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2020-08-12 [p.533]
By unanimous consent, it was resolved, — That the House: (a) mourn the loss of life following the tragic explosion in Beirut on August 4, 2020; (b) stand in solidarity with the Lebanese people, particularly the families of the more than 150 people who have died, the more than 6,000 hospitalized, and the estimated 300,000 who have been rendered homeless by the explosion; and (c) commit to helping and accompanying the Lebanese people in their desire for reform and to sustainably rebuild and continue to stand with the Lebanese community both in Lebanon and here in Canada at this most difficult time.
2020-08-12 [p.534]
Pursuant to order made earlier today and to Standing Order 33(1), Ms. Gould (Minister of International Development) made a statement.
2020-06-17 [p.479]
By unanimous consent, it was resolved, — That, whereas: Ukrainian International Airlines Flight PS752 was unlawfully shot down on January 8, 2020, near Tehran, taking the innocent lives of all 176 people on board, including 55 Canadian citizens and 30 permanent residents, as well as others from Iran, Ukraine, the United Kingdom, Sweden and Afghanistan; the Government of Iran has publicly acknowledged that its military forces fired the missiles that caused these deaths, that it is legally obligated to conduct appropriate and transparent safety and criminal investigations to bring those responsible to justice and to safeguard civil aviation, and that it is obliged to make reparations to the affected states, including in the form of compensation to the families of all the victims, in accordance with international law; the flight recorders from PS752 have been recovered by Iran, but have not yet been downloaded to allow their data to be analyzed, which should have been done “without delay”, according to international standards, immediately following January 8, long before any limitations imposed as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic; and the families of the victims, in Canada, in Iran and in other countries around the world, continue to grieve the tragic and senseless loss of their loved-ones and are anxious to learn the whole truth about the tragedy of Flight PS752, who was responsible, and how they are being held to account, in addition to seeking honourable treatment with respect to compensation from both the airline and Iran, and in matters related to their ongoing safety and peace of mind, the House:
(a) express its deep condolences to the families of the victims who lost their lives in the horrific downing of Flight PS752, condemn the perpetrators, and stand in solidarity with the families in the pursuit of transparency, accountability and justice for those families;
(b) support steps taken thus far, including the implementation of a whole-of-government approach to addressing the needs of the families, the provision of consular services, immigration and travel supports, the identification and repatriation of remains, financial support (directly from the government in the form of emergency financial assistance and by matching private donations to the Canada Strong Campaign), mental health and counselling services, a regular ongoing flow of information and replies to inquiries, investigative work, the formation of a Canada-led International Coordination and Response Group (CG), the Prime Minister’s launch of the “Safer Skies” initiative at the Munich Security Conference, and Canada’s representations to the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO);
(c) call upon all relevant departments and agencies of the Government of Canada to exercise all necessary diligence, persistence and determination to grapple effectively with the complexities inherent in international disasters of this magnitude, as well as the additional impediments created by the COVID-19 pandemic, so the families can ultimately know the truth about what happened, notwithstanding the time and effort such pursuit of justice may require;
(d) call upon the Government of Canada in the meantime to
(i) pursue, with the other affected states of the CG, negotiations on reparations with Iran to obtain appropriate compensation for the families of the victims from the state of Iran, in addition to the obligations of the airline company,
(ii) resolve outstanding immigration issues in a fair, equitable and compassionate manner,
(iii) implement appropriate means of honouring and commemorating the precious lives lost,
(iv) help protect families from foreign interference, intimidation, harassment and cyber threats; and
(e) support the work of the Government of Canada, in partnership with the international community through the CG and ICAO, and otherwise, to expose as much as possible the sequence of events and the decision-making chain that resulted in deadly missiles being launched against this civilian aircraft contrary to international law, and to determine how and why civilian aircraft were allowed to be in that airspace over a dangerous conflict zone, all in an effort to avoid repetitions of this disastrous set of circumstances.
2020-01-27 [p.72]
By unanimous consent, it was resolved, — That this House: (a) stand alongside the families and relatives of the victims who lost their lives during the tragedy of flight PS752 on January 8, 2020; (b) request that a full and transparent international investigation be carried out so that families obtain the answers to their questions and justice; (c) demand cooperation from Iran which must remain fully transparent about the investigation; (d) demand that Iran offer fair compensation to the families of the victims; (e) demand that Iran fully respect the will of families of victims; (f) demand that Iran hold those responsible for this tragedy to account by conducting an independent criminal investigation followed by transparent and impartial judicial proceedings which meet international standards; and (g) request that Canada continue to support the families of the victims, hold Iran accountable for its actions and work with the international community to that end.
2017-11-22 [p.2417]
— No. 421-01772 concerning the protection of the environment. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-3-31.
2017-10-31 [p.2316]
— by Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands), one concerning the National Building Code (No. 421-01770), one concerning climate change (No. 421-01771) and one concerning the protection of the environment (No. 421-01772).
2017-09-27 [p.2163]
Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. DeCourcey (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs) laid upon the Table, — Copy of the Agreement on Enhancing International Arctic Scientific Cooperation, and Explanatory Memorandum, dated May 11, 2017. — Sessional Paper No. 8532-421-47.
2017-09-20 [p.2138]
— by Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands), one concerning the Canadian Armed Forces (No. 421-01649) and one concerning the protection of the environment (No. 421-01650);
2017-04-03 [p.1554]
Q-867 — Ms. Watts (South Surrey—White Rock) — With regard to spending by Environment and Climate Change Canada, between November 4, 2015, and February 10, 2017: (a) what amount has been announced, committed, promised, and spent outside of Canada on (i) other sovereign states, (ii) international programs, (iii) global initiatives, (iv) United Nations initiatives or programs, (v) for-profit programs and organizations, (vi) not-for-profit programs and organizations; and (b) what data was used to determine which projects, countries, or initiatives in (a)(i), (ii), (iii), (iv), (v), (vi) would be funded? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-867.
2017-04-03 [p.1554]
Q-868 — Ms. Watts (South Surrey—White Rock) — With regard to spending by Global Affairs Canada, between November 4, 2015, and February 10, 2017: (a) what amount of money has been announced, committed, promised, and spent outside of Canada on (i) other sovereign states, (ii) international programs, (iii) global initiatives, (iv) United Nations initiatives or programs, (v) for-profit programs and organizations, (vi) not-for-profit programs and organizations; and (b) what data was used to determine which projects, countries, or initiatives in (a)(i), (ii), (iii), (iv), (v), (vi) would be funded? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-868.
2016-06-03 [p.548]
Pursuant to Standing Order 39(7), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the returns to the following questions made into Orders for Return:
Q-107 — Mr. Dusseault (Sherbrooke) — With regard to the exchange of information between Canada and the United States (US) under the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA): (a) how many individuals were reported, in total and broken down by (i) Canadian citizens, (ii) permanent residents of Canada, (iii) temporary residents of Canada; (b) how many individuals were reported, broken down by (i) individuals with Canadian addresses, (ii) individuals with US addresses, (iii) individuals with addresses in other countries; (c) how many accounts were reported, in total and broken down by (i) bank accounts, (ii) credit union accounts, (iii) investment accounts, (iv) insurance accounts, (v) other types of accounts; (d) with respect to (c)(iii), what types of insurance accounts were reported; (e) with respect to (c)(v), what other types of accounts were reported; (f) of the accounts reported, how many were (i) under $50,000 US, (ii) between $50,000 and $1,000,000 US, (iii) over $1,000,000 US; (g) of the accounts reported, how many were (i) Registered Retirement Savings Account accounts, (ii) Registered Education Savings Account accounts, (iii) Registered Disability Savings Account accounts, (iv) Tax Free Savings Account accounts; (h) of the accounts reported, how many were held jointly with one or more non US persons, broken down by type of account and indicating the type of relationship between the joint account holder and the US person, if it is known; (i) how many accounts of organizations were reported to the IRS because a US person had signing authority, interest in, or other connection to the organization; (j) of the accounts that were reported, how many were (i) business accounts, (ii) professional accounts, (iii) charitable or non-profit organization accounts, (iv) connected to other organizations, broken down by type of organization; (k) what agency, organization, and individuals was the information provided to; (l) what measures were taken to ensure this information will not be provided to any other agency, organization, and individuals; (m) what measures were taken to ensure that information transmitted will not be subject to identity theft, fraud, other criminal activities, or breach of privacy; (n) how many records did Canada receive from the US, in total and broken down by (i) individuals who live in Canada, (ii) individuals who live in the US, (iii) individuals who live in other countries, broken down by country; (o) how many accounts did Canada receive information about; (p) what type of information was in the records Canada received; (q) did Canada receive information regarding (i) income from the accounts, (ii) total assets in accounts, (iii) account balances, (iv) transactions, deposits and withdrawals, (v) account numbers, (vi) names of account holders, (vii) Social Insurance Numbers, (viii) other related information; (r) what type of information did Canada receive that was not provided by the US prior to the FATCA Intergovernmental Agreement; and (s) when did Canada receive the information? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-107.
2015-06-05 [p.2644]
Pursuant to Standing Order 39(7), Mr. Lukiwski (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the return to the following questions made into Orders for Return:
Q-1159 — Mr. Dewar (Ottawa Centre) — With regard to Canadian policy concerning nuclear weapons: (a) has the government of Canada communicated or consulted with any other governments about the so-called Austrian Pledge on nuclear disarmament, that was issued following the 2014 Vienna Conference on the Humanitarian Impact of Nuclear Weapons, and, if so, which governments; (b) for each such communication or consultation, was it done by the Canadian government alone or in collaboration with other states, and, if the latter, which other states; (c) has the government encouraged other states to join the Austrian Pledge, and, if so, which states; (d) have other states encouraged Canada to join the Austrian Pledge, and, if so, which states; (e) what preparation has the government undertaken for the 2015 Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) Review Conference; (f) what steps has the government taken to implement the parliamentary motion adopted by unanimous consent on December 7, 2010, which “encourage[d] the Government of Canada to engage in negotiations for a nuclear weapons convention”;
(g) does official Canadian policy concerning nuclear weapons refer explicitly to the motion cited in (f); (h) has the government explicitly referenced the motion cited in (f) in any formal démarches to other countries regarding its policy on nuclear weapons; (i) as a NATO member state which has attended all three international meetings on the humanitarian impact of nuclear weapons, has the government shared the findings of these meetings with other NATO members; (j) how has the government contributed to NATO efforts to reach its stated goal of a world without nuclear weapons; (k) for what reasons did the government refuse to endorse the Joint Statement on the Humanitarian Consequences of Nuclear Weapons, as delivered by New Zealand at the United Nations General Assembly on October 20, 2014; (l) does the government agree with the statement that “[i]t is in the interest of the very survival of humanity that nuclear weapons are never used again, under any circumstances”; (m) under what circumstances does the government consider that the use of nuclear weapons would be appropriate; (n) how does the government reconcile the role of nuclear weapons in Canada’s security policy with Canada’s commitments under international humanitarian law and the NPT; (o) what is the government assessment of the sustainability of deterrence as a pillar of Canada's security policy; and (p) what steps has the government taken to implement the agreement of all states party to the NPT at the 2010 Review Conference, under action 5e of the Outcome Document, to reduce reliance on nuclear weapons for security? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-412-1159.
2015-05-29 [p.2594]
— by Mr. Blaney (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness) — Response of the government, pursuant to Standing Order 109, to the 14th Report of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts, "Chapter 2, Support for Combatting Transnational Crime, of the Fall 2014 Report of the Auditor General of Canada" (Sessional Paper No. 8510-412-182), presented to the House on Monday, February 23, 2015. — Sessional Paper No. 8512-412-182.
2015-05-06 [p.2483]
Q-1119 — Mr. Harris (St. John's East) — With regard to Canadian support being provided to Ukraine, the Declaration of Intent between the Department of National Defence of Canada and the Ministry of Defence of Ukraine of December 8, 2014, in Kiev, the subsequent deployment of Canadian military personnel to Ukraine to train Ukrainian forces, and Canada’s commitment to helping Ukraine in the strengthening of its security forces and its social and democratic institutions: (a) what activities are being carried out with the Ukrainian forces, the Ukrainian government, or civilians, with respect to (i) strengthening the capacity of Ukrainian security forces, (ii) promoting institutions that serve the wellbeing of Ukrainian society, (iii) training Ukrainian personnel in areas of policing, medical and personal protective measures, (iv) enhancing Ukrainian democratic institutions; (b) how many Canadian personnel are involved, in total and in each of the categories of activities mentioned in (a), further broken down by whether they are civilian or military; (c) are the deployed personnel members of the RCMP, the Canadian Armed Forces, or other institutions, agencies or organizations and, if so, what are these other institutions, agencies or organizations; (d) what are the measures of success used in evaluating progress on the objectives mentioned in (a); (e) what progress has been made on the objectives mentioned in (a) since the signing of the Declaration of Intent referenced above; (f) who is directly responsible for the leadership and oversight of the deployment to Ukraine; and (g) what form does the government expect future Canadian cooperation with and support to Ukraine to take? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-412-1119.
2015-02-23 [p.2161]
Mr. Christopherson (Hamilton Centre), from the Standing Committee on Public Accounts, presented the 14th Report of the Committee, "Chapter 2, Support for Combatting Transnational Crime, of the Fall 2014 Report of the Auditor General of Canada". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-412-182.
Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.
A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 46 and 47) was tabled.
2014-11-17 [p.1759]
— No. 412-4065 concerning human rights in Nigeria. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-412-135-01;
2014-09-26 [p.1495]
— by Mr. Dewar (Ottawa Centre), one concerning human rights in Nigeria (No. 412-4065);
2014-09-24 [p.1468]
— by Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands), one concerning missing persons (No. 412-4034), one concerning navigable waters (No. 412-4035) and one concerning environmental assessment and review (No. 412-4036);
2014-09-15 [p.1362]
Q-538 — Ms. Duncan (Etobicoke North) — With respect to the government’s support to West Africa’s counter-terrorism strategy and efforts to find the Nigerian schoolgirls held by Boko Haram: (a) what support has the government provided to the Economic Community of West African States’ counter-terrorism strategy, broken down by project, including (i) start and end dates, (ii) partner organization, (iii) project rationale; (b) what support has the government provided to build Nigeria’s anti-terrorism capacities, broken down by project, including (i) start and end dates, (ii) partner organization, (iii) project rationale; (c) what specific resources has Canada sent to Nigeria to help search for the Nigerian schoolgirls, and for each resource, what is (i) the monetary value of the contribution, (ii) the date the resource was “on the ground” in Nigeria, (iii) the date until which the resource will stay; (d) in order to be invited to the Paris summit to boost the search for the Nigerian schoolgirls, were invitees required to contribute a certain value, and if so, what was the requirement; (e) did Canada receive an invitation to attend the Paris summit; and (f) did Canada attend the Paris summit, (i) if so, in what capacity, (ii) if not, why not? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-412-538.
2012-06-11 [p.1479]
Q-622 — Ms. Laverdière (Laurier-Sainte-Marie) — With regard to Canada’s examination of its participation in some international organizations, as announced in Budget 2012: (a) what international organizations are part of the examination; (b) what is the timeline for the examination; (c) who will be consulted during the examination; and (d) will the results of the examination be made public? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-411-622.
2011-10-03 [p.306]
— by Ms. Oda (Minister of International Cooperation) — Report on the Government of Canada's Official Development Assistance for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2011, pursuant to the Official Development Assistance Accountability Act, S.C. 2008, c. 17, s. 5. — Sessional Paper No. 8560-411-1022-01. (Pursuant to Standing Order 32(5), permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development)
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