectors at the expense of Quebec agriculture.
In the agri-food sector, we have seen how fragile the globalized supply chains are. To ensure food security for our people, we must support our farmers and enable them to produce in a fair market that supports healthy products from local businesses that can again be handed down from one generation to the next.
Then there are processors and temporary foreign workers. The federal government must help farmers, processors and businesses continue to bring in temporary foreign workers. We must improve the temporary foreign worker programs to make them more flexible and more tailored to business conditions, without overlooking regional businesses. It takes over eight hours to drive to Abitibi—Témiscamingue, which makes things complicated for a farmer who wants to personally pick up the foreign worker from the airport.
I will conclude with a few words about support for land use and local development. Obviously, the major issue is access to high-speed Internet and the cell network. To support regional economic development, we want the federal government to transfer the necessary funds to Quebec immediately so all Quebeckers can connect to high-speed Internet. The delays are never-ending, and Canada has proven itself incapable of breaking down the biggest barriers to the competition that Quebec telecom companies large and small face to ensure accessible, affordable telecom service in Quebec. There are nine federal programs, each with its own idiosyncrasies. Doing business with the federal government is very complicated.
Quebec also needs the means to create a system that will help restore services to the regions. I am talking about airline service. However, Ottawa must not get in the way of financial support and regional connections Quebec has set up. I will come back to that. Air Canada cannot be subsidized forever. There are companies such as Propair in Abitibi—Témiscamingue that want to serve the regions.
In conclusion, the Bloc Québécois is in favour of the motion. The federal government has now gone nearly two years without presenting a proper budget. The last budget was presented in the spring of 2019, before the election and, of course, before the pandemic. We need action, and we need it now. A great many businesses, their workers and their families are watching. This has been a long wait. Support is needed quickly, so we must act quickly by adopting this motion.
Madame la Présidente, la pandémie actuelle aura changé les habitudes et plongé dans l'incertitude de nombreux travailleurs et leurs familles. Afin d'assurer le maintien de nombreux emplois et d'encourager la reprise de plusieurs secteurs, comme celui du tourisme, le gouvernement fédéral devra mettre le travailleur au centre de la relance.
Le prochain budget fédéral devra prévoir des programmes de soutien améliorés et flexibles qui assureront le maintien d'emplois de qualité. Le fédéral devra mettre en place des mesures sectorielles de soutien aux travailleurs des secteurs durement touchés, tels que les organismes de bienfaisance et les entreprises des secteurs comme le tourisme, l'accueil, l'hébergement, les arts, le divertissement et les grands événements. Le confinement et les mesures sanitaires leur ont causé d'énormes pertes financières.
Sur le plan du tourisme, par exemple, le confinement a nui grandement au secteur. Les touristes internationaux sont restés dans leur pays et les touristes d'ici ont préféré rester prudents. Le chiffre d'affaires des entreprises et des organisations de l'industrie touristique qui sont prospères de manière saisonnière ne peut être au plus bas.
En ce qui a trait à l'hôtellerie, l'absence de touristes provenant de l'étranger a fait des hôtels du Québec, comme ceux de la ville de Québec ou de Montréal, des lieux quasi abandonnés. La saison fut très difficile pour des milliers d'auberges dans les villages accueillants qui existent au Québec, comme ceux des régions le long du fleuve Saint-Laurent.
Pour ce qui est des travailleurs dans les secteurs économiques importants du Québec, les impacts socioéconomiques sur les travailleurs ont été nombreux, à savoir une perte d'emploi pour beaucoup de jeunes et d'étudiants, des emplois dans les petits et les grands événements, les bars, les restaurants et les camps de vacances. En fait, perdre son emploi n'est pas chose facile; les gens et les familles doivent parfois se relocaliser et réorienter leur carrière. Cela provoque du stress, particulièrement du stress financier. Cela peut même mener à la dépression. Cela provoque aussi une perte d'expertise dans une entreprise, par exemple. Cela provoque du stress sur les dirigeants et les propriétaires. Évidemment, on ne peut pas ne pas parler de faillite. La crise sanitaire n'a pas frappé tout le monde également. Certains secteurs ont été littéralement terrassés, d'autres ne se sortiront de la crise que dans de longs mois. La COVID-19 ne doit pas déboucher sur une pandémie de faillites. Il faut donner du temps aux personnes et aux petites et moyennes entreprises qui doivent de l'argent à l'État à cause de l'aide qu'elles ont reçue. Il faut leur offrir un sursis sans paiement et sans intérêts. Il faut également soutenir toutes les entreprises locales assaillies par les multinationales du commerce en ligne. Il faut donc des programmes de soutien améliorés.
Depuis un an, le gouvernement a été généreux, mais ses programmes d'envergure, en plus d'être très coûteux, sont mal adaptés à ceux qui ont été les plus durement frappés. Encore aujourd'hui, certains problèmes demeurent sur le plan de la conception des programmes, de leur accessibilité et des délais de traitement.
Les pertes d'emploi et les insécurités ont des impacts sur les gens et leur famille, sur nos travailleurs et nos propriétaires. Afin de réduire au maximum les pertes d'emploi et les programmes mal adaptés, il doit y avoir des mesures de soutien efficaces, ciblées et flexibles qui sont essentielles pour soutenir les travailleurs. Il faut agir vite, car il y a de quoi s'inquiéter de la détérioration de la qualité de vie depuis mars 2020; de nombreux sondages en témoignent d'ailleurs.
Il faut également s'inquiéter de l'avenir de nos petits commerces et de nos petites entreprises pour qui l'endettement pèse de plus en plus lourd, et qui doivent faire face à une concurrence féroce de la part des grandes chaînes et des multinationales. Il faut mieux soutenir nos entreprises et nos organismes en revoyant notamment les modalités des mesures d'aide. Pour les secteurs qui ont particulièrement souffert de la crise et qui seront dans les derniers à rouvrir, le Bloc québécois exige des programmes de soutien améliorés, y compris du crédit pour les petites et moyennes entreprises. Le crédit doit être accessible dans les 30 jours suivant l'adoption de la motion, afin de prévenir une vague de faillites et de mises à pied. Cela nous guette.
Il faut penser aussi à des subventions et à des crédits d'impôt, mais sans augmenter l'endettement des entreprises. Comme on dit, il y a une limite à étirer l'élastique. Si l'on veut maintenir les emplois et les expertises dans les entreprises, les subventions et les crédits d'impôt sont essentiels. Nous avons besoin d'employés qualifiés pour la relance, et il faudra de l'intelligence, de l'innovation et de l'expérience. Il ne faut pas que les entreprises s'enfoncent dans les embauches et dans les recherches de talents. Je pense aux industries touristiques et culturelles qui perdent présentement des talents, des gestionnaires aux guides, parce qu'elles sont en pause. La Subvention salariale d'urgence du Canada et la Subvention d'urgence du Canada pour le loyer, en particulier pour les secteurs qui prendront du temps à se relever, sont nécessaires pour la relance des entreprises touristiques et culturelles. Il faut prolonger le programme au moins jusqu'à la prochaine saison touristique pour que l'industrie se relève. Je parle de flexibilité, et cela en est un exemple.
Pour reconstruire, il faut surtout investir dans les ressources humaines, dans cet écosystème qui a été malmené depuis la dernière année. Les entreprises touristiques, les festivals et les autres événements d'envergure devront se réinventer pour redéfinir les offres de services des régions du Québec.
Pour que les entreprises touristiques et culturelles québécoises se réinventent, le gouvernement fédéral doit délaisser graduellement les programmes d'envergure au profit de programmes mieux ciblés et plus flexibles. Ces derniers sont plus efficaces et favorisent l'innovation. Par exemple, pour soutenir la relance des organismes culturels et communautaires et pour les aider à reprendre le rythme du travail le plus rapidement possible, le fédéral devrait permettre un crédit d'impôt spécial de 200 $ remboursable à 80 %, uniquement cette année. Un autre exemple est de mettre en place un crédit d'impôt généreux, afin d'inciter les travailleurs d'expérience qui le souhaitent à prolonger leur carrière au lieu de prendre leur retraite.
Sur le plan du tourisme, et pour aller un peu plus loin, il y a l'attractivité des territoires. Pourquoi ne pas reprendre le tourisme comme un levier dynamique de développement personnel et régional fait par et pour les jeunes qui ont la volonté d'habiter les territoires, d'y vivre sainement et d'y créer une qualité de vie exceptionnelle?
Il faut faire en sorte que les jeunes et les moins jeunes ressentent la fierté de vivre en région, tout en contribuant à la mise en valeur du territoire, de ses beautés naturelles, mais aussi de son savoir-faire, des projets innovants, culturels et touristiques. Laissons la relève nous montrer les régions du Québec et du Canada à leur meilleur.
Pour que cette relève s'implante en région, il faut favoriser certains secteurs. Je pense notamment à la relève agricole. Aujourd'hui, il est plus avantageux pour les agriculteurs de vendre leur ferme à des étrangers que de la céder à un proche. Le gouvernement du Québec a encore une fois pris les devants en changeant lui-même ses règles fiscales de façon à encourager la relève de nos fermes familiales. Arrêtons cette injustice maintenant. Il faut que le gouvernement fédéral modifie les règles fiscales de façon à ce que les transferts intergénérationnels de fermes soient au moins aussi avantageux que les ventes faites à des étrangers. Je pense évidemment au projet de loi C-208, qui est présentement à l'étude au Comité permanent des finances.
Sur le plan agroalimentaire, depuis longtemps, c'est-à-dire depuis la Confédération, le Québec sait que, en matière d'agriculture, le gouvernement fédéral nuit au développement du modèle québécois, particulièrement aujourd'hui, alors qu'il favorise d'autres secteurs d'exportation au détriment de l'agriculture québécoise.
Dans le domaine agroalimentaire, on a réalisé la fragilité des chaînes d'approvisionnement mondialisées. Pour assurer la sécurité alimentaire de notre population, nous devons soutenir nos agriculteurs et leur permettre de produire notre monde dans un marché équitable où prévalent les produits sains tirés d'entreprises de nos régions qui pourront de nouveau passer d'une génération à la suivante.
Je pense également aux transformateurs et aux travailleurs étrangers temporaires. Le gouvernement fédéral doit absolument aider les agriculteurs, les transformateurs et les entreprises qui recrutent les travailleurs étrangers temporaires à continuer de les accueillir. Il faut améliorer les programmes d'accueil des travailleurs étrangers temporaires, afin de les rendre plus flexibles et mieux adaptés à la situation des entreprises, tout en incluant les entreprises en région. L'Abitibi—Témiscamingue est à plus de 8 heures de route, et cela complique les choses pour un producteur agricole qui désire aller chercher lui-même le travailleur étranger à l'aéroport.
Je vais terminer mon allocution en parlant du soutien à l'occupation et au développement du territoire. Évidemment, l'enjeu majeur est celui relatif à l'accès à Internet haute vitesse et au réseau cellulaire. Pour soutenir le développement économique régional, nous demandons au gouvernement fédéral de transférer immédiatement les sommes nécessaires à Québec, afin de brancher tous les citoyens à Internet haute vitesse. Les retards n'en finissent plus et le Canada démontre qu'il n'est pas en mesure de limiter les principaux obstacles à la libre compétition ou à la concurrence que rencontrent les grandes et les petites entreprises de télécommunication québécoises pour assurer l'accessibilité et l'abordabilité des services de télécommunication au Québec. Il existe neuf programmes fédéraux, qui ont tous leurs petites particularités. C'est très complexe de faire affaire avec le fédéral.
Il faut également donner les moyens à Québec de mettre en place un système qui favorisera le rétablissement des dessertes régionales. Je parle ici de l'aviation. Par contre, il ne faudra pas qu’Ottawa aille à l'encontre des aides financières et liaisons régionales mises en place par Québec. J'y reviendrai. Il y a une fin à subventionner Air Canada. Il y a des compagnies, comme Propair, en Abitibi—Témiscamingue, qui ont le goût de servir la région.
En guise de conclusion, je dirai que le Bloc québécois est en faveur de la motion. Cela fait maintenant près de deux ans que le gouvernement fédéral n'a pas présenté de budget en bonne et due forme. Le dernier budget remonte au printemps 2019, soit avant les élections et, bien sûr, avant la pandémie. Il faut agir, et il faut agir maintenant. De nombreuses entreprises, leurs travailleurs et leur famille nous regardent. Cette attente est immense. Nous devons recevoir un soutien rapidement. Il faut donc agir rapidement au moyen de cette motion.
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2021-03-09 17:33 [p.4781]
Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to speak today on Bill C-216.
We are debating this legislation because the Liberal government has not treated supply-managed sectors fairly. They have not supported farmers or producers, and not followed through on their commitments. However, this legislation does not address the issues of farmers and producers.
Conservatives have been strong and vocal supporters of our supply-managed sectors and will continue to be. In fact, Conservatives have a policy declaration that says the following:
...it is in the best interest of Canada and Canadian agriculture that the industries under the protection of supply management remain viable. A Conservative Government will support supply management and its goal to deliver a high quality product to consumers for a fair price with a reasonable return to the producer.
Our leader, our party, and our policy have been clear on this. The Conservative party is an ally, supporter and defender of supply management in Canada. I will talk about these important supply-managed sectors.
When I met with the Chicken Farmers of Canada, they were clear about their priorities. Through correspondence and an appearance at committee, we know that their priorities are new investment programs to support producers as they improve their operations, a market development fund to promote Canadian-raised chicken, a tariff rate quota allocation methodology designed to ensure minimal market distortions, the enforcement of Canadian production standards on imports and the resolution of import control loopholes undermining this sector. One of these is the fraudulent importation of mislabelled broiler meat being declared as spent fowl. There are reports of chicken meat imports being mislabelled in order to bypass import control measures.
When this situation first became apparent in 2012, Canada was importing the equivalent of 101% of the United States’ entire spent fowl production. According to the Chicken Farmers of Canada, these illegal imports have resulted in an estimated annual loss of 1,400 jobs in Canada, $105 million in contributions to the national economy, $35 million in tax revenue and the loss of at least $66 million in government revenues due to tariff evasion.
These illegal imports also raise important food safety concerns relating to traceability for recalls. This issue not only affects our economy and hard-working chicken farmers, but the lives of Canadians are on the line in the case of a food-borne illness.
Where is the action plan to deal with this?
When I spoke to the Egg Farmers of Canada, an industry association that represents over 1,000 family farms across the country that support over 18,000 jobs and $1.3 billion in GDP, they were clear that they wanted the government to stop claiming to support the industry and actually start defending it. I learned of the innovation occurring in this industry.
The egg industry is tired of being strung along by the government. They had to fight tooth and nail for clarity on promised compensation. They expressed their desire for investment in their industry, which is the backbone of rural communities, and for market development support when it comes to the Canadian egg brand.
Where is the desire or action plan to defend our egg industry?
When I spoke to the Dairy Farmers of Canada, they told me how hard it was for the industry to plan for the future due to the government’s lack of transparency, not the least in regard to the disbursement of promised compensation.
Where is the desire and action plan to defend the dairy industry?
These same concerns were raised by the Turkey Farmers of Canada. When I first spoke with them, they were going into year four without any payments of promised compensation by the government.
The Conservatives are the only party who can and will be able to ensure that our world-class producers of dairy, chicken, turkey, and eggs have a partner in government. The Bloc Québécois will never have to negotiate a trade agreement for Canada and be the partner in government that the supply management businesses in Quebec and across the country can rely on. The Conservative Party is the only party that can and will put an end to the failures of the Liberal government when it comes to trade agreements and compensation.
Conservatives will faithfully defend supply management. We were in the House of Commons pressing the government over and over again to fulfill its compensation promises to the supply-managed sectors. We have also raised in the House the meaningful actions that we can take now to protect and support farmers and producers, including in supply-managed sectors. These actions would include modernizing and improving agricultural risk management programs, asking the Competition Bureau to investigate the impacts of abusive trade practices in the grocery industry by the grocery giants, or providing flexibility and clarity on how compensation for supply-managed sectors is allocated.
Why have we seen no plans on these important topics?
I have spent a lot of time talking with businesses and industry representatives. They want consultation, understanding and transparency from the government. They want support from the government, which has been sorely lacking. After all, our agricultural sectors do not compete fairly with other countries that subsidize, both directly and indirectly, their own products.
Creating legislation such as we are debating today, which could target farmers and producers right from the onset as bargaining chips in future trade negotiations, is not a wise strategy. Canada could be outnegotiated and forced to agree to concessions and pay compensation. This would mean more workers losing jobs, and it would do nothing to drive investment, spearhead innovation or protect jobs.
In my home province of British Columbia, supply management is an important part of our economy. B.C. has over three million egg-laying hens across over 140 farms in the province. Chicken farmers in B.C. produce 87 million dozen eggs annually and account for 14,000 jobs, contributing $1.1 billion to Canada's GDP.
B.C. is also the third-largest dairy-producing province in Canada, with 500 farms.
It is the Conservatives who are putting forth private members' bills that are meaningful to the agriculture sector. Conservative private member's bill, Bill C-206, would exempt farmers from paying the carbon tax on gasoline, propane and natural gas. From heating barns to running farm equipment, farmers face steep energy costs, and these have skyrocketed in many parts of the country due to the increasing federal carbon tax. It is a practical measure to help alleviate the financial strain on the agriculture sector. Supporting our food security is more important than ever.
Conservative private member's bill, Bill C-208, would allow the transfer of a small business, family farm or fishing operation at the same tax rate when selling to a family member as when selling to a third party. I was happy to jointly second this bill in the first session of this Parliament. This was a poor tax policy change brought in by the government. This policy bothered me so much when it first came out. It was one of the factors that prompted me to run to become a member of Parliament.
Succession planning is a challenge at the best of times for small businesses, in particular farmers, and it is unfair that it is more financially advantageous to sell to a stranger than to one's own children, who have often grown up around the family business and contributed over time. I have many communications regarding this bill from my constituents in Kelowna—Lake Country on how positively it will affect their businesses and future planning.
Conservative Bill C-205 would amend the animal health act to address trespassing onto farms, into barns or other enclosed areas where the health of animals and safety of Canada’s food supply is potentially at risk. Entering a farm without lawful authority or excuse would become an offence under the act.
We will always support the hard-working farmers and producers in our supply managed sectors who ensure quality foods for Canadians. Dairy products, chicken, turkey and eggs are core staples on our dinner tables, and the pandemic showed us how important it is to protect our supply chains, supply management and food security.
The legislation we are debating today does nothing to address any of the concerns I have outlined. There are more meaningful, productive and long-lasting ways we can stand up for supply management without supporting Bill C-216.
Canada’s Conservatives will continue to support our supply managed sectors and ensure that dairy- and poultry-farming families and producers are consulted and engaged in any trade negotiations in the future.
We will continue to support all farmers and producers in meaningful ways.
Monsieur le Président, je suis heureuse de prendre la parole aujourd'hui au sujet du projet de loi C-216.
Si nous en sommes venus à débattre de ce projet de loi, c'est parce que le gouvernement libéral n'a pas traité de manière équitable les secteurs soumis à la gestion de l'offre. ll n'a pas épaulé les agriculteurs et les producteurs, et n'a pas respecté ses engagements. Je précise toutefois que le projet de loi dont nous sommes saisis n'aborde pas les enjeux relatifs aux agriculteurs et aux producteurs.
Les conservateurs continuent d'appuyer fermement les secteurs soumis à la gestion de l'offre partout au pays. En fait, le Parti conservateur a même inscrit le principe suivant dans son énoncé de politique:
[...] il est dans l’intérêt du Canada et du secteur agricole que les industries sujettes à la gestion de l’offre demeurent viables. Un gouvernement conservateur appuiera la gestion de l’offre et son objectif d’offrir aux consommateurs un produit de grande qualité à un bon prix et avec un rendement raisonnable pour le producteur.
Notre chef et notre parti ont toujours adhéré très clairement à ce principe. Le Parti conservateur demeure un allié, un partisan et un défenseur de la gestion de l'offre au Canada. J'aimerais à présent parler des importants secteurs soumis à la gestion de l'offre.
Quand j'ai rencontré les Producteurs de poulet du Canada, ils ont été clairs au sujet de leurs priorités. Étant donné qu'ils nous ont écrit et qu'ils ont témoigné devant un comité, nous savons quelles sont leurs priorités: de nouveaux programmes d'investissement pour appuyer les producteurs alors qu'ils apportent des améliorations à leurs exploitations; un fonds de développement du marché visant à promouvoir le poulet élevé au Canada; une méthode d'attribution des contingents tarifaires élaborée afin de minimiser les distorsions du marché; l'application de normes de production canadiennes sur les importations; et l'élimination des échappatoires entourant le contrôle des importations, qui minent le secteur. L'une de ces échappatoires est l'importation frauduleuse de viande de poulet à griller faussement étiquetée pour être déclarée comme de la volaille de réforme. On signale que des importations de viande de poulet sont mal étiquetées afin de contourner les mesures de contrôle des importations.
Quand on s'est rendu compte de la situation en 2012, le Canada importait l'équivalent de 101 % de toute la production étatsunienne de volaille de réforme. Selon les Producteurs de poulet du Canada, ces importations illégales ont entraîné une perte annuelle d'environ 1 400 emplois au Canada, de 105 millions de dollars en contribution à l'économie du pays, de 35 millions de dollars en recettes fiscales et d'au moins 66 millions de dollars en recettes gouvernementales à cause de l'évasion des droits de douane.
Ces importations illégales soulèvent aussi d'importantes inquiétudes au sujet de la salubrité des aliments relativement à la traçabilité dans le cas d'un rappel. Ce problème touche non seulement l'économie et les producteurs de poulet, qui travaillent fort, mais la vie des Canadiens pourrait aussi être en jeu dans le cas d'une maladie d'origine alimentaire.
Où est le plan d'action pour régler ce problème?
Lorsque j'ai parlé aux Producteurs d'œufs du Canada, une association de l'industrie qui représente plus de 1 000 exploitations agricoles familiales dans tout le pays, qui soutient plus de 18 000 emplois et qui contribue au PIB à hauteur de 1,3 milliard de dollars, ils ont clairement indiqué qu'ils voulaient que le gouvernement cesse de prétendre de soutenir l'industrie et commence à la défendre. J'ai appris qu'il y avait des innovations dans l'industrie.
L'industrie des œufs en a assez d'être embobinée par le gouvernement. Elle a dû se battre bec et ongles pour obtenir des éclaircissements sur l'indemnisation promise. Elle a dit vouloir voir des investissements dans son secteur, qui est l'épine dorsale des collectivités rurales, et vouloir obtenir de l'aide pour développer des marchés pour la marque d'œufs du Canada.
Où est la volonté de défendre l'industrie des œufs et le plan d'action pour y parvenir?
Lorsque j'ai parlé aux Producteurs laitiers du Canada, ils m'ont dit à quel point il est difficile pour l'industrie de planifier l'avenir en raison du manque de transparence du gouvernement, notamment en ce qui concerne le versement des indemnités promises.
Où est la volonté de défendre l'industrie laitière et le plan d'action pour y parvenir?
Les Éleveurs de dindon du Canada ont exprimé les mêmes inquiétudes. Lorsque je leur ai parlé pour la première fois, ils en étaient à la quatrième année d'attente pour les indemnités promises par le gouvernement.
Le Parti conservateur est le seul parti qui peut se poser en allié des producteurs laitiers, de poulet, de dindon et d'œufs de classe mondiale au sein du gouvernement, et nous jouerons ce rôle. Le Bloc québécois ne négociera jamais un accord commercial pour le Canada et il ne sera jamais le partenaire au gouvernement sur lequel les entreprises soumises à la gestion de l'offre au Québec et dans tout le pays peuvent compter. Le Parti conservateur est le seul parti qui peut mettre un terme aux échecs du gouvernement libéral au chapitre des accords commerciaux et des indemnités, et c'est ce que nous ferons.
Les conservateurs vont défendre avec loyauté la gestion de l'offre. Nous avons exercé des pressions sur le gouvernement à maintes reprises à la Chambre des communes pour qu'il respecte ses promesses de verser des indemnités aux secteurs soumis à la gestion de l'offre. Nous avons également soulevé à la Chambre les mesures significatives que nous pourrions prendre dès maintenant pour protéger et soutenir les agriculteurs et les producteurs, notamment dans les secteurs soumis à la gestion de l'offre. Nous pourrions par exemple moderniser et améliorer les programmes de gestion des risques agricoles, demander au Bureau de la concurrence d'enquêter sur les effets des pratiques commerciales abusives des géants de l'alimentation dans le secteur de l'épicerie ou encore assouplir et préciser la façon dont les indemnités sont versées aux secteurs soumis à la gestion de l'offre.
Pourquoi n'avons-nous pas vu de plan pour ces domaines importants?
J'ai longuement discuté avec des représentants du monde des affaires et des secteurs industriels. Ils veulent un processus de consultation, de la compréhension et de la transparence de la part du gouvernement. Ils veulent que le gouvernement leur offre un appui, ce qui leur fait cruellement défaut. Après tout, nos secteurs de l'agriculture ne peuvent concurrencer à armes égales les secteurs d'autres pays qui subventionnent, directement et indirectement, leurs propres produits.
Il serait malavisé d'instaurer de nouvelles dispositions législatives — comme celles dont nous débattons aujourd'hui — qui cibleraient les agriculteurs et les producteurs d'entrée de jeu comme monnaie d'échange pour les futures négociations commerciales. Le Canada risquerait de se retrouver le bec dans l'eau et d'être forcé d'accepter des concessions et de payer des indemnités. Il en résulterait que d'autres travailleurs perdraient leur emploi, sans parler du fait que cela ne contribuerait pas à stimuler les investissements, ni à favoriser l'innovation, ni à protéger les emplois.
Dans ma province, la Colombie-Britannique, la gestion de l'offre occupe une part importante de notre économie. On y compte plus de 3 millions de poules pondeuses réparties dans plus de 140 fermes. Les producteurs d'œufs d'un bout à l'autre de la province produisent 87 millions de douzaines d'œufs annuellement. Au total, cette industrie fournit 14 000 emplois et contribue au PIB du Canada à hauteur de 1,1 milliard de dollars.
Par ailleurs, la Colombie-Britannique compte 500 fermes laitières, ce qui la place au troisième rang pour ce type de production parmi les provinces canadiennes.
Ce sont les conservateurs qui présentent des projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire utiles pour le secteur agricole. Un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire des conservateurs, le projet de loi C-206, exempterait les agriculteurs de la taxe sur le carbone imposée sur l'essence, le propane et le gaz naturel. Du chauffage des granges au fonctionnement de l'équipement de la ferme, les agriculteurs sont confrontés à des coûts énergétiques élevés. Or, ces derniers ont grimpé en flèche dans bien des régions du pays à cause de l'augmentation de la taxe fédérale sur le carbone. Le projet de loi est une mesure pratique qui contribuerait à atténuer la pression financière qui pèse sur le secteur agricole. Il est plus important que jamais d'appuyer notre sécurité alimentaire.
Un autre projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire des conservateurs, le projet de loi C-208, permettrait de transférer une petite entreprise ou une société agricole ou de pêche familiale à un membre de la famille au même taux d'imposition que celle qui s'applique lors d'un transfert à un tiers. J'ai été heureuse d'appuyer conjointement ce projet de loi pendant la première session de la présente législature. Il s'agissait de corriger une mauvaise modification à la politique fiscale présentée par le gouvernement. Cette modification m'avait beaucoup troublée lorsqu'elle avait été présentée. C'était un des facteurs qui m'ont incitée à me présenter aux élections fédérales.
Même dans des circonstances idéales, la planification de la relève pose des défis aux petites entreprises, particulièrement aux agriculteurs. Il est injuste qu'il soit plus avantageux, sur le plan financier, de vendre l'entreprise à un étranger qu'à ses propres enfants, lesquels ont souvent contribué au fil des ans à cette entreprise qui fait partie de leur vie. Bon nombre de mes concitoyens de Kelowna—Lake Country ont communiqué avec moi pour me parler du projet de loi et des effets positifs qu'il aura sur leur entreprise et sur leur planification.
Le projet de loi conservateur C-205 modifierait la Loi sur la santé des animaux pour traiter du problème que posent les entrées non autorisées dans des exploitations agricoles, des granges ou d'autres espaces fermés où une telle intrusion pourrait mettre en péril la santé des animaux et la sécurité de l'approvisionnement alimentaire du Canada. Le fait de pénétrer dans une exploitation agricole sans autorisation ou excuse légitime deviendrait une infraction en vertu de la loi.
Nous soutiendrons toujours les agriculteurs et les producteurs vaillants qui oeuvrent dans les secteurs soumis à la gestion de l'offre et veillent à fournir aux Canadiens des aliments de qualité. Les produits laitiers, le poulet, le dindon et les oeufs font partie des denrées de base des foyers canadiens, et la pandémie a mis en évidence la nécessité de protéger les chaînes d'approvisionnement, la gestion de l'offre et la sécurité alimentaire.
Le projet de loi dont nous débattons aujourd'hui ne contribuerait aucunement à régler les problèmes que j'ai mentionnés. Pour défendre la gestion de l'offre, nous pouvons, au lieu de soutenir le projet de loi C-216, utiliser des méthodes plus constructives, plus productives et plus durables.
Les conservateurs du Canada continueront de soutenir les secteurs soumis à la gestion de l'offre et à faire en sorte que les producteurs et les familles d'agriculteurs spécialistes des produits laitiers et de la volaille soient consultés lors des futures négociations commerciales et y participent.
Nous continuerons de soutenir concrètement les agriculteurs et les producteurs.
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
I declare the motion carried. Accordingly, the bill stands referred to the Standing Committee on Finance.
Je déclare la motion adoptée. En conséquence, le projet de loi est renvoyé au Comité permanent des finances.
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
BQ (QC)
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
2021-02-01 11:05 [p.3797]
Mr. Speaker, for those who may not know, the city of Joliette, for which my riding is named, was established after Barthélemy Joliette built a mill on the bank of the L'Assomption River. At that time, the city was named L'industrie, which cleary shows the importance of entrepreneurship for our regional county municipality and for the northern Lanaudière region.
I already knew that before I was elected in 2015, when my riding was booming both socially and economically. However, I have heard from many entrepreneurs about how difficult it is to transfer their business to their children, since it is less profitable than selling it to a stranger. That is unbelievable. The Bloc Québécois and I are obviously in favour of Bill C-208. We have been working on this issue for many years. In fact, my colleague from Pierre-Boucher—Les Patriotes—Verchères introduced a similar bill in the previous Parliament.
If this bill were to pass, it would have a very significant impact on Quebec. Nearly one-third of Quebec's SMEs were buy-outs, whereas that number is one-quarter for Canadian businesses. According to Marc Duhamel, a professor at Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, the rate of business buy-outs in rural areas is around 45%. Helping the next generation of business owners would be good for Quebec, and when something is good for Quebec, the Bloc Québécois votes in favour of it.
I also know that these changes will be good for my region. My riding has numerous farms in practically every one of its municipalities, including places like Saint-Thomas, Rawdon and Saint-Ambroise. We all know a farmer, and we are proud to support our local producers in our farmers' markets, grocery stores and even the little stands we see on pretty much every major roadway.
Right now, the crux of the issue is that a business transferred to a family member is treated as a dividend, not a capital gain, unlike a business sold to someone at arm's length. People who want to sell their small or medium-sized business or their farm or fishing operation to their children are not entitled to the lifetime capital gains exemption, but if they sell to a third party, they are.
I get that the government wants to prevent potential fraud and tax avoidance, but this situation complicates the lives of everyone who genuinely wants to take over the family business. This is like asking people to slow down to 80 kilometres per hour because some people are speeding along at over 130 kilometres per hour. The government should fix this situation by allowing transfers to family members. If a transaction is fraudulent, the government can investigate it, kind of like how a police officer would ticket someone speeding on Highway 50, but would let everyone who obeys the speed limit carry on.
Speaking of tax avoidance, there are other much more concerning cases. Here are three examples the government should tackle. First, the government should immediately start taxing web giants doing business in Quebec and Canada. Second, web giants' digital services should be subject to GST. Quebec already collects QST from them. These two measures have been announced, but they should be implemented right away. Third, the government should shut down the tax haven loophole. That was my goal in 2016 with Motion No. 42.
This is a serious problem, and many people in my riding are suffering as a result. Year after year, I meet entrepreneurs who are looking for someone, the next generation, a young person, to take over the family business. Rather than taking examples from my own family, among my uncles, aunts and cousins, let me give an example that illustrates how ridiculous this situation is. I will tell you about Charles, who went to high school with my assistant.
I have met Charles a number of times since my first election campaign in 2015. Ever since he was old enough to work, Charles has been toiling in his family business, a great sound, multimedia and lighting services company, the kind you often see at festivals, fundraisers and community events in the Lanaudière region and beyond. Not too long ago, Charles and his business partner bought the company. However, the family member who owned the business would have been better off selling it only to the partner, who was already working for the business, rather than including his own son in the transaction. How is that right?
Another incongruity has to do with selling to a competitor, which would actually be more profitable than selling to the next generation, the ones who know the distributors, the customers, the activities and the local reality. This would reduce competition in the sector, possibly increase the price of services and cause the loss of local expertise.
Unlike many other businesses that have no choice but to close up shop because of tax regulations, that SME was able to keep running back home in Joliette. If I open my curtains, I can see it from my window. I could talk at length about the problems facing this industry and even more so now because of the wide-scale cancellation of activities. However, that is not what this bill is about.
I would point out that the Canadian Federation of Independent Business, the CFIB, would like to see this bill pass, which is only natural.
There are many reasons we need to keep these SMEs in the hands of the next generation. First, this would allow several regions to develop their industry. We need to fix this problem for all SMEs, but even more so for businesses in the fisheries and agricultural sectors. In Quebec and in the regions, fisheries and agriculture are among our biggest industries.
Things are looking rather bleak when it comes to the next generation taking the reins of SMEs in the future. Statistics show that in 2016, fewer than 25% of farms had secured a successor and that rate has remained the same since 2011.
Between 500 and 800 young farmers are taking over a farm each year, when in fact 1,000 are required to maintain the number of farms in Quebec. Roughly one farm a day is disappearing back home.
In the fisheries sector, there are three major obstacles to the acquisition of a business. Léa Richard, of the Comité sectoriel de main-d'œuvre des pêches maritimes, said the following:
...what is truly difficult for this next generation is access to financing, the transfer of licences and the administrative complexity. These are the three elements that make it difficult for the next generation to acquire a fishing business.
We know that it is already difficult to take over a business. It is that much more difficult in sectors that require a sizeable capital investment. For these people who have poured their heart and soul into their business, which most of the time represents their retirement nest egg, it seems unfair that it costs them an arm and a leg to sell their business to their children.
It is difficult for people to go into business and later to let go of what they have spent most of their life building. If we could at least make it easier for them to sell their business to a family member, that would be a good thing.
The government will probably remind us that we need to make choices and that this measure comes at a significant cost. In fact, the Parliamentary Budget Officer reviewed a similar bill in 2017 and estimated the cost at about $376 million. To put that in terms the Liberals will understand, that is equivalent to a little more than one-third of a contribution agreement with WE Charity, or about 40% more than the sole-source contract awarded to Frank Baylis.
This measure may be costly, but it is nothing considering how much the next generation could help business owners. Losing a business is hard on the owners, but the impact of that loss ripples beyond the owner and their loved ones. Suppliers, creditors, employees and customers lose an important partner. We often think about how the closure of a large company can have repercussions on a region, as was the case with Electrolux a few years ago in Assomption, near my riding. However, we rarely consider that the loss of multiple small businesses can have a less immediate but equally serious impact on the socio-economic fabric.
Ensuring the succession and continuity of SMEs is not only good for our economy and governments' fiscal capacity, but it is necessary for efficient land occupancy. From the North Shore to Abitibi, from Gaspé to Nunavik, Quebec has chosen to have vibrant regions, each with its own strengths, growth sectors and educational institutions, such as CEGEPs. According to Maripier Tremblay, an associate professor in the department of management in Université Laval's faculty of business administration, “Quebec's economy depends on its SMEs, but also on its regions. It is very important for businesses in the regions to retain their pools of workers.”
I will close by saying that to have strong regions, we need to have people living there. For the period from 2014 to 2023, the Board of Trade of Metropolitan Montreal estimates that between 79,000 and 140,000 jobs in our SMEs could be lost due to the entrepreneurial deficit. That is a gigantic number.
That is like one or two whole ridings of workers disappearing in 10 years. When many families leave a region, it has significant consequences for the entire ecosystem.
Monsieur le Président, au cas où l'on ne le saurait pas, la ville de Joliette, qui a donné son nom à ma circonscription, a été créée après l'installation d'un moulin au bord de la rivière L'Assomption par Barthélemy Joliette. C'est à ce moment-là que l'on a donné le nom de cette industrie à la ville. Cela démontre bien l'importance de l'entrepreneuriat pour notre municipalité régionale de comté et pour le nord de Lanaudière.
Je constatais déjà cela avant mon élection en 2015, alors que le tissu social et économique de ma circonscription était en effervescence. Cependant, plusieurs entrepreneurs m'avaient parlé de la difficulté de transférer leur entreprise à leurs enfants, pareille transaction étant moins rentable que de vendre à un inconnu, ce qui est inconcevable. Le Bloc québécois et moi sommes évidemment en faveur du projet de loi C-208. Nous nous impliquons dans ce dossier depuis plusieurs années. Ainsi, lors de la dernière législature, mon collègue de Pierre-Boucher—Les Patriotes—Verchères avait déjà déposé un projet de loi dans ce sens.
Au Québec, l'adoption de ce projet de loi aurait des conséquences très importantes. En effet, près d'une PME québécoise sur trois est issue du repreneuriat, alors que c'est plutôt le quart au Canada. Selon Marc Duhamel, professeur à l'Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, ce taux avoisine les 45 % en région rurale. Le fait de faciliter la relève serait donc bon pour le Québec et, au Bloc, lorsque c'est bon pour le Québec, nous votons pour.
Je sais aussi que ces changements vont être bénéfiques pour mon coin de pays. Nous avons plusieurs entreprises agricoles dans presque toutes les municipalités de ma circonscription, comme à Saint-Thomas, à Rawdon ou à Saint-Ambroise. Nous connaissons tous un agriculteur et nous sommes fiers d'encourager nos producteurs locaux dans nos marchés publics, dans nos épiceries et même dans les petits kiosques que l'on voit sur pratiquement chaque grande artère.
Cependant, le nœud du problème à l'heure actuelle est que le transfert d'une entreprise à un membre de la famille est traité comme un dividende et non comme un gain en capital, contrairement à la vente à un tiers. La personne qui veut vendre à ses enfants sa PME ou son entreprise agricole ou de pêche n'a pas droit à l'exonération cumulative des gains en capital, contrairement à si elle vendait à un tiers.
Je comprends évidemment que le gouvernement veut éviter de possibles fraudes ou de l'évitement fiscal. Par contre, la situation actuelle complique la vie à tous ceux qui veulent réellement prendre la relève familiale. Ce serait comme demander à quelqu'un de réduire sa vitesse à 80 kilomètres à l'heure parce qu'il y a des gens qui roulent à plus de 130 kilomètres à l'heure sur l'autoroute. Le gouvernement devrait plutôt régler la situation en permettant le transfert à un membre de la famille. Si la transaction s'avère frauduleuse, le gouvernement pourra se pencher sur le dossier, un peu comme un policier donnerait une contravention à un conducteur qui roule trop vite sur l'autoroute 50, mais laisserait passer ceux qui respectent les limites de vitesse.
Tant qu'à parler d'évitement fiscal, il en existe d'autres sources beaucoup plus importantes, dont voici trois exemples auxquels il faudrait s'attaquer. En premier lieu, il faudrait imposer dès maintenant les géants du Web faisant affaire sur le territoire québécois et canadien. Ensuite, comme le fait déjà le Québec avec la TVQ, il faudrait imposer la TPS aux services numériques des géants du Web. Ces deux mesures ont déjà été annoncées, mais pourraient être mises en place dès maintenant. Troisièmement, il faudrait fermer l'échappatoire que constituent les paradis fiscaux, comme je l'avais demandé à la Chambre en 2016 avec la motion M-42.
Ce problème n'est pas anodin et plusieurs personnes de ma circonscription en souffrent. En effet, j'en rencontre chaque année, des entrepreneurs à la recherche d'une relève ou des jeunes voulant racheter la compagnie familiale. Au lieu de chercher des exemples dans ma propre famille, parmi mes oncles, mes tantes, mes cousins et mes cousines, je vais plutôt donner un exemple du loufoque de la situation. Je vais évoquer l'histoire de Charles, qui est allé à l'école secondaire avec mon adjoint.
Depuis ma première campagne électorale en 2015, nous nous sommes rencontrés plusieurs fois. Depuis qu'il a l'âge de travailler, Charles est dans l'entreprise familiale, une belle compagnie de services de sonorisation, de multimédia et d'éclairage que l'on voit beaucoup dans les festivals, les collectes de fonds ou les activités communautaires de Lanaudière et d'au-delà. Il n'y a pas si longtemps, avec son partenaire d'affaires, Charles a racheté la compagnie. Par contre, il aurait été plus avantageux pour la famille propriétaire de vendre uniquement au partenaire, qui était déjà dans l'entreprise, que d'inclure son propre fils dans la transaction. Est-ce normal?
Il existe une autre incongruité, celle de vendre à un compétiteur. Cela serait plus rentable que de vendre à la relève qui connaît les distributeurs, les clients, les activités et la réalité locale. Cependant, cela diminuerait la concurrence dans le secteur, ferait peut-être augmenter les prix des services, et ferait perdre l'expertise locale.
Or, contrairement à bien d'autres entreprises qui n'ont pas le choix de laisser partir leur commerce à cause de la réglementation fiscale, nous avons conservé cette PME chez nous, à Joliette. Si j'ouvre les rideaux, je peux la voir de ma fenêtre. Je pourrais parler encore longtemps des problèmes auxquels fait face ce secteur d'activités, et davantage actuellement en raison de l'annulation des activités à grand déploiement. Nous nous éloignerions cependant du sujet du projet de loi.
Parlant de ce projet de loi, je tiens à rappeler que la Fédération canadienne de l'entreprise indépendante, ou FCEI, demande son adoption, ce qui est tout à fait normal.
Il existe plusieurs raisons pour lesquelles nous devons conserver ces PME sous le contrôle de la relève. D'abord, cela permettrait à plusieurs régions de développer leur industrie. Il est important de régler ce problème pour toutes les PME, mais encore plus pour les entreprises du secteur des pêches et de l'agriculture. De plus, au Québec et en région, les secteurs agricoles et de la pêche figurent parmi nos grands secteurs d'activités.
Le portrait est toutefois assez sombre en ce qui concerne la reprise des entreprises par la relève dans l'avenir. Les statistiques démontrent qu'en 2016, moins du quart des entreprises fermes avaient une relève assurée et que ce taux stagne depuis 2011.
Ce sont entre 500 et 800 jeunes agriculteurs qui reprennent une ferme chaque année, alors qu'il en faudrait 1 000 pour maintenir le nombre de fermes au Québec. C'est environ une ferme par jour qui disparaît chez nous.
En ce qui a trait au secteur de la pêche, trois obstacles majeurs compliquent l'acquisition d'une entreprise. À ce sujet, Mme Léa Richard, du Comité sectoriel de main-d'œuvre des pêches maritimes, déclarait ceci:
 [...] ce qui est vraiment difficile pour cette relève-là c'est l'accès au financement, le transfert de permis puis la complexité administrative. C'est vraiment les trois éléments qui sont ressortis qui sont difficiles pour la relève afin d'acquérir une entreprise de pêche.
On comprend qu'il est déjà difficile de reprendre une entreprise. Ce l'est encore plus dans ces secteurs où le capital requis est assez élevé. Pour ces entrepreneurs qui ont mis tout leur cœur dans leur entreprise et pour qui il s'agit, la plupart du temps, de leur fonds de retraite, il y a une injustice liée au fait qu'il leur en coûte un bras de vendre l'entreprise à leurs enfants.
Il est difficile de se lancer en affaires et de laisser ensuite partir ce qu'on a bâti pendant une bonne partie de sa vie. Si nous pouvions au moins leur enlever la difficulté de vendre l'entreprise à une relève apparantée, ce serait déjà un bon départ.
Je suis conscient du fait que le gouvernement nous rappellera probablement qu'il faut faire des choix et que la mesure a un coût important. En effet, le directeur parlementaire du budget a étudié un projet de loi similaire en 2017. On parle d'une mesure évaluée à environ 376 millions de dollars. En des termes que les libéraux pourront comprendre, cela équivaut à un peu plus que le tiers d'une entente de contribution de gré à gré avec l'organisme UNIS ou à 40 % de plus que le contrat accordé à Frank Baylis sans appel d'offres.
Une telle mesure a un coût important, mais ce coût est minime comparativement à ce qu'offrirait à nos entrepreneurs notre relève. En effet, pour les personnes impliquées, la disparition d'une entreprise est un dur coup pour les propriétaires, et ses conséquences ne se font toutefois pas uniquement sentir sur eux et sur leurs proches. Les fournisseurs, les créanciers, les employés et les clients se retrouvent alors privés d'un partenaire important. On pense souvent aux répercussions de la fermeture d'une grande entreprise sur une région, comme celle d'Electrolux, il y a quelques années, à L'Assomption, tout près de ma circonscription. Or, on pense moins aux conséquences, moins rapides, mais tout aussi graves, de la perte de plusieurs PME dans un tissu socioéconomique.
La relève et le maintien des PME, ce n'est pas uniquement bon pour notre économie et pour la capacité fiscale des gouvernements; c'est aussi nécessaire pour une occupation effective du territoire. Le Québec a fait le choix d'avoir des régions dynamiques — de la Côte-Nord à l'Abitibi, de la Gaspésie au Nunavik —, chacune avec ses forces, ses secteurs d'avenir et ses institutions d'enseignement, comme les cégeps. Selon Maripier Tremblay, professeure agréée au département de management de la Faculté des sciences de l’administration de l’Université Laval: « Le Québec est une économie de PME, mais c'est aussi les régions. L'importance des entreprises dans les régions à retenir des bassins de travailleurs est très grande. »
Je terminerai en disant que, pour avoir des régions fortes, ça prend du monde pour y habiter. Pour la période allant de 2014 à 2023, la Chambre de commerce du Montréal métropolitain évaluait les pertes d'emplois par le manque de relève dans nos PME à entre 79 000 et 140 000. Ce chiffre est énorme.
C'est comme si une ou deux circonscriptions complètes de travailleurs disparaissaient en 10 ans. Lorsque plusieurs familles quittent une région, cela a des conséquences importantes sur tout l'écosystème.
View Gord Johns Profile
NDP (BC)
View Gord Johns Profile
2021-02-01 11:16 [p.3798]
Mr. Speaker, many in this country are away from their loved ones, so before I get started, I note that today is my oldest daughter's 21st birthday. She is on the other side of the country, but I wish Maddie a happy 21st birthday and give her lots of love from everyone here at home.
It is always an honour to rise on behalf of the federal NDP to fight for small business. We know that small business owners are the job creators. Right now they are are creating 80% of all new jobs in our country. Bill C-208 is very important for supporting small businesses and local communities and for stopping the economic leakages from small communities in our country. These leakages often end up in the hands of large corporations because of flawed and broken tax rules that create a benefit for selling a business to those at arm's length versus a family member.
I want to thank the member for Brandon—Souris for reintroducing the bill, which shows that there is non-partisanship when it comes to supporting it. As members are well aware, the bill was first tabled as Bill C-274 by the former NDP finance critic and former member from Rimouski, Guy Caron. He fought hard, as the New Democrats continue to do, for small business.
I want to talk about what Bill C-208 would mean for small communities. We know that owners of small businesses, such as family farms and fishing businesses, as in the communities around where I live in coastal Canada, are often selling their businesses to family members. Specifically, the bill would give business owners the same rights they would normally get if they were selling to someone at arm's length. This is important, because nobody should be penalized for selling a family business to a family member, but it is happening now with the current taxation system. The bill is very important to us, and we are excited to be speaking in support of it given what it would mean to rural communities.
I cited the importance of small business for job creation. If people see a barrier to selling to someone at arm's length and will pay more tax, they will do everything they can to pay less tax. With the current structure, for example, if a person sold a family business worth $1 million to a family member, they would end up paying a dividend tax rate of about $350,000. However, if a person were to sell that same million-dollar business to a stranger, someone at arm's-length, they would end up saving $306,000 of the tax they would have paid otherwise. It makes absolutely no sense.
We want to encourage people to keep businesses in the hands of family members and encourage intergenerational business ownership, because we know that it keeps money and profits in our communities. For example, in fishing, if a person were to sell a family fishing operation to someone in their family, they would keep the quota and the jobs in the family. However, if a family member had to pay more tax, they would be more likely to sell to an international company or large conglomerate, which would hoard fishing licences and then lease them out to fishers. The same applies to farmers. Profits then leave the community at the end of the day, which is a huge economic leakage. The money is leaving the community and leaving our country in many cases, and this needs to stop.
Mr. Caron's bill tabled in the last Parliament would have supported small businesses, farmers and fishers, but it was defeated by a margin of only 12 votes. It was voted on after the government misled Parliament. The government cited that the fiscal losses would be up to $1.2 billion, but the PBO put the fiscal revenue shortfall between $126 million and $249 million. That is quite a gap. The Liberal government could have stated what it would have cost Canadians taxpayers to do the right thing to help support the sale of intergenerational businesses by not making them pay more, but instead it said the loss would be an astronomical amount of money. In fact, the PBO's numbers were somewhere between 10% and 18% of what the government had initially cited, which is a big gap.
The cost of the economic leakage and its impact on small communities across our country, and on family members, is worth the price of what we are going to lose in the long run, as we see those profits leave our communities.
We are heading into a huge period of succession in our country. A lot of small business owners belong to an aging demographic. People want to sell their businesses to their family members and keep the ownership in the community, which I assume we want to encourage. We expect over $50 billion in farm assets alone to change hands over the next 10 years, so we are heading into a huge period of succession. For farming alone it is critical that we fix this now, because we have lost 8,000 family farms in the last decade. We need to do everything we can to curb that trend because it is obviously not working for Canadians. Only half of those small business owners actually have a succession plan, while 76% of them are planning to retire over the next decade.
That is important for a lot of people who have developed and built businesses in their families. I had a business for many years. When I started it, I was not informed that if I were to sell my business to one of my three children I would be penalized with a heavy tax bill. If I sold it to someone at arm's length, I would not have incurred that same tax. It makes absolutely no sense, but most Canadians do not know that this is the current situation.
This is something we need to remedy. I hope that the government will talk about the real numbers that the PBO shared. We saw some Liberal members support the opposition in the last Parliament, so I am hoping those Liberals who decided to vote with their government's misleading information will actually support the PBO and do the right thing to support their communities and small business owners, especially those family businesses that want to maintain intergenerational ownership. In rural communities such as Courtenay—Alberni, where a large part of our main street is made up of local or small businesses, this is a really important piece to our long-term survival. We want to encourage local ownership.
Again, this bill did not pass based on misinformation in the last Parliament. The Liberals continue to make excuses on this bill. They say they will relax the rule for tax avoidance, but we want it to be done carefully to avoid these difficulties and challenges of people avoiding tax rules. If the purchaser or family member retains the shares for five years, the Canada Revenue Agency's concern is that, in the absence of a specific provision, the shares would pass from one family to another. If that five-year provision were in place, it would make that impossible. We want to make sure that we take all the excuses away from the government and alleviate the concerns of taxpayers, so that there are provisions and a system in place to protect against flipping these businesses to avoid paying taxes. This is to keep them in the hands of small business owners.
According to a 2012 CIBC study, close to 30%, or 310,000, business owners were planning to exit ownership or transfer control of their businesses by 2017, in one year alone. We do not have the recent figures. That means that a lot of businesses are changing hands right now.
I want to talk about economic leakages, because we are seeing more businesses being sold and ending up in the hands of large conglomerates. We constantly see local ownership being reduced. This kind of taxation creates a threat to local communities. We want to invest in small communities, and this is a very good way to invest in families and small communities.
Returning to closing economic leakages, we need to do everything we can. This legislation is important, but we also need to make sure that the big banks pay their share, that we cap merchant fees and that we continue to take a holistic approach to supporting small businesses. This is a good bill and I hope the government will support it as well.
Monsieur le Président, beaucoup de gens au pays sont séparés de leurs êtres chers. Avant de commencer mon intervention, je veux souligner le 21e anniversaire de ma fille aînée. Elle se trouve à l'autre bout du pays, mais je tiens à souhaiter à Maddie un joyeux 21e anniversaire et je lui transmets les bons voeux de tout le monde ici à la maison.
C'est toujours un honneur de prendre la parole au nom du NPD fédéral afin de défendre les petites entreprises. Nous sommes conscients que ce sont les propriétaires de petites entreprises qui créent les emplois. À l'heure actuelle, ils génèrent 80 % de tous les nouveaux emplois au pays. Le projet de loi C-208 appuie de manière considérable les petites entreprises et les localités, et contribue à freiner les fuites économiques que vivent les petites collectivités du pays. Ces fuites finissent souvent par favoriser les grandes sociétés, car, en raison de règles fiscales boiteuses, il est plus profitable de vendre une entreprise à une grande société indépendante qu'à un membre de la famille.
Je remercie le député de Brandon—Souris d'avoir présenté le projet de loi à nouveau. Cela indique que le projet de loi jouit d'un appui non partisan. Comme les députés le savent, le projet de loi a initialement été présenté en tant que projet de loi C-274 par Guy Caron, l'ancien porte-parole du NPD en matière de finances et ancien député de Rimouski. Il a travaillé d'arrache-pied pour les petites entreprises, comme les néo-démocrates continuent de le faire.
J'aimerais parler de ce que l'adoption du projet de loi C-208 signifierait pour les petites collectivités. Nous savons que les propriétaires de petites entreprises, notamment dans les secteurs de l'agriculture et de la pêche — qui ne sont pas sans rappeler celles qu'on rencontre dans les collectivités de la côte canadienne où j'habite —, vendent souvent leurs entreprises à des membres de leurs familles. Plus particulièrement, le projet de loi donnerait les mêmes droits aux propriétaires d'entreprises que s'ils vendaient à une personne extérieure à la famille, et c'est important parce que personne ne devrait être puni pour avoir vendu son entreprise familiale à un membre de sa famille. Pourtant, c'est ce qui se passe en ce moment à cause du régime fiscal actuel. C'est un projet de loi important pour nous et nous sommes très heureux de l'appuyer, étant donné ce qu'il signifierait pour les collectivités rurales.
J'ai parlé de l'importance des petites entreprises dans la création d'emplois. Entre vendre à une personne hors du cercle familial et payer plus d'impôts et trouver une autre solution, un propriétaire de petite entreprise va faire tout son possible pour payer moins d'impôts. Dans le régime fiscal actuel, un propriétaire qui vend son entreprise familiale d'une valeur de 1 million de dollars à un membre de sa famille est condamné à payer 350  000 $ d'impôts sur les dividendes. Cependant, s'il vend cette même entreprise à un étranger, il économisera 306 000 $ en impôts. Cela n'a absolument pas de sens.
Il faut encourager les gens à garder leur entreprise au sein de leur famille et à la transmettre de génération en génération, parce que l'argent et les profits restent alors dans les collectivités. Dans le secteur de la pêche, par exemple, si la vente se fait d'un membre de la famille à un autre, les quotas et les emplois restent dans la famille. Par contre, si les impôts d'un vendeur potentiel risquent d'augmenter, il sera plus enclin à vendre à un grand conglomérat ou à une entreprise étrangère qui s'appropriera et louera ensuite les permis de pêche de l'entreprise à d'autres pêcheurs. C'est la même chose dans le domaine agricole. Les profits quittent la collectivité et, au bout du compte, c'est une énorme perte économique. L'argent quitte la collectivité, voire le pays dans de nombreux cas, et il faut que cela cesse.
Le projet de loi que M. Caron a déposé à la législature précédente aurait soutenu les petites entreprises, les agriculteurs et les pêcheurs, mais il a été rejeté par la marge de 12 voix seulement. Or, il a été mis aux voix après que le gouvernement a induit le Parlement en erreur. En effet, le gouvernement a affirmé que cette mesure entraînerait une perte de recettes fiscales de 1,2 milliard de dollars, alors que, selon le directeur parlementaire du budget, cette perte se situerait entre 126 millions et 249 millions de dollars. C'est tout un écart. Au lieu de dire franchement ce qu'il en coûterait aux contribuables canadiens pour soutenir comme il se doit le transfert intergénérationnel d'entreprises en éliminant l'impôt supplémentaire qui s'y rattache, le gouvernement libéral a déclaré que cela entraînerait une perte astronomique de recettes fiscales. Les pertes estimées par le directeur parlementaire du budget représentent à peine 10 à 18 % de la somme déclarée par le gouvernement. On parle d'un écart considérable.
Le coût de cette fuite économique et son incidence dans les petites collectivités partout au pays et sur les familles concernées valent le prix que nous devrons payer à long terme lorsque ces profits quitteront nos collectivités.
Le Canada se dirige vers une énorme période de relève. Beaucoup de propriétaires de petite entreprise appartiennent à une tranche vieillissante de la population. Les gens veulent vendre leur entreprise à un membre de leur famille et faire en sorte que l'entreprise continue d'appartenir à des intérêts locaux. J'ose présumer que nous souhaitons encourager cela. Rien que dans le domaine agricole, on s'attend à ce que plus de 50 milliards de dollars d'actifs changent de main au cours des 10 prochaines années. Nous nous dirigeons donc vers une énorme période de relève. Il est essentiel de remédier à ce problème, ne serait-ce que pour les exploitations agricoles. Rien qu'au cours de la dernière décennie, nous avons perdu 8 000 exploitations agricoles familiales. Nous devons faire tout en notre pouvoir pour renverser cette tendance, car, de toute évidence, la situation actuelle est intenable pour les Canadiens. À peine la moitié des propriétaires de petite entreprise possèdent un plan de relève, alors que 76 % d'entre eux prévoient de prendre leur retraite au cours de la prochaine décennie.
C'est un facteur important pour les nombreux entrepreneurs qui ont bâti une entreprise familiale. J'ai moi-même été propriétaire d'une entreprise pendant des années. Quand je l'ai fondée, personne ne m'a informé que, si je la vendais un jour à l'un de mes trois enfants, je me retrouverais avec une facture d'impôt considérable, ce qui ne serait pas le cas si je la vendais à une personne sans lien de dépendance avec moi. Cette règle n'a aucun sens, et la plupart des Canadiens ne savent pas qu'elle existe.
Nous devons rectifier la situation. J'espère que le gouvernement parlera des chiffres réels que le directeur parlementaire du budget a diffusés. Pendant la dernière législature, quelques députés libéraux ont appuyé l'opposition et voté en fonction des renseignements trompeurs fournis par le gouvernement. J'espère que, cette fois-ci, ils s'appuieront sur les chiffres du directeur parlementaire du budget. J'espère qu'ils prendront la mesure qui s'impose afin de soutenir les collectivités et les propriétaires de petites entreprises de leur circonscription, particulièrement les entreprises familiales que la famille espère transmettre d'une génération à l'autre. Dans les régions rurales comme Courtenay—Alberni, où l'économie repose surtout sur des commerces locaux et de petites entreprises, c'est vraiment important pour la survie à long terme de la région. Nous tenons à mettre l'accent sur les propriétaires locaux.
Comme je l'ai déjà dit, le projet de loi n'a pas été adopté lors de la dernière législature à cause de désinformation. Les libéraux continuent de trouver des excuses pour ne pas adopter cette mesure législative. Ils disent qu'ils assoupliront la règle anti-évitement. Cependant, nous voulons qu'ils agissent avec prudence pour éviter les difficultés liées à l'évitement fiscal. Si l'acheteur ou le membre de la famille conserve les actions pendant cinq ans, l'Agence du revenu du Canada craint que, en l'absence d'une disposition précise, les actions passeraient d'une famille à l'autre. La mise en place d'une telle disposition empêcherait cela. Nous souhaitons priver le gouvernement de toute excuse et apaiser les craintes des contribuables. Nous désirons mettre en oeuvre des dispositions et un système pour empêcher le transfert d'entreprises à des fins d'évitement fiscal. Cela permettrait de garder les entreprises entre les mains des petits entrepreneurs.
Selon une étude menée par la CIBC en 2012, 310 000 propriétaires d'entreprises, soit près de 30 % d'entre eux, prévoyaient quitter la tête de leur entreprise ou en transférer le contrôle d'ici 2017. Ce sont là les chiffres d'une seule année. Nous n'en avons pas de plus récents. Cela signifie que bien des entreprises changent de main à l'heure actuelle.
Je désire parler des fuites économiques parce que de plus en plus d'entreprises se font vendre et se retrouvent entre les mains de grands conglomérats. La propriété locale diminue constamment. Cette forme d'imposition constitue une menace pour les localités. Nous voulons investir dans les petites collectivités, et c'est une excellente façon d'investir dans elles et dans les familles.
Pour en revenir aux fuites économiques, nous devons faire tout ce que nous pouvons pour les enrayer. La mesure législative est importante, mais nous devons aussi veiller à ce que les grandes banques paient leur part, plafonner les frais imposés aux marchands et continuer à adopter une approche holistique pour appuyer les petites entreprises. Il s'agit d'un bon projet de loi, et j'espère que le gouvernement l'appuiera aussi.
View Bernard Généreux Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I am honoured to rise today in support of Bill C-208 introduced by my hon. colleague, the member for Brandon—Souris, to amend the Income Tax Act to facilitate the transfer of small businesses or family farms or fishing corporations.
We already knew how important this issue was when this bill was introduced for first reading in February 2020. Who would have thought that, barely a month later, COVID-19 would come along and drastically change the landscape for Canada's SMEs?
As an entrepreneur and representative of a region that consistently ranks as one of the most entrepreneurial areas in the country, I was very sad to see the latest survey that the Canadian Federation of Independent Business, or CFIB, released last week, warning that 181,000 small business owners in Canada were considering closing their businesses. That means one in five businesses could close down, despite all the programs and billions of dollars spent by different levels of government and the support services we have provided in our respective ridings.
This is a frightening prospect, since 2.4 milion jobs are at risk if the pandemic continues, which is why I want to reiterate how important it is that the government do whatever it takes to fix the vaccine supply problem. We cannot sit back and wait until 2022. After all, we are barely into 2021.
Workers in the tourism and cultural sector are very much on my mind. Last year was devastating for them. The federal government really needs to get creative with its vaccine strategy, and it needs to do it fast so we can at least hope for some degree of recovery for the sector this summer.
September is too late, and 2022 is even worse. Until very recently, small and medium-sized businesses were the backbone of our economy. They created more than 77% of all new jobs between 2002 and 2012. As a Conservative, I am very proud of the Harper government for creating an environment that helped SMEs grow by reducing the corporate tax rate from 22% to 15%, lowering the small business tax rate to 11%, and increasing the income limit for applying this tax rate from $300,000 to $500,000.
As a business owner who created nearly 30 printing and communications jobs in my region, I understand the importance of ensuring our tax system encourages entrepreneurship.
It is important to understand what motivates entrepreneurs to risk all of their savings and their financial security to set up or buy a new business. People go into business for a variety of reasons. Some are motivated by their passion, while others see a service gap in their community that needs to be filled. However, most people go into business to provide for their family, with the hope that, one day, their children will be able to take over the business and build a better future.
In my case, I intend to one day transfer my family business to my daughter, of whom I am obviously very proud. However, I was very surprised to learn that, under the existing Income Tax Act of Canada, it would be better for me to sell my business to a stranger than to a member of my own family. When a business is sold to a family member, the difference between the sale price and the original price of the business is considered a dividend and is taxable at 100%. However, if the sale is between two strangers, the difference is considered a capital gain, only half of which is taxed. What is more, in Canada, the lifetime capital gains exemption that normally applies to small and medium-sized businesses does not apply when the business is sold to a family member.
What message are we sending? Are we trying to discourage people from going to business? I am not the only one asking these questions. According to a 2012 CFIB study, approximately 310,000 business owners, or around 30%, planned to sell or transfer their business within five years. That figure jumped to around 550,000 within 10 years. The figure may have changed during the COVID-19 crisis, which makes passing Bill C-208 all the more urgent for the many family businesses whose future is at stake. It is already bad enough that so many businesses plan to hand their keys over to creditors during this economic crisis.
We must not allow the unfairness in the Income Tax Act to force so many small businesses to hand their keys over to the government. According to the Canadian Federation of Agriculture, “Over $50 billion in farm assets are set to change hands over the next 10 years”. That does not even include the more than 8,000 family farms that have already folded in the past 10 years. Just half of them had a succession plan. As the population ages, three in four farmers plan to retire in the next decade. We need to act quickly to fix this anomaly in the Income Tax Act to prepare for the demographic reality we are facing, in the agricultural sector especially.
That is why I support Bill C-208, introduced by my colleague from Brandon—Souris, and I urge the Liberals to do the same. I remind my colleagues that during the 42nd Parliament, we debated a similar bill that had been introduced by Guy Caron, the former member of Parliament for a riding next to mine. This is a unifying bill. This is not a left or right issue; it unites us all.
I would like to remind members that Bill C-274 received the support of the Conservative Party, the Bloc Québécois and the NDP, but was defeated by the Liberals, who had a majority at the time, because they heeded the advice of public servants rather than that of the people who elected them. Many organizations across Quebec support the bill. The Association des marchands dépanneurs et épiciers du Québec has spoken out against the current situation, and the Union des producteurs agricoles and the Board of Trade of Metropolitan Montreal both indicated that they supported the bill.
This issue was also brought to my attention during the last campaign, in 2019, when I met with UPA producers in Cap-Saint-Ignace, which is in my riding. Last Friday, I received an email from Andre Harpe of Grain Growers of Canada asking us to support Bill C-208.
I want to point out that the agriculture sector is following the debate very closely today. As the saying goes, better late than never. If the Liberal Party really wants to back SMEs, it must support this bill and pass it quickly because Bill C-208 will ensure that all these family businesses will continue to operate and remain intact by facilitating their intergenerational transfer. If this does not happen, a Conservative government will have no problem ensuring that it does.
I would add that with the speeches my colleagues made ahead of me, I think it is clear that the Liberals have no choice but to move forward and support this bill. In any event, they are in a minority. We will move forward with this bill. Whatever it may cost to implement it, not doing so would cost even more, because the value and pride that comes from handing down a family business is priceless. Considering that for the most part, all Canadian businesses started as family businesses, that they represent 90% of the Canadian economy, and that they are the backbone of Canadian entrepreneurship and businesses with fewer than 10 employees, it is essential that people be able to transfer these businesses to members of their own family without being penalized.
Monsieur le Président, j'ai l'honneur de prendre la parole aujourd'hui en appui au projet de loi C-208, mis de l'avant par mon honorable collègue, le député de Brandon-Souris, afin de modifier la Loi sur l'impôt sur le revenu pour faciliter le transfert d'une petite entreprise ou d'une société agricole ou de pêche familiale.
C'est une question à laquelle nous accordions déjà beaucoup d'importance lorsque le projet de loi a été déposé en première lecture en février 2020. Qui aurait cru que, à peine un mois plus tard, la COVID-19 allait complètement venir bouleverser le paysage des PME au pays?
En tant qu'entrepreneur et représentant d'une région qui se classe régulièrement parmi les plus entrepreneuriales au pays, c'est avec beaucoup de tristesse que j'ai pris connaissance du dernier sondage de la Fédération canadienne de l'entreprise indépendante, la FCEI, publié la semaine dernière et avertissant que 181 000 propriétaires de PME envisageaient de fermer boutique au Canada, soit une PME sur cinq, et ce, malgré tous les programmes et les milliards octroyés par les différents paliers de gouvernement, ainsi que les services d'accompagnement que nous avons offerts dans nos circonscriptions respectives.
Le constat est effrayant puisque 2,4 millions d'emplois sont menacés si la pandémie perdure. C'est pourquoi je réitère à quel point il est important que le gouvernement prenne tous les moyens possibles pour résoudre le problème d'approvisionnement en vaccins. Nous ne pouvons pas nous contenter d'attendre 2022, nous venons tout juste de commencer 2021.
Je tiens particulièrement à saluer les travailleurs des secteurs du tourisme et de la culture. L'année 2020 a été assez dévastatrice pour eux et il est important et urgent que le gouvernement fédéral fasse preuve d'imagination et d'inventivité sur le plan vaccinal pour que l'on puisse au moins espérer une certaine reprise des activités dans ce secteur à l'été 2021.
Septembre, c'est trop tard et 2022, c'est encore pire. Jusqu'à tout récemment, les PME étaient l'épine dorsale de notre économie, ayant créé plus de 77 % de tous les nouveaux emplois qui ont vu le jour entre 2002 et 2012. Comme conservateur, je suis très fier du bilan du gouvernement Harper, lequel a créé un climat favorable au développement des PME notamment en réduisant le taux d'imposition des grandes entreprises de 22 % à 15 %, en abaissant celui des petites entreprises à 11 %, et en faisant passer le seuil maximal d'admissibilité à cet avantage fiscal de 300 000 à 500 000 dollars.
En tant qu'entrepreneur ayant créé presque une trentaine d'emplois dans le domaine de l'imprimerie et de la communication dans ma région, je comprends l'importance de maintenir un régime fiscal qui favorise l'entrepreneuriat.
Il est important de comprendre la motivation derrière chaque entrepreneur qui prend le risque de mettre toutes ses économies et sa sécurité financière en jeu en créant ou en acquérant une nouvelle entreprise. Les gens se lancent en affaires pour diverses raisons. Certains le font par passion, d'autres pour répondre à un manque de certains services au sein de leur communauté respective, mais la plupart le font pour subvenir aux besoins de leur famille, avec l'espérance que leurs enfants puissent un jour prendre la relève et bâtir un avenir meilleur.
Dans mon cas, j'ai l'intention un jour de transférer mon entreprise familiale à ma fille, dont je suis évidemment très fier. Or, j'ai été bien surpris d'apprendre que, en vertu de l'actuelle Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu du Canada, il serait plus avantageux pour moi de vendre à un étranger que de vendre à un membre de ma propre famille. En effet, lorsqu'une vente a lieu entre les membres d'une même famille, la différence entre le prix de vente et le prix payé à l'origine est considérée comme un dividende et donc imposable à 100 %. Si la vente a lieu entre deux inconnus, par contre, elle est traitée comme un gain en capital et n'est imposable qu'à 50 %. De plus, une vente au sein de la même famille ne donne pas droit à l'exemption à vie sur les gains en capital qui est normalement accordée aux petites et moyennes entreprises.
Quel genre de message cela envoie-t-on? Se lancer en affaires est-il donc à décourager? Je ne suis pas le seul à le penser puisque, selon une étude menée en 2012 par la FCEI, environ 310 000 propriétaires d'entreprises — soit près de 30 % d'entre eux — avaient l'intention de vendre ou de transférer le contrôle de leur entreprise au cours des cinq années suivantes. Ce chiffre passait à environ 550 000 pour les dix années suivantes. Durant la crise de la COVID-19, ce chiffre a peut-être changé, d'où l'urgence d'adopter le projet de loi C-208 afin d'appuyer les entreprises familiales maintenant, alors que l'avenir de beaucoup d'entre elles est en jeu. Il est déjà assez épouvantable que tant d'entreprises envisagent de remettre les clés à leurs créanciers durant la crise économique actuelle.
Il ne faudrait pas qu'en plus l'injustice fiscale qu'on retrouve actuellement dans la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu pousse un aussi grand nombre à remettre les clés au gouvernement. D'après la Fédération canadienne de l'agriculture, « plus de 50 milliards de dollars en actifs agricoles devraient changer de main au cours des dix prochaines années ». Cela est sans compter les plus de 8 000 fermes familiales qui ont déjà fermé au cours des dix dernières années. Seulement, la moitié d'entre elles ont établi un plan de succession. De plus, avec la population vieillissante, trois producteurs agricoles sur quatre ont l'intention de prendre leur retraite au cours de la prochaine décennie. Il est devenu urgent d'agir pour corriger l'anomalie actuelle dans la loi de l'impôt, afin de se préparer à la réalité démographique qui est devant nous, particulièrement dans le monde de l'agriculture.
C'est pour cette raison que j'appuie le projet de loi C-208 de mon collègue de Brandon—Souris et j'invite les libéraux à faire pareil. Je rappelle à nos collègues que, lors de la 42e législature, nous avions déjà considéré un projet de loi semblable qui avait été proposé par l'ancien député de ma circonscription voisine M. Guy Caron. On parle ici d'un projet rassembleur. Il n'est pas question de gauche ou de droite politique. C'est un projet vraiment rassembleur.
Je tiens à rappeler que le projet de loi C-274 avait reçu l'appui du Parti conservateur, du Bloc québécois et du NPD, mais qu'il avait été défait parce que les libéraux, majoritaires à l'époque, avaient préféré écouter l'avis des fonctionnaires plutôt que celui de la population qui les avaient élus. Partout au Québec, les appuis envers ce projet de loi sont nombreux. L'Association des marchands dépanneurs et épiciers du Québec a dénoncé la situation actuelle, et l'Union des producteurs agricoles ainsi que la Chambre de commerce du Montréal métropolitain étaient toutes en faveur de ce projet de loi.
On m'en avait d'ailleurs parlé, lors de la dernière campagne électorale, en 2019, quand j'ai rencontré les producteurs de l'UPA à Cap-Saint-Ignace dans ma circonscription. D'ailleurs, vendredi dernier, j'ai reçu un courriel de M. Andre Harpe des Producteurs de grains du Canada demandant qu'on appuie le projet de loi C-208.
Je veux dire que le milieu agricole suit le débat d'aujourd'hui très attentivement. Comme on le dit, mieux vaut tard que jamais. Si le Parti libéral souhaite réellement se ranger derrière les PME, il doit appuyer ce projet de loi et faire adopter rapidement le projet de loi C-208 qui veille à ce que toutes ces entreprises familiales soient maintenues dans leur intégralité en facilitant le transfert intergénérationnel. S'il ne le fait pas, un gouvernement conservateur, lui, va le faire sans problème.
Je tiens à ajouter qu'avec les discours de mes collègues qui m'ont précédé, je pense qu'il est évident que les libéraux n'ont pas le choix d'aller de l'avant et d'appuyer ce projet de loi. De toute façon, ils sont minoritaires. Nous allons mettre ce projet de loi en avant. Quel que soit le coût de sa mise en vigueur, le fait de ne pas le faire coûte encore plus cher, puisque la valeur et la fierté du transfert familial des entreprises n'ont pas de prix. Quand on pense que l'ensemble des entreprises canadiennes sont nées d'entreprises familiales pour la très grande majorité, qu'elles représentent 90 % de l'économie canadienne et qu'elles forment la colonne vertébrale de l'entrepreneuriat au Canada et des entreprises de moins de 10 employés, il est essentiel et fondamental que l'on puisse transférer ces entreprises aux membres de sa propre famille sans les pénaliser.
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for Brandon—Souris for bringing forward this bill. I know that private members' business can generate some good bills from throughout the House. A lot of people do not fully appreciate the amount of work that goes into private members' business, which one only knows if one has gone down that road. Just for taking the time to go through the process to bring this piece of legislation forward, and all the work that went into it, the member deserve a lot of credit.
I am pleased to take part in the debate today over this private member's bill, Bill C-208, which aims to facilitate the transfer of family businesses between family members. This is an admirable goal. Indeed, our government recognizes this important issue, as evidenced by the mandate given by the Prime Minister to the Minister of Finance and the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food to work together on tax measures to facilitate the intergenerational transfer of farms.
Ensuring the sustainability of small businesses, family farms and fishing corporations is essential to our economy and to the communities these businesses serve. This has been underscored by their crucial role in supporting families and communities as we continue to fight against COVID-19.
Our government understands that this is a fact. From the onset of the pandemic, through Canada's COVID-19 economic response plan, we have introduced a range of supports for small business owners to help bridge them to the other side. Simply put, we have their backs, and this extends to helping family businesses thrive for generations to come.
Encouraging the sale of businesses to family members often means those businesses will remain in and continue to benefit their communities, as well as their families, who have fought hard, sacrificed and, through pure determination and entrepreneurial spirit, succeeded. It is with this spirit in mind that Bill C-208 is to bear full and careful consideration.
Bill C-208 seeks to amend two of the Income Tax Act's most important and complex anti-avoidance rules. These rules deal with intercorporate dividends, share sales and circumstances in which the lifetime capital gains exemption is claimed. Any relieving changes to these sections of the act must be done cautiously and follow rigorous study and debate to avoid the unintentional creation of loopholes that would disproportionately benefit the wealthy, instead of protecting the middle class and those who are struggling to join it.
Section 84.1 of the act, in particular, is in place to apply anti-avoidance rules when, as appropriate, an individual sells shares of one corporation to another corporation that is linked to the individual, such as one of a family member. When the individual sells shares of a Canadian corporation to a linked corporation, section 84.1 of the act deems, in certain circumstances, that the individual has received a taxable dividend from the linked corporation rather than the capital gain.
This prevents the individual from realizing the proceeds from the sale on the tax-free basis using the lifetime capital gains exemption. This rule is meant to ensure that taxpayers cannot use linked corporations to, in effect, remove earnings from their corporations using a contract sale. Without this rule, such sales between related parties could be used to convert what should be dividends of an individual shareholder into capital gains that are tax-free under the lifetime capital gains exemption.
Bill C-208 proposes narrowing the scope of section 84.1 by removing the sale of certain shares of small businesses, family farms or fishing corporations from its application when being sold by an individual to another corporation that is owned by their adult child or grandchild. This change would allow the owner-operator of a family business to convert the dividends of the corporation into tax-free capital gains.
In order to better illustrate how this would work, I will use an example. Let us say Darryl and Emily own a potato farm in P.E.I., which has grown to be a major regional supplier. After decades of hard work, they are now planning their retirement and want to pass down their business to their two adult children, both of whom already own successful small businesses in the community.
By applying the proposed amendments in Bill C-208, Darryl and Emily would sell non-voting preferred shares from their farm corporation to the two corporations controlled by their children. In doing this, they could claim tax-free treatment of the resulting capital gain from the sale under the lifetime capital gains exemption in a manner that allows the sale to be financed by the sold corporation's own assets without relinquishing control of the farm corporation.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie le député de Brandon—Souris d'avoir présenté ce projet de loi. Je sais que de bons projets de loi peuvent découler des initiatives parlementaires de tous les députés de la Chambre. Beaucoup de gens ne savent pas vraiment tout le travail qu'exigent les initiatives parlementaires. On en est conscient seulement si on est passé par là. Le député mérite toutes nos félicitations seulement pour avoir pris le temps de suivre le processus visant à présenter la mesure législative et pour tout le travail qu'elle a nécessité.
Je suis heureux de prendre part au débat d'aujourd'hui sur ce projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire, le projet de loi C-208, qui vise à faciliter le transfert des entreprises familiales entre les membres d'une famille. C'est un objectif admirable. En effet, le gouvernement reconnaît l'importance de cette question, comme en témoigne le mandat que le premier ministre a confié à la ministre des Finances et à la ministre de l'Agriculture et de l'Agroalimentaire de collaborer à l’établissement de mesures fiscales visant à favoriser le transfert intergénérationnel de fermes.
Il est essentiel pour l'économie d'assurer la viabilité des petites entreprises et des sociétés agricoles ou de pêche familiales et il est aussi dans l'intérêt des localités qu'elles servent de le faire. Cela a été démontré par le rôle crucial qu'elles jouent dans le soutien des familles et des communautés alors que nous continuons de combattre la COVID-19.
Le gouvernement comprend bien que c'est un fait. Depuis le tout début de la pandémie, le Canada a inclus toute une gamme de mesures de soutien pour les propriétaires de petites entreprises dans sa réponse économique à la COVID-19 afin de les aider à passer à travers cette crise. Bref, ils peuvent compter sur nous. Nous aidons en outre aussi les entreprises familiales à prospérer pour les générations à venir.
En facilitant la vente des entreprises aux membres de la famille, nous permettons à ces entreprises de demeurer au sein de leurs localités, qui pourront continuer d'en bénéficier, tout comme les familles qui ont travaillé d'arrache-pied et ont fait des sacrifices pour prospérer, grâce à une détermination inébranlable et un fort esprit d'entreprise. Voilà pourquoi le projet de loi C-208 mérite d'être étudié soigneusement.
Le projet de loi C-208 a pour but de modifier deux des règles anti-évitement les plus importantes et les plus complexes de la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu. Ces règles portent sur les dividendes intersociétés, la vente d'actions et les situations dans lesquelles est appliquée l'exonération cumulative des gains en capital. Tout changement visant à alléger ces dispositions de la loi doit être apporté avec grande prudence, après une étude et un débat rigoureux, afin d'éviter de créer involontairement des échappatoires qui avantageraient de façon disproportionnée les gens riches au lieu de protéger la classe moyenne et les personnes qui travaillent fort pour en faire partie.
En fait, l'article 84.1 de la Loi, en particulier, a pour but d'appliquer des règles anti-évitement dans les cas où, lorsque c'est possible, une personne vend des actions d'une société à une autre société liée à une personne, comme un membre de la famille. Lorsqu'une personne vend des actions d'une société canadienne à une société liée, l'article 84.1 de la Loi prévoit qu'elle est réputée, dans certaines circonstances, avoir reçu des dividendes imposables de la société liée au lieu de gains en capital.
Cela empêche la personne de réaliser le produit de la vente sans payer d'impôt en utilisant l'exonération cumulative des gains en capital. Cette règle a pour but d'empêcher les contribuables d'utiliser des sociétés liées pour sortir des gains de leur société au moyen d'une vente. Sans elle, de telles ventes entre parties liées pourraient être utilisées pour convertir ce qui devrait être des dividendes versés à un actionnaire en gains en capital admissibles à l'exonération cumulative des gains en capital, donc non imposables.
Le projet de loi C-208 propose de réduire la portée de l'Article 84.1 en soustrayant de son application la vente d'actions de petites entreprises ou de sociétés agricoles ou de pêche familiales d'un particulier à une autre société détenue par l'enfant adulte de ce particulier ou encore par son petit-fils ou sa petite-fille adulte. Cette modification permettrait au propriétaire-exploitant d'une société familiale de convertir des dividendes de la société en gains en capital non imposables.
Pour mieux en saisir les implications, voici un exemple concret: supposons que Darryl et Emily sont propriétaires d'une ferme de pommes de terre à l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard et qu'ils sont devenus d'importants fournisseurs de la région. Après des décennies de dur labeur, ils prévoient maintenant prendre leur retraite et souhaitent léguer leur entreprise à leurs deux enfants adultes, qui possèdent déjà de petites entreprises prospères dans la même localité.
Grâce aux modifications proposées dans le projet de loi C-208, Darryl et Emily pourraient vendre les actions privilégiées sans droit de vote de leur exploitation agricole aux deux sociétés appartenant à leurs enfants. Ce faisant, ils pourraient exonérer d'impôt le gain en capital tiré de la vente par l'exonération cumulative des gains en capital. Ainsi, la vente serait financée par les propres actifs de l'entreprise vendue sans que l'on ait à renoncer au contrôle de la ferme.
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
Lib. (ON)
Darryl and Emily could then use this planning to convert their annual dividend income into tax-free capital gains as often as they want, up to an amount equal to their lifetime capital gains limit. In this case, each parent could reduce his or her income tax by up to about $45,000 for each $100,000 of business profits distributed.
It is important to note that there is currently nothing in the act to stop a parent from selling their shares of their family business directly to their child or grandchild on a tax-free basis by using the lifetime capital gains exemption, which currently shelters up to $1 million in capital gains on qualified farm and fishing properties.
The issues sought to be addressed by Bill C-208 arise only in multi-tier corporate structures in which one corporation owns a second corporation. Adopting the proposed changes to section 84.1 could open the door to new tax avoidance opportunities. This would unfairly benefit wealthy individuals instead of the middle class.
Bill C-208 also proposes amendments to section 55 of the act, which generally applies to corporations that are seeking to inappropriately reduce their capital gains by paying excessive tax-free dividends between corporations, which the act considers to be a capital gain.
Darryl et Emily pourraient aussi envisager de convertir leur revenu de dividendes annuel en gains en capital libres d'impôt aussi souvent qu'ils le souhaitent, jusqu'à un montant maximal équivalent à la limite des gains en capital pouvant faire l'objet d'une exonération cumulative. Dans ce cas-ci, chaque parent pourrait réduire de son impôt sur le revenu jusqu'à 45 000 $ pour chaque tranche de 100 000$ de bénéfices répartis de l'entreprise.
Il est important de noter que, en ce moment, rien dans le projet de loi n'empêche un parent de vendre des actions de la société familiale directement à son enfant ou à son petit-enfant en franchise d'impôt en demandant l'exonération cumulative des gains en capital, qui met actuellement à l'abri de l'impôt jusqu'à 1 million de dollars de gains en capital réalisés lors de la disposition de biens agricoles ou de pêche admissibles.
Les problèmes que le projet de loi C-208 vise à régler surviennent seulement au sein des structures organisationnelles à plusieurs niveaux, où une société en détient une autre. Adopter les changements proposés à l'article 84.1 pourrait ouvrir la porte à de nouvelles possibilités d'évitement fiscal. Ce sont les particuliers fortunés qui en profiteraient injustement plutôt que les gens de la classe moyenne.
Le projet de loi C-208 propose également des modifications à l'article 55 de la loi, qui s'applique habituellement aux sociétés qui cherchent à réduire indûment leurs gains en capital en versant des dividendes libres d'impôt excessifs entre les sociétés, ce qui constitue un gain en capital au titre de la loi.
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I thank the Bloc member for raising that point of order.
Bill C-208 also proposes amendments to section 55 of the act, which generally applies to corporations that seek to inappropriately reduce capital gains by paying excessive tax-free dividends between corporations, which the act considers to be a capital gain.
Two exemptions to these anti-avoidance rules authorize businesses that are restructuring to allow company shareholders to split company shares between them while deferring taxes. The first exemption applies to the restructuring of related corporations, and the second applies to all corporate restructurings. Bill C-208 would broaden the first exemption so that it applies to brothers and sisters, despite a standing long-term tax policy that considers brothers and sisters to have separate and independent economic interests for these purposes. Any changes to this exemption could risk eroding the tax base.
Spouses, as well as parents and their children, are already eligible for this exemption because it is presumed they have shared economic interests. Although brothers and sisters cannot restructure their participation in a corporation on a tax-deferred basis under the related corporation's exemption, they can do it under the second exemption of section 55, which applies to all corporate restructurings. This is called the butterfly exemption, and there are fewer tax avoidance opportunities under it.
If the proposed amendments of section 55 included in Bill C-208 were passed, siblings could undertake business restructurings in which otherwise taxable capital gains realized between corporations would be converted into tax-free intercorporate dividends. This would create new opportunities for tax avoidance.
In conclusion, these are important considerations to take into account when reviewing the merits of Bill C-208. Our government remains committed to working with family businesses, including farming and fishing businesses, to make it more efficient, or less difficult, to hand down their businesses to the next generation. However, we must exercise caution to not create loopholes and opportunities for the wealthy to use private corporations for tax avoidance purposes. This would dilute our base protection of anti-avoidance tax rules. Moreover, this would create a tax system that caters to the wealthy at the expense of the middle class.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie la députée bloquiste d'avoir soulevé ce rappel au Règlement.
Le projet de loi C-208 propose également des modifications à l'article 55 de la loi, qui s'applique habituellement aux sociétés qui cherchent à réduire indûment leurs gains en capital en versant des dividendes libres d'impôt excessifs entre les sociétés, ce qui constitue un gain en capital au titre de la loi.
Deux exceptions à la règle anti-évitement autorisent les entreprises en restructuration à permettre à leurs actionnaires de diviser les actifs entre eux tout en reportant l'impôt à payer. La première exception s'applique à la restructuration des sociétés liées; la deuxième, à toutes les restructurations de sociétés. Le projet de loi C-208 propose d'étendre cette première exception aux frères et soeurs, malgré la politique fiscale de longue date selon laquelle ceux-ci ont des intérêts économiques distincts et indépendants à ces fins. Toute modification à cette exemption risquerait d'éroder l'assiette fiscale.
Les conjoints, de même que les parents et leurs enfants, peuvent s'en prévaloir parce que l'on présume qu'ils ont des intérêts économiques communs. Bien que les frères et soeurs ne puissent pas restructurer leur participation dans une société avec report de l'impôt en vue de l'exception des sociétés liées, ils peuvent le faire en vertu de la seconde exception, soit celle qui s'applique à toutes les restructurations de sociétés. On la nomme l'« exception papillon », et elle est moins propice à l'évitement fiscal.
Si les modifications à l'article 55 de la loi proposées par le projet de loi C-208 étaient adoptées, les frères et soeurs pourraient entreprendre une restructuration d'entreprise dans le cadre de laquelle les gains en capital réalisés entre les sociétés qui auraient normalement été imposables seraient convertis en dividendes intersociétés libres d'impôt. Cela aurait pour conséquence de créer de nouvelles possibilités de pratiquer l'évitement fiscal.
Pour conclure, il y a des éléments importants dont il faut tenir compte lorsqu'on examine le bien-fondé du projet de loi C-208. Le gouvernement demeure résolu à collaborer avec les entreprises familiales, y compris les sociétés agricoles ou de pêche familiales, pour qu'elles puissent transférer plus efficacement et plus facilement l'entreprise à la prochaine génération. Cependant, il faut se montrer prudent afin d'éviter de créer des échappatoires permettant aux riches de se servir de sociétés privées pour se soustraire à l'impôt. Permettre ainsi de contourner les règles anti-évitement nuirait à l'assiette fiscale. De plus, cela créerait un régime fiscal qui favorise les riches au détriment de la classe moyenne.
View Xavier Barsalou-Duval Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, today's debate is about Bill C-208, an act to amend the Income Tax Act with respect to the transfer of small business or family farm or fishing corporation. This is a very important issue, and I am concerned about the government's ongoing failure to take action on it. This problem comes back year after year, and it has still not been resolved.
In Quebec, one in three SMEs is a buy-out. That means that one-third of Quebec's small businesses were existing businesses bought by someone else. That is a big deal, yet the government penalizes people who want to transfer their business to a family member. In 2018, it was estimated that 30,000 to 60,000 Quebec businesses would not find a buyer in the years to come, yet the government is actively penalizing people who want to buy out the family business. It would rather those businesses disappear or be sold to strangers. That is just great.
In the agricultural sector, Quebec is losing one farm a day. We know this, we talk about it and we speak out against it. The fishing sector is no different. Fifty years ago, fisheries were flourishing in the regions, but today, fishing villages are disappearing one after the other. This is sad, but it is partly due to inaction by this government and, obviously, governments before it.
During my previous term, from 2015 to 2019, I introduced Bill C-275 to address this issue by allowing family businesses to be transferred to members of the same family. I was made aware of this issue by some of my constituents, including Mr. Tremblay, from Armoires Tremblay in Saint-Mathieu-de-Belœil. Mr. Tremblay was in his 30s and his father owned a small, family-owned cabinetmaking business. His father wanted to retire and was waiting to sell his business to his children, in the hopes that one day the act would be amended and allow him to do so without being penalized.
Right now, the government assumes that people who sell their business to their children are fraudsters. It thinks that they will not set the price at fair market value, so it decided to tax the entire profit generated by the transaction. The problem is that a small company can quickly grow to be worth one, two or three million dollars, even if it does not employ a million people, but rather three, four, five, six or 20.
We cannot ask young people who want to take over from their parents to withdraw two million dollars from their bank account. Very few people in their twenties and thirties can withdraw one million dollars from their bank account. That is the problem. The government thinks that people who sell their business to their children are fraudsters because they will give them a better price.
That means that they will not be able to sell unless they sell to strangers. Businesses will have to close because there will be no one to take the reins. It is really frustrating to see how the government refuses to recognize and resolve this problem year after year.
Not so long ago, I was discussing this with an old school friend, Marc-André Daigneault. His parents have a company called Revêtement RJ. The same thing happened to him. His parents wanted to wait to sell their company in the hope that the rules would one day change. He is saddened by the fact that young people cannot take over their parents’ companies because the government does not want to modernize and change the legislation.
At the time, I had tabled a bill that was similar to Bill C-208. The NDP found the bill so appealing that it decided to copy it, and the former NDP member for Rimouski, Guy Caron, tabled it himself. I would not want to take all the credit for the bill, because this is something the Bloc Québécois has been fighting for for 15 years. As early as 2005, a Bloc Québécois member introduced a bill seeking to address the problem of passing down family businesses from one generation to the next.
I am an accountant by training. In my university years, when I learned the tax rules and understood that people could not pass a business down to their children—well, it is possible but very disadvantageous from a tax perspective—I was really frustrated and could not get over it. All of my classmates and professors agreed with me. If we visited a tax school, an accounting office, a lawyer’s office or any university and asked an accounting or tax professor what they thought of this, they would tell us that it makes absolutely no sense. Unfortunately, the government is digging in its heels and preventing family businesses from being passed down to the next generation.
In June 2015, however, the Liberal member for Bourassa introduced a bill concerning the passing down of family businesses. He said that it was his first bill and that it was extremely important. That was in June 2015. When the Liberals came to power in October 2015, just a few months later, they were suddenly against it. It seems that the Liberals promise all sorts of things when they are in the opposition but do not follow through when they get to power .
As my colleague from Rivière-du-Loup pointed out earlier, this is not a partisan approach. My Conservative colleague said he thinks transferring family businesses is important. I mentioned my NDP colleague earlier. I do not know the Green Party's position, but I know a lot of Liberals are not happy with their party's position and agree that it is ridiculous, so much so that the government now finds itself in an awkward position.
We have seen several economic updates and budgets since 2015. The government said it would tackle the problem and try to fix it. Now here we are in 2021, and it is still not fixed. The Bloc has been fighting for this since 2005. This is unacceptable.
There are solutions, however. The government is going to tell us that we would be opening up loopholes, but our tax law is full of loopholes. People use tax havens, and the government does not go after them, but it prevents the transfer of family businesses. How does that make any sense?
The government says that it is impossible, but we have tabled a number of bills to resolve the problem. In 2016, Quebec's Minister of Finance announced a solution to the problem in his budget. Since January 1, 2017, four years ago, Quebeckers have been able to pass down their business to their children without a tax penalty, but the federal government is unable to do the same. We do not know why, but it cannot do it. I think that the problem is stubbornness more than anything else.
Let us examine this question more in depth. The capital gains deduction in 2021 is $892,000. That means that you can sell a business you spent your entire life building without paying income tax on the first $892,000. It is similar to the sale of a tax-exempt home.
We also know that people with small businesses often do not have an RRSP. They pay themselves dividends or a small salary, and they have just as much as they need to get by. I am thinking about the neighbourhood mechanic or your local farmer. Often, they do not have any money put aside because they put everything back into the business. When they come to retire, they are very happy to have the $892,000, because retirement is expensive, and they need enough money to last the rest of their lives.
Unfortunately, the government does not allow them this $892,000 if they sell their business to their children. Selling their business to a stranger gets them an $892,000 deduction, but they have to pay tax on that amount if they sell to their children. Even worse, the tax payable on capital gains is normally half the amount. If they sell the business to their children, they have to pay income tax on the profit as if it were ordinary income or a dividend.
It boggles the mind that the government insists on voting against the bill when it is well aware of the problem, when we have been telling it for years, and when a number of bills have been tabled to resolve the situation. I try to understand, but I cannot. That is why I am very pleased that we have a minority government today and that, with the three opposition parties, we will be able to pass the bill.
Monsieur le Président, le débat d'aujourd'hui porte sur le projet de loi C-208, Loi modifiant la Loi de l’impôt sur le revenu pour le transfert d’une petite entreprise ou d’une société agricole ou de pêche familiale. C'est une question très importante. Je trouve un peu inquiétant de constater l'inaction perpétuelle du gouvernement dans ce dossier. Ce problème revient année après année, et il n'est toujours pas réglé.
Au Québec, une PME sur trois est issue du repreneuriat. Cela veut dire qu'une petite entreprise québécoise sur trois a été reprise par quelqu'un alors qu'elle existait déjà. Ce n'est pas rien. Pourtant, le gouvernement pénalise ceux qui veulent transférer leur entreprise à des gens de leur famille. En 2018, on estimait que, dans les années à venir, il y aurait entre 30 000 et 60 000 entreprises québécoises qui ne trouveraient pas repreneur. Malgré cela, ce gouvernement tient à pénaliser les gens qui veulent reprendre l'entreprise de leur famille. Il préfère que des entreprises disparaissent ou bien qu'elles soient vendues à des étrangers. C'est un peu spécial.
Du côté agricole, une ferme par jour disparaît au Québec. On le sait, on en parle souvent et on le déplore. On pourrait aussi parler des entreprises de pêche qui, il y a 50 ans, fleurissaient partout en région. Aujourd'hui, quand on fait le tour, on se rend compte que les villages de pêcheurs sont en train de fermer les uns après les autres. C'est triste, mais c'est en partie dû à l'inaction de ce gouvernement et, évidemment, de ceux qui l'ont précédé.
Lors de mon dernier mandat, de 2015 à 2019, j'avais déposé le projet de loi C-275 pour régler ce problème en permettant la transmission d'entreprises familiales aux membres d'une même famille. Ce sont des gens de ma circonscription qui m'avaient sensibilisé à cette question, notamment M. Tremblay, d'Armoires Tremblay à Saint-Mathieu-de-Belœil. C'était un jeune dans la trentaine, dont le père avait une petite entreprise familiale qui fabriquait des armoires. Ce dernier voulait prendre sa retraite à un moment donné et attendait de pouvoir vendre son entreprise à ses enfants, en espérant qu'un jour, des changements seraient apportés à la loi pour permettre de le faire sans être pénalisé.
À l'heure actuelle, le gouvernement considère que ceux qui vendent leur entreprise à leur enfant sont des fraudeurs. Il considère que le vendeur ne fixera pas le prix à sa juste valeur marchande et il décide donc d'imposer la totalité du profit réalisé sur la transaction. Le problème, c'est qu'une petite entreprise peut rapidement valoir un, deux ou trois millions de dollars, même si elle n'embauche pas un million de personnes, mais plutôt trois, quatre, cinq, six ou vingt personnes.
On ne peut pas demander à un jeune qui veut prendre la relève de ses parents de retirer deux millions de dollars de son compte de banque. Peu de gens dans la vingtaine ou la trentaine sont capables de retirer un million de dollars de leur compte de banque. Il est là, le problème. Le gouvernement considère que ceux qui vendent leur entreprise à leurs enfants sont des fraudeurs parce qu'ils leur feront un meilleur prix.
Le propriétaire sera donc incapable de vendre son entreprise, à moins de la vendre à des gens qu'il ne connaît pas. Les entreprises devront fermer parce qu'il n'y aura personne pour prendre la relève. C'est vraiment frustrant de voir année après année un gouvernement s'obstiner à ne pas reconnaître et régler ce problème.
Il n'y a pas si longtemps, j'en parlais encore avec un ancien collègue d'école, Marc-André Daigneault. Ses parents ont une compagnie de revêtement qui s'appelle Revêtement RJ. La même chose s'est produite de son côté. Ses parents ont voulu attendre avant de vendre leur entreprise dans l'espoir qu'un jour, les règles changeraient. Il est quand même triste d'empêcher les jeunes de prendre la relève d'une entreprise parce que le gouvernement ne veut pas moderniser ses lois et les changer.
À l'époque, j'avais déposé un projet de loi qui était assez semblable au projet de loi C-208. Le NPD l'avait trouvé tellement bon qu'il avait décidé de le copier et c'est l'ancien député néodémocrate de Rimouski, Guy Caron, qui l'avait déposé. Je ne voudrais pas m'attribuer tout le mérite de ce projet de loi parce que c'est un combat que le Bloc québécois mène depuis 15 ans. Déjà en 2005, un député du Bloc québécois avait déposé un projet de loi qui visait à régler le problème de la transmission des entreprises familiales.
Je suis comptable de formation. Lorsque j'ai fait mes études à l'université, quand on m'a appris les règles fiscales et que j'ai compris qu'il n'était pas possible de transférer une entreprise à ses enfants — du moins c'est possible mais très désavantageux fiscalement —, j'étais frustré et je n'en revenais pas. Tous mes collègues de classe et mes professeurs pensaient la même chose. Si on va faire un tour dans une école de fiscalité, dans un bureau de comptables, dans un bureau d'avocats ou dans n'importe quelle université et qu'on demande à un professeur de comptabilité ou de fiscalité ce qu'il en pense, celui-ci dira que cela n'a absolument aucun sens. Malheureusement, le gouvernement s'entête et empêche les entreprises familiales de se transmettre d'une génération à l'autre.
Pourtant, en juin 2015, le député libéral de la circonscription de Bourassa a déposé un projet de loi pour la transmission des entreprises familiales. Il disait que c'était son premier projet loi et que c'était super important. On parle de juin 2015. Or lorsque les libéraux ont pris le pouvoir en octobre 2015, donc à peine quelques mois plus tard, ils étaient rendus contre. Il semble que quand les libéraux sont dans l'opposition, ils promettent toutes sortes de choses, mais, lorsqu' ils arrivent au pouvoir, on voit que ce n'est pas comme cela que les choses se passent.
Comme l'a souligné mon collègue de Rivière-du-Loup tout à l'heure, ce n'est pas une approche partisane. Mon collègue conservateur disait qu'il trouvait important le transfert des entreprises familiales. J'ai fait référence tout à l'heure à mon collègue du NPD. Je ne connais pas la position du Parti vert, mais je sais qu'il y a beaucoup de libéraux qui sont mécontents de la position de leur parti et qui trouvent aussi que cela n'a pas de sens. Cela n'a tellement pas de bon sens comme problème que l'on a mis le gouvernement un peu dans l'embarras.
Plusieurs mises à jour économiques dans plusieurs budgets ont été déposées après 2015. Le gouvernement a dit qu'il allait traiter le problème et essayer de le régler. Nous sommes rendus en 2021 et ce n'est pas encore réglé. Le Bloc se bat pour cela depuis 2005. C'est déplorable.
Pourtant, il existe des solutions. Là, le gouvernement va nous dire que nous ouvrons des brèches. Il y en a tellement des brèches dans loi de l'impôt, comme des gens qui sont dans des paradis fiscaux et que le gouvernement ne va pas poursuivre. Par contre il empêche la transmission des entreprises familiales. Cherchons la cohérence là-dedans.
Le gouvernement nous dit que c'est impossible, mais cela fait plein de fois que l'on dépose un projet de loi pour régler le problème. En 2016, le ministre des Finances du Québec a fait une annonce dans son budget pour régler le problème. Depuis le 1er janvier 2017, donc depuis quatre ans, les entreprises familiales peuvent se transmettre au Québec sans pénalité fiscale, mais le fédéral n'en est pas capable. On ne sait pas pourquoi, mais il n'est pas capable. Je pense que c'est plus de l'entêtement qu'autre chose.
Examinons cette question en profondeur. La déduction pour gain en capital est de 892 000 $ en 2021. Cela veut dire qu'on peut vendre une entreprise qu'on a passé toute sa vie à bâtir sans payer d'impôt sur les premiers 892 000 $. C'est similaire à la vente d'une maison exempte d'impôt.
On sait aussi que souvent les petits entrepreneurs n'ont pas de REER. Ils se versent des dividendes ou un petit salaire et ils ont juste ce qu'il faut pour financer leurs besoins. Je pense au garagiste du coin et à la ferme aussi. Souvent, ils n'ont pas d'argent de côté parce qu'ils réinvestissent tout l'argent qu'ils possèdent dans leur entreprise. Lorsque la retraite arrive, ils sont bien contents d'avoir les 892 000 $, parce que l'on sait qu'une retraite coûte cher et qu'il faut de l'argent pour durer jusqu'à la fin de ses jours.
Malheureusement, le gouvernement ne permet pas d'avoir accès à ces 892 000 $ si l'on vend l'entreprise à ses enfants. La vente à un étranger donne droit à la déduction de 892 000 $, mais il faut payer l'impôt sur ce montant en cas de vente à ses enfants. Pire: normalement, en cas de gain de capital, on a deux fois moins d'impôts à payer. Dans le cas d'une vente à ses enfants, il faut payer tout l'impôt comme si c'était un revenu ordinaire d'un dividende.
C'est ahurissant que le gouvernement s'entête à voter contre le projet de loi, alors qu'il est au courant du problème, qu'on lui en parle depuis des années et que plein de projets de loi ont été déposés pour régler la situation. J'essaie de comprendre, mais c'est impossible. C'est pour cela que je suis très heureux de voir qu'on a un gouvernement minoritaire en ce moment et, qu'avec les trois partis, nous allons être capables de faire passer ce projet de loi
View Larry Maguire Profile
CPC (MB)
View Larry Maguire Profile
2021-02-01 11:56 [p.3804]
Mr. Speaker, it is my privilege to be here in the House today. As I said on November 25, “it truly is a humbling moment to stand in this chamber and put one's name to legislation and ask one's colleagues to support it.” That is an extremely important part of private members' bills and it has been recognized by my Liberal colleague today, and I thank him for his comments as well. I will refer to that in a moment.
I want to thank my colleagues in the House for supporting this bill on small businesses and the idea making it fairer for people to sell their business to their own family members directly, as opposed to selling it to a complete stranger or a third party that they may not have any connection with.
The bill and the bipartisan support I have seen in the House are tremendously important. Here I want to congratulate my former colleague, the interim leader of the NDP, Mr. Guy Caron, for bringing this bill forward to start with and for the support of the Bloc, which a couple of speakers have pointed out here today, as well as in the first hour of the second reading of the bill on November 25.
This legislation impacts every corner of Canada. It impacts every one of us in the House, all 338 of us. We all have small businesses in our ridings and I want to refer to the words “small businesses”, as some of my colleagues who have spoken today have addressed the fact that this is for small businesses, not big businesses. There is a huge difference that I want to point out to my colleagues in the House, and they know that.
The bill refers to family operations in fishing, farming and other small businesses in Canada that have been built on the pride of ownership and the hard work that their families have done throughout Canada, and it in no way is trying to provide any kind of loopholes. In fact, the bill is very clear and has gone to great lengths, which Mr. Caron and I have studied, to make sure that its wording will not allow those types of situations. As I said, it would be pride of ownership for people to be able to build a small business into a larger business, but once they do that, the things we are talking about in this bill are not relevant to those businesses.
The outcome of bill will have very little impact on the government, as my colleagues have pointed out today. It will have very little financial impact on the federal government, but a huge impact on the currency that is available through small businesses to every region of this country, particularly during this pandemic. All small businesses are struggling. It is not their fault, but they are struggling right now and the bill would go a long way toward helping all of them alleviate some of the stress and strain of being able to hand their business directly down to their own son, daughter, granddaughter or grandson. That is whom this applies to. It is very narrow in its scope in that way.
It is inherently unfair for small business persons to pay disproportionately higher taxes if they sell their operation to their own children than if they did to a complete and absolute stranger. We have referred to the difference between selling to their family as a dividend, or to a stranger as a capital gains exemption, which amounts to a difference of hundreds of thousands of dollars to small businesses.
In making this change, it will allow the next generation to become business owners and to be able to carry on those businesses and to keep jobs in their local areas. Moreover, the funds the younger generation provide to the older generation are generally used for retirement, because a lot of funds that are earned during the small business development are going into the business to keep it afloat and expanding so that they can have that pride of ownership for their families in the future.
I want to close by asking all members to support Bill C-208 to encourage small business development in our country.
Monsieur le Président, c'est un privilège pour moi d'être ici aujourd'hui. Comme je l'ai dit le 25 novembre dernier, « il s'agit véritablement d'un exercice d'humilité que de prendre la parole à la Chambre pour mettre son nom sur un projet de loi et demander à ses collègues de l'appuyer ». C'est une partie extrêmement importante des projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire et mon collègue libéral l'a reconnu aujourd'hui, et je le remercie également de ses commentaires. Je vais y revenir dans un instant.
Je tiens à remercier les députés d'avoir appuyé le projet de loi pour les petites entreprises et l'idée de rendre la vente d'une entreprise familiale directement à des membres de la famille plus juste par rapport à la vente à un parfait étranger ou à un tiers avec lequel le propriétaire n'a peut-être aucun lien.
Le projet de loi et l'appui bipartite que j'ai constaté à la Chambre sont extrêmement importants. Je tiens à féliciter mon ancien collègue, le chef intérimaire du NPD, M. Guy Caron, d'avoir présenté la première version du projet de loi. Je tiens également à remercier le Bloc d'avoir apporté son appui, ce que quelques députés ont souligné aujourd'hui ainsi qu'au cours de la première heure de la deuxième lecture du projet de loi, le 25 novembre dernier.
Ce projet de loi concerne toutes les régions du pays et l'ensemble des 338 députés de cette Chambre, puisque toutes les circonscriptions compte de petites entreprises, et je tiens à préciser qu'il s'agit de petites entreprises, car comme certains de mes collègues l'ont mentionné, le projet de loi vise non pas de grandes, mais de petites entreprises. Je tiens à souligner cette énorme différence dont mes collègues sont bien conscients.
Le projet de loi vise les sociétés agricoles ou de pêche familiales ainsi que d'autres petites entreprises de toutes les régions du pays qui ont été bâties par des familles qui travaillent fort et qui sont fières d'être propriétaires. Il ne s'agit aucunement de créer des échappatoires. D'ailleurs, le projet de loi est très clair, et M. Caron et moi l'avons étudié très attentivement pour qu'il soit conçu de manière à éviter de telles situations. Comme je l'ai dit, ces propriétaires seraient fiers que leur petite entreprise prenne de l'expansion, mais une fois cet objectif atteint, les aspects visés par ce projet de loi ne sont plus pertinents pour ces entreprises.
En soi, le projet de loi ne changera à peu près rien dans la vie du gouvernement, comme l'ont souligné mes collègues tout à l'heure. Financièrement, il aura très peu d'incidence sur les affaires de l'État, mais beaucoup sur les petites entreprises du pays et sur les liquidités dont elles pourront disposer — ce qui est plus important que jamais, vu la pandémie. Les petites entreprises sont en difficulté. Elles n'y sont pour rien et le projet de loi enlèverait une partie du stress que vivent les propriétaires lorsqu'ils souhaitent laisser leur entreprise directement à leurs enfants ou petits enfants. C'est à eux que s'adresse cette mesure législative, et elle ne va pas plus loin que ça.
Il est profondément injuste que les taxes et impôts que doivent payer les gens d'affaires quand ils veulent vendre leur entreprise à leurs propres enfants soient beaucoup plus élevés que s'il s'agissait de purs étrangers. Nous avons expliqué que, dans un cas — celui où une entreprise est vendue à un membre de la famille —, il s'agit d'un dividende, et dans l'autre — celui où elle est plutôt vendue à un étranger —, d'une exonération de gains en capital, mais la différence représente malgré tout des centaines de milliers de dollars.
Grâce au changement proposé, la jeune génération pourra se lancer en affaires tout en assurant la survie des entreprises actuelles et en continuant à créer des emplois de proximité. C'est sans parler du fait que, généralement, les fonds ainsi transférés de la jeune à la vieille génération servent à constituer un revenu de retraite, puisqu'une bonne partie des fonds qui sont engrangés quand une petite entreprise est dans sa phase de développement servent ensuite à la maintenir à flot et à lui faire prendre de la croissance afin que les générations à venir puissent reprendre fièrement le flambeau.
En terminant, j'invite tous les députés à appuyer le projet de loi C-208 et à contribuer du coup au développement des petites entreprises du pays.
View Bruce Stanton Profile
CPC (ON)
View Bruce Stanton Profile
2021-02-01 12:01 [p.3805]
Accordingly, pursuant to an order made on Monday, January 25, the division stands deferred until Wednesday, February 3, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions.
En conséquence, conformément à l'ordre adopté le lundi 25 janvier, le vote par appel nominal est reporté au mercredi 3 février, à la fin de la période prévue pour les questions orales.
View Larry Maguire Profile
CPC (MB)
View Larry Maguire Profile
2020-11-25 17:31 [p.2438]
moved that Bill C-208, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (transfer of small business or family farm or fishing corporation), be read the second time and referred to a committee.
He said: Madam Speaker, it truly is a humbling moment to stand in this chamber and put one's name to legislation and ask one's colleagues to support it. As fate would have it, today marks the seventh anniversary of my representing Brandon—Souris since the by-election that took place on November 25, 2013.
Private members' bills give us the opportunity to set aside our political allegiances, to rise as parliamentarians and to champion the causes of issues whose time has come. In that spirit, I reached out to all the MPs in this House from other parties, to speak about this legislation back before the first reading. I want to specifically thank Guy Caron, who spearheaded this legislation in the last Parliament. Now it is up to us to pick up where he left off and pass it into law.
The essence of this bill is pretty straightforward. Bill C-208 would allow small businesses, farm families and family fishing corporations the same tax rate when selling their operations to a family member as they would if they sold it to a third party. Currently, when a person sells their small business to a family member, the difference between the sale price and the original purchase price is considered to be a dividend. However, if the business is sold to a non-family member, the sale is considered a capital gain. A capital gain is taxed at a much lower rate and allows the seller to use the lifetime capital gains exemption.
It is completely unacceptable that it is more financially advantageous for a parent to sell their farm or small business to an absolute stranger than it is to their own children. I want to give two specific examples this afternoon on how this legislation will help families transfer their operations when they decide to make that transition.
Imagine a bakery that a couple have owned for about 30 years. The couple running the bakery are now ready to retire and another bakery has reached out to indicate that they would like to purchase it from them. However, their daughter has worked with the couple throughout the years in that bakery as she has grown up and has indicated that she wants to take over the family business. Like a lot of small business owners and farmers, they could not afford to put large sums of money away into RRSPs and other saving vehicles, as any extra money that they had went into their own small business.
This couple would rely on the sale of the bakery to basically fund their retirement plans, so they call upon an accountant to start a conversation about different planning scenarios. Their accountant comes back to them, saying if they sold the bakery to the other company, rather than their daughter, they would have an effective tax rate of 10% after using their lifetime capital gains exemption. Their accountant also told them that if they sold the bakery to their daughter, she would be obligated to repay their loan with personal tax dollars, which is a significant penalty. Compared to selling their bakery to the other company, it would render the effective tax rate to be significantly higher. With that information in hand, they have a family huddle and discuss the options.
The couple is now seriously considering selling the business outside of the family as they do to want to put the burden of their tax obligation on their daughter. It would inhibit her ability to make a living and grow the business. On the sale of shares to the bakery, this couple should be indifferent to selling shares to their daughter or the other company. Their daughter should not be penalized for purchasing shares from her parents and should be able to fund the purchase with corporate funds, as she would if she were to purchase the business from an unrelated party.
Bill C-208 would allow the next generation to become business owners and to keep businesses locally owned. With this bill, Bill C-208, we can fix this injustice once and for all. Right now many small businesses are struggling. This pandemic has been one of the most disruptive times in our lifetime. Across our country, no community is immune from its impact. To those entrepreneurs who are listening to this speech tonight, I have their back. Anyone who has ever run their own business understands the massive responsibility and stress that comes with being one's own boss. They are risk takers and job creators. Small business owners make up the backbone of our economy.
From tradespeople to grocers, and everything in between, entrepreneurs are the pillars of our communities. It is not easy to start a business. Some people must take out massive loans just to get their doors open. They put everything on the line to make their operations a success. Hopefully, after many years of hard work, they slowly and surely pay off their debt, expand their business and create even more jobs in their own communities. They pour their hearts and souls into their businesses and, when they are ready to enjoy retirement, there would be no greater joy for them than to see what they built be transferred to their child or grandchild.
As a young entrepreneur, I was one of those who was able to carry on the legacy of my parents. In 1948, my mom and dad carved out a little slice of heaven and started our farm near Elgin, Manitoba. My brother and I are proud to be the sons of farmers.
In the words of Paul Harvey:
And on the 8th day, God looked down on his planned paradise and said, “I need a caretaker.” So God made a farmer. God said, “I need somebody willing to get up before dawn, milk cows, work all day in the fields, milk cows again, eat supper and then go to town and stay past midnight at a meeting of the school board.” So God made a farmer.
I learned a lot from my parents. There were times when they were incredibly tough. Sometimes commodity prices were in the basement. There were other times when equipment would break down just when it was needed the most. I know life is not always easy. It never has been, and it probably never will be.
However, the legislation we have before us today sends a strong message to all those family-run businesses that it will no longer be more financially advantageous to transfer a business or farm to a stranger than to their own children because of tax purposes.
The other example I want to give is of a farmer who is set to retire in the next couple of years and is reviewing succession options. The farmer wants his son to take over; however, he wants fair market value for his farm in order to fund his retirement, as well.
If a third party were to ask to purchase the shares of the farming company, the purchaser would be able to purchase those shares through a corporation. By selling his farm to this third party, the farmer could use his farm capital gain exemption on the sale, resulting in a 13.39% effective tax rate.
However, if the farmer sold his farm to his son, that sale would be recorded as a dividend, rather than a capital gain, and the farmer would pay 47.4% in tax. That is over 34% more in tax. I think we can all agree that it is completely unfair for the tax rate to be significantly higher when the farmer sells his operation to his son rather than to a third party who, in many cases, is a complete stranger.
Bill C-208 sends a message of hope to young farmers who want to carry on what their parents started. There is something special about being connected to the land and reaping what one sows, as is true for any small business. It is an attachment.
In Manitoba and other provinces, there are Century Farm Awards to celebrate farm families who have maintained continuous production for 100 years or more. Many of these in the Prairies are now well over 125 years. I have attended many centennial farm celebration ceremonies, and the faces of the family members involved show how important this milestone is for them.
Farm families face unique pressures in succeeding their operations, including the increasing cost of land, the average age of farm operators and the capital requirements for those entering the industry. The passage of this bill would eliminate the unfair tax rates that make it difficult to keep businesses under family ownership.
With that, I ask my colleagues to reach out to their constituents and ask them if they should support this legislation. Ask those constituents if they think it is unfair that selling a business to their children should be more expensive than selling to a stranger.
This legislation would impact every single constituency in Canada. From a family run farm in Cumberland—Colchester to a family run business in Winnipeg North or a fishing enterprise in Miramichi, people are looking to their members of Parliament to support this bill.
With that, I ask all members to join me in passing Bill C-208. By working together, we can support our entrepreneurs, small businesses, farmers and fishers who make up the backbone of our economy. Let us roll up our sleeves and get this job done.
propose que le projet de loi C-208, Loi modifiant la Loi de l’impôt sur le revenu (transfert d’une petite entreprise ou d’une société agricole ou de pêche familiale), soit lu pour la deuxième fois et renvoyé à un comité.
— Madame la Présidente, il s'agit véritablement d'un exercice d'humilité que de prendre la parole à la Chambre pour mettre son nom sur un projet de loi et demander à ses collègues de l'appuyer. Comme le hasard fait bien les choses, je célèbre aujourd'hui le septième anniversaire de ma victoire aux élections partielles dans la circonscription de Brandon-Souris qui ont eu lieu le 25 novembre 2013.
Les projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire nous donnent l'occasion de mettre de côté nos allégeances politiques, de prendre la parole à titre de parlementaires et de défendre les causes dont l'heure est venue. C'est dans cet esprit que j'ai communiqué avec tous les députés des autres partis pour parler du projet de loi avant l'étape de la première lecture. Je remercie tout particulièrement Guy Caron, qui a parrainé cette mesure législative lors de la dernière législature. Il nous appartient maintenant de continuer sur sa lancée et d'adopter le projet de loi.
Le fond du projet de loi est assez simple. Le projet de loi C-208 permettrait aux petites entreprises, aux familles d'agriculteurs et aux sociétés de pêche familiales de profiter du même taux d'imposition lorsqu'il y a vente de l'entreprise à un membre de la famille que lorsqu'il y a vente à un tiers. Actuellement, lorsqu'une personne vend sa petite entreprise à un membre de sa famille, la différence entre le prix de vente et le prix d'achat original compte comme un dividende. Cependant, si l'entreprise est vendue à un étranger, on considère que la vente donne lieu à un gain en capital. Or, un gain en capital est imposé à un taux beaucoup plus bas et permet au vendeur de profiter de l'exonération cumulative des gains en capital.
Il est tout à fait inacceptable que ce soit plus avantageux financièrement pour un parent de vendre sa société agricole ou sa petite entreprise à un étranger qu'à ses propres enfants. Permettez-moi de vous donner, cet après-midi, deux exemples précis de la manière dont cette mesure législative aidera les familles à transférer leur entreprise, quand elles le décideront.
Imaginons un instant un couple qui exploite une boulangerie depuis une trentaine d'années. Ce couple est maintenant prêt à prendre sa retraite, et une autre boulangerie a indiqué vouloir acheter l'entreprise du couple. Toutefois, la fille du couple, qui a grandi dans cette boulangerie et qui y a travaillé au fil des ans, annonce qu'elle aimerait reprendre l'entreprise familiale. Comme bien des petits entrepreneurs et des agriculteurs, ce couple n'a pas pu mettre de côté d'importantes sommes d'argent dans des REER ou d'autres instruments d'épargne, toute somme excédentaire ayant généralement été réinvestie dans l'entreprise.
Comme ce couple prévoyait vendre sa boulangerie pour financer sa retraite, il s'adresse à un comptable pour étudier les divers scénarios possibles. Après examen, le comptable leur apprend qu'en vendant leur boulangerie à l'autre entreprise plutôt qu'à leur fille, ils obtiendraient un taux d'imposition réel de 10 % après avoir utilisé leur exonération cumulative des gains en capital. Le comptable ajoute que s'ils vendent la boulangerie à leur fille, elle devra rembourser leur prêt de sa poche, ce qui constitue une pénalité importante. Le taux d'imposition réel serait beaucoup plus élevé que si le couple vendait à l'autre entreprise. Apprenant cela, ils convoquent une réunion de famille pour discuter des options possibles.
Le couple envisage maintenant sérieusement de vendre l'entreprise à un étranger. Ces gens ne veulent pas que leur fille se retrouve avec leur fardeau fiscal. Si cette dernière avait à s'acquitter de ce fardeau, il lui serait plus difficile de gagner sa vie et de faire prendre de l'expansion à l'entreprise. Il ne devrait pas y avoir de différence entre vendre des actions de la boulangerie à la fille de ce couple ou à une autre entreprise. La fille de ces entrepreneurs ne devrait pas être pénalisée lorsqu'elle achète des actions de ses parents et elle devrait pouvoir financer l'achat avec des fonds d'entreprise, comme elle le ferait si elle achetait l'entreprise d'un tiers sans lien de parenté.
Le projet de loi C-208 permettrait aux membres de la génération suivante de devenir propriétaires d'entreprise et de faire en sorte que les entreprises appartiennent à des gens de la localité. Il nous permettrait de remédier à cette injustice une fois pour toutes. À l'heure actuelle, de nombreuses entreprises éprouvent des difficultés. De notre vivant, peu d'événements ont entraîné autant de bouleversements que cette pandémie. Elle frappe partout au pays. Je veux que les entrepreneurs qui écoutent cette allocution ce soir sachent que je défends leurs intérêts. Toute personne qui a déjà eu une entreprise sait qu'être son propre patron s'accompagne d'une énorme responsabilité et de beaucoup de stress. Les entrepreneurs prennent des risques et créent des emplois. Bref, les propriétaires de petite entreprise sont un pilier de notre économie.
Les gens de métier, les épiciers et tous les autres entrepreneurs sont les piliers de nos collectivités. Démarrer une entreprise n'est pas chose facile. Certains doivent faire d'énormes emprunts juste pour pouvoir se lancer en affaires. Ils mettent tout en jeu pour assurer la réussite de leur entreprise. En travaillant avec ardeur pendant de nombreuses années, ils peuvent espérer rembourser leur dette lentement, mais sûrement, faire croître leur entreprise et créer encore plus d'emplois dans leur collectivité. Ils se dévouent corps et âme pour leur entreprise, et lorsqu'ils sont prêts à prendre leur retraite, il n'y a pas de plus grande joie pour eux que de pouvoir léguer l'entreprise qu'ils ont bâtie à leur enfant ou à leur petit-enfant.
Dans ma jeunesse, j'ai fait partie des entrepreneurs qui ont eu la chance de poursuivre l'œuvre de leurs parents. En 1948, ma mère et mon père ont aménagé leur petit coin de paradis et ont commencé à pratiquer l'agriculture près d'Elgin, au Manitoba. Mon frère et moi sommes fiers d'être des fils d'agriculteurs.
Je cite Paul Harvey:
Le huitième jour, Dieu contempla son projet paradisiaque et dit: « Il me faut un gardien. » Alors Dieu créa un fermier. Dieu dit: « Il me faut quelqu'un qui voudra se lever avant l'aube, traire les vaches, travailler toute la journée dans les champs, traire les vaches encore, prendre son souper, puis aller en ville jusqu'après minuit pour assister à une réunion du conseil scolaire. » Alors Dieu a créé un fermier.
J'ai beaucoup appris de mes parents. Il leur est arrivé d'avoir à être incroyablement tenaces. Parfois, le prix des produits s'effondrait; parfois, l'équipement tombait en panne juste comme on en avait besoin. Je sais que la vie n'est pas toujours facile. Cela n'a jamais été le cas et ne le sera probablement jamais.
Par contre, le projet de loi à l'étude envoie un message fort à toutes les entreprises familiales: il ne sera plus avantageux du point de vue fiscal de transférer une entreprise ou une ferme à un étranger plutôt qu'à ses enfants.
L'autre exemple que je voulais donner est celui d'un agriculteur qui doit prendre sa retraite dans les années à venir et qui étudie les choix qui s'offrent à lui en matière de succession. L'agriculteur voudrait que son fils reprenne son exploitation, mais il veut aussi obtenir la juste valeur marchande pour sa ferme afin de financer sa retraite.
Si un tiers demandait à acheter des parts de l'exploitation agricole, il pourrait le faire par l'entremise d'une société. En vendant sa ferme à un tiers, l'agriculteur pourrait se servir de l'exemption sur les gains en capital pour sa ferme, ce qui donnerait un taux d'imposition effectif de 13,39 %.
Toutefois, si l'agriculteur vend sa ferme à son fils, cette vente sera enregistrée sous forme de dividende, plutôt que comme gain en capital, et il devra payer 47,4 % d'impôts, ce qui représente 34 % de plus. Je pense que nous pouvons tous convenir qu'il est totalement injuste que le taux d'imposition soit considérablement plus élevé lorsque l'agriculteur vend son exploitation agricole à son fils plutôt qu'à un tiers qui, plus souvent qu'autrement, est un parfait étranger.
Le projet de loi C-208 envoie un message d'espoir aux jeunes agriculteurs qui souhaitent prendre les rênes d'une entreprise fondée par leurs parents. Il y a quelque chose de particulier dans le fait d'être lié à la terre et de récolter ce que l'on sème, comme c'est le cas pour toute petite entreprise. Il s'agit d'un attachement sain.
Au Manitoba et dans d'autres provinces, on décerne des prix pour les fermes centenaires, pour rendre hommage aux familles d'agriculteurs qui ont maintenu une production continue pendant 100 ans, voire davantage. Dans les Prairies, nombre de ces exploitations agricoles ont maintenant bien plus de 125 ans. J'ai assisté à de nombreuses cérémonies organisées pour fêter le centenaire d'une ferme, et en observant le visage des membres des familles concernées, j'ai réalisé à quel point ce jalon est important pour eux.
Les familles d'agriculteurs sont confrontées à des pressions exceptionnelles pour mener leurs opérations avec succès, notamment en raison de l'augmentation du coût des terrains, de l'âge moyen des exploitants agricoles et des besoins en capitaux des jeunes qui entrent dans la profession agricole. L'adoption de ce projet de loi permettrait d'éliminer les taux d'imposition inéquitables qui rendent difficile pour une famille de céder son exploitation agricole à ses descendants.
Sur ce, je demande aux députés de prendre contact avec les habitants de leurs circonscriptions et de leur demander s'ils devraient appuyer ce projet de loi. Nous devons demander aux personnes qui nous ont élus si elles trouvent injuste qu'il soit plus difficile pour les agriculteurs de transférer leur entreprise à leurs propres enfants plutôt qu'à un étranger.
Cette mesure législative aurait un impact dans chacune des circonscriptions au Canada. Qu'il s'agisse d'une ferme familiale dans Cumberland—Colchester, d'une entreprise familiale dans Winnipeg-Nord ou d'une entreprise de pêche dans Miramichi, les Canadiens souhaitent que leur député appuie ce projet de loi.
Cela dit, je demande à tous les députés de se joindre à moi pour adopter le projet de loi C-208. En travaillant ensemble, nous pouvons soutenir les entrepreneurs, les petites entreprises, les agriculteurs et les pêcheurs qui forment l'épine dorsale de notre économie. Retroussons-nous les manches et mettons-nous au travail.
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2020-11-25 17:42 [p.2440]
Madam Speaker, I congratulate the member on his seventh anniversary today.
I recognize the true value of our family farms. Not only today, but in the past, they have contributed so much to who we are as a nation and kept our rural identity very much alive.
Has my friend across the way had any discussions with the Department of Finance or the Department of Agriculture to get a sense of the potential cost we are talking about? Has there been any dialogue with respect to that?
Madame la Présidente, je félicite le député à l'occasion de son septième anniversaire.
Je reconnais toute la valeur des fermes familiales. Aujourd'hui, comme autrefois, elles contribuent beaucoup à définir notre nation et à garder bien vivante notre identité rurale.
Mon ami d'en face s'est-il entretenu avec les représentants du ministère des Finances ou du ministère de l'Agriculture pour avoir une idée des coûts potentiels dont il est question? Un dialogue a-t-il été entamé à ce sujet?
View Larry Maguire Profile
CPC (MB)
View Larry Maguire Profile
2020-11-25 17:43 [p.2440]
Madam Speaker, yes, we have. We reached out, as Mr. Caron did before, to the Parliamentary Budget Officer, who indicated that depending on the means and number of units that are sold, it could be anywhere from $178 million to $300 million annually. It would make a huge difference to each individual operation, leaving much more money in the hands of those people to spend on things that would contribute to society. It is not a complete cost, because a lot of that money would come back through taxes and purchases they would make for their daily lives.
Madame la Présidente, la réponse est oui. Nous avons fait appel au directeur parlementaire du budget, comme M. Caron l'avait fait auparavant, et il nous a indiqué qu'en fonction des moyens déployés et du nombre d'unités vendues, il pourrait s'agir d'un montant annuel variant entre 178 et 300 millions de dollars. Cela améliorerait certainement la situation de ces gens en leur laissant beaucoup plus d'argent pour acquérir des biens qui leur permettraient de contribuer à la société. Il ne s'agit pas seulement d'une dépense, parce qu'une grande partie de cet argent serait récupéré par la voie de taxes et d'achats que ces personnes feraient au quotidien.
View Sébastien Lemire Profile
BQ (QC)
Madam Speaker, I thank the member for introducing this bill. It is obviously a bill that is important to us, and I will have the opportunity to talk about it later.
I want to thank him for this outpouring of love for our farmers, especially the next generation. However, is this not inconsistent with what we heard in the House at about the same time yesterday? Conservatives opposed the bill on the breach in supply management that was being defended by my colleague from Berthier—Maskinongé, among others.
How can Conservatives call themselves friends of the next generation of farmers when they attack them and do not want to protect supply management? There seems to be a disconnect.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie le député d'avoir déposé ce projet de loi. Évidemment, c'est un projet de loi qui nous tient à cœur; j'aurai la chance d'en parler tantôt.
Je veux le remercier de cette vague d'amour pour nos agriculteurs, particulièrement pour ceux de la relève. Toutefois, n'est-ce pas incohérent compte tenu de ce qu'on a entendu à la Chambre hier, à peu près à la même heure? Les conservateurs ont donné une jambette au projet de loi, appuyé notamment par mon collègue de Berthier—Maskinongé, qui porte sur la brèche dans la gestion de l'offre.
Comment les conservateurs peuvent-ils se dire les amis de la relève agricole tout en leur faisant une jambette en ne voulant pas protéger la gestion de l'offre? Cela me semble être une incohérence.
View Larry Maguire Profile
CPC (MB)
View Larry Maguire Profile
2020-11-25 17:44 [p.2440]
Madam Speaker, I have reached out on this particular bill to many of the member's colleagues. I did not have a chance to talk with him personally, but I talked with many Bloc members, NDP members, Green members and some of my colleagues in the Liberal Party to get the concentrated input that I have received on this particular bill. I thank him for his support.
As a former farm leader myself, which got me into politics, I can assure the member that there were times when I was looking at making sure we had choices of how to sell our wheat in the world and in western Canada. My colleague, Mr. Ritz, made a good choice in those days.
I was on the phone with the Chicken Farmers of Canada just yesterday. I have spoken with many of the dairy producers in Manitoba, and throughout Canada, a number of times on the particular issue that the member raised regarding supply management. I can assure him that my support for that industry has continued. We did it by making sure that when there was trade interference, there was a compensation package. The hon. member for Abbotsford designed that package with Prime Minister Harper. The big problem, which I just found out yesterday, is there has been no compensation to those supply-managed chicken producers in Canada in the last few years at all.
I can assure the member that we will continue to work together on that.
Madame la Présidente, j'ai consulté de nombreux collègues du député au sujet de ce projet de loi. Je n'ai pas eu l'occasion de lui parler personnellement, mais je me suis entretenu avec de nombreux bloquistes, néo-démocrates, verts et certains de mes collègues libéraux afin d'obtenir une véritable rétroaction sur cette mesure législative. Je remercie le député de son appui.
En tant qu'ancien dirigeant de nombreuses organisations du secteur agricole — expérience qui m'a mené à la vie politique —, j'assure au député qu'à certains moments je me suis employé à ce que nous ayons le choix quant à la manière de vendre notre blé dans le monde et dans l'Ouest canadien. Mon collègue, M. Ritz, a fait un bon choix à l'époque.
Pas plus tard qu'hier, j'étais au téléphone avec des représentants des Producteurs de poulet du Canada. J'ai parlé à plusieurs reprises avec de nombreux producteurs laitiers du Manitoba et de tout le Canada au sujet de la gestion de l'offre, question que le député a soulevée. J'assure au député que je continue d'appuyer cette industrie. Lorsque des échanges commerciaux changeaient la donne, nous mettions en place un programme d'indemnisation. Le député d'Abbotsford a conçu un tel programme avec le premier ministre Harper. J'ai découvert hier un énorme problème: depuis quelques années, les producteurs de poulet soumis à la gestion de l'offre au Canada ne reçoivent aucune indemnisation.
J'assure au député que nous continuerons à collaborer dans ce dossier.
View Peter Julian Profile
NDP (BC)
Madam Speaker, I thank the member for bringing forward the bill that Guy Caron worked so assiduously on in previous Parliaments. As the member knows and has indicated, it has been endorsed by independent business organizations that support small business and agriculture and farming organizations. There is a lot of support for this bill. What we will do on the NDP side is endeavour to get it to committee.
I want to ask the member if he is willing to entertain amendments at the committee stage. There are some clarifications, as he is well aware, that would need to happen in terms of the legislation itself. Is he—
Madame la Présidente, je remercie le député d'avoir présenté le projet de loi auquel Guy Caron a consacré tellement d'efforts au cours de législatures précédentes. Comme il le sait et l'a dit, ce projet de loi bénéficie du soutien d'organismes qui représentent les entreprises indépendantes et les entreprises agricoles. Ce projet de loi jouit d'un vaste appui. Le NPD s'efforcera d'ailleurs de le renvoyer au comité.
J'aimerais savoir si le député est ouvert à des amendements à l'étape du comité. Comme il le sait pertinemment, il faudrait apporter certaines améliorations au projet de loi. Est-il...
View Larry Maguire Profile
CPC (MB)
View Larry Maguire Profile
2020-11-25 17:47 [p.2440]
Madam Speaker, the member for New Westminster—Burnaby is right that, among the Canadian Federation of Independent Business taxpayers, L'Union des producteurs agricoles and the Chicken Farmers of Canada, there is a broad base of support for this particular bill to go before the House.
We did spend a considerable amount of time working with Mr. Caron, when he was there before, in moving it forward. If there is anything that we could look at, we would certainly be willing to do that at committee, but I know Mr. Caron worked in great depth to get it to precisely the wording that he had in this bill.
Madame la Présidente, le député de New Westminster—Burnaby a raison de dire que la Fédération canadienne de l'entreprise indépendante, l'Union des producteurs agricoles et Les Producteurs de poulet du Canada appuient ce projet de loi dont la Chambre est saisie.
Nous avons consacré beaucoup de temps à ce projet de loi avec M. Caron lorsqu'il était député. Nous sommes certainement disposés à examiner toute amélioration possible à l'étape du comité, mais je sais que M. Caron a consacré beaucoup d'efforts à rédiger le projet de loi dans sa forme actuelle.
View Tony Van Bynen Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Tony Van Bynen Profile
2020-11-25 17:48 [p.2440]
Madam Speaker, I grew up on a small 50-acre farm and, in spite of having 11 labour-cost-free children, my father still required off-the-farm income because he realized it was not easy to feed 11 children with what we could produce on the farm.
I am pleased to take part in the debate today on private member's bill, Bill C-208, which aims to facilitate the transfer of family businesses between family members.
Ensuring the sustainability of small businesses, family farms and fishing corporations is essential to our economy and to the communities that they serve. This has been underscored by the critical need to support families and communities as we continue to fight COVID-19. Our government understands this. From the outset of the pandemic, Canada's economic response to COVID-19 has introduced a range of support measures for small businesses to help bridge them to the other side.
Simply put, we have their backs. That extends to helping family businesses thrive for generations to come.
Encouraging the sale of family businesses to family members often means those businesses will remain in, and continue to benefit, their communities as well as the families that fought hard, sacrificed and succeeded through pure determination and entrepreneurial spirit. It is with this spirit in mind that Bill C-208 bears careful consideration.
Bill C-208 seeks to amend two of the Income Tax Act's most important and complex anti-avoidance rules. These rules deal with inter-corporate dividends, share sales and circumstances under which the lifetime capital gains exemption is charged. Any relieving changes to these sections of the act must be done cautiously, following rigorous study and debate, to avoid unintentionally creating loopholes that would disproportionately benefit the wealthy instead of protecting the middle class and those working hard to join it.
Section 84.1 of the act, in particular, is in place to apply an anti-avoidance rule where, when appropriate, an individual sells shares of one corporation to another corporation that is linked to an individual, such as a family member. When an individual sells shares of a Canadian corporation to a linked corporation, section 84.1 of the act deems, in certain circumstances, that the individual has received a taxable dividend from the linked corporation rather than a capital gain. This prevents the individual from realizing the proceeds of the sale on a tax-free basis using the lifetime capital gains exemption.
This rule is meant to ensure that taxpayers cannot use linked corporations to, in effect, remove earnings from their corporations, using a sale as a basis to do so. Without this rule, such sales between related parties could be used to convert what should be dividends to an individual shareholder into capital gains that are tax free under the lifetime capital gains exemption.
Bill C-208 proposes narrowing the scope of section 84.1 by removing the sale of shares of small businesses, family farms or fishing corporations from its application, when they are being sold by an individual to another corporation that is owned by their adult child or their grandchild. This change would allow the owner-operator of a family business to convert dividends to the corporation into a tax-free capital gain.
It is important to note that there is currently nothing in the act stopping a parent from selling the shares of a family business directly to their child or grandchild on a tax-free basis using the lifetime capital gains exemption, which currently shelters up to $1 million in capital gains on qualified farm and fishing properties. The issues sought to be addressed by Bill C-208 arise only in multi-tier corporate structures, where one corporation owns a second corporation. Adopting the proposed changes to section 84.1 could open the door to new tax-avoidance opportunities.
Bill C-208 also proposes amendments to section 55 of the act, which generally applies to corporations that seek to inappropriately reduce capital gains by paying excessive tax-free dividends between corporations, which the act considers to be a capital gain.
Two exemptions to these anti-avoidance rules authorize businesses that are restructuring to allow company shareholders to split company shares between them while deferring taxes. The first exemption applies to the restructuring of related corporations and the second applies to all corporate restructuring.
Bill C-208 would broaden the first exemption so that it applies to brothers and sisters, despite long-standing tax policy that considers brothers and sisters to have separate and independent economic interests for these purposes. Any change to this exemption would risk eroding our tax base.
Spouses, as well as parents and their children, are already eligible for this exemption, because it is presumed that they have shared economic interests. Although brothers and sisters cannot restructure their participation in a corporation on a tax-deferred basis under the related corporations exemption, they can do it under the second exemption of section 55, which applies to all corporate restructurings.
This is called the butterfly exemption, and there are few tax avoidance opportunities under it. If the proposed amendments under section 55 included in Bill C-208 were passed, siblings could undertake business restructurings in which otherwise taxable capital gains realized between corporations would be converted into tax-free intercorporate dividends, which would create new opportunities for tax avoidance in Canada.
I will conclude by saying that we know many businesses are continuing to face stress and uncertainty due to COVID-19. Our government has stepped up to the plate to make sure that they have the support during these unprecedented times.
We have made unprecedented support available to Canadian businesses, including the Canadian emergency business account, which has provided 758,000 business loans totalling $30 billion. The Canada emergency wage subsidy has supported the wages of more than 3.5 million employees totalling $36.7 billion.
Just this week applications were opened for the new Canada emergency rent subsidy, which will provide simple and easy-to-access commercial rent support and an additional lockdown support of 25% for businesses that have temporarily shut down due to mandatory public orders. Combined, this will mean the hard-hit businesses subject to lockdown will receive rent support up to 90%.
Our message to businesses remains the same. We have their back.
There are important considerations to take into account when we are reviewing the merits of Bill C-208. Our government remains committed to working with family businesses, including farming and fishing businesses, to make it efficient, or less difficult, to hand down their businesses to a next generation. However, we must exercise caution when making amendments to the Income Tax Act.
Madame la Présidente, j'ai grandi sur une petite ferme de 50 acres. Malgré une main-d'œuvre bénévole composée de ses 11 enfants, mon père avait tout de même besoin d'un revenu à l'extérieur de la ferme. Ce n'était en effet pas facile de nourrir 11 enfants avec ce que nous arrivions à produire sur la ferme.
Je suis heureux de prendre part au débat d'aujourd'hui sur le projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire C-208, qui vise à faciliter le transfert intergénérationnel des entreprises familiales.
Il est essentiel pour l'économie d'assurer la viabilité des petites entreprises et des sociétés agricoles ou de pêche familiales et il est aussi dans l'intérêt des localités qu'elles servent de le faire. Cela a été démontré par la nécessité cruciale de soutenir les familles et les communautés alors que nous continuons de combattre la COVID-19. Le gouvernement le comprend bien. Depuis le tout début de la pandémie, la réponse économique du Canada à la COVID-19 a d'ailleurs inclus toute une gamme de mesures de soutien pour les petites entreprises afin de les aider à passer à travers cette crise.
Bref, ils peuvent compter sur nous. Nous aidons en outre aussi les entreprises familiales à prospérer pour les générations à venir.
En facilitant la vente des entreprises familiales aux membres de la famille, nous permettons à ces entreprises de demeurer au sein de leurs localités. Celles-ci pourront continuer d'en bénéficier, tout comme les familles qui ont travaillé d'arrache-pied et ont fait des sacrifices pour prospérer, grâce à une détermination inébranlable et un fort esprit d'entreprise. Voilà pourquoi le projet de loi C-208 mérite d'être étudié soigneusement.
Le projet de loi C-208 a pour but de modifier deux des règles anti-évitement les plus importantes et les plus complexes de la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu. Ces règles portent sur les dividendes intersociétés, la vente d'actions et les situations dans lesquelles est appliquée l'exonération cumulative des gains en capital. Tout changement visant à alléger ces dispositions de la loi doit être apporté avec grande prudence, après une étude et un débat rigoureux, afin d'éviter de créer involontairement des échappatoires qui avantageraient de façon disproportionnée les gens riches au lieu de protéger la classe moyenne et les personnes qui travaillent fort pour en faire partie.
L'article 84.1 de la loi, en particulier, a pour but d'appliquer une règle anti-évitement dans les cas où, lorsque c'est possible, une personne vend des actions d'une société à une autre société liée à une personne, comme un membre de la famille. Lorsqu'une personne vend des actions d'une société canadienne à une société liée, l'article 84.1 de la loi prévoit qu'elle est réputée, dans certaines circonstances, avoir reçu des dividendes imposables de la société liée au lieu de gains en capital. Cela empêche la personne de réaliser le produit de la vente sans payer d'impôt en utilisant l'exonération cumulative des gains en capital.
Cette règle a pour but d'empêcher les contribuables d'utiliser des sociétés liées pour sortir des gains de leur société au moyen d'une vente. Sans elle, de telles ventes entre parties liées pourraient être utilisées pour convertir ce qui devrait être des dividendes versés à un actionnaire en gains en capital admissibles à l'exonération cumulative des gains en capital, donc non imposables.
Le projet de loi C-208 propose de réduire la portée de l'article 84.1 en soustrayant de son application la vente d'actions de petites entreprises ou de sociétés agricoles ou de pêche familiales d'un particulier à une autre société détenue par l'enfant adulte ou le petit-enfant adulte de ce particulier. Cette modification permettrait au propriétaire-exploitant d'une société familiale de convertir des dividendes de la société en gains en capital non imposables.
Il est important de noter que, en ce moment, rien dans le projet de loi n'empêche un parent de vendre des actions de la société familiale directement à son enfant ou à son petit-enfant en franchise d'impôt en demandant l'exonération cumulative des gains en capital, qui met actuellement à l'abri de l'impôt jusqu'à 1 million de dollars de gains en capital réalisés lors de la disposition de biens agricoles ou de pêche admissibles. Les problèmes que le projet de loi C-208 vise à régler surviennent seulement au sein des structures organisationnelles à plusieurs niveaux, où une société en détient une autre. Adopter les changements proposés à l'article 84.1 pourrait ouvrir la porte à de nouvelles possibilités d'évitement fiscal.
Le projet de loi C-208 propose également des modifications à l'article 55 de la loi, qui s'applique habituellement aux sociétés qui cherchent à réduire indûment leurs gains en capital en versant des dividendes libres d'impôt excessifs entre les sociétés, ce qui constitue un gain en capital au titre de la loi.
Il y a deux exceptions à la règle anti-évitement qui autorisent les entreprises en restructuration à permettre à leurs actionnaires de diviser les actifs entre eux tout en reportant l'impôt à payer. La première exception s'applique à la restructuration des sociétés liées, et la deuxième exception s'applique à toutes les restructurations de sociétés.
Le projet de loi C-208 propose d'étendre cette première exception afin de permettre à des frères et sœurs de s'en prévaloir, malgré cette vieille politique fiscale qui prévoit que les frères et sœurs ont des intérêts économiques distincts et indépendants à ces fins. Toute modification à cette exemption risquerait d'éroder l'assiette fiscale.
Les conjoints, de même que les parents et leurs enfants, sont admissibles à cette exonération parce que l'on présume qu'ils ont des intérêts économiques communs. Bien que les frères et sœurs ne puissent pas restructurer leur participation dans une société avec report de l'impôt en vue de l'exception des sociétés liées, ils sont en mesure de le faire en vertu de la seconde exception, soit celle qui s'applique à toutes les restructurations de sociétés.
On la nomme l'« exception papillon », et il y a moins de possibilités d'évitement fiscal en vertu de celle-ci. Si la modification proposée de l'article 55 comprise dans le projet de loi C-208 était adoptée, les frères et sœurs pourraient entreprendre une restructuration d'entreprise dans le cadre de laquelle les gains en capital réalisés entre les sociétés qui auraient normalement été imposables seraient convertis en dividendes intersociétés libres d'impôt, ce qui aurait pour conséquence de créer de nouvelles possibilités de pratiquer l'évitement fiscal au pays.
Je vais conclure en disant que nous savons que beaucoup d'entreprises continuent de faire face au stress et à l'incertitude occasionnés par la COVID-19. Le gouvernement est intervenu pour faire en sorte qu'elles puissent bénéficier d'un soutien en cette période sans précédent.
Nous avons offert une aide financière sans précédent aux entreprises canadiennes, notamment en créant le Compte d'urgence pour les entreprises canadiennes, qui a accordé 758 000 prêts totalisant 30 milliards de dollars à des petites entreprises. La Subvention salariale d'urgence du Canada a couvert les salaires de 3,5 millions d'employés, pour un total de 36,7 milliards de dollars.
Depuis cette semaine, il est possible de soumettre une demande de Subvention d'urgence du Canada pour le loyer, qui assurera un accès simple et facile à une subvention pour le loyer, en plus d'une indemnité de confinement de 25 % pour les entreprises qui doivent rester fermées temporairement en raison d'une ordonnance de la santé publique. Prises ensemble, ces mesures permettront aux entreprises touchées de façon significative par le confinement de recevoir de paiements s'élevant à jusqu'à 90 % de leur loyer.
Notre message aux entreprises demeure le même. Nous sommes derrière eux.
Il y a des considérations importantes dont il faut tenir compte lorsqu'on examine le bien-fondé du projet de loi C-208. Le gouvernement demeure résolu à collaborer avec les entreprises familiales, y compris les sociétés agricoles ou de pêche familiales, pour qu'elles puissent transférer plus efficacement et plus facilement l'entreprise à la prochaine génération. Cependant, il faut faire preuve de prudence lorsqu'on cherche à modifier la Loi de l'impôt.
View Sébastien Lemire Profile
BQ (QC)
Madam Speaker, it is an honour for me to rise in the House.
Before I got into politics, I was the secretary to the Fédération de la relève agricole de l'Abitibi—Témiscamingue. My colleague, the member for Brandon—Souris, might be interested to know that.
The matter of transfers, particularly transfers to family members, is very important in Abitibi—Témiscamingue. I remember participating in a workshop about transfers hosted by the Réseau Agriconseils. A number of people attended because they were concerned about this issue, particularly since land value is different in Abitibi—Témiscamingue. Since our land is worth less than land in other parts of Quebec, it cannot be used as security as often. That is not the subject of this speech, but it is relevant when we are talking about the facility of transfer when a business is being transferred to a family member.
I had the opportunity to talk about this when I participated in the convention of the Fédération de la relève agricole du Québec, which took place in March in Rouyn-Noranda, located in my riding of Abitibi—Témiscamingue. As impossible as it may seem, still today, business owners are better off transferring their business to external shareholders than to a member of their own family.
I want to thank the member for Brandon—Souris for introducing his bill. I would have liked to introduce it myself, much like the member for Berthier—Maskinongé, as it is a fundamental issue. The Bloc Québécois supports Bill C-208. For several years now, my party has been calling for measures to encourage and facilitate the transfer of family businesses, especially in the agriculture and fisheries sectors. In fact, I would point out to my colleagues in the House that the member for Pierre-Boucher—Les Patriotes—Verchères introduced Bill C-275, an act to amend the Income Tax Act regarding business transfer in the previous Parliament.
The Bloc Québécois has been calling for measures to encourage and facilitate the transfer of family businesses for more than 15 years. For Quebeckers, for the Bloc Québécois, and for me, business succession is important. The next generation is important for the future of our SMEs in general, but especially for the family farming businesses in the Abitibi—Témiscamingue region.
Business succession is a major and promising phenomenon across Canada and especially in Quebec. Nearly one-third of Quebec's small and medium-sized businesses were buy-outs. In 2017, one-quarter of Canadian SMEs were takeovers. In Quebec, the majority of business buy-outs are in rural areas, where 44% of the SMEs belong to entrepreneurs who have taken over a business. In Canada, that figure is around 31%, according to UQTR professor Marc Duhamel, a regular researcher at the UQTR's small business research institute. Unfortunately, the government's unfavourable tax rules do little to encourage business succession.
The risk of sales to foreign buyers and businesses being lost is very real. In 2018, it was estimated that between 30,000 and 60,000 Quebec businesses would not find a buyer in the years to come and would die as a result. That represents around 150,000 jobs and $8 billion to $10 billion in revenue.
Right now, Quebec is losing one farm a day. That is alarming. The risk of sales to foreign buyers and businesses being lost is very real. In Quebec, the next generation of entrepreneurs is suffering badly. Unfortunately, this Parliament is not doing enough to support business succession.
Why does the Liberal Party not want to put a family member on equal ground with a foreign investor? Here are the facts. Under the existing legislation, the transfer of a business to a family member is treated as a dividend and not as a capital gain, unlike a sale to a third party. As a result, owners are not entitled to the lifetime capital gains exemption if they decide to sell the business to their children. The existing legislation is an affront to common sense.
Why does the Liberal Party of Canada refuse to amend the Income Tax Act? As we just heard, they appear to be worried about condoning tax evasion. That would explain why the Income Tax Act makes no mention of the notions of transferring, shuttering or selling a small business to a family member, for fear of potential abuse or tax fraud. If abuse and tax fraud are actual reasons, I am having trouble understanding why the Liberal Party continues to do nothing about tax havens.
As the member of Parliament for Abitibi—Témiscamingue, I have had the honour, along with members of my team, to speak with many farmers in my region week after week. I want to acknowledge the president of the Fédération de la relève agricole, Meghan Jarry. The federation and all business owners in Quebec see business succession as a key way to stop the outflow of businesses and Quebeckers to urban centres and to make it easier for young entrepreneurs to take over the family business.
Business succession is essential for Abitibi—Témiscamingue. It is essential for all of Quebec. The future of the Abitibi—Témiscamingue region is in the hands of the next generation of farmers.
I want to quote a farmer from the region, Simon Leblond, who is also a friend and a member of the Fédération de la relève agricole du Québec. He was the president of FRAQ when I was the secretary there. He said the following:
I am certainly going to have challenges, starting with the financing and development of my company, of course. There are also other issues unique to my region, including maintaining a large enough pool of producers to maintain services for farms and, more generally, to ensure the vitality of the industry and make it known to those outside the world of agriculture.
The next generation of farmers is essential because it ensures the vitality of agriculture, which in turn ensures the vitality of the towns in our regions. The vitality of our regions ensures the vitality of Quebec, the dynamic use of our land.
I think we need to talk about distress. In Abitibi-Témiscamingue and other parts of Quebec, farmers young and old are struggling. They have to deal with red tape, paperwork, long hours of work, their roles as mothers or fathers, bills, the stress of everyday life, the stress of being in debt, equipment that breaks down and has to be repaired or replaced, short production and crop seasons, poor weather conditions and all of the other pressures they are under.
Farmers are in real distress. Encouraging and facilitating the transfer of family businesses could alleviate some of that distress. I think that is an important reason for members of the House to support Bill C-208.
Now I would like to talk about what things are really like for new farmers. We all know farmers are stubborn and tenacious people. They are probably the most resilient members of our society. Young farmers are constantly looking for ways to access assets and encourage the transfer and start-up of agricultural businesses in Quebec. They face major challenges, including land grabbing and land financialization, income security, vet services for farm animals, crop insurance and agricultural drainage. These are major challenges. Improving access to land and improving quality of life for Quebec's young farmers is one way to ensure a future in agriculture for Quebec's youth.
It is the duty of this Parliament to create conditions conducive to establishing the next generation of farmers in order to attract that next generation and secure the future of small and medium family farms. That cannot happen without easier access to land. Transferring a farm is the best way to get a start in farming because starting a farm from scratch is very hard.
On top of that, land prices, the cost of quotas and production standards are increasing every year. Farm values are increasing. It takes longer and longer and is increasingly difficult to transfer the farm to one's children. Paying back the loans needed to purchase a farm takes so long and the red tape is becoming increasingly cumbersome, making it increasingly difficult for farmers to access land and operate their businesses. Farmers want the process for purchasing a farm to be simplified. Some are calling for a single-desk model to avoid having to speak to too many stakeholders in a transfer process. Everything I have mentioned from the beginning of my speech reflects opinions expressed by the Fédération de la relève agricole du Québec, which works to improve the lives of young farmers in Quebec.
Just today, actually, I spoke with Julie Bissonnette, the president of the FRAC, and its executive director, Philippe Pagé. Regarding the transfer of a family farm, the Fédération de la relève agricole du Québec is unanimous: It is just wrong that it is more advantageous to sell the family farm to a stranger than to a family member. Julie Bissonnette told me today that she is always asked about this issue no matter where she goes. Young farmers in Quebec and the Abitibi—Témiscamingue region have been calling for legislative changes for several years now.
She also told me that it was a problem on both sides. The transferors also want this to change. The oldest farmers in Abitibi-Témiscamingue want to transfer their farms to family members. This means that local farming will be put on hold. Dozens, if not hundreds of young future farmers and transferors want to be able to make transactions. This is a global issue. This desire to transfer their farm to their children is part of what has been driving older farmers to work as hard as they do and invest so much time in it for 30, 40 or 50 years. It may even span two, three, four or five generations. Farmers work like mad to provide a future to their kids. Selling their farm to a stranger can lead to feelings of failure or profound grief.
For farmers, it is a big step to hand over the farm to their children out of love and devotion. That is what I have heard from FRAQ members, young and old alike, who feel concerned. Their greatest wish is to be able to hand over their farms to their families.
I will conclude by mentioning that the tax arguments raised when the last point was rejected do not hold up well if we look at the PBO study. In my opinion, if things are not moving right now, it is because there is a flagrant lack of political will on the part of the Government of Canada. This lack of will needs to stop, and that is why the Bloc Québécois supports Bill C-208.
I expect the House to unanimously support this bill in order to prevent this outflow of people to urban centres and to foster the entrepreneurial spirit of our young farmers.
Madame la Présidente, c'est un honneur pour moi de me lever à la Chambre.
Avant de faire le saut en politique, j'étais secrétaire de la Fédération de la relève agricole de l'Abitibi—Témiscamingue. Mon collègue le député de Brandon—Souris pourrait être intéressé par cette information.
L'enjeu des transferts, particulièrement les transferts apparentés, est un enjeu très important en Abitibi—Témiscamingue. Je me rappelle avoir participé au colloque sur le transfert du Réseau Agriconseils, auquel participaient quelque personnes. Elles étaient préoccupées par cet enjeu, d'autant plus que, en Abitibi—Témiscamingue, l'enjeu de la valeur des terres est particulier. Comme nos terres ont moins de valeur qu'ailleurs au Québec, elles peuvent moins être moins données en garantie. Ce n'est pas l'objet du présent discours, n'empêche que c'est une information pertinente quand on parle des facilités de transfert vers des cédants lorsqu'ils sont apparentés.
J'ai eu l'occasion d'en parler lorsque j'ai participé au congrès de la Fédération de la relève agricole du Québec qui a eu lieu en mars dernier à Rouyn-Noranda, donc chez nous, en Abitibi—Témiscamingue. Aussi incroyable que cela puisse paraître, il est aujourd'hui plus avantageux pour un entrepreneur de céder son entreprise à des actionnaires extérieurs plutôt qu'à des membres de sa propre famille.
Je tiens à remercier le député de Brandon—Souris d'avoir déposé son projet de loi. J'aurais moi-même aimé le déposer, tout comme mon collègue de Berthier—Maskinongé, parce que l'enjeu est fondamental. Le Bloc québécois est favorable au projet de loi C-208. Ma formation politique milite depuis plusieurs années déjà pour encourager et faciliter le transfert d'entreprises familiales, surtout dans les domaines de la pêche et de l'agriculture. D'ailleurs, je souligne à mes collègues à la Chambre que le député de Pierre-Boucher—Les Patriotes—Verchères a déjà déposé le projet de loi C-275, Loi modifiant la Loi de l’impôt sur le revenu relative à la transmission d’entreprises lors de la législature précédente.
Encourager et faciliter le transfert d'entreprises familiales est une demande du Bloc québécois depuis plus de 15 ans. Pour les Québécois, pour le Bloc québécois, ainsi que pour moi, la relève entrepreneuriale est importante. La relève est importante pour l'avenir de nos PME en général, mais surtout pour les entreprises agricoles de la région de l'Abitibi—Témiscamingue.
Le repreneuriat est un phénomène important et porteur partout au Canada, mais particulièrement au Québec. Près d'une PME québécoise sur trois est issue du modèle de repreneuriat, tandis qu'au Canada cette proportion a atteint le quart en 2017. C'est en région rurale qu'on retrouve le plus de repreneurs au Québec, dans la mesure où 44 % des PME en région rurale appartiennent à des repreneurs, tandis qu'au Canada c'est environ 31 %., selon le professeur Marc Duhamel de l'UQTR, chercheur régulier à l'Institut de recherche sur les PME de l'UQTR. Pourtant, ce modèle n'est pas suffisamment encouragé en raison de considérations fiscales désavantageuses.
Le risque de vente à l'étranger et de perdre l'entreprise est bien réel. En 2018, on estimait que dans les années à venir entre 30 000 et 60 000 entreprises québécoises ne trouveraient pas de repreneurs. C'est-à-dire qu'elles mourront parce qu'elles n'auront pas été revendues. Cela représente près de 150 000 emplois et de 8 à 10 milliards de dollars en chiffres d'affaires.
Présentement, au Québec, on perd une ferme par jour. C'est alarmant. Le risque de vente à l'étranger et de perdre l'entreprise est bien réel. La relève entrepreneuriale au Québec en souffre beaucoup. Malheureusement, dans ce Parlement, le repreneuriat n'est pas suffisamment encouragé.
Pourquoi donc le Parti libéral ne veut-il pas mettre sur le même pied d'égalité un membre d'une famille et un investisseur étranger? La réalité est la suivante. Selon la loi en vigueur, le transfert d'une entreprise à un membre de la famille est traité comme un dividende et non comme un gain en capital, contrairement à la vente à un tiers. Par conséquent, le propriétaire n'a pas le droit à l'exonération cumulative des gains en capital s'il décide de vendre son entreprise à ses enfants. La loi en vigueur punit le gros bon sens.
Qu'est-ce qui motive le Parti libéral du Canada à refuser de modifier la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu? Il semblerait que c'est par crainte d'encourager l'évitement fiscal, comme on vient de l'entendre. Cela justifierait que la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu ne prend pas en considération le principe de transfert, de cessation ou de vente de petites entreprises à des gens d'une même famille, notamment pour des raisons de possibles abus ou de fraudes fiscales. Si les abus et les fraudes fiscales sont des véritables raisons, je m'explique mal les raisons pour lesquelles le Parti libéral ferme toujours les yeux sur les paradis fiscaux.
En tant que député de la circonscription d'Abitibi—Témiscamingue, j'ai eu l'honneur, tout comme les membres de mon équipe, d'échanger semaine après semaine avec de nombreux agriculteurs de ma région. Je salue d'ailleurs la présidente de la Fédération de la relève agricole d'Abitibi—Témiscamingue, Meghan Jarry. Pour eux, comme pour tous les entrepreneurs québécois, le repreneuriat est une mesure essentielle qui permet de freiner l'exode des entreprises et des Québécois vers les centres urbains en laissant des jeunes, la fibre entrepreneuriale, reprendre l'entreprise familiale avec plus de facilité.
Le repreneuriat est essentiel pour l'Abitibi—Témiscamingue. C'est tout aussi essentiel pour le Québec. La relève agricole est nécessaire pour l'avenir de la région de l'Abitibi—Témiscamingue.
Je vais citer un agriculteur de la région, Simon Leblond, qui est aussi un ami et qui est membre de la Fédération de la relève agricole du Québec. Quand j'étais secrétaire de la FRAQ, il était aussi mon président.
Des défis, c'est sûr que je vais en avoir à commencer par le financement et le développement de mon entreprise, évidemment. Il y a aussi d'autres enjeux propres à ma région, dont celui de maintenir un bassin de producteurs suffisants pour conserver les services qui gravitent autour des entreprises agricoles et plus globalement pour assurer le dynamisme du secteur et le faire découvrir à du monde déconnecté de l'agriculture.
La relève est essentielle, car elle assure la vitalité agricole et la vitalité agricole assure la vitalité des villages de nos régions. La vitalité de nos régions assure la vitalité du Québec, l'occupation dynamique du territoire.
Je pense qu'il faut parler de la détresse. En Abitibi-Témiscamingue, comme ailleurs au Québec, les agricultrices et les agriculteurs, les jeunes comme les moins jeunes sont écrasés par la bureaucratie, la paperasse, les nombreuses heures de travail, les rôles de père ou de mère, les comptes à payer, le stress du quotidien, le stress de l'endettement, la machinerie qui brise et qui doit être réparée ou remplacée, les courtes périodes de production et de récolte, les conditions météorologiques difficiles et toutes les autres pressions qu'ils subissent.
La détresse est grande chez les agricultrices et les agriculteurs. Encourager et faciliter le transfert d'entreprises familiales va réduire en partie cette détresse. Selon moi, c'est une raison importante pour que les députés de la Chambre appuient le projet de loi C-208.
Je parlerai maintenant des réalités de la relève agricole. Les agriculteurs sont des personnes têtues et tenaces, on le sait. Ils sont probablement les citoyens les plus résilients de notre société. Les jeunes agricultures travaillent continuellement à trouver des solutions pour favoriser l'accès aux actifs et encourager les transferts et le démarrage d'entreprises agricoles au Québec. Les défis sont grands. Il s'agit notamment de l'accaparement ou la financiarisation des terres, la sécurité du revenu, les services vétérinaires pour les animaux de ferme, l'assurance-récolte de céréales et le drainage des terres agricoles. Les défis sont grands et améliorer l'accès à la terre et les conditions de vie des jeunes productrices et producteurs du Québec est une façon d'assurer un avenir agricole à la jeunesse québécoise.
Ce Parlement a le devoir d'améliorer les conditions d'établissement de la relève agricole afin d’attirer une nouvelle génération et d'assurer un avenir aux petites et moyennes entreprises agricoles familiales. Or, la condition première est d'améliorer l'accès à la terre, et le transfert d'une ferme est la voie royale d'accès à l'agriculture, car monter une ferme à partir de rien est très difficile.
De plus, le prix des terres, le coût des quotas et les nouvelles normes de production augmentent année après année. Les fermes valent de plus en plus cher. C'est de plus en plus long et difficile de transférer la ferme aux enfants. C'est maintenant long de rembourser les prêts nécessaires à l'achat d'une ferme, d'autant plus que la bureaucratie est de plus en plus lourde et qu'elle rend l'accès à la terre et le quotidien des agriculteurs de plus en plus difficiles. Les agriculteurs veulent que le processus d'achat d'une ferme soit simplifié. Certains exigent un guichet unique afin d'éviter de parler à trop d'intervenants impliqués dans un processus de transfert. D'ailleurs, tout ce que j'ai nommé depuis le début de mon intervention fait partie des réflexions de la Fédération de la relève agricole du Québec, qui milite pour l'amélioration du sort des jeunes agriculteurs et agricultrices du Québec.
D'ailleurs, j'ai parlé aujourd'hui à Julie Bissonnette, la présidente de la FRAC, ainsi qu'à son directeur général, Philippe Pagé. Sur le transfert d'une ferme familiale, la Fédération de la relève agricole du Québec est unanime: ce n'est pas normal que ce soit plus avantageux de vendre la ferme familiale à un étranger qu'à un membre de sa famille. Julie Bissonnette me disait aujourd'hui que, partout où elle va, elle est interpellée sur cet enjeu. Cela fait plusieurs années que les jeunes agricultrices et agriculteurs du Québec et de l'Abitibi-Témiscamingue exigent des modifications législatives.
Elle m'a aussi dit que c'était problématique des deux côtés. Les cédants veulent aussi que cela change. Les plus vieux producteurs agricoles d'Abitibi-Témiscamingue veulent céder leur entreprise aux membres de leurs familles. Cela fait que notre agriculture va tomber en pause. Des dizaines, voire des centaines de jeunes de la relève et des cédants veulent pouvoir faire des transactions. C'est un enjeu global. Ce désir de céder leurs entreprises agricoles à des enfants fait partie des motivations qui ont poussé des plus vieux producteurs à travailler aussi fort et à investir autant de temps pendant 30, 40 ou 50 ans. Cela peut même s'étaler sur deux, trois, quatre ou cinq générations. Les producteurs agricoles travaillent comme des forcenés pour offrir un avenir à leurs enfants. Céder leur entreprise agricole à un étranger peut s'avérer un échec ou un deuil profond.
Pour un producteur, une grande étape est de céder sa ferme à ses enfants, par amour et par dévouement. C'est justement ce que m'ont avoué les membres de la FRAC, qui se sentent interpellés, les jeunes comme les vieux. Le plus grand souhait des producteurs, c'est de pouvoir céder leur ferme à leur famille.
Je vais conclure en mentionnant que les arguments fiscaux mentionnés lors du rejet du dernier point tiennent mal si on tient compte de l'étude du directeur parlementaire du budget. À mon avis, si les choses ne bougent pas en ce moment, c'est parce qu'il y a un flagrant manque de volonté politique de la part du gouvernement du Canada. Ce manque de volonté doit cesser, et c'est pourquoi le Bloc québécois est en faveur du projet de loi C-208.
Je m'attends à ce que la Chambre accorde un appui unanime à ce projet de loi, afin d'éviter cet exode vers les centres urbains et pour stimuler la fibre entrepreneuriale de nos jeunes agriculteurs.
View Peter Julian Profile
NDP (BC)
Madam Speaker, I am pleased to rise on behalf of the NDP caucus today at second reading of Bill C-208. We will be according our support at second reading to take it to committee. As I already indicated, we will be looking potentially for some clarifications around the bill when it goes to committee.
I need to praise Guy Caron, the former member of Parliament for Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, for his good work in advancing this issue. This is not an insignificant issue. It is extremely important for the next generation of people running small businesses across the length and breadth of our country, for family farms to be passed down from one generation to the next and for fishing corporations to be passed down as well to maintain the vital fishing industry on our coasts across the country.
These are important points that Guy Caron brought forward to Parliament which we are now debating to take to committee. These extremely important things must be put into place.
I am a long-time member of the New Westminster Chamber of Commerce and the Burnaby Board of Trade. Because of that long-time involvement in the Board of Trade and Chamber of Commerce, I have worked with small businesses. I also ran a social enterprise myself.
It is extremely important to maintain those family-run businesses across the country. In many communities, family-run businesses are really the backbone of a community's economic development. Ending what is a very perverse aspect of our tax system and facilitating, in a sense, small businesses under $1 million to be passed from one generation to the next without penalties being incurred makes a big difference for family-owned business.
As well, I come from a farming family. My mother's family ran a farm in Alberta when it originally came from Norway and settled in the Cariboo Hill area of Burnaby. The area now known as Cariboo Park was the family farm.
Families that have run farms for generations have nothing but my deepest respect. Again, we have to end the perverse penalties that exist right now for families that want to pass their farms from one generation to the next.
I am going to set aside my speech for a moment because I would like to respond to the member for Newmarket—Aurora, who spoke to the bill on behalf of the Liberal government. He basically questioned the impacts on the tax base of putting forward these measures.
The Liberal government has completely collapsed the tax base in the country. I find it incredible, quite frankly, for any Liberal to stand in the House and say that he or she is concerned about the tax base for something that is of far less significance on the scale of the federal budget than it is in the positive impacts small businesses and farms would feel across the country.
The reality is, as the Parliamentary Budget Officer has pointed out, the government has undermined the tax base to the point that we lose over $25 billion a year to overseas tax havens. In terms of housing, education, health care expanding to pharmacare and dental care, $25 billion lost each and every year, $125 billion since the Liberals came to power, is an astronomical amount.
CRA representatives who came before the finance committee indicated that the reason nobody had ever been prosecuted for the Panama papers or the paradise papers, the well-known documentation around the use of overseas tax havens, was because they had never been given the tools by the Liberal government to crack down on these overseas tax havens. For the government to pretend its concern is the tax base, when it has done anything but, as an excuse, a pretext, for opposing the bill is difficult to believe.
In addition, as you well know, Madam Speaker, the NDP has brought forward provisions around the wealth tax and the excess profits tax. The leader of the NDP, the member for Burnaby South, has been very clear in this respect. The federal Liberal government has simply refused to undertake those measures, even though we know Canadian billionaires have added to their wealth, over $37 billion since the beginning of this pandemic.
The banking sector has received over $750 billion in liquidity supports and their profits have been astronomical as well. Just in the first two quarters, over $15 billion in profits have been supported by federal government institutions, ensuring, with as much largesse as possible, that they have everything taken care of during this pandemic.
In previous crises that the country has gone through, for example, the Second World War, there were strict laws against profiteering. There was an effective corporate tax rate to ensure we were all in this together. The government has refused to do the right thing, whether it is cracking down on overseas tax havens, bringing in a wealth tax or proposing an excess profits tax. It has undermined and destroyed our tax base.
What many Canadians are concerned about is the fact that this could well lead to austerity when Canadians are not getting the supports, in so many cases, they need to get through this pandemic.
The last point I would like to make in reply to the member for Newmarket—Aurora is that he seemed to be very proud about the government support for small businesses. If he spoke with small businesses, the member would know that nothing could be further from the truth. The NDP put pressure on the government to bring in the wage subsidy. The NDP was able to achieve that in this minority Parliament.
However, the rent relief program was a massive failure. The member for Courtenay—Alberni, the NDP small business critic, has raised this repeatedly. Now we have a rent relief program that will fix all the problems with the old one, but the federal Liberal government has refused to put into place the retroactivity that would allow small business that did not get any rent relief in the first version, because it was so badly botched, to apply retroactively for rent relief.
The pretensions of why Liberal members would oppose the bill are disingenuous, to say the least, when the Liberal government has done everything to destroy our tax base, while at the same time has not offered the supports for small business, which are so desperately needed.
A number of people have talked very positively about the bill.
Dan Kelly, president of the CFIB, has said, “Many small business owners are telling us that tax rules discourage them from passing on their firm to their children.”
This time Mr. Kelly was speaking about Guy Caron's work, when he said that the “Bill addresses this unfairness and will help small business owners ensure their firm remains locally owned, creating and protecting local jobs.”
Ron Bennett, president of Canadian Federation of Agriculture, has said, “Simply put, if taxation barriers aren't addressed, we will see fewer and fewer family farms in Canada. We support Mr. Caron and his colleague's commitment to addressing these tax burdens that could cause significant administrative burden.”
The bill introduced by Guy Caron, the former member for Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, was supported by many organizations, including the Fédération des chambres de commerce du Québec, the Board of Trade of Metropolitan Montreal, the Union des producteurs agricoles du Québec, the Agricultural Alliance of New Brunswick and the Producteurs de lait du Québec, not to mention several other organizations representing supply-managed farms.
This is part of what should be done to preserve family farms while above all continuing to support a stronger supply management system. We will be supporting the bill and hope to discuss it at greater length in committee.
Madame la Présidente, je suis heureux de prendre la parole au nom du caucus néo-démocrate à l'étape de la deuxième lecture du projet de loi C-208. Nous l'appuierons à l'étape de la deuxième lecture pour qu'il soit renvoyé au comité. Comme je l'ai déjà dit, nous chercherons probablement à obtenir des précisions sur le projet de loi lorsqu'il sera étudié par le comité.
Je tiens à louer l'excellent travail de Guy Caron, ancien député de Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, dans ce dossier. L'enjeu est de taille. Il est extrêmement important pour les jeunes qui reprendront les rênes de petites entreprises aux quatre coins du pays, pour les exploitations agricoles familiales qui seront transmises d'une génération à l'autre et pour les sociétés de pêche qui seront aussi transmises pour maintenir l'industrie vitale de la pêche dans l'ensemble des régions côtières.
Guy Caron a soulevé ces points importants au Parlement, et nous débattons aujourd'hui du renvoi de la question au comité. Ces mesures cruciales doivent être mises en place.
Je suis depuis longtemps membre de la chambre de commerce de New Westminster et de celle de Burnaby. En raison de cette implication de longue date, j'ai travaillé avec les petites entreprises. J'ai aussi été à la tête d'une entreprise sociale.
Il est extrêmement important de soutenir les entreprises familiales dans l'ensemble du pays. Dans de nombreux cas, les entreprises familiales constituent l'épine dorsale du développement économique de la collectivité dans laquelle elles se trouvent. L'élimination d'un élément très pervers de notre régime fiscal et la prise de mesures qui favorisent, d'une certaine manière, la transmission des petites entreprises valant moins d'un million de dollars d'une génération à l'autre sans pénalité pourraient être une solution salutaire pour les entreprises familiales.
Je viens d'une famille d'agriculteurs. Lorsque la famille de ma mère est arrivée de la Norvège et s'est installée en Alberta, elle a commencé une exploitation agricole dans la région de Cariboo Hill, à Burnaby. L'endroit qui est maintenant connu comme Cariboo Park était autrefois la ferme familiale.
J'ai le plus grand respect pour les familles qui maintiennent des exploitations agricoles en activité depuis des générations. Je le répète, nous devons mettre un terme aux pénalités perverses qui existent à l'heure actuelle pour les familles qui souhaitent transmettre leurs exploitations agricoles aux prochaines générations.
Je vais interrompre mon discours brièvement, car j'aimerais revenir sur les propos du député de Newmarket—Aurora, qui est ici pour intervenir sur le projet de loi au nom du gouvernement. Essentiellement, il s'est interrogé sur l'incidence de la mise en œuvre de ces mesures sur l'assiette fiscale du Canada.
Le gouvernement libéral a totalement détruit l'assiette fiscale du pays. Pour être honnête, je trouve incroyable qu'un député libéral intervienne à la Chambre pour dire qu'il se préoccupe de l'assiette fiscale, surtout lorsqu'il est question de mesures dont les répercussions sur le budget fédéral seront bien négligeables lorsqu'on les compare à l'incidence positive qu'elles auront sur les petites entreprises et les exploitations agricoles de l'ensemble du pays.
Comme l'a souligné le directeur parlementaire du budget, le gouvernement a miné l'assiette fiscale du pays à un point tel que plus de 25 milliards de dollars s'envolent maintenant chaque année vers des paradis fiscaux étrangers. Chaque année, l'on est privés de 25 milliards de dollars qui auraient autrement pu être consacrés au logement, à l'éducation ou à l'élargissement des soins de santé à l'assurance-médicaments et aux soins dentaires. Cela représente 125 milliards de dollars depuis l'arrivée des libéraux au pouvoir, un somme astronomique.
Les représentants de l'Agence du revenu du Canada qui ont témoigné devant le comité des finances ont indiqué que la raison pour laquelle personne n'a été poursuivi à la suite des Panama Papers ou des Paradise Papers, deux ensembles de documents bien connus sur les paradis fiscaux, est que le gouvernement libéral ne leur a jamais donné les outils nécessaires pour mettre fin au recours à ces paradis fiscaux. Il est difficile de croire que le gouvernement se préoccupe de l'assiette fiscale alors qu'il n'a pris aucune mesure pour ne pas la perdre, et je ne peux pas croire qu'il ose utiliser ce prétexte pour s'opposer au projet de loi qui nous occupe.
En outre, comme vous le savez, madame la Présidente, le NPD a proposé un impôt sur la fortune ainsi qu'un impôt sur les profits excessifs. Le chef du NPD, le député de Burnaby-Sud, est sans équivoque à ce sujet. Le gouvernement fédéral libéral refuse tout simplement d'adopter ces mesures, même si nous savons que la fortune des milliardaires canadiens s'est accrue de plus de 37 milliards de dollars depuis le début de la pandémie.
Le secteur bancaire a reçu un soutien de plus de 750 milliards de dollars en liquidités et enregistre lui aussi des profits astronomiques. Rien que dans les deux premiers trimestres, il a affiché des profits de plus de 15 milliards de dollars grâce au soutien du gouvernement fédéral. Cette générosité permet aux institutions bancaires de traverser la pandémie sans le moindre souci.
Par le passé, lorsque le pays a connu des crises, telles que la Seconde Guerre mondiale, des lois strictes ont été adoptées pour empêcher le mercantilisme. Un taux d'imposition effectif des sociétés a été instauré dans un effort de solidarité. Par contraste, le gouvernement refuse de faire ce qui s'impose, qu'il s'agisse de sévir contre le recours à des paradis fiscaux à l'étranger, d'instaurer un impôt sur la fortune ou de proposer un impôt sur les profits excessifs. Il mine et détruit notre assiette fiscale.
Beaucoup de Canadiens craignent que cela mène à l'austérité alors qu'ils sont nombreux à ne pas obtenir l'aide dont ils ont besoin pour traverser cette pandémie.
J'aimerais faire une dernière observation au député de Newmarket—Aurora. Il semble très fier de l'aide aux petites entreprises offerte par le gouvernement. Or, si le député parlait aux petits entrepreneurs, il se rendrait compte qu'ils ne voient pas du tout la situation du même œil. C'est le NPD qui a exercé des pressions sur le gouvernement pour qu'il mette en place le programme de subventions salariales. Le NPD s'est servi du fait que le gouvernement est minoritaire pour le convaincre de présenter ce programme.
Toutefois, la première mouture du programme d'aide pour le loyer commercial a été un échec monumental. Le député de Courtenay—Alberni, porte-parole du NPD en matière de petite entreprise, l'a souligné à maintes reprises. Maintenant, nous avons un nouveau programme d'aide pour le loyer commercial qui corrigera toutes les lacunes de l'ancien programme. Cependant, le gouvernement libéral fédéral refuse de permettre aux petites entreprises n'ayant pas obtenu d'aide pour le loyer lors de la première mouture du programme, car elle était si terriblement bâclée, de réclamer cette aide rétroactivement.
Les prétextes donnés par les députés libéraux pour expliquer leur opposition au projet de loi sont, pour le moins, de mauvaise foi quand le gouvernement libéral a tout fait pour détruire l'assiette fiscale du pays, sans offrir aux petites entreprises l'aide dont elles ont désespérément besoin.
Plusieurs personnes ont parlé du projet de loi de façon très élogieuse.
Dan Kelly, président de la Fédération canadienne de l'entreprise indépendante, a dit ceci: « De nombreux chefs de PME nous disent que les règles fiscales actuelles les dissuadent de transférer leur entreprise à leurs enfants. »
Puis, en parlant du travail effectué par Guy Caron, M. Kelly a ajouté que « le projet de loi [...] corrige cette iniquité et pourrait contribuer à ce que les entreprises restent entre les mains de gens de leur localité, contribuant du même souffle à créer et à protéger les emplois dans les collectivités. »
Ron Bennett, président de la Fédération canadienne de l'agriculture a dit ceci: « Autrement dit, si les obstacles d’imposition ne sont pas éliminés, il y aura de moins en moins de fermes familiales au Canada. Nous soutenons l’engagement de M. Caron et de ses collègues de réduire ces charges fiscales susceptibles de créer un fardeau administratif [...] considérable. »
Plusieurs organisations ont appuyé le projet de loi qu'avait proposé Guy Caron, l'ancien député de Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques. Cela inclut la Fédération des chambres de commerce du Québec, la Chambre de commerce du Montréal métropolitain, l'Union des producteurs agricoles du Québec, l'Alliance agricole du Nouveau-Brunswick et les Producteurs de lait du Québec, sans oublier plusieurs autres organisations s'occupant de fermes qui sont liées à la gestion de l'offre.
Cela fait partie de ce que l'on devrait faire pour préserver les fermes familiales tout en continuant surtout à appuyer le renforcement de la gestion de l'offre. Nous allons donc l'appuyer, et nous espérons bien en discuter davantage en comité.
View Richard Lehoux Profile
CPC (QC)
View Richard Lehoux Profile
2020-11-25 18:17 [p.2445]
Madam Speaker, I am pleased to speak in support of Bill C-208, an act to amend the Income Tax Act with regard to the transfer of a small business or family farm or fishing corporation, which was introduced by my colleague, the member for Brandon—Souris.
The amendments made by this bill are necessary to standardize the process for selling family businesses. These amendments would considerably improve the Income Tax Act with respect to the transfer of a small business or family farm to a family member.
In the current state of affairs, the sad reality faced by business owners is that they must pay more taxes if they sell to a family member than if they sell to a third party. The current act puts operators who want to transfer their family business to their son or daughter at an unfair disadvantage. This forces owners to decide whether they want to keep their life's work in the family or sell it to the highest bidder.
If this bill were adopted, it would facilitate many more family business successions. It would also guarantee the retirement savings that business owners worked so hard to earn and enable more local businesses to prosper, which would strengthen the Canadian economy and local economies. We must never lose sight of the fact that SMEs are the cornerstone of our economy.
Everyone in the House knows a factory, a family restaurant, a corner store or a farm in their riding that has been around for generations. These family businesses are well liked and extremely important to the local economy. These small businesses are the backbone of our society. Some of these businesses not only help feed our communities, but they also provide important jobs for the people in our ridings.
The dynamic of keeping a family business in the family is unprecedented. The idea that an owner could be forced to sell their business to a third party simply because of overtaxation is simply shocking. When a third-party purchaser buys a business, many unknowns come into play. Will the new owner cut jobs? Will they move the business to a different region or even a different country? These are the questions the seller must keep in mind, but also their employees and family members.
We know that Beauce is a haven for SMEs. I will provide two real-life examples from my riding.
My first example is Eddy Berthiaume, the owner of Les escaliers de Beauce, located in my hometown of Saint-Elzéar, who was forced to make the difficult decision that I just explained to the House. He owned 50% of this business for many years. He is a good, hard-working man who spent years building his business. When he was ready to retire, he decided to sell his shares in the family business to his children, but unfortunately, he was unfairly forced to pay thousands of dollars in transfer fees. The worst part of this story is that his business partner was able to sell his 50% stake to a third party and pay a pittance in taxes. He paid essentially nothing.
Some may wonder how this is unfair. There are other examples like this one that show how the government is letting down business owners across the country. We need a government that is prepared to grant exemptions to Canadians and that does not penalize tenacious families like the Berthiaumes.
My second example is Estampro, a business in Saint-Évariste-de-Forsyth owned by the Fortin family, who dealt with the same rules for transferring the business to a family member. The business, which was founded in 1984, is already run by the third generation of Fortins. The family had to work extremely hard to get there, however. The time and money they spent on filling out forms for the transfer certainly could have been used to hire extra machinists or to make more progress on automation. Instead, the family was trapped in all of the red tape required by the existing legislation, and we cannot underestimate the impact this has had on the family. I spoke with them this week, and I know that they are seriously wondering what problems they will encounter if the business is transferred to the next generation.
I am sure many of my colleagues are aware of cases like these. There are many others throughout my riding. If the House does not act now, then wonderful, healthy, viable, proudly Canadian companies will end up in the hands of people other than the families that built them or, even worse, in the hands of foreign countries.
This bill will also help Canadian business owners by advancing women's entrepreneurship. Only 16% of businesses and 29% of family farms are majority female-owned. If the government stopped penalizing owners of small businesses and family farms who sell their businesses to their daughters, it would help foster entrepreneurship among women and increase their participation in the Canadian economy.
It is very unfortunate that our party is obliged to introduce bills like this one when we have a government that claims to always be there for women and small businesses. We need the government to get involved and quickly examine the issues raised by bills like this one.
This bill is not partisan in any way. I think that the amendments to this private member's bill are not only a matter of fairness, as many of my colleagues mentioned, but also a matter of common sense.
I cannot believe that this government has not already introduced amendments to the Income Tax Act in this area.
We need to treat business owners fairly. These tax policies are unfair when the time comes for them to step down from their family business. Leaving a family business can be a positive thing if they know they are leaving it in the hands of someone they love and, more importantly, someone who will love and honour the values and culture of the business, as the owner did for many years.
Business owners should not feel like they have to sell their business to a third party simply because it will cost them less. Business owners must also obey the law. We would not want them to make concessions or act fraudulently in order to save the hard-earned pension or retirement savings they would otherwise lose in taxes. That is why it is important that Bill C-208 pass in the House as quickly as possible.
I heard some of my colleagues say that changes to this bill could lead to more fraud and tax evasion. That is why our party wrote protection mechanisms into the bill. To forestall those potential problems, the bill provides that the family member purchasing the business must keep their shares for at least five years to avoid the penalty. This will thwart attempts to exploit the system.
Right now, and especially during this global pandemic, Canadian businesses need our help, not just to stay afloat while we fight the pandemic together, but also in the future when the time comes to sell and buy their family businesses. Canadians want to remain self-sufficient. They want to support their local businesses. Most of all, they want their local businesses to succeed from one generation to the next.
I hope the Conservative Party can count on all parties to vote for this bill, which is so important to our family businesses. I speak from experience, because I myself was part of the fourth generation of a family business.
Madame la Présidente, je suis heureux d'intervenir pour appuyer le projet de loi C-208, Loi modifiant la Loi de l’impôt sur le revenu (transfert d’une petite entreprise ou d’une société agricole ou de pêche familiale), présenté par mon collègue, le député de Brandon—Souris.
Les modifications apportées dans ce projet de loi sont nécessaires pour uniformiser les modalités de vente des entreprises familiales. Ces amendements amélioreraient considérablement la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu en ce qui concerne le transfert d'une petite entreprise ou d'une exploitation agricole familiale à un membre de la famille.
Dans l'état actuel des choses, la triste réalité à laquelle sont confrontés les propriétaires d'entreprise est qu'il leur en coûte plus en impôts de vendre à un membre de leur famille que de vendre à un acheteur tiers. La Loi actuelle désavantage de manière injustifiée les exploitants qui souhaitent transmettre leur entreprise familiale à leur fille ou à leur fils, laissant aux propriétaires la charge de décider s'ils peuvent conserver l'œuvre de leur vie au sein de la famille ou s'ils doivent la vendre au plus offrant.
Si ce projet de loi était adopté, il permettrait une succession d'entreprises familiales beaucoup plus importante. Il garantirait également l'épargne-retraite durement gagnée par les propriétaires et permettrait à un plus grand nombre d'entreprises locales de prospérer, ce qui renforcerait l'économie canadienne et locale. Il ne faut jamais perdre de vue que les PME sont la base de notre économie.
Tout le monde à la Chambre connaît dans sa circonscription une manufacture, un restaurant familial, un magasin du coin ou une exploitation agricole qui existe depuis des générations. Ces entreprises familiales sont très appréciées et extrêmement importantes pour l'économie locale. Ces petites entreprises sont l'épine dorsale de notre société. Non seulement certaines de ces entreprises permettent de nourrir nos collectivités, mais elles fournissent également des emplois importants aux citoyens de nos circonscriptions.
La dynamique du maintien d'une entreprise familiale dans la famille est sans précédent. Le fait qu'un propriétaire soit contraint de vendre son entreprise à un acheteur tiers simplement à cause d'une surimposition est tout simplement choquant. Lorsqu'un acquéreur tiers achète une entreprise, beaucoup d'inconnues entrent en jeu. Le nouveau propriétaire va-t-il supprimer des emplois? Va-t-il déplacer l'entreprise dans une nouvelle région ou même dans un autre pays? Ce sont autant de questions que le vendeur doit prendre en compte, mais aussi ses employés et les membres de sa famille.
On sait que la Beauce est le berceau des PME. Je vais me permettre de donner deux exemples concrets de ma circonscription.
Mon premier exemple est celui d'Eddy Berthiaume, propriétaire de l'entreprise Les escaliers de Beauce, située dans ma municipalité natale de Saint-Elzéar, qui a été forcé de prendre la décision difficile que je viens d'expliquer à la Chambre. Il a été propriétaire à 50 % de cette entreprise pendant de nombreuses années. C'est un homme vaillant et acharné qui a travaillé des années pour bâtir son entreprise. Il était enfin prêt à prendre sa retraite. Malheureusement pour lui, lorsqu'il a décidé de vendre ses parts de l'entreprise familiale à ses enfants, il a été injustement contraint de payer des milliers de dollars en droits de transfert. Dans cette histoire, le plus déplorable est que son associé a pu vendre sa part de 50 % à un acheteur tiers pour une somme dérisoire en impôts, voire nulle.
Certains vont se demander en quoi cela est injuste. Il existe d'autres exemples comme celui-là, qui démontrent comment le gouvernement laisse tomber les entreprises dans ce pays. Nous avons besoin d'un gouvernement prêt à accorder des exemptions aux Canadiens et qui ne pénalise pas les familles persévérantes comme la famille Berthiaume.
Mon second exemple est celui d'Estampro, une entreprise de Saint-Évariste-de-Forsyth dont les propriétaires, la famille Fortin, ont dû faire face aux mêmes règles pour le transfert aux membres de la famille. L'entreprise, lancée en 1984, est déjà dirigée par la troisième génération de Fortin. Pour arriver là, cependant, les membres de la famille ont dû bûcher fort, comme on le dit en bon Québécois. Le temps et l'argent investis à remplir des formulaires pour le transfert auraient sûrement pu servir à embaucher des machinistes supplémentaires ou à améliorer la robotisation alors déjà bien en cours, au lieu de tenter de sortir des méandres bureaucratiques imposés par la Loi actuelle, sans en sous-estimer les répercussions sur les membres de la famille. Pour avoir discuté avec eux cette semaine, je sais qu'ils s'interrogent sérieusement sur les problèmes qu'ils rencontreront lors d'un éventuel transfert à la prochaine génération.
Des cas comme ceux-là, je suis convaincu que plusieurs collègues en auraient à nommer. Il y en a encore partout dans ma circonscription. Si la Chambre n'agit pas maintenant, il est certain que de belles entreprises saines, viables et fièrement canadiennes se retrouveront dans d'autres mains que celles des familles qui les ont bâties ou, pire encore, dans les mains de pays étrangers.
Une autre façon dont ce projet de loi aiderait les entrepreneurs canadiens serait de faire progresser l'entrepreneuriat féminin. Seulement 16 % des entreprises et 29 % des exploitations agricoles sont détenues en majorité par des femmes. En cessant de pénaliser les propriétaires de petites entreprises et d'exploitations agricoles canadiennes qui vendent leur entreprise à leurs filles, on contribuerait ainsi à faire progresser l'esprit d'entreprise et la participation des femmes à l'économie canadienne.
Il est très regrettable que notre parti soit obligé de présenter des projets de loi comme celui-ci alors que le gouvernement actuel prétend toujours être là pour les femmes et les petites entreprises. Nous avons besoin que ce gouvernement s'implique et examine rapidement les questions soulevées par des projets de loi comme celui-ci.
Ce projet de loi n'est en aucun cas partisan. Je pense que les amendements à ce projet de loi émanant d'un député ne sont pas seulement une question d'équité, comme plusieurs de mes collègues l'ont mentionné, mais également une question de gros bon sens.
J'ai beaucoup de mal à croire que le gouvernement actuel n'a pas déposé de modifications à la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu dans ce domaine.
Nous devons être justes envers les propriétaires d'entreprise. Ces politiques fiscales sont injustes quand vient le temps pour eux de se séparer de leur entreprise familiale. Quitter une entreprise familiale peut être une belle chose lorsqu'on sait qu'on la laisse entre les mains de quelqu'un qu'on aime et, surtout, quelqu'un qui aimera et respectera les valeurs et la culture de l'entreprise, comme on l'a fait pendant de nombreuses années.
Il est important que les propriétaires ne soient pas obligés de vendre leur entreprise à un tiers acquéreur simplement parce que cela leur coûte moins cher. Il est également important que les propriétaires d'entreprise respectent la loi. Nous ne voudrions pas qu'ils fassent des concessions ou agissent de manière frauduleuse afin d'économiser leur pension durement gagnée ou leur épargne-retraite qu'ils perdraient en impôt. C'est pourquoi il est important que le projet de loi C-208 soit adopté le plus rapidement possible à la Chambre.
J'entends certains collègues de cette assemblée dire que les modifications à ce projet de loi pourraient entraîner davantage de fraude et d'évasion fiscale. C'est pourquoi notre parti a mis en place des mécanismes de protection dans le projet de loi. Pour contrer ces problèmes potentiels, le projet de loi prévoit, entre autres, que le membre de la famille qui achète l'entreprise devra maintenir ses parts pendant un minimum de cinq ans pour éviter la pénalité, ce qui garantira que le système ne sera pas exploité.
Maintenant et plus que jamais en cette pandémie mondiale, les entreprises canadiennes ont besoin de notre aide, non seulement pour rester à flot pendant que nous luttons ensemble contre cette pandémie, mais aussi à l'avenir, lorsque viendra le temps d'acheter et de vendre leurs entreprises familiales. Les Canadiens veulent rester autosuffisants. Ils veulent soutenir leurs entreprises locales, et ils veulent surtout voir leurs entreprises locales réussir d'une génération à une autre.
J'espère que le Parti conservateur aura le soutien de tous les partis lorsqu'il s'agira de voter sur ce projet de loi si important pour nos entreprises familiales. Je parle ici en connaissance de cause, parce que j'ai fait partie de la quatrième génération d'une entreprise familiale.
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2020-11-25 18:27 [p.2446]
Madam Speaker, I listened very closely to the comments that were made, and I know I will get two opportunities to respond: this evening, for a few minutes, and the next time this comes up for debate, when I will try to deal with a bit more of the content.
What concerns me is that members from different political entities in the House have tried to give an impression that I do not believe is accurate. We need to recognize that virtually from day one, the government and the Prime Minister have recognized the importance of small businesses, whether they are the family farms in our rural communities or the stores and shops in our urban centres and rural communities. We have seen this amplified over the last number of months in different ways. I encourage my colleagues on all sides of the House to, at the very least, recognize some of the ways we have done that.
This legislation talks about the issue of taxes, a sense of tax fairness and wanting to see family businesses continue on as much as possible through family members, in a fair fashion. On the issue of tax fairness, the government has demonstrated very clearly where our priorities have been, and we have seen significant tax changes take place.
I want to focus, in what little time I have, on an area of concern that members have talked about in the last hour.
Small business is the backbone of our Canadian economy. It even goes beyond our economy, to our society and lifestyle. It has been such a positive force for decades and will continue to be a driving force into the future. That is why, virtually from day one of the pandemic, we have invested so many resources, whether through the wage subsidy program, the rent assistance program, or working with banks so small businesses would have the leverage to get the loans that are necessary.
I see my time has expired. I look forward to continuing the next time the bill comes up for debate.
Madame la Présidente, j'ai écouté très attentivement les observations qui ont été faites, et je sais que j'aurai deux occasions d'y répondre, soit ce soir pendant quelques minutes ainsi que la prochaine fois que nous débattrons de ce projet de loi; c'est à ce moment-là que je m'étendrai un peu plus sur sa teneur.
Ce qui me préoccupe, c'est que des députés de différents partis ont tenté de donner une impression que j'estime inexacte. Nous devons admettre que, depuis pratiquement le tout début, le gouvernement et le premier ministre ont su reconnaître l'importance des petites entreprises, qu'il s'agisse des exploitations agricoles familiales dans les collectivités rurales ou des magasins et boutiques dans les centres urbains et les collectivités rurales. Dans les derniers mois, nous avons redoublé d'efforts de différentes façons. J'encourage mes collègues de tous les partis à reconnaître au moins certains de nos efforts à ce chapitre.
Ce projet de loi porte sur l'impôt, sur une certaine notion d'équité fiscale et sur le désir de voir les entreprises familiales poursuivre leurs activités en étant transmises de manière équitable à d'autres membres de la famille. Le gouvernement a fait clairement connaître ses priorités en matière d'équité fiscale et il a apporté des modifications fiscales considérables.
Je profiterai du peu de temps qu'il me reste pour parler d'une préoccupation abordée par les députés au cours de la dernière heure.
Les petites entreprises sont l'épine dorsale de l'économie canadienne. En fait, elles sont essentielles non seulement à l'économie, mais aussi à notre société et à notre mode de vie. Elles représentent une force positive depuis des décennies et demeureront une force motrice pour les années à venir. C'est pourquoi nous leur avons consacré beaucoup de ressources pratiquement dès le premier jour de la pandémie, que ce soit grâce à la subvention salariale ou au programme d'aide au loyer, ou encore en travaillant avec les banques afin que les petites entreprises disposent de leviers pour obtenir les prêts dont elles ont besoin.
Je constate que mon temps de parole est écoulé. Je poursuivrai avec plaisir mes observations la prochaine fois que la Chambre débattra de ce projet de loi.
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
The time provided for the consideration of Private Members' Business has now expired and the order is dropped to the bottom of the order of precedence on the Order Paper.
Pursuant to an order made on Thursday, November 19, 2020, the House shall now resolve itself into committee of the whole to consider Motion No. 2 under government business.
I do now leave the chair for the House to resolve itself into committee of the whole.
La période prévue pour l'étude des affaires émanant des députés est maintenant expirée et l'ordre est reporté au bas de l'ordre de priorité au Feuilleton.
Conformément à l'ordre adopté le jeudi 19 novembre 2020, la Chambre se forme maintenant en comité plénier pour étudier la motion no 2, sous la rubrique des affaires émanant du gouvernement.
Je quitte maintenant le fauteuil afin que la Chambre se forme en comité plénier.