Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 2 of 2
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-01-29 16:27 [p.24989]
Madam Speaker, I am very pleased to rise here in the new House of Commons. Looking down, it feels like we are in the old chamber, but looking up, that is clearly not the case. It is certainly a lot brighter here than in the old chamber, so bright that it is difficult to look up at the sky.
I am honoured to rise on behalf of the 100,000 people of my riding, Beauport—Limoilou. Now that it is 2019, we are slowly but surely gearing up for an election campaign. Personally, I intend to be re-elected, if my constituents would once again do me the honour, but since we can neither know what fate has in store nor determine the outcome, I will, of course, work very hard. For that reason, I am savouring this honour and this opportunity to speak here for yet another parliamentary session.
Today, I would like to clarify something very important for the people of my riding. This morning, the member for Carleton moved a motion in the House of Commons, a fairly simple motion that reads as follows:
That, given the Prime Minister broke his promise to eliminate the deficit this year and that perpetual and growing deficits lead to massive tax increases, the House call on the Prime Minister to table a plan in Budget 2019 to eliminate the deficit quickly with a written commitment that he will never raise taxes of any kind.
My constituents may find it rather strange to ask a Prime Minister to promise not to raise taxes after the next election, if he is re-elected. He might even raise taxes before the election. After all, the Liberals tried to raise taxes many times over the past three years. I will say more about that in my speech. However, we are asking the Prime Minister to make this promise because we see that public finances are in total disarray.
In addition, the Prime Minister has broken several of the key promises he made to Canadians and Quebeckers. Some of them were national in scope. For example, he promised to return to a balanced budget by 2019, which did not happen. Instead, our deficit is nearly $30 billion. The budget the Liberals presented a few months ago forecast an $18-billion deficit, but according to the Office of the Parliamentary Budget Officer—an institution that forces the government to be more transparent to Canadians and that was created by Mr. Harper, a great Prime Minister—the deficit would actually be around $29 billion instead of $18 billion.
The Prime Minister quite shamelessly broke his promise to rebalance the budget, since this is the first time in the history of Canada that a government has racked up a deficit outside of a war or serious economic crisis. There was a big economic recession when the Conservatives were in power between 2008 and 2012.
I like to remind Canadians who may be listening to us that accountability is a key part of the Westminster system. That is why we talk about the notion of government accountability and why we have question period every day. It is not all about the theatrics, I might add. We ask the same ministers, although sometimes other ministers, questions every day because one day they are going to slip up and tell us the truth. Then we can talk about responsibility and accountability.
In short, the Prime Minister broke his promise to balance the budget by 2019. He also broke his promise to change our electoral system, which was very important to a huge segment of the Canadian left and Canadian youth.
He also broke his promise about the Canada Post community mailboxes. Although we believe that Canada Post's five-point action plan was important for ensuring the corporation's survival in the long term, the Prime Minister nevertheless promised the return of community mailboxes. I travelled across the country with my colleague from Edmonton and other members of the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates. All Canadians told Liberal members of the committee that they hoped the government would restore community mailboxes. However, the Liberals only put in place a moratorium.
The member from Quebec City and Minister of Families, Children and Social Development said that the state of the Quebec Bridge was deplorable, that the bridge was covered in rust and that some citizens were concerned about security and public safety.
I would like to reassure them. Our engineers' reports states that the bridge is not dangerous. That said, it is a disgrace that this historic bridge is completely rusty. The Liberals promised that this would be taken care of by June 30, 2016. That was over two years ago.
They also promised to help the middle class. In fact, to some extent, they followed in the footsteps of Mr. Harper's Conservative government, which also focused on helping Canadian families as much as possible. I held three public consultations in 2018. It is already 2019. Time flies. I called those public consultations, “Alupa à l'écoute”.
I will table my report in a month and a half. It will express my willingness to suggest to my leader to either table a bill or include in his election platform measures to address the labour shortage and to help seniors return to the labour market without being further penalized. I go door to door every month. What is more, during my public consultations, what I heard most often from my constituents, who I thank for coming, is that they are surviving. Their lives have not improved at all in three and a half years. On the contrary, they are facing challenges as a result of the Prime Minister's repeated failures.
I said we needed the Prime Minister to promise not to raise taxes either before the election or, if he wins, after. We all know what he has done over the past three years. He tried to tax dental benefits. He tried to tax employee benefits and bonuses. For example, some restaurant owners give their servers free meals. That is what happened when I was a server. The Liberals wanted to tax that benefit. They tried to tax small and medium-sized businesses by taxing their revenue as capital gains, and that was a total disaster. They wanted to tax every source of income businesses could use to prepare for bad times or retirement so they would eventually be less of a burden on the state.
The Liberals also significantly increased taxes. Studies show that 81% of Canadians have to pay more than $800 a year in taxes because the Liberals got rid of almost all of the tax credits the Conservatives had implemented, such as those for textbooks or public transit. They got rid of the tax credits for sports and for families. The Prime Minister and his Liberal team got rid of all kinds of family credits, which significantly increased taxes. Furthermore, they tried many times to significantly increase other taxes. They also tried payroll deductions, like the increase to the Canada pension plan. If we really take a look at the various benefits or income streams Canadians receive, we can see that their taxes have increased.
We do not trust the Prime Minister when he says he will not raise taxes after the next election if he is re-elected. We know he will have to raise taxes because of his repeated failures. In economic terms, there is an additional $60 billion in deficits on top of the debt. His deficits now total $80 billion after three and a half years. I am also thinking of his failures on immigration and on managing border crossings. Quebec is asking for $300 million to make up for the shortfall it has suffered because of illegal refugees. I am also thinking of all the problems related to international relations. I am also thinking of infrastructure.
How is it possible that the Prime Minister, still to this day, refuses tell the people of Beauport—Limoilou and Quebec City that he will agree to go ahead and help the CAQ government build the third link? All around the world, huge infrastructure projects are under way, yet over the past three years, the Liberal government has been incapable of allocating more than a few billion dollars of the $187 billion infrastructure fund.
Canadians are going to pay for the Prime Minister's mistakes. We want him to commit in writing that he will not raise taxes if he is re-elected.
Madame la Présidente, je suis très heureux de prendre la parole dans cette nouvelle Chambre des communes. Lorsqu'on regarde vers le bas, on pourrait croire qu'on est dans l'ancienne enceinte parlementaire, mais lorsqu'on lève les yeux, on réalise que ce n'est manifestement pas le cas. Je remarque que c'est beaucoup plus illuminé qu'à l'autre endroit. On a presque de la difficulté à lever les yeux vers le ciel.
Je suis honoré de prendre la parole au nom des 100 000 citoyens et citoyennes de ma circonscription, Beauport—Limoilou. Puisque nous sommes en 2019, nous entamons lentement, mais sûrement la campagne électorale. Pour ma part, j'ai fermement l'intention d'être réélu, si les citoyens me font cet honneur une autre fois, mais puisque le hasard fait ses choses et qu'on ne peut jamais vraiment déterminer ce qui va arriver, je vais quand même travailler très fort. Je savoure donc cet honneur et cette chance de pouvoir m'exprimer pendant encore toute une session au Parlement.
Aujourd'hui, j'aimerais éclairer les citoyens et les citoyennes de ma circonscription sur un sujet fort important. Il s'agit de la motion que nous avons présentée à la Chambre des communes et qui a été déposée ce matin par le député de Carleton. C'est une motion assez simple qui se lit comme suit:
Que, étant donné que le premier ministre a rompu sa promesse d’éliminer le déficit cette année, et que les déficits perpétuels et croissants entraînent d’énormes hausses d’impôts, la Chambre demande au premier ministre de déposer, avec le budget de 2019, un plan pour l’élimination rapide du déficit, en s’engageant par écrit à ne jamais hausser les impôts, sous quelque forme que ce soit.
Mes concitoyens trouvent peut-être cela un peu paradoxal de demander à un premier ministre de nous promettre de ne pas hausser les impôts à la suite des prochaines élections s'il est réélu. Il se peut même qu'il les hausse avant les élections. Après tout, les libéraux ont tenté à maintes reprises d'augmenter les impôts au cours des trois dernières années, et j'en parlerai davantage dans mon discours. Toutefois, nous demandons cela au premier ministre parce que nous constatons de prime abord que les finances publiques sont en plein désarroi.
Nous constatons également que le premier ministre a brisé plusieurs des promesses phares qu'il avait faites aux Canadiens et aux Québécois. Certaines d'entre elles étaient d'une envergure nationale. Par exemple, il avait promis un retour à l'équilibre budgétaire dès l'année 2019, ce qui n'a pas eu lieu. Nous avons plutôt un déficit de presque 30 milliards de dollars. Le budget que les libéraux ont présenté il y a quelques mois faisait état d'un déficit de 18 milliards de dollars, mais grâce au bureau du directeur parlementaire du budget, une institution qui pousse le gouvernement à être plus transparent à l'égard des électeurs et qui a été créée par M. Harper, un grand premier ministre, on a appris que le déficit n'était pas de 18 milliards de dollars, mais plutôt d'environ 29 milliards de dollars.
Le premier ministre a donc brisé cette promesse du retour à l'équilibre budgétaire de manière assez éhontée, puisque c'est la première fois dans l'histoire du Canada qu'un gouvernement cumule des déficits hors d'une période de guerre ou de crise économique importante. Sous les conservateurs, entre 2008 et 2012, il y avait la grande récession économique.
J'aime rappeler aux citoyens qui nous écoutent que la responsabilité est un élément phare du parlementarisme westminstérien. C'est pourquoi on parle de la notion de gouvernement responsable et que nous avons une période de questions tous les jours. Celle-ci n'est pas du tout un théâtre, en passant. Nous posons des questions tous les jours aux mêmes ministres, parfois à d'autres, parce qu'un jour, ils vont flancher et nous dire la vérité. À ce moment-là, on pourra parler de responsabilité et de reddition de comptes.
Bref, le premier ministre a brisé la promesse du retour à l'équilibre budgétaire en 2019. Il a également brisé sa promesse de changer le mode de scrutin, qui était très importante pour tout un pan de la gauche canadienne et de la jeunesse canadienne.
En outre, il a brisé sa promesse concernant le retour des boîtes communautaires pour Postes Canada. Bien que nous pensions que la réforme en cinq points de Postes Canada était intéressante pour assurer la survie de celle-ci à long terme, le premier ministre avait quand même promis le retour des boîtes communautaires. J'ai moi-même traversé le pays au complet avec mon collègue d'Edmonton et les autres membres du Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires. Tous les Canadiens disaient aux membres libéraux du Comité qu'ils espéraient que le gouvernement rétablisse les boîtes communautaires. Cependant, les libéraux n'ont fait que mettre en place un moratoire.
Le député de Québec et ministre de la Famille, des Enfants et du Développement social avait dit que la situation du pont de Québec était déplorable, que le pont était complètement rouillé et que certains citoyens avaient peur quant à la protection et à la sécurité publique.
Je tiens à les rassurer: les rapports de nos ingénieurs disent que le pont n’est pas dangereux. Cela étant dit, c’est une honte de voir ce pont historique être complètement rouillé. Les libéraux nous avaient promis que cela serait réglé avant le 30 juin 2016. Cela fait plus de deux ans.
Ils nous avaient également promis d’aider la classe moyenne. En fait, ils suivaient un peu les traces du gouvernement conservateur de M. Harper, qui mettait autant que possible l’accent sur l’aide aux familles canadiennes. J’ai mené trois consultations publiques en 2018. Nous sommes déjà rendus en 2019; le temps passe très vite. J’ai nommé ces trois consultations publiques « Alupa à l’écoute ».
Je vais déposer mon rapport dans un mois et demi. Ce rapport va faire état de ma volonté de suggérer à mon chef soit de mettre dans sa plateforme, soit de déposer dans un projet de loi des mesures qui vont pallier la pénurie de la main-d’œuvre et qui vont aider les aînés à retourner sur le marché du travail sans être pénalisés davantage. Je fais du porte-à-porte chaque mois. De plus, lors de mes consultations publiques, ce que j’ai entendu le plus souvent de la part de mes concitoyens et concitoyennes, que je remercie d’être venus, c’est qu’ils survivent. Leur vie n’a pas du tout été améliorée depuis trois ans et demi. Bien au contraire, ils font face à des difficultés. Ces difficultés découlent des échecs répétés du premier ministre.
Je disais que nous avions besoin que le premier ministre nous promette de ne pas hausser les taxes et les impôts d’ici aux élections et après les élections, si jamais il gagne. Nous avons vu ce qu’il a fait au cours des trois dernières années: il a tenté de taxer les prestations de l’assurance dentaire. Il a tenté de taxer les prestations et les bonis des employés. Par exemple, il arrive qu’un propriétaire de restaurant offre le repas à une serveuse qui y travaille. Quand j’étais serveur, c’était le cas. Les libéraux voulaient taxer cet avantage. Ils ont tenté de taxer, de manière complètement catastrophique, les petites et moyennes entreprises en taxant leur revenu en gain en capital. Ils ont voulu taxer toutes les sources de revenus que les entreprises peuvent utiliser soit pour se préparer pour de mauvais jours soit pour se préparer à leur retraite, et donc, être un moindre poids pour l’État ultérieurement.
Les libéraux ont également augmenté les taxes de manière tangible. En fait, les études démontrent que 81 % des Canadiens doivent payer plus de 800 $ par année en taxes, parce que les libéraux ont coupé dans presque toutes les mesures de crédits d’impôt que les conservateurs avaient mises en place, comme les mesures pour les manuels scolaires ou pour le transport en commun. Ils ont coupé dans les mesures pour les activités sportives ou les crédits d’impôt pour la famille. Ce qu’on constate, c’est que le premier ministre et son équipe libérale ont mis fin à toutes sortes de crédits familiaux, ce qui a fait augmenter les taxes de manière substantielle. De plus, ils ont tenté à maintes reprises d’augmenter de manière très importante d’autres taxes. Ils ont également augmenté des retenues sur le salaire. On pense notamment à l’augmentation du Régime de pensions du Canada. Vraiment, lorsqu’on regarde l’ensemble des différents bénéfices ou des différentes avenues monétaires que les Canadiens reçoivent, on voit que leurs taxes ont augmenté.
Nous ne faisons pas confiance au premier ministre lorsqu’il nous dit qu’il n’y aura pas d’augmentation de taxes après les prochaines élections s’il est réélu. Nous savons qu’il va devoir le faire à cause de tous ses échecs répétés. Sur le plan économique, il y a des déficits importants de 60 milliards de dollars de plus sur la dette. Ces déficits atteignent 80 milliards de dollars après trois ans et demi. Je pense également à ses échecs en ce qui concerne notre système d’immigration et la gestion des aller-retour à la frontière. Le Québec demande 300 millions de dollars pour pallier son déficit engendré par l’accueil des réfugiés illégaux. Je pense également à tout ce qui touche les relations internationales. Je pense aussi aux infrastructures.
Comment est-il possible que le premier ministre soit encore incapable aujourd’hui de confirmer aux citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou et de Québec qu’il va accepter d’aller de l’avant et d’aider le gouvernement de la CAQ à construire le troisième lien? Partout au monde, des projets gigantesques se font en matière d’infrastructures. Pourtant, depuis trois ans, le gouvernement libéral est incapable de fournir plus de quelques milliards de dollars sur 187 milliards de dollars.
Les Canadiens vont payer pour les échecs du premier ministre. Nous voulons qu'il s'engage par écrit à ne pas augmenter les impôts ou les taxes s'il est réélu.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-04-19 16:30 [p.18572]
Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to speak today. As a Conservative MP, nothing is more important to me than tradition. As tradition would have it, I would like to acknowledge all those who are watching me and those I meet at the community centres, at all the organized events in my riding, or when I go door to door. As always, I am very happy to represent my constituents in the House of Commons.
I would like to wish a good National Volunteer Week to everyone in Beauport, the people of Limoilou, Giffard, Sainte-Odile, and all around the riding. In Beauport, there are more than 2,500 volunteers. It is the Quebec City neighbourhood with the highest number of volunteers. That makes me very proud. Without volunteers, our social costs would be much higher. I commend all those who put their heart and soul into helping their neighbours and so many others.
I would quickly like to go back to some comments made by the Liberal member for Markham—Thornhill. She boasted that the Liberal government is open and transparent. I would like to remind her that our esteemed Prime Minister's trip to the Aga Khan's island was not all that transparent. The commissioner had to examine and report on this trip, in short, do an investigation, to get to the bottom of things. First of all, I think it is outrageous for a sitting prime minister to go south. He should have stayed in Canada as most Canadians do.
Furthermore, the Liberals' tax reform for small and medium-sized businesses was not all that transparent. The objective was to increase the tax rate for all small and medium-sized businesses and to create jobs in Canada, through the back door, by increasing corporate and small business taxes through changes in how dividends and other various financial vehicles are treated.
Then, there were all of the Minister of Finance's dealings. He hid some funds generated by his family firm, Morneau Shepell. We discovered that he hid these funds in a numbered company in Alberta.
Basically, we have a long list of items proving that the government is not all that open and transparent. This list also includes the amendments and changes the Liberals made to the Access to Information Act. The commissioner stated very clearly in black and white that they are going to impede access to information. On top of that, the Liberals refused to give access to information from the Prime Minister's Office, as they promised during the election campaign.
I would still like to talk about the bill brought forward by the member for Beauce, for whom I have a great deal of respect. He is a man of courage and principle. This bill is consistent with his principles. He does not care to see subsidies, handouts, being given to large corporations. With this bill, however, he does not oppose the idea of giving money to businesses to help them out. He said something very simple: the technology partnerships Canada program spent about $3.3 billion. For 200 businesses, that represents $700 million in loans and 45% of cases. The member for Beauce does not oppose those loans; he is simply asking the government to tell us whether those companies have paid back the $700 million, which breaks down into different amounts, for example $800,000, $300,000, or $2 million. If some companies have not paid back those loans, then we can simply tell Canadians that they were actually subsidies, not loans.
I want to get back to what I said during my earlier question. When I was a student at Laval University, I remember naively telling my professor that I would go to Parliament to talk about philosophy, the Constitution, and the great debates of our time. He told me that there would be debates on these types of issues, yes, but fundamentally, what was at the heart of England's 13th century parliamentary system was accountability, namely what was happening with the money.
There is a reason why we spend two months talking about the budget. It is very important. The budget is at the heart of the parliamentary system. I sometimes find it a little annoying. I wonder if we could talk about Constitutional issues, Quebec's distinct society, the courts, politics, and other issues. However, much to my chagrin, we spend most of our time talking about money. There is a valid reason for this: every one of us here represents about 100,000 people, most of whom pay taxes. All of the government's programs, initiatives, and public policies, good or bad, are dynamic and rely on public funds.
In England in the 13th century, bourgeois capitalists went to see the king to tell him that all his warmongering was getting a little expensive. They asked him to create a place where they could talk to him or his representative and find out what he was doing with their money. That was the precise moment in the course of human history when liberal democracy made its first appearance.
Another example of the importance of knowing what is being done with people's money is the American Revolution. This is complicated and could fill many books, but essentially, the American Revolution happened because England was not interested in taxation with representation. The Americans said they had had enough. If taxes on tea—hence, the Tea Party—were going up, they wanted to know what was being done with their money. The only way the Americans could find out what the British were doing with the money was through elected representation of the colonies in the British Parliament. However, the king, in his arrogance, and his British governing council told the colonies to keep quiet and pay their taxes to His Majesty like they were supposed to. Thus ensued the American Revolution.
Such major historical examples demonstrate how accountability is at the very heart of the parliamentary system and liberal democracy, which guarantees the protection of individual rights and freedoms so dear to our Liberals in this place.
Now, this is what I do not understand. The opposition members, whether they belong to the NDP, the Conservative Party, or the Quebec caucus, introduce sensible and fairly simple bills. Why will the government not just admit it and thank them? Not only is it the purpose of Parliament to inform Canadians about what is being done with their money, but the government itself should know what is happening.
The government could use half of the unpaid $700 million to more quickly implement its much-touted social housing program or pharmacare 2020. However, between $400 million and $700 million has not been paid back to the federal government. Thus, it is completely unacceptable and illogical for the Liberals to tell us that this is not a laudable or justifiable bill.
When I came to Parliament, I had the opportunity to work on the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates, a very complex committee. It was a bit overwhelming, but I took it very seriously and I did all the reading. That committee just keeps voting on credits for months because it approves all the spending. When I was there, the President of the Treasury Board attended our meetings three times to explain the changes he wanted to make to the main estimates. These were disastrous changes that sought to take away the power of opposition MPs to examine spending vote by vote for over two months. He wanted to cut that time down to about two weeks. It was an attempt on the part of the Liberals to gradually undermine the work and transparency of this democratic institution.
What is more, the Liberals wanted to make major changes that would cut our speaking time in the House of Commons. For heaven's sake. At the time of Confederation, our forefathers sometimes talked for six or seven hours. Now, 20 minutes is too long. For example, today, I have 10 minutes to speak. The Liberals wanted to cut our time down from 20 minutes to 10 minutes. This government never stops trying to cut the opposition's speaking time, and that is not to mention the $7 billion that have still not been allocated.
In short, the bill introduced by the member for Beauce is a laudable bill that goes to the very heart of the principle underlying liberal democracy and the British parliamentary system, that of knowing where taxpayers' money is going.
Monsieur le Président, je suis très content de prendre la parole aujourd'hui. En tant que député conservateur, ce qui est le plus important pour moi, c'est la tradition. Comme la tradition le veut, j'aimerais saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes qui m'écoutent, ceux que je rencontre lorsque je fais du porte-à-porte, dans les centres communautaires et lors de toutes les activités organisées dans ma circonscription. Comme toujours, je suis très content de représenter mes concitoyens à la Chambre des communes.
J'aimerais souhaiter une bonne Semaine de l'action bénévole à l'ensemble des Beauportois et des gens de Limoilou, de Giffard, de Sainte-Odile et des quatre coins de la circonscription. À Beauport, il y a plus de 2 500 bénévoles. C'est l'arrondissement de la ville de Québec qui compte le plus grand nombre de bénévoles. J'en suis très fier. Sans les bénévoles, nos coûts sociaux seraient bien plus importants. Je félicite donc tous ces gens qui se donnent corps et âme pour aider autrui et leur prochain.
J'aimerais revenir rapidement sur certains commentaires faits par la députée libérale de Markham—Thornhill. Elle se vantait du fait que le gouvernement libéral était ouvert et transparent. J'aimerais quand même lui rappeler que le voyage sur l'île de l'Aga Khan de notre cher premier ministre était plus ou moins transparent. Il a fallu qu'une commissaire fasse une étude et un rapport, donc une enquête, sur ce voyage pour savoir ce qu'il en était. De prime abord, je trouve que c'est une hérésie pour un premier ministre d'aller dans le Sud lorsqu'il est en fonction. Il devrait rester au Canada, comme la plupart des Canadiens le font.
En outre, la réforme fiscale que les libéraux ont imposée aux petites et moyennes entreprises était plus ou moins transparente. L'objectif était de hausser le taux d'imposition de toutes les petites et moyennes entreprises et de créer des emplois au Canada, et ce, par la porte arrière, en augmentant, dans le cadre de dividendes et de plusieurs véhicules financiers différents, l'impôt des sociétés et des petites et moyennes entreprises.
Il y a également eu toutes les actions du ministre des Finances. Il a caché certains fonds provenant de son entreprise familiale, Morneau Shepell. On a découvert qu'il cachait ces fonds dans une société à numéro en Alberta.
Bref, la liste qui démontre que le gouvernement n'est pas si ouvert et transparent que cela est très longue. Cette liste comprend également les modifications et les amendements que les libéraux ont apportés à la Loi sur l'accès à l'information. La commissaire a stipulé, noir sur blanc, que cela va empirer l'accès à l'information. De plus, les libéraux n'ont pas donné l'accès à l'information du bureau du premier ministre, comme ils avaient promis lors de la campagne électorale.
Je voudrais quand même parler du projet de loi du député de Beauce, un homme que je respecte énormément. Il est courageux et il a des principes. Ce projet de loi cadre justement avec ses principes. C'est un individu qui n'aime pas beaucoup les subventions, le bien-être social, accordées aux grandes entreprises. Cependant, dans ce projet de loi, il ne s'oppose pas à l'argent donné aux entreprises pour les aider. Il dit quelque chose de très simple: le programme de Partenariat technologique Canada a dépensé environ 3,3 milliards de dollars. Pour 200 entreprises, cela représente 700 millions de dollars en prêts et 45 % des cas. Le député de Beauce n'est pas en désaccord avec ces prêts, il demande tout simplement au gouvernement de nous dire si ces entreprises ont remboursé les 700 millions de dollars, répartis de différentes façons, par exemple, 800 000 $, 300 000 $ et 2 millions de dollars. Si les entreprises n'ont pas remboursé les prêts, on pourra dire aux Canadiens et aux Canadiennes que ce n'était pas des prêts mais plutôt des subventions.
Je vais revenir sur ce que j'ai dit lors de ma question préalable. Lorsque j'étais étudiant à l'Université Laval, je me rappelle avoir dit à un professeur, avec ma belle naïveté de l'époque, que j'irais au Parlement pour parler de philosophie, de la Constitution et des grands débats qui nous animent. Il m'a répondu qu'il y aurait des débats sur ce genre d'enjeux, mais que foncièrement, ce qui était au coeur même du parlementarisme au XIIIe siècle, en Angleterre, c'était la reddition de comptes, à savoir ce qui se passe avec l'argent.
Ce n'est pas pour rien qu'on passe un ou deux mois à parler du budget. C'est tellement important. Le budget est au coeur du parlementarisme. Parfois, je trouve cela un peu embêtant. Je me demande si on peut parler des problèmes liés à la Constitution, de la société distincte du Québec, de la judiciarisation, de la politique et de différents enjeux. Toutefois, à mon grand dam, on parle d'argent la majorité du temps. Il y a quand même une raison louable à cela: chacun d'entre nous est ici pour représenter, grosso modo, 100 000 individus dont la plupart paie des impôts. Tous les programmes, toutes les initiatives et toutes les politiques publiques du gouvernement, bons ou mauvais, sont vivants et dépendent des fonds publics.
Au XIIIe siècle, en Angleterre, les capitalistes bourgeois sont allés voir le roi pour lui dire que ses projets de grandes guerres commençaient à être un peu lourds. Ils lui ont demandé de créer un endroit où ils pourraient discuter avec lui ou son représentant afin de savoir ce qu'il faisait avec leur argent. C'était le début de la démocratie libérale, ni plus ni moins, dans l'histoire de l'humanité.
L'autre exemple qui démontre l'importance de savoir ce qu'on fait avec l'argent, c'est la révolution américaine. C'est complexe et on pourrait remplir des millions de pages, mais grosso modo, la révolution américaine est arrivée parce que l'Angleterre ne voulait pas accepter la representation with taxation. Les Américains ont dit qu'ils en avaient assez: si on allait taxer davantage leur thé — d'où le Tea Party —, ils voulaient savoir ce qu'on faisait avec leur argent. Or la seule façon dont les Américains pouvaient savoir ce que les Britanniques faisaient avec l'argent, c'était d'être représentés par des élus au Parlement britannique de la colonie américaine. Cependant, le roi, avec sa grande arrogance et son conseil de gouvernance britannique, a dit à la colonie de se taire et de payer ses taxes à Sa Majesté comme il se doit. La révolution américaine s'en est suivie.
De grands exemples historiques de ce genre nous démontrent à quel point la reddition de comptes se trouve au coeur même du parlementarisme et de la démocratie libérale, qui garantit la protection des droits et libertés individuelles qui est si chère à nos libéraux ici.
Maintenant, voici ce que je ne comprends pas. Les députés de l'opposition, qu'ils soient du NPD, du Parti conservateur ou du Groupe parlementaire québécois, proposent des projets de loi sensés et assez simples. Pourquoi le gouvernement ne peut-il jamais l'admettre et les remercier? Non seulement c'est le but du Parlement d'informer la population au sujet de ce qu'on fait avec son argent, mais le gouvernement devrait lui-même savoir ce qui se passe.
Si c'est la moitié des 700 millions de dollars qui n'ont pas été remboursés, le gouvernement pourrait utiliser cet argent pour mettre en oeuvre plus rapidement son fameux programme de logement social ou son fameux programme Pharmacare 2020. Ce sont quand même entre 400 millions et 700 millions de dollars qui n'ont pas été remboursés au gouvernement fédéral. Il est donc tout à fait inacceptable et illogique que des libéraux nous disent que ce n'est pas un projet de loi louable ou justifiable.
J'ai eu la chance de travailler au Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires, un comité très complexe, lorsque je suis arrivé au Parlement. J'étais un peu dépassé par cela, mais j'ai pris cela au sérieux et j'ai fait toutes mes lectures. À ce comité, on n'arrête pas de voter sur des crédits, et ce, pendant des mois, puisqu'on y approuve toutes les dépenses. Or j'ai vu le président du Conseil du Trésor assister à nos rencontres trois fois pour nous expliquer les réformes qu'il voulait effectuer en ce qui a trait au Budget principal des dépenses. Il s'agissait de réformes désastreuses qui visaient à enlever aux députés de l'opposition le pouvoir d'analyser les dépenses crédit par crédit pendant plus de deux mois. Il voulait limiter cela à environ deux semaines. C'est une tentative de la part des libéraux d'amoindrir progressivement le travail et la transparence en cette institution démocratique.
De plus, les libéraux ont voulu procéder à une réforme afin de réduire notre temps de parole à la Chambre des communes. Bon Dieu! À l'époque de la Confédération, nos aïeux parlaient parfois pendant six ou sept heures. Maintenant, 20 minutes c'est presque trop. Aujourd'hui, j'ai 10 minutes, par exemple. Les libéraux voulaient diminuer notre temps de parole de 20 minutes à 10 minutes. Ce gouvernement tente sans cesse de réduire le temps de parole des députés de l'opposition, et c'est sans parler des 7 milliards de dollars qui n'ont toujours pas été affectés.
Bref, le projet de loi du député de Beauce est un projet de loi louable qui va au coeur même du principe qui sous-tend la démocratie libérale et le parlementarisme britannique: savoir où va l'argent des contribuables.
Results: 1 - 2 of 2

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data