Interventions in the House of Commons
For assistance, please contact us
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-01-29 16:27 [p.24989]
Madam Speaker, I am very pleased to rise here in the new House of Commons. Looking down, it feels like we are in the old chamber, but looking up, that is clearly not the case. It is certainly a lot brighter here than in the old chamber, so bright that it is difficult to look up at the sky.
I am honoured to rise on behalf of the 100,000 people of my riding, Beauport—Limoilou. Now that it is 2019, we are slowly but surely gearing up for an election campaign. Personally, I intend to be re-elected, if my constituents would once again do me the honour, but since we can neither know what fate has in store nor determine the outcome, I will, of course, work very hard. For that reason, I am savouring this honour and this opportunity to speak here for yet another parliamentary session.
Today, I would like to clarify something very important for the people of my riding. This morning, the member for Carleton moved a motion in the House of Commons, a fairly simple motion that reads as follows:
That, given the Prime Minister broke his promise to eliminate the deficit this year and that perpetual and growing deficits lead to massive tax increases, the House call on the Prime Minister to table a plan in Budget 2019 to eliminate the deficit quickly with a written commitment that he will never raise taxes of any kind.
My constituents may find it rather strange to ask a Prime Minister to promise not to raise taxes after the next election, if he is re-elected. He might even raise taxes before the election. After all, the Liberals tried to raise taxes many times over the past three years. I will say more about that in my speech. However, we are asking the Prime Minister to make this promise because we see that public finances are in total disarray.
In addition, the Prime Minister has broken several of the key promises he made to Canadians and Quebeckers. Some of them were national in scope. For example, he promised to return to a balanced budget by 2019, which did not happen. Instead, our deficit is nearly $30 billion. The budget the Liberals presented a few months ago forecast an $18-billion deficit, but according to the Office of the Parliamentary Budget Officer—an institution that forces the government to be more transparent to Canadians and that was created by Mr. Harper, a great Prime Minister—the deficit would actually be around $29 billion instead of $18 billion.
The Prime Minister quite shamelessly broke his promise to rebalance the budget, since this is the first time in the history of Canada that a government has racked up a deficit outside of a war or serious economic crisis. There was a big economic recession when the Conservatives were in power between 2008 and 2012.
I like to remind Canadians who may be listening to us that accountability is a key part of the Westminster system. That is why we talk about the notion of government accountability and why we have question period every day. It is not all about the theatrics, I might add. We ask the same ministers, although sometimes other ministers, questions every day because one day they are going to slip up and tell us the truth. Then we can talk about responsibility and accountability.
In short, the Prime Minister broke his promise to balance the budget by 2019. He also broke his promise to change our electoral system, which was very important to a huge segment of the Canadian left and Canadian youth.
He also broke his promise about the Canada Post community mailboxes. Although we believe that Canada Post's five-point action plan was important for ensuring the corporation's survival in the long term, the Prime Minister nevertheless promised the return of community mailboxes. I travelled across the country with my colleague from Edmonton and other members of the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates. All Canadians told Liberal members of the committee that they hoped the government would restore community mailboxes. However, the Liberals only put in place a moratorium.
The member from Quebec City and Minister of Families, Children and Social Development said that the state of the Quebec Bridge was deplorable, that the bridge was covered in rust and that some citizens were concerned about security and public safety.
I would like to reassure them. Our engineers' reports states that the bridge is not dangerous. That said, it is a disgrace that this historic bridge is completely rusty. The Liberals promised that this would be taken care of by June 30, 2016. That was over two years ago.
They also promised to help the middle class. In fact, to some extent, they followed in the footsteps of Mr. Harper's Conservative government, which also focused on helping Canadian families as much as possible. I held three public consultations in 2018. It is already 2019. Time flies. I called those public consultations, “Alupa à l'écoute”.
I will table my report in a month and a half. It will express my willingness to suggest to my leader to either table a bill or include in his election platform measures to address the labour shortage and to help seniors return to the labour market without being further penalized. I go door to door every month. What is more, during my public consultations, what I heard most often from my constituents, who I thank for coming, is that they are surviving. Their lives have not improved at all in three and a half years. On the contrary, they are facing challenges as a result of the Prime Minister's repeated failures.
I said we needed the Prime Minister to promise not to raise taxes either before the election or, if he wins, after. We all know what he has done over the past three years. He tried to tax dental benefits. He tried to tax employee benefits and bonuses. For example, some restaurant owners give their servers free meals. That is what happened when I was a server. The Liberals wanted to tax that benefit. They tried to tax small and medium-sized businesses by taxing their revenue as capital gains, and that was a total disaster. They wanted to tax every source of income businesses could use to prepare for bad times or retirement so they would eventually be less of a burden on the state.
The Liberals also significantly increased taxes. Studies show that 81% of Canadians have to pay more than $800 a year in taxes because the Liberals got rid of almost all of the tax credits the Conservatives had implemented, such as those for textbooks or public transit. They got rid of the tax credits for sports and for families. The Prime Minister and his Liberal team got rid of all kinds of family credits, which significantly increased taxes. Furthermore, they tried many times to significantly increase other taxes. They also tried payroll deductions, like the increase to the Canada pension plan. If we really take a look at the various benefits or income streams Canadians receive, we can see that their taxes have increased.
We do not trust the Prime Minister when he says he will not raise taxes after the next election if he is re-elected. We know he will have to raise taxes because of his repeated failures. In economic terms, there is an additional $60 billion in deficits on top of the debt. His deficits now total $80 billion after three and a half years. I am also thinking of his failures on immigration and on managing border crossings. Quebec is asking for $300 million to make up for the shortfall it has suffered because of illegal refugees. I am also thinking of all the problems related to international relations. I am also thinking of infrastructure.
How is it possible that the Prime Minister, still to this day, refuses tell the people of Beauport—Limoilou and Quebec City that he will agree to go ahead and help the CAQ government build the third link? All around the world, huge infrastructure projects are under way, yet over the past three years, the Liberal government has been incapable of allocating more than a few billion dollars of the $187 billion infrastructure fund.
Canadians are going to pay for the Prime Minister's mistakes. We want him to commit in writing that he will not raise taxes if he is re-elected.
Madame la Présidente, je suis très heureux de prendre la parole dans cette nouvelle Chambre des communes. Lorsqu'on regarde vers le bas, on pourrait croire qu'on est dans l'ancienne enceinte parlementaire, mais lorsqu'on lève les yeux, on réalise que ce n'est manifestement pas le cas. Je remarque que c'est beaucoup plus illuminé qu'à l'autre endroit. On a presque de la difficulté à lever les yeux vers le ciel.
Je suis honoré de prendre la parole au nom des 100 000 citoyens et citoyennes de ma circonscription, Beauport—Limoilou. Puisque nous sommes en 2019, nous entamons lentement, mais sûrement la campagne électorale. Pour ma part, j'ai fermement l'intention d'être réélu, si les citoyens me font cet honneur une autre fois, mais puisque le hasard fait ses choses et qu'on ne peut jamais vraiment déterminer ce qui va arriver, je vais quand même travailler très fort. Je savoure donc cet honneur et cette chance de pouvoir m'exprimer pendant encore toute une session au Parlement.
Aujourd'hui, j'aimerais éclairer les citoyens et les citoyennes de ma circonscription sur un sujet fort important. Il s'agit de la motion que nous avons présentée à la Chambre des communes et qui a été déposée ce matin par le député de Carleton. C'est une motion assez simple qui se lit comme suit:
Que, étant donné que le premier ministre a rompu sa promesse d’éliminer le déficit cette année, et que les déficits perpétuels et croissants entraînent d’énormes hausses d’impôts, la Chambre demande au premier ministre de déposer, avec le budget de 2019, un plan pour l’élimination rapide du déficit, en s’engageant par écrit à ne jamais hausser les impôts, sous quelque forme que ce soit.
Mes concitoyens trouvent peut-être cela un peu paradoxal de demander à un premier ministre de nous promettre de ne pas hausser les impôts à la suite des prochaines élections s'il est réélu. Il se peut même qu'il les hausse avant les élections. Après tout, les libéraux ont tenté à maintes reprises d'augmenter les impôts au cours des trois dernières années, et j'en parlerai davantage dans mon discours. Toutefois, nous demandons cela au premier ministre parce que nous constatons de prime abord que les finances publiques sont en plein désarroi.
Nous constatons également que le premier ministre a brisé plusieurs des promesses phares qu'il avait faites aux Canadiens et aux Québécois. Certaines d'entre elles étaient d'une envergure nationale. Par exemple, il avait promis un retour à l'équilibre budgétaire dès l'année 2019, ce qui n'a pas eu lieu. Nous avons plutôt un déficit de presque 30 milliards de dollars. Le budget que les libéraux ont présenté il y a quelques mois faisait état d'un déficit de 18 milliards de dollars, mais grâce au bureau du directeur parlementaire du budget, une institution qui pousse le gouvernement à être plus transparent à l'égard des électeurs et qui a été créée par M. Harper, un grand premier ministre, on a appris que le déficit n'était pas de 18 milliards de dollars, mais plutôt d'environ 29 milliards de dollars.
Le premier ministre a donc brisé cette promesse du retour à l'équilibre budgétaire de manière assez éhontée, puisque c'est la première fois dans l'histoire du Canada qu'un gouvernement cumule des déficits hors d'une période de guerre ou de crise économique importante. Sous les conservateurs, entre 2008 et 2012, il y avait la grande récession économique.
J'aime rappeler aux citoyens qui nous écoutent que la responsabilité est un élément phare du parlementarisme westminstérien. C'est pourquoi on parle de la notion de gouvernement responsable et que nous avons une période de questions tous les jours. Celle-ci n'est pas du tout un théâtre, en passant. Nous posons des questions tous les jours aux mêmes ministres, parfois à d'autres, parce qu'un jour, ils vont flancher et nous dire la vérité. À ce moment-là, on pourra parler de responsabilité et de reddition de comptes.
Bref, le premier ministre a brisé la promesse du retour à l'équilibre budgétaire en 2019. Il a également brisé sa promesse de changer le mode de scrutin, qui était très importante pour tout un pan de la gauche canadienne et de la jeunesse canadienne.
En outre, il a brisé sa promesse concernant le retour des boîtes communautaires pour Postes Canada. Bien que nous pensions que la réforme en cinq points de Postes Canada était intéressante pour assurer la survie de celle-ci à long terme, le premier ministre avait quand même promis le retour des boîtes communautaires. J'ai moi-même traversé le pays au complet avec mon collègue d'Edmonton et les autres membres du Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires. Tous les Canadiens disaient aux membres libéraux du Comité qu'ils espéraient que le gouvernement rétablisse les boîtes communautaires. Cependant, les libéraux n'ont fait que mettre en place un moratoire.
Le député de Québec et ministre de la Famille, des Enfants et du Développement social avait dit que la situation du pont de Québec était déplorable, que le pont était complètement rouillé et que certains citoyens avaient peur quant à la protection et à la sécurité publique.
Je tiens à les rassurer: les rapports de nos ingénieurs disent que le pont n’est pas dangereux. Cela étant dit, c’est une honte de voir ce pont historique être complètement rouillé. Les libéraux nous avaient promis que cela serait réglé avant le 30 juin 2016. Cela fait plus de deux ans.
Ils nous avaient également promis d’aider la classe moyenne. En fait, ils suivaient un peu les traces du gouvernement conservateur de M. Harper, qui mettait autant que possible l’accent sur l’aide aux familles canadiennes. J’ai mené trois consultations publiques en 2018. Nous sommes déjà rendus en 2019; le temps passe très vite. J’ai nommé ces trois consultations publiques « Alupa à l’écoute ».
Je vais déposer mon rapport dans un mois et demi. Ce rapport va faire état de ma volonté de suggérer à mon chef soit de mettre dans sa plateforme, soit de déposer dans un projet de loi des mesures qui vont pallier la pénurie de la main-d’œuvre et qui vont aider les aînés à retourner sur le marché du travail sans être pénalisés davantage. Je fais du porte-à-porte chaque mois. De plus, lors de mes consultations publiques, ce que j’ai entendu le plus souvent de la part de mes concitoyens et concitoyennes, que je remercie d’être venus, c’est qu’ils survivent. Leur vie n’a pas du tout été améliorée depuis trois ans et demi. Bien au contraire, ils font face à des difficultés. Ces difficultés découlent des échecs répétés du premier ministre.
Je disais que nous avions besoin que le premier ministre nous promette de ne pas hausser les taxes et les impôts d’ici aux élections et après les élections, si jamais il gagne. Nous avons vu ce qu’il a fait au cours des trois dernières années: il a tenté de taxer les prestations de l’assurance dentaire. Il a tenté de taxer les prestations et les bonis des employés. Par exemple, il arrive qu’un propriétaire de restaurant offre le repas à une serveuse qui y travaille. Quand j’étais serveur, c’était le cas. Les libéraux voulaient taxer cet avantage. Ils ont tenté de taxer, de manière complètement catastrophique, les petites et moyennes entreprises en taxant leur revenu en gain en capital. Ils ont voulu taxer toutes les sources de revenus que les entreprises peuvent utiliser soit pour se préparer pour de mauvais jours soit pour se préparer à leur retraite, et donc, être un moindre poids pour l’État ultérieurement.
Les libéraux ont également augmenté les taxes de manière tangible. En fait, les études démontrent que 81 % des Canadiens doivent payer plus de 800 $ par année en taxes, parce que les libéraux ont coupé dans presque toutes les mesures de crédits d’impôt que les conservateurs avaient mises en place, comme les mesures pour les manuels scolaires ou pour le transport en commun. Ils ont coupé dans les mesures pour les activités sportives ou les crédits d’impôt pour la famille. Ce qu’on constate, c’est que le premier ministre et son équipe libérale ont mis fin à toutes sortes de crédits familiaux, ce qui a fait augmenter les taxes de manière substantielle. De plus, ils ont tenté à maintes reprises d’augmenter de manière très importante d’autres taxes. Ils ont également augmenté des retenues sur le salaire. On pense notamment à l’augmentation du Régime de pensions du Canada. Vraiment, lorsqu’on regarde l’ensemble des différents bénéfices ou des différentes avenues monétaires que les Canadiens reçoivent, on voit que leurs taxes ont augmenté.
Nous ne faisons pas confiance au premier ministre lorsqu’il nous dit qu’il n’y aura pas d’augmentation de taxes après les prochaines élections s’il est réélu. Nous savons qu’il va devoir le faire à cause de tous ses échecs répétés. Sur le plan économique, il y a des déficits importants de 60 milliards de dollars de plus sur la dette. Ces déficits atteignent 80 milliards de dollars après trois ans et demi. Je pense également à ses échecs en ce qui concerne notre système d’immigration et la gestion des aller-retour à la frontière. Le Québec demande 300 millions de dollars pour pallier son déficit engendré par l’accueil des réfugiés illégaux. Je pense également à tout ce qui touche les relations internationales. Je pense aussi aux infrastructures.
Comment est-il possible que le premier ministre soit encore incapable aujourd’hui de confirmer aux citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou et de Québec qu’il va accepter d’aller de l’avant et d’aider le gouvernement de la CAQ à construire le troisième lien? Partout au monde, des projets gigantesques se font en matière d’infrastructures. Pourtant, depuis trois ans, le gouvernement libéral est incapable de fournir plus de quelques milliards de dollars sur 187 milliards de dollars.
Les Canadiens vont payer pour les échecs du premier ministre. Nous voulons qu'il s'engage par écrit à ne pas augmenter les impôts ou les taxes s'il est réélu.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-22 18:01 [p.22699]
Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to speak this evening. I want to acknowledge the people of Beauport—Limoilou watching us in real time or watching a rebroadcast on Twitter or Facebook.
Dear citizens, this evening we are debating a very important motion on a topic that is very sensitive for all Canadians given that we are talking about other Canadians. We are talking about Canadian combatants who have joined the Islamic State since 2013. More than 190 Canadians have made the solemn decision to join the ranks of the Islamic State, sometimes unwittingly, sometimes fully consciously. We condemn their decision to go overseas to join Daesh, better known as the Islamic State, which shrank in size considerably following the western coalition attacks. The group is located primarily in Syria and Iraq, in the Middle East.
These 190 Canadians decided to go overseas to join the Islamic State, which fights western countries and their values, including liberal democracy and gender equality. These are values that are dear to Canadian parliamentary democracy.
Today, the member for Winnipeg North and a number of his Liberal colleagues stated that these 190 Canadians were radicalized on the Internet, by reading literature or by ISIS propagandists on social networks. The Liberals are telling us that we should help Canadians who went to fight against Canada's military members and liberal democracy. Who knows. Perhaps they went to fight in order to one day destroy Canada's political system because they espouse different views. Every time, the Liberals tell us that we need to take pity on them and hold their hands because they were radicalized.
Today, we have moved our motion to address the following reality. Some of them were radicalized. However, I would venture that the vast majority of Canadians who went overseas to join Daesh did so of their own volition and for reasons that are rational, objective and politically motivated and that they believe are good reasons. They did not do so because they were alienated or radicalized. They perhaps want to destroy liberal democracy and gender equality around the world. They had several reasons for joining ISIS. They are not necessarily crazy or alienated.
How are we going to deal with those Canadians who return to Canada? I am not talking about those who left because they were suffering from mental illness or alienation, but rather those who went to the areas where ISIS attacks and counterattacks were taking place, and went of their own free will, to fight Canadian soldiers and soldiers of our allied military partners.
Today the Liberals are saying that the Conservatives are inventing numbers. Journalist Manon Cornellier, a director with the parliamentary press gallery, is highly regarded in the journalism community. She is very professional. In her article in Le Devoir this morning, she writes:
Some 190 Canadians are active in overseas terrorist groups such as Islamic State, also known as Daesh, mostly in Syria and Iraq. About 60 have returned to Canada, but only four have faced charges to date.
A professional journalist, employed by a highly respected newspaper that has been around for decades in Canada, must check her sources and facts before publishing any articles. Ms. Cornellier is reporting exactly the same figures as the official opposition. These are concrete numbers: 190 Canadians left; 60 of those terrorists, who have deliberately committed horrific crimes like raping women and killing children, have returned to Canada; four of them have faced criminal charges; and no one knows where the other 56 are.
What we are asking for is perfectly reasonable and normal in a country governed by the rule of law like Canada. We are asking the government to bring forward a plan within 45 days for determining the whereabouts of the 56 terrorists, both known and unknown, and others who may be coming, finding out what they are doing, and making sure that in the days, weeks or months to come, they are formally charged for what they did. Many of them did what they did for objective, political reasons. They were on a kind of campaign or crusade that went against Canadian and international law.
I will continue quoting from Ms. Cornellier article's in Le Devoir:
Daesh meets the definition of a terrorist organization, and its actions meet the definition of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Under the international law that Canada helped formulate, a country can prosecute anyone who committed such crimes and is physically present on its territory, regardless of where the acts were committed. Furthermore, Canada passed its own universal jurisdiction law in 2000 after ratifying the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. It used that law in 2005 to prosecute Désiré Munyaneza for crimes against humanity for his role in the Rwandan genocide.
This is not a first. She also writes:
According to Kyle Matthews, executive director of the Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies, Canada must not allow Canadian fighters to return to Canada or be repatriated without holding them responsible for the atrocities they helped perpetrate. They must be prosecuted to deter others from committing such crimes.
In other words, Ms. Cornellier and the executive director of the Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies are saying exactly what we, Her Majesty's loyal opposition, are saying: these crimes must be punished by the courts.
Here is one final excellent quote from her article that shines a light on what we are saying today:
Investigations and the gathering of admissible evidence are indeed difficult, but the government is responsible for finding a solution. It must devise a legal process that operates in accordance with the principles of fundamental justice and overcomes the unique constraints that interfere with punishing these crimes. Without that, there can be no justice, and barbaric acts will continue to go unpunished.
That was written by Manon Cornellier, who is with a rather left-wing paper, Le Devoir, and is a director of the Parliamentary Press Gallery here in Ottawa.
That was not the Conservatives talking. It was a professional journalist who provided the same figures we did and who, like us, says that these 190 Canadians who participated in attacks in Syria or Iraq with ISIS committed barbaric acts. She is saying that the government must absolutely bring these people to justice when they return to Canada, that it is a matter of fundamental principles and Canadian history.
I would like to read the motion we moved today and that the Liberals have agreed to support. That said, they have decided to support our motion on a number of occasions and then failed to produce any meaningful action. The motion reads as follows:
That the House support the sentiments expressed by Nadia Murad, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, who in her book entitled The Last Girl: My Story of Captivity, and My Fight Against the Islamic State, stated: “I dream about one day bringing all the militants to justice, not just the leaders like Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi but all the guards and slave owners, every man who pulled a trigger and pushed my brothers’ bodies into their mass grave, every fighter who tried to brainwash young boys into hating their mothers for being Yazidi, every Iraqi who welcomed the terrorists into their cities and helped them, thinking to themselves, Finally we can be rid of those nonbelievers. They should all be put on trial before the entire world, like the Nazi leaders after World War II, and not given the chance to hide.”; and call on the government to: (a) refrain from repeating the past mistakes of paying terrorists with taxpayers’ dollars or trying to reintegrate returning terrorists back into Canadian society; and (b) table within 45 days after the adoption of this motion a plan to immediately bring to justice anyone who has fought as an ISIS terrorist or participated in any terrorist activity, including those who are in Canada or have Canadian citizenship.
That is the motion that we moved this morning and that we will soon be voting on.
Starting next week, if possible, we want the Liberal government to focus on bringing perpetrators of genocide and terrorist acts to justice and ensuring that courts have access to evidence gathered against suspected terrorists.
We want the Liberal government to keep Canadians safe from those who are suspected of committing acts of terrorism and to take special measures, like our previous Conservative government did in the wake of the terrorist attacks that took place here on Parliament Hill and nearby in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu. We responded by bringing forward Bill C-51.
We want the Liberals to encourage greater use of the tools to place conditions on those suspected of committing terrorist acts or genocide, as we did with Bill C-51.
We want the Liberals to institute processes for bringing perpetrators of atrocities to justice, since the current process is too slow, fails victims and prevents them from going home.
Lastly, we want the Liberals to support initiatives like those proposed by Premier Doug Ford, to ensure that terrorists returning to Canada are restricted from taking advantage of Canada's generous social programs as part of their reintegration.
In my riding, every weekend, whether I am at a spaghetti dinner or going door to door, my constituents ask me how it is possible that the Liberal government's primary goal continues to be helping people who are not yet citizens or helping Canadians who have fought against our own soldiers.
In Canada, above all we should help Canadians who are struggling to make ends meet or to find employment, as well as those having a hard time joining the workforce because of disability or other reasons.
We hope that beyond their support for our motion, the Liberals will come up with a real plan to address the problem of returning Islamic combatants, those Canadians who sadly decided to fight our values and our country.
Monsieur le Président, je suis très content de prendre la parole ce soir. J'aimerais saluer tous les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en temps réel ou qui nous écouteront en rediffusion sur Twitter ou sur Facebook.
Chers citoyens, nous débattons ce soir d'une motion fort importante qui porte sur un sujet très sensible pour tous les Canadiens, étant donné qu'on parle d'autres Canadiens. Nous parlons des combattants canadiens qui ont rejoint le groupe État islamique depuis 2013. Plus de 190 Canadiens ont pris la décision solennelle de joindre les rangs du groupe État islamique, parfois malgré eux, parfois en toute clarté d'esprit. Bien entendu, nous déplorons leur décision d'aller outre-mer pour participer aux campagnes de Daech, plutôt connu sous le nom de groupe armé État islamique, dont la portée a rapetissé de manière importante à la suite des attaques de la coalition occidentale. Le groupe se situe principalement en Syrie et en Irak, au Moyen-Orient.
Ces 190 Canadiens ont décidé d'aller outre-mer pour rejoindre le groupe État islamique, qui combat les pays occidentaux et leurs valeurs, dont la démocratie libérale et l'égalité entre les hommes et les femmes. Ce sont des valeurs qui sont chères à la démocratie parlementaire canadienne.
Aujourd'hui, le député de Winnipeg-Nord et plusieurs de ses collègues libéraux ont mentionné que ces 190 Canadiens se sont radicalisés par l'entremise d'Internet, de lectures ou de propagandistes du groupe armé État islamique sur les réseaux sociaux. Les libéraux nous disent qu'il faut tendre la main aux Canadiens qui sont allés se battre contre les militaires canadiens et les valeurs de la démocratie libérale canadienne. Qui sait, ils sont peut-être allés combattre pour un jour détruire le système politique canadien, parce qu'ils en ont une vision différente. Chaque fois, les libéraux nous disent qu'il faut les prendre par la main parce qu'ils font pitié et qu'ils ont été radicalisés.
Aujourd'hui, nous déposons notre motion pour faire face à la réalité suivante. Certains d'entre eux ont effectivement été radicalisés. Cependant, je suis prêt à dire que la lourde majorité des Canadiens qui sont partis outre-mer pour rejoindre les rangs de Daech l'ont certainement fait pour des raisons qui leur sont propres, rationnelles, objectives et motivées par des raisons politiques qu'ils croient bonnes. Ils ne l'ont pas tous fait parce qu'ils ont été aliénés ou radicalisés. Ils veulent peut-être mettre fin à la démocratie libérale ainsi qu'à l'égalité entre les hommes et les femmes dans le monde. Ils ont plusieurs raisons d'avoir rejoint les rangs du groupe armé État islamique. Ils ne sont pas nécessairement fous ou aliénés.
Comment va-t-on répondre à ces Canadiens qui reviennent sur le territoire canadien? Je ne parle pas de ceux qui sont partis à cause de la maladie mentale ou de l'aliénation, mais bien de ceux qui sont partis sur le territoire où avaient lieu les offensives et les contre-offensives du groupe armé État islamique de leur plein gré pour combattre les militaires canadiens et d'autres militaires alliés à notre cher pays.
Aujourd'hui, les libéraux ont dit que les conservateurs inventent des chiffres. La journaliste Manon Cornellier, responsable de la Tribune de la presse parlementaire, est très reconnue dans le milieu journalistique. Elle est très professionnelle. Dans son article publié dans Le Devoir ce matin, elle écrit:
Ils seraient environ 190 Canadiens actifs à l’étranger, surtout en Syrie et en Irak, dans des groupes terroristes, comme le groupe armé État islamique, Daech. Une soixantaine seraient déjà revenus au pays, mais, jusqu’ici, seulement quatre ont fait l’objet d’accusations.
Une journaliste professionnelle, employée d'un journal de grande qualité qui existe depuis plusieurs décennies au Canada, doit vérifier les sources et les informations avant de publier ses articles. Mme Cornellier indique exactement les mêmes chiffres que l'opposition officielle. Ce sont des chiffres concrets: 190 Canadiens sont partis; 60 de ces terroristes, qui ont délibérément commis des crimes terribles comme violer des femmes et tuer des enfants, sont revenus au pays; quatre ont fait l'objet d'accusations; et on ne sait pas où sont les 56 autres.
Ce que nous demandons est tout à fait raisonnable et normal dans un État de droit comme le Canada. On demande au gouvernement de mettre de l'avant un plan d'ici 45 jours pour s'assurer de savoir ce que font et où sont les 56 terroristes, connus ou non, et les autres qui vont peut-être venir, et qu'on s'assure de porter, dans les jours, les semaines ou les mois à venir, à des accusations formelles eu égard à ce qu'ils ont fait. Nombreux sont ceux qui l'ont fait pour des raisons objectives, politiques. C'est une sorte de campagne ou une croisade qu'ils ont menée et qui va à l'encontre du droit canadien et du droit international.
Je vais continuer à citer le texte de Mme Cornellier dans Le Devoir:
Daech répond à la définition d'organisation terroriste et ses actions, à celles de génocide, de crimes de guerre et de crimes contre l'humanité. En vertu du droit international que le Canada a contribué à élaborer, un pays peut poursuivre quiconque a commis ces crimes et se trouve sur son territoire, peu importe où les actes ont été perpétrés. Le Canada a d'ailleurs adopté en 2000 sa propre loi de compétence universelle à la suite de sa ratification du Statut de Rome de la Cour pénale internationale. Il s'en est prévalu en 2005 pour poursuivre pour crime contre l'humanité Désiré Munyaneza, un complice du génocide rwandais.
On n'est pas dans une première, ici. Également, elle écrit:
Selon le directeur de l'Institut montréalais d'études sur le génocide et les droits de la personne, Kyle Matthews, le Canada ne doit pas permettre le retour ou le rapatriement de ces combattants canadiens sans les tenir responsables des atrocités dont ils se sont rendus complices. Ils doivent être traduits en justice pour décourager la perpétuation de ces crimes.
En d'autres mots, Mme Cornellier et le directeur de l'Institut montréalais d'études sur le génocide disent exactement ce que nous — la loyale opposition de Sa Majesté — disons, soit que ces crimes doivent être punis devant la justice.
Également, voici une dernière citation tirée de son article que je trouve excellent et qui met en lumière ce que nous disons aujourd'hui:
Les enquêtes et la récolte de preuves admissibles sont difficiles, soit, mais il revient au gouvernement de chercher une solution. Il doit envisager une procédure judiciaire qui permet à la fois de respecter les principes de justice fondamentale et de surmonter les contraintes uniques qui freinent la sanction de ces crimes. Sans cela, justice ne sera pas rendue, et l'impunité restera la règle face à la barbarie.
Je rappelle que je cite la journaliste Manon Cornellier, responsable de la Tribune de la presse parlementaire canadienne, ici, à Ottawa et d'un journal plus tôt à gauche, Le Devoir.
Ce ne sont pas des conservateurs qui parlent, c'est une journaliste professionnelle qui a donné les mêmes chiffres que nous et qui, comme nous, dit que ce sont des gestes barbares qui ont été perpétués par ces 190 Canadiens qui ont participé aux offensives en territoire syrien ou irakien avec le groupe État islamique. Elle dit qu'il est absolument fondamental et nécessaire que ceux-ci, lorsqu'ils sont rapatriés, soient traduits en justice pour des questions de principes fondamentaux et de l'histoire du Canada.
J'aimerais également lire la motion que nous présentons aujourd'hui et que les libéraux ont accepté d'appuyer. Cela dit, comme dans nombreux cas où ils ont décidé d'appuyer notre motion, aucune action concrète de leur part ne s'en est suivie:
Que la Chambre appuie les sentiments exprimés par Nadia Murad, lauréate du prix Nobel de la paix, qui, dans son livre intitulé Pour que je sois la dernière, déclare: « Je rêve qu’un jour tous les militants seront traduits en justice. Pas seulement les dirigeants, comme Abou Bakr al-Baghdadi, mais aussi tous les gardes et les propriétaires d’esclaves, tous les hommes qui ont appuyé sur une détente et ceux qui ont poussé mes frères dans leur charnier, tous les combattants qui ont essayé de mettre dans la tête de jeunes garçons qu’ils haïssaient leur mère parce qu’elle était yézidie, tous les Iraquiens qui ont accueilli les terroristes dans leur ville et qui les ont aidés en se disant qu’ils allaient enfin pouvoir se débarrasser des mécréants. Ils devraient tous être jugés devant le monde entier, comme les dirigeants nazis après la Deuxième Guerre mondiale, et ils ne devraient pas avoir la possibilité de se cacher. »; et exhorte le gouvernement à : a) éviter de répéter les erreurs du passé en payant des terroristes avec l’argent des contribuables ou en tentant de réintégrer dans la société canadienne des terroristes de retour au pays; b) déposer dans les 45 jours suivant l’adoption de la présente motion un plan visant à traduire immédiatement en justice quiconque a combattu au sein du groupe terroriste EIIL ou participé à une quelconque activité terroriste, y compris les personnes qui se trouvent au Canada ou qui ont la citoyenneté canadienne.
Voilà la motion que nous avons déposée ce matin et sur laquelle nous voterons très bientôt.
Dès la semaine prochaine, si possible, nous voulons que le gouvernement libéral se concentre sur les poursuites judiciaires contre les auteurs de génocides ou d'actes terroristes et qu'il s'assure que les tribunaux ont accès aux preuves recueillies sur certains terroristes soupçonnés.
Nous voulons qu'il cherche à protéger les Canadiens contre les gens soupçonnés d'avoir commis des actes terroristes et qu'il prenne des mesures spéciales comme celles que notre précédent gouvernement conservateur avait mises en place dans la foulée des attentats terroristes qui ont eu lieu ici même, sur la Colline du Parlement, ainsi qu'à Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, qui est tout près. Nous avions mis en place le projet de loi C-51.
Nous voulons que les libéraux encouragent l'utilisation accrue d'outils afin d'imposer des conditions aux gens soupçonnés d'activités terroristes ou de génocide, comme on le faisait dans le projet de loi C-51.
Nous voulons que les libéraux mettent en place des processus visant à traduire les auteurs d'atrocités en justice, puisque le processus actuel est trop lent, nuit aux victimes et les empêche de rentrer chez elles.
Enfin, nous voulons que les libéraux soutiennent des initiatives comme celles proposées par le premier ministre Doug Ford pour s'assurer que les terroristes qui reviennent au Canada ne peuvent pas profiter des généreux programmes sociaux du Canada dans le cadre de leur réintégration.
Dans ma circonscription, toutes les fins de semaine, que ce soit lors des soupers spaghetti ou quand je fais du porte-à-porte, à tous les événements où je vais à la rencontre de mes concitoyens, ceux-ci me demandent comment il est possible que le gouvernement libéral ait toujours comme objectif premier d'aider des gens qui ne sont pas encore citoyens ou d'aider des Canadiens qui ont combattu nos propres miliaires.
Au Canada, on devrait d'abord et avant tout aider les Canadiens qui peinent à joindre les deux bouts et à trouver un emploi, ainsi que ceux qui ont de la difficulté à entrer sur le marché du travail pour des raisons d'incapacité ou autres.
Nous espérons qu'au-delà de leur appui à l'égard de notre motion, les libéraux vont mettre en place un plan réel qui s'attaque au problème du retour des combattants islamiques, ces Canadiens qui ont pris la décision bien triste de combattre nos valeurs et notre pays.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-17 16:32 [p.22510]
Madam Speaker, I will be sharing my time with my very hon. colleague from Cariboo—Prince George, in northern B.C.
As usual, I want to say hello to the people of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching us live on CPAC. I know that many of them do watch us, because they tell me so when I go door to door. They tell me that they watched me the week before. I want to say hello to all of them.
Today's debate is a very important one, since we are talking about harassment and discrimination in the workplace. Some may be surprised to hear me say this, and I am no expert, but it seems to me that the Canada Labour Code does not apply to employees who work in MPs' offices on Parliament Hill. This means that the code would not apply to me or my employees. This is rather surprising, in 2018.
I want to quickly touch on last week, which I spent in my riding. You will see why. I hosted two economic round tables. The first round table was for the Beauport business network, which I created a year and a half ago. There are some 50 business owners in this network, who get together once a month to talk about business-related issues and priorities in the riding. On Friday morning, I also held a round table called “Conservatives are listening to Quebecers”. This round table was attended by social, community and business stakeholders, among others.
Yesterday I asked the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour a question. After all, we are talking about workplaces here, with Bill C-65. I asked her if she was aware that we are in a crisis at the moment, especially in Quebec City, but all over Canada, because of the labour shortage. She made a mockery of it, saying that it was proof that the government has created so many jobs in Canada that businesses can no longer find workers. While that may be true from an objective, Socratic and rational standpoint, she is ignoring a real crisis situation that we are in.
I want to say one last thing before I get to the bill. At the two round tables I hosted, every time I visit businesses in my riding, in all my discussions with constituents and in all the correspondence I receive every day, to which I reply in writing every time, people mention the labour shortage. Some businesses have had to shut down in Beauport—Limoilou and others are scaling back operations, so I think it is very sad and upsetting that the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour would make a mockery of my question. The people of Quebec City were not happy to see that on Twitter and Facebook.
Today we are talking about an important bill, the act to amend the Canada Labour Code regarding harassment and violence, the Parliamentary Employment and Staff Relations Act and the Budget Implementation Act, 2017, No. 1. It is clear that Conservatives, New Democrats, Liberals and all Canadians in general support the Liberal government's recently introduced bill. That is certainly not something I say every day, but when it is true, it must be acknowledged. With this important bill, even employees on Parliament Hill will benefit from guidelines and protection to keep them safe from sexual harassment, psychological harassment and every kind of discriminatory behaviour in the workplace.
I can say that this affects us all. It could also affect our family, a cousin, a brother or sister and, in my case, it affects my children. My daughter Victoria is four years old and my son Winston is a year and a half. My daughter started kindergarten a few months ago. It is the first time she has attended school. We definitely do not want her to experience discrimination or harassment. It will inevitably happen because good and evil are part of life, and harassment and discrimination will always exist. That is why it is important to have laws that govern, try to control, eliminate or at least reduce this as much as possible in our society.
I would like to tell you that I have directly experienced discrimination and psychological harassment, but not sexual harassment, thank God. When I was in grade six, I moved from New Brunswick to Quebec. I can see my colleague laughing because he knows that I grew up in New Brunswick. I am from Quebec, but I grew up in New Brunswick. I moved to Quebec when I was in grade six. Children can be very brutal because they lack empathy and an understanding of the context in which they find themselves.
Kids are often oblivious to the harm they inflict on others. I got beaten up at recess every day for a year, so this is a subject I am not unfamiliar with. In my case, the situation made me stronger. Unfortunately, in other cases, it has ruined lives. What we want to avoid is situations where harassment and discrimination destroy lives. It is terrible to see a life completely destroyed after such an incident.
I want to reiterate that, setting politics aside and speaking from a human perspective, all members and all Canadians should support this bill. However, that does not mean there is no need to propose certain amendments, which I will discuss shortly.
The bill is meant to strengthen the workplace safety framework on Parliament Hill. When I think of all the young Canadians who work on the Hill, it makes me even more motivated to support this bill. The people working on the Hill are often young Canadians in their twenties who are full of hope, ambition and energy. They love politics, and they love Canada. They are proud to work for a minister, the Prime Minister, a shadow cabinet member or an MP. These young people arrive in Parliament full of energy and enthusiasm.
There is no denying that, throughout our country's history, members and ministers have behaved inappropriately or committed inappropriate acts, including sexual harassment, psychological harassment and discrimination.
Many of the young victims were surely brilliant, highly motivated and ambitious individuals. Perhaps they were even future Liberal, Conservative or NDP prime ministers, although unfortunately for them, that will never happen now. These were young people who were here for the right reasons, who were not cynical. A lot of young people in Canada are saying they have no use for politics, and that is unfortunate. Those young people should read books on Canadian history to understand what we are doing here today. Some young people have had the courage to get over their cynicism and come to this place, only to become victims of sexual or psychological harassment or discrimination. Careers have been destroyed in some cases, along with their hope and love for Canada. I find that appalling and very upsetting.
This bill sets out to fill a legal void. I would like to remind everyone that Parliament Hill was the only place where Canada Labour Code provisions on harassment and discrimination did not apply. There was a legal void, and it is important to acknowledge that that void played a part in destroying young Canadians who came here full of energy to help build a strong and thriving country on both national and international stages. Everyone wants a workplace that contributes to their quality of life, one where safety is important. Employees perform better in such workplaces.
Most of the Conservatives' amendments were accepted. We successfully introduced an amendment to prevent political interference during harassment investigations. The Conservatives played an active role in bringing the bill to this stage. We successfully introduced an amendment to ensure strict timelines for investigations into incidents of harassment. We proposed mandatory sexual harassment training, training that all MPs received. We proposed a mandatory review of the bill after five years because it needs to be reviewed at regular intervals, as my colleague said.
In closing, since this is Small Business Week, I want to say three cheers for business people. I thank the people of Beauport—Limoilou for the work they do every day. I think they are wonderful, and I look forward to seeing them when I go door to door.
Madame la Présidente, je tiens à dire que je partagerai mon temps de parole avec mon très honorable collègue de Cariboo—Prince George, dans le Nord de la Colombie-Britannique.
Comme d'habitude, j'aimerais d'emblée saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent actuellement en direct sur CPAC. Je sais que plusieurs d'entre eux le font, parce que lorsque je fais du porte-à-porte, souvent, ils m'en font part. Ils m'informent du fait qu'ils m'ont écouté la semaine d'avant, notamment. Je les salue tous.
Le débat d'aujourd'hui est fort important, puisque nous parlons de harcèlement et de discrimination en milieu de travail. Peut-être que certains seront fort surpris de ce que je vais dire — et je ne suis pas un expert —, mais semble-t-il que le Code canadien du travail ne s'appliquait pas aux employés qui travaillent dans les bureaux de députés sur la Colline parlementaire. Donc, il ne s'appliquait pas à moi ni à mes employés. En 2018, on peut être assez surpris de cela.
J'aimerais revenir rapidement sur la semaine dernière, que j'ai passée dans ma circonscription. On comprendra pourquoi. J'ai tenu deux tables rondes économiques. La première était une table ronde économique du réseau des gens d'affaires de Beauport, un réseau que j'ai créé il y a un an et demi. Nous sommes une cinquantaine d'entrepreneurs et nous nous regroupons une fois par mois pour discuter des enjeux et des priorités entrepreneuriales dans la circonscription. Également, j'ai tenu vendredi matin une table ronde intitulée « Les conservateurs à l'écoute des Québécois ». Encore une fois, cela regroupe des acteurs de différentes communautés, des acteurs sociaux, communautaires, entrepreneuriaux, etc.
Hier, j'ai posé une question à la ministre de l’Emploi, du Développement de la main-d'œuvre et du Travail. Justement, on parle de lieux de travail dans le projet de loi C-65. Je lui ai demandé si elle savait qu'il y a une crise en ce moment, tout particulièrement dans la ville de Québec, mais partout au Canada, à cause de la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre. Elle a tourné cela à la dérision en disant que c'était la preuve que le gouvernement avait créé tellement d'emplois au Canada que les entreprises ne pouvaient plus trouver d'employés. Même si d'un point de vue objectif, socratique et rationnel, c'est vrai de dire cela, elle fait fi d'une vraie crise qui sévit actuellement.
Je vais dire une dernière une chose avant d'en arriver au projet de loi. Dans les deux tables rondes que j'ai tenues, dans toutes les visites d'entreprises que je fais dans ma circonscription, dans toutes mes discussions avec les citoyens et dans toutes les correspondances que je reçois chaque jour, et auxquelles je réponds par écrit chaque fois, les gens me parlent de pénurie de main-d'oeuvre. Des entreprises ferment leurs portes déjà à Beauport—Limoilou, et d'autres ralentissent leurs activités. Je suis donc très désolé et attristé que la ministre de l’Emploi, du Développement de la main-d'œuvre et du Travail ait tourné ma question en dérision. Les gens de Québec ne sont pas contents de voir cela sur Twitter et Facebook.
Nous discutons aujourd'hui d'un projet de loi important, la Loi modifiant le Code canadien du travail relativement au harcèlement et à la violence, la Loi sur les relations de travail au Parlement et la Loi no 1 d'exécution du budget de 2017. Il ne fait aucun doute que les conservateurs, les néo-démocrates, les libéraux et tous les Canadiens en général appuient ce projet de loi quand même juste présenté par le gouvernement libéral. C'est rare que je dis cela, mais quand c'est le cas, il faut le reconnaître. Ce projet de loi important vise à faire que même les employés de la Colline parlementaire bénéficient de balises et de protections qui les sécurisent dans leur environnement de travail en ce qui a trait au harcèlement sexuel, au harcèlement psychologique et à des comportements de discriminations de toutes sortes.
Je peux dire que cela nous touche tous. Cela peut aussi toucher notre famille, un cousin ou une cousine, un frère ou une soeur, et, dans mon cas, cela touche mes enfants. Ma fille Victoria a quatre ans et mon fils Winston a un an et demi. Ma fille est à la pré-maternelle déjà depuis quelques mois. C'est la première fois que ma fille vit un contexte scolaire. C'est sûr que nous ne voulons pas qu'elle vive un contexte de discrimination et de harcèlement. Cela va sûrement arriver tout de même, parce que, comme le mal et le bien font partie intégrante de la vie sur terre, le harcèlement et la discrimination existeront toujours. Voilà pourquoi c'est important d'avoir des lois qui régissent, qui tentent d'encadrer, de faire disparaître ou, du moins, de diminuer cela le plus possible dans notre société.
J'aimerais dire que moi-même, j'ai expérimenté de très proche la discrimination et le harcèlement psychologique, mais pas le harcèlement sexuel, Dieu merci. En sixième année, j'ai déménagé du Nouveau-Brunswick au Québec. Je vois mon collègue qui rigole, parce qu'il sait que j'ai grandi au Nouveau-Brunswick. Je viens du Québec, mais j'ai grandi au Nouveau-Brunswick, et je suis arrivé au Québec en sixième année. Les enfants peuvent être très violents, parce qu'ils manquent d'empathie et de compréhension du contexte dans lequel ils se situent.
Les enfants n'ont souvent pas conscience du mal qu'ils font à autrui. Pendant un an, j'ai été battu tous les jours dans la cour de récréation. Ce n'est donc pas quelque chose qui m'est inconnu. Dans mon cas, la situation m'a rendu plus fort. Malheureusement, dans d'autres cas, cela a détruit des vies. Ce que l'on veut éviter, c'est que le harcèlement et la discrimination détruisent des vies. C'est terrible de voir qu'une vie est complètement détruite à la suite d'un tel événement.
Je tiens à réitérer le fait que, d'un point de vue humain et au-delà de la politique, tous les députés et tous les Canadiens devraient appuyer le projet de loi. Par contre, cela ne veut pas dire qu'on ne voit pas la nécessité de proposer certains amendements. Je vais en parler bientôt.
Le projet de loi vise à renforcer les balises de la sécurité au travail sur la Colline du Parlement. Quand je pense à tous les jeunes Canadiens qui travaillent sur la Colline, j'ai encore plus envie d'appuyer ce projet de loi. Les gens qui travaillent sur la Colline sont souvent des jeunes Canadiens âgés d'une vingtaine d'années qui sont pleins d'espoir, d'ambition et d'énergie, qui aiment la politique et qui aiment le Canada. Ils sont fiers de travailler pour un ministre, pour le premier ministre, pour un membre du cabinet fantôme ou pour un député. Ces jeunes arrivent au Parlement pleins de vigueur et d'énergie.
Il ne faut pas nier que, dans l'histoire de notre pays, des députés et des ministres ont eu des comportements inappropriés ou ont posé des gestes inappropriés, qu'il s'agisse de harcèlement sexuel, de harcèlement psychologique ou de discrimination.
Parmi les jeunes qui ont vécu cela, plusieurs étaient brillants, extrêmement motivés et ambitieux. Ils étaient peut-être des futurs premiers ministres libéral, conservateur ou néo-démocrate — bien que cela ne soit jamais arrivé, malheureusement pour eux. Ce sont des jeunes qui étaient ici pour les bonnes raisons, et ils n'étaient pas cyniques. Au Canada, il y a beaucoup de jeunes qui disent que la politique ne sert à rien, et cela est dommage. Ces jeunes devraient lire des livres sur l'histoire du Canada pour comprendre ce que nous faisons ici aujourd'hui. Certains jeunes ont eu le courage de ne pas être cyniques et de venir ici, mais ils ont été victimes de harcèlement sexuel ou psychologique et de discrimination. Dans certains cas, on a détruit leur carrière, leur espoir et leur amour envers le pays. Cela est épouvantable et m'attriste énormément.
Ce projet de loi vise à rectifier un vide juridique. J'aimerais rappeler que la Colline du Parlement était le seul endroit où les dispositions du Code canadien du travail concernant le harcèlement et la discrimination ne s'appliquaient pas. Il y avait donc un vide juridique. Il est d'autant plus important de constater que ce vide juridique contribuait à détruire des jeunes Canadiens qui arrivaient ici pleins d'énergie afin de continuer à construire un pays fort et épanoui, à la fois au niveau national et international. Bien entendu, chacun veut un milieu de travail qui permet d'avoir une qualité de vie et où la sécurité est importante, puisque cela permet d'être plus performant.
La plupart des amendements proposés par les conservateurs ont été acceptés. Nous avons présenté avec succès un amendement visant à éviter l'ingérence politique pendant les enquêtes sur les incidences du harcèlement. Les conservateurs ont donc participé activement à la mise en oeuvre du projet de loi. Nous avons présenté avec succès un amendement pour nous assurer que les délais imposés pour les enquêtes sur les incidences du harcèlement sont stricts. Nous avons proposé une formation obligatoire sur le harcèlement sexuel, une formation que tous les députés ont suivie. Nous avons proposé l'examen obligatoire du projet de loi après cinq ans, puisqu'il doit constamment être revu, comme ma collègue l'a spécifié.
En terminant, vive les entrepreneurs, puisque c'est la semaine de la PME. Je remercie les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou du travail qu'ils font tous les jours. Je les adore, et on se verra lors du porte-à-porte.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-05-04 12:42 [p.19136]
Mr. Speaker, it is always an honour to speak in the House of Commons.
On a more serious note, I would like to take a moment to talk about my colleague from Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes, who passed away very suddenly this week. I never imagined this could happen. I share his family's sorrow, though of course mine could never equal theirs. His young children will not get to share amazing moments in their lives with their father, and that is staggeringly sad. I would therefore like to publicly state that I encourage them to hang in there. One day, they will surely find joy in living again, and we are here for them.
As usual, I want to say acknowledge all of the residents of Beauport—Limoilou who are tuning in. I would like to let them know that there will be a press conference Monday morning at my office. I will be announcing a very important initiative for our riding. I urge them to watch the news or read the paper when the time comes.
Bill C-48 would essentially enact a moratorium on the entire Pacific coast. It would apply from Prince Rupert, a fascinating city that I visited in 2004 at the age of 18, to Port Hardy, at the northern tip of Vancouver Island. This moratorium is designed to prevent oil tankers, including Canadian ones, that transport more than 12,500 tons of oil from accessing Canada's inland waters, and therefore our ports.
This moratorium will prohibit the construction of any pipeline project or maritime port beyond Port Hardy, on the northern tip of Vancouver Island, to export our products to the west. In the past three weeks, the Liberal government has slowly but surely been trying to put an end to Canada's natural resources, and oil in particular. Northern Gateway is just one example.
The first thing the Liberals did when they came to power was to amend the environmental assessment process managed by the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency; they even brag about it. Northern Gateway was in the process of being accepted, but as a result of these amendments, the project was cancelled, even though the amendments were based on the cabinet's political agenda and not on scientific facts, as the Liberal government claims.
When I look at Bill C-48, which would enact a moratorium on oil tankers in western Canada, it seems clear to me that the Liberals had surely been planning to block the Northern Gateway project for a while. Their argument that the project did not clear the environmental assessment is invalid, since they are now imposing a moratorium that would have prevented this project from moving forward regardless.
The Prime Minister and member for Papineau has said Canada needs to phase out the oil sands. Not only did he say that during the campaign, but he said it again in Paris, before the French National Assembly, in front of about 300 members of the Macron government, who were all happy to hear it. I can guarantee my colleagues that Canadians were not happy to hear that, especially people living in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta who benefit economically from this natural resource. Through their hard work, all Canadians benefit from the incredible revenues and spinoffs generated by that industry.
My colleague from Prince Albert gave an exceptional speech this morning. He compassionately explained how hard it has been for families in Saskatchewan to accept and understand the decisions being made one after the other by this Liberal government. The government seems to be sending a message that is crystal clear: it does not support western Canada's natural resources, namely oil and natural gas. What is important to understand, however, is that this sector represents roughly 60% the economy of the western provinces and 40% of Canada's entire economy.
I can see why the Minister of Environment and Climate Change says we need to tackle climate change first. The way she talks to us every day is so arrogant. We believe in climate change. That is not the issue. Climate change and natural resources are complex issues, and we must not forget the backdrop to this whole debate. People are suffering because they need to put food on the table. Nothing has changed since the days of Cro-Magnon man. People have to eat every day. People have to find ways to survive.
When the Liberals go on about how to save the planet and the polar bears, that is their post-modern, post-materialist ideology talking. Conservatives, in contrast, talk about how to help families get through the day. That is what the Canadian government's true priority should be.
Is it not completely absurd that even now, in 2018, most of the gas people buy in the Atlantic provinces, Quebec, and Ontario comes from Venezuela and Saudi Arabia even though we have one of the largest oil reserves in the world? Canada has the third-largest oil reserve in the world, in fact. That is not even counting the Arctic Ocean, of which we own a sizeable chunk and which has not yet been explored. Canada has tremendous potential in this sector.
As I have often told many of my Marxist-Leninist, leftist, and other colleagues, the price of oil is going to continue to rise dramatically until 2065 because of China's and India's fuel consumption. Should Canada say no to $1 trillion in economic spinoffs until then? Absolutely not.
How will we afford to pay for our hospitals, our schools, and our social services that are so dear to the left-wing advocates of the welfare state in Canada? As I said, the priority is to meet the needs of Canadians and Canada, a middle power that I adore.
To get back to the point I was making, as my colleague from Prince Albert said, the decision regarding Bill C-48 and the moratorium was made by cabinet, without any consultation or any study by a parliamentary committee. Day after day, the Liberals brag about being the government that has consulted more with Canadians over the past three years than any government in history. It is always about history with them.
The moratorium will have serious consequences for Canada's prosperity and the economic development of the western provinces, which represent a growing segment of the population. How can the Liberals justify the fact that they failed to conduct any environmental or scientific impact assessments, hold any Canada-wide consultations, or have a committee examine this issue? They did not even consult with the nine indigenous nations that live on the land covered by the moratorium. The NDP ought to be alarmed about that. That is the point I really want to talk about.
I have here a legal complaint filed with the B.C. Supreme Court by the Lax Kw'alaams first nation—I am sorry if I pronounced that wrong—represented by John Helin. The plaintiffs are the indigenous peoples living in the region covered by the moratorium. Only nine indigenous nations from that region are among the plaintiffs. The defendant is the Government of British Columbia.
The lawyer's argument is very interesting from a historical perspective.
The claim area includes and is adjacent to an open and safe deepwater shipping corridor and contains lands suitable for development as an energy corridor and protected deepwater ports for the development and operation of a maritime installation, as defined in Bill C-48, the oil tanker moratorium act.
“The plaintiffs' aboriginal title encompasses the right to choose to what uses the land can be put, including use as a marine installation subject only to justifiable environmental assessment and approval legislation.”
He continues:
The said action by Canada “discriminates against the plaintiffs by prohibiting the development of land...in an area that has one of the best deepwater ports and safest waterways in Canada, while permitting such development elsewhere”, such as in the St. Lawrence Gulf, the St. Lawrence River, and the Atlantic Ocean.
My point is quite simple. We have a legal argument here that shows that not only does the territory belong to the indigenous people and the indigenous people were not consulted, but that the indigenous people, whom the Liberals are said to love, are suing the Government of British Columbia. This will likely go all the way to the Supreme Court because this moratorium goes against their ancestral rights on their territory, which they want to develop for future oil exports. This government is doing a very poor job of this.
Monsieur le Président, c'est toujours un honneur de prendre la parole à la Chambre.
Sur un ton plus serein, j'aimerais prendre le temps de parler de mon collègue de Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands et Rideau Lakes, qui est mort cette semaine d'une façon extrêmement subite. Jamais je n'aurais cru que cela pourrait arriver. Je partage la tristesse de sa famille, même si la mienne ne peut être aussi profonde, bien sûr. Ses jeunes enfants ne pourront pas partager des moments incroyables de leur vie avec leur père, et c'est d'une tristesse ahurissante. Je voudrais donc dire publiquement que je les encourage à persévérer. Un jour, ils vont sûrement retrouver le goût de vivre, et nous sommes là pour les soutenir.
Comme d'habitude, j'aimerais saluer tous les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre. Je voudrais leur dire que, lundi matin, il y aura une conférence de presse à mon bureau. J'y annoncerai une initiative très importante pour la circonscription. Je les invite donc à écouter la télévision et à lire les journaux au moment opportun.
Le projet de loi C-48 vise à appliquer un moratoire, ni plus ni moins, sur l'ensemble de la côte pacifique. Il s'appliquera de Prince Rupert, une ville intéressante que j'ai visitée en 2004, quand j'avais 18 ans, jusqu'à Port Hardy, au nord de l'île de Vancouver. Ce moratoire vise à empêcher tous les pétroliers de ce monde, y compris les pétroliers canadiens qui transportent au-delà de 12 500 tonnes de pétrole, d'accéder aux eaux intérieures et donc aux ports du Canada.
Ce moratoire empêchera la construction, au-delà de la ville de Port Hardy, au nord de l'île de Vancouver, de tout projet d'oléoduc ou de port maritime pour exporter nos produits vers l'Ouest. Depuis les trois dernières années, le gouvernement libéral tente de mettre fin, lentement mais sûrement, aux ressources naturelles canadiennes, s'agissant particulièrement du pétrole. On n'a qu'à penser au projet Northern Gateway.
La première chose que les libéraux ont faite lorsqu'ils sont arrivés au pouvoir — et ils s'en vantent — a été de modifier les processus d'évaluation environnementale régis par l'Agence canadienne d'évaluation environnementale, qui se penche sur les projets énergétiques au Canada. Northern Gateway était en voie d'être accepté, mais à cause de ces modifications, qui n'étaient pas basées sur des faits scientifiques, comme le gouvernement libéral le dit toujours, mais plutôt sur des visées politiques du Cabinet, il a été annulé.
Quand je regarde le projet de loi C-48, qui vise à établir un moratoire sur les pétroliers dans l'Ouest canadien, je me dis que les libéraux songeaient assurément depuis longtemps à barrer la route au projet Northern Gateway. Leur argument selon lequel celui-ci n'a pas passé le test de l'évaluation environnementale est caduc, puisqu'ils imposent maintenant un moratoire qui aurait empêché ce projet de voir le jour de toute manière.
Le premier ministre et député de Papineau a dit qu'il fallait éliminer progressivement les sables bitumineux. Non seulement il l'a dit lors des élections, mais il l'a redit à Paris, à l'Assemblée nationale française, devant environ 300 membres de la députation du président Macron, qui étaient bien contents de l'entendre. Je peux garantir à mes collègues que les Canadiens n'étaient pas contents de l'entendre, encore moins ceux qui vivent au Manitoba, en Saskatchewan et en Alberta et qui bénéficient des retombées des ressources naturelles du pétrole. Grâce à leur travail, tous les Canadiens bénéficient des redevances et des retombées incroyables liées à cette industrie.
Mon collègue de la circonscription de Prince Albert a fait un discours remarquable, ce matin. Il a expliqué avec compassion combien il était difficile pour les familles de la Saskatchewan d'accepter et de comprendre les décisions prises l'une après l'autre par le gouvernement libéral. Ce dernier semble envoyer un message clair comme de l'eau de roche: il est contre les ressources naturelles du pétrole et du gaz naturel dans l'Ouest canadien. Toutefois, ce qu'il faut comprendre, c'est que cela correspond à environ 60 % de l'économie des provinces de l'Ouest et à 40 % de l'économie du Canada dans son entièreté.
Je peux bien comprendre que la ministre de l'Environnement et du Changement climatique dit qu'il faut d'abord s'attaquer aux changements climatiques. D'ailleurs, jour après jour, la manière dont elle nous parle est tellement arrogante, parce que nous croyons aux changements climatiques, là n'est pas la question. Les changements climatiques et les ressources naturelles sont des enjeux complexes, et il ne faut jamais oublier qu'au coeur de ce litige des individus souffrent, car ils doivent mettre de la nourriture sur la table. Rien n'a changé depuis le temps de l'homme de Cro-Magnon: il faut manger tous les jours. C'est vrai, il faut vivre.
Les libéraux sont toujours dans une idéologie postmoderne, postmatérialiste où ils nous parlent de comment sauver la planète et les ours polaires. Cependant, nous, les conservateurs, parlons de comment faire en sorte qu'une famille puisse vivre sa journée. C'est cela qui est la vraie priorité d'un gouvernement canadien.
En outre, n'est-ce pas une absurdité totale de penser qu'encore aujourd'hui, en 2018, la majorité du pétrole consommé dans les provinces de l'Atlantique, ainsi qu'au Québec et en Ontario, provient du Venezuela et de l'Arabie saoudite, alors que nous avons parmi les plus grandes réserves de pétrole au monde? En effet, le Canada possède la troisième plus grande réserve de pétrole du monde. Et cela, c'est sans compter l'océan Arctique, dont nous possédons une bonne partie, et qui n'a pas encore été exploré. Le Canada a donc un énorme potentiel dans ce domaine.
Comme je le dis souvent à plusieurs de mes collègues marxistes-léninistes, gauchistes et autres, le prix du pétrole va continuer à augmenter de façon spectaculaire à cause de la consommation chinoise et indienne, jusqu'en 2065. Est-ce que le Canada devrait dire non à 1 000 milliards de dollars en retombées économiques d'ici 2065? Absolument pas.
Comment allons-nous payer nos hôpitaux, nos écoles et nos services sociaux qui sont si chers aux pourfendeurs de l'État providence de la gauche canadienne? Comme je l'ai dit, la priorité est de subvenir aux besoins des Canadiens et du Canada, en tant que puissance moyenne que j'adore.
Je dois absolument arriver au point dont je veux parler. Comme mon collègue de Prince Albert l'a dit, la décision concernant le projet de loi C-48 et le moratoire a été prise au Cabinet, sans consultation et sans étude par un comité parlementaire. Jour après jour, les libéraux se targuent d'être le gouvernement qui, dans l'histoire du Canada — c'est toujours historique avec eux —, a consulté le plus les Canadiens au cours des trois dernières années.
Le moratoire aura des conséquences draconiennes sur la prospérité du Canada et sur l'évolution économique des provinces de l'Ouest qui représentent de plus en plus une partie importante de la population canadienne. Comment les libéraux peuvent-ils justifier n'avoir fait aucune étude environnementale ou sur l'impact scientifique possible, aucune consultation pancanadienne et aucune étude par un comité? Ils n'ont même pas consulté les neuf nations autochtones qui vivent sur les territoires visés par le moratoire. Le NPD devrait s'alarmer de cela. C'est justement à cela que je veux arriver.
J'ai entre les mains une plainte légale déposée à la Cour suprême de la Colombie-Britannique par la Première Nation Lax Kw'alaams —  je m'excuse de la prononciation —, représentée par John Helin. Les plaintifs sont les Autochtones de la région où le moratoire s'applique. Seulement neuf des nations autochtones de cette région font partie des plaintifs. Le défendeur est le gouvernement de la Colombie-Britannique.
Ce que l'avocat démontre est fort intéressant d'un point de vue historique:
« La zone revendiquée comprend un couloir de navigation en eaux profondes ouvert et sûr et y est adjacente, et couvre des terres convenant à la mise en valeur d'un couloir de transport de l'énergie, ainsi que de ports en eaux profondes protégés pour la mise en valeur et l'exploitation d'une installation maritime telle que définie dans le projet de loi C-48, Loi sur le moratoire relatif aux pétroliers. »
« Le titre ancestral du plaignant comprend le droit de déterminer l'utilisation des terres, y compris pour y construire une installation maritime sujette à une évaluation environnementale justifiable et aux lois sur l'approbation. »
Il continue:
Ladite action intentée par le Canada « est discriminatoire à l'égard des plaignants en interdisant la mise en valeur des terres [...] dans une région où se trouvent l'un des meilleurs ports en eaux profondes et l'une des routes maritimes les plus sûres au Canada, tout en permettant la même mise en valeur ailleurs », comme dans le golfe du Saint-Laurent, le fleuve Saint-Laurent et l'océan Atlantique.
Mon argument est très simple. On a ici un argument légal: non seulement le territoire appartient au peuple autochtone et celui-ci n'a pas été consulté, mais les Autochtones, que les libéraux sont censés adorer, vont poursuivre le gouvernement de la Colombie-Britannique. Cela ira certainement jusqu'en Cour suprême, car le moratoire va à l'encontre de leurs droits ancestraux sur le territoire, alors qu'ils veulent exploiter celui-ci pour d'éventuelles exportations pétrolières. C'est un très mauvais travail de la part de ce gouvernement.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-04-19 16:30 [p.18572]
Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to speak today. As a Conservative MP, nothing is more important to me than tradition. As tradition would have it, I would like to acknowledge all those who are watching me and those I meet at the community centres, at all the organized events in my riding, or when I go door to door. As always, I am very happy to represent my constituents in the House of Commons.
I would like to wish a good National Volunteer Week to everyone in Beauport, the people of Limoilou, Giffard, Sainte-Odile, and all around the riding. In Beauport, there are more than 2,500 volunteers. It is the Quebec City neighbourhood with the highest number of volunteers. That makes me very proud. Without volunteers, our social costs would be much higher. I commend all those who put their heart and soul into helping their neighbours and so many others.
I would quickly like to go back to some comments made by the Liberal member for Markham—Thornhill. She boasted that the Liberal government is open and transparent. I would like to remind her that our esteemed Prime Minister's trip to the Aga Khan's island was not all that transparent. The commissioner had to examine and report on this trip, in short, do an investigation, to get to the bottom of things. First of all, I think it is outrageous for a sitting prime minister to go south. He should have stayed in Canada as most Canadians do.
Furthermore, the Liberals' tax reform for small and medium-sized businesses was not all that transparent. The objective was to increase the tax rate for all small and medium-sized businesses and to create jobs in Canada, through the back door, by increasing corporate and small business taxes through changes in how dividends and other various financial vehicles are treated.
Then, there were all of the Minister of Finance's dealings. He hid some funds generated by his family firm, Morneau Shepell. We discovered that he hid these funds in a numbered company in Alberta.
Basically, we have a long list of items proving that the government is not all that open and transparent. This list also includes the amendments and changes the Liberals made to the Access to Information Act. The commissioner stated very clearly in black and white that they are going to impede access to information. On top of that, the Liberals refused to give access to information from the Prime Minister's Office, as they promised during the election campaign.
I would still like to talk about the bill brought forward by the member for Beauce, for whom I have a great deal of respect. He is a man of courage and principle. This bill is consistent with his principles. He does not care to see subsidies, handouts, being given to large corporations. With this bill, however, he does not oppose the idea of giving money to businesses to help them out. He said something very simple: the technology partnerships Canada program spent about $3.3 billion. For 200 businesses, that represents $700 million in loans and 45% of cases. The member for Beauce does not oppose those loans; he is simply asking the government to tell us whether those companies have paid back the $700 million, which breaks down into different amounts, for example $800,000, $300,000, or $2 million. If some companies have not paid back those loans, then we can simply tell Canadians that they were actually subsidies, not loans.
I want to get back to what I said during my earlier question. When I was a student at Laval University, I remember naively telling my professor that I would go to Parliament to talk about philosophy, the Constitution, and the great debates of our time. He told me that there would be debates on these types of issues, yes, but fundamentally, what was at the heart of England's 13th century parliamentary system was accountability, namely what was happening with the money.
There is a reason why we spend two months talking about the budget. It is very important. The budget is at the heart of the parliamentary system. I sometimes find it a little annoying. I wonder if we could talk about Constitutional issues, Quebec's distinct society, the courts, politics, and other issues. However, much to my chagrin, we spend most of our time talking about money. There is a valid reason for this: every one of us here represents about 100,000 people, most of whom pay taxes. All of the government's programs, initiatives, and public policies, good or bad, are dynamic and rely on public funds.
In England in the 13th century, bourgeois capitalists went to see the king to tell him that all his warmongering was getting a little expensive. They asked him to create a place where they could talk to him or his representative and find out what he was doing with their money. That was the precise moment in the course of human history when liberal democracy made its first appearance.
Another example of the importance of knowing what is being done with people's money is the American Revolution. This is complicated and could fill many books, but essentially, the American Revolution happened because England was not interested in taxation with representation. The Americans said they had had enough. If taxes on tea—hence, the Tea Party—were going up, they wanted to know what was being done with their money. The only way the Americans could find out what the British were doing with the money was through elected representation of the colonies in the British Parliament. However, the king, in his arrogance, and his British governing council told the colonies to keep quiet and pay their taxes to His Majesty like they were supposed to. Thus ensued the American Revolution.
Such major historical examples demonstrate how accountability is at the very heart of the parliamentary system and liberal democracy, which guarantees the protection of individual rights and freedoms so dear to our Liberals in this place.
Now, this is what I do not understand. The opposition members, whether they belong to the NDP, the Conservative Party, or the Quebec caucus, introduce sensible and fairly simple bills. Why will the government not just admit it and thank them? Not only is it the purpose of Parliament to inform Canadians about what is being done with their money, but the government itself should know what is happening.
The government could use half of the unpaid $700 million to more quickly implement its much-touted social housing program or pharmacare 2020. However, between $400 million and $700 million has not been paid back to the federal government. Thus, it is completely unacceptable and illogical for the Liberals to tell us that this is not a laudable or justifiable bill.
When I came to Parliament, I had the opportunity to work on the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates, a very complex committee. It was a bit overwhelming, but I took it very seriously and I did all the reading. That committee just keeps voting on credits for months because it approves all the spending. When I was there, the President of the Treasury Board attended our meetings three times to explain the changes he wanted to make to the main estimates. These were disastrous changes that sought to take away the power of opposition MPs to examine spending vote by vote for over two months. He wanted to cut that time down to about two weeks. It was an attempt on the part of the Liberals to gradually undermine the work and transparency of this democratic institution.
What is more, the Liberals wanted to make major changes that would cut our speaking time in the House of Commons. For heaven's sake. At the time of Confederation, our forefathers sometimes talked for six or seven hours. Now, 20 minutes is too long. For example, today, I have 10 minutes to speak. The Liberals wanted to cut our time down from 20 minutes to 10 minutes. This government never stops trying to cut the opposition's speaking time, and that is not to mention the $7 billion that have still not been allocated.
In short, the bill introduced by the member for Beauce is a laudable bill that goes to the very heart of the principle underlying liberal democracy and the British parliamentary system, that of knowing where taxpayers' money is going.
Monsieur le Président, je suis très content de prendre la parole aujourd'hui. En tant que député conservateur, ce qui est le plus important pour moi, c'est la tradition. Comme la tradition le veut, j'aimerais saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes qui m'écoutent, ceux que je rencontre lorsque je fais du porte-à-porte, dans les centres communautaires et lors de toutes les activités organisées dans ma circonscription. Comme toujours, je suis très content de représenter mes concitoyens à la Chambre des communes.
J'aimerais souhaiter une bonne Semaine de l'action bénévole à l'ensemble des Beauportois et des gens de Limoilou, de Giffard, de Sainte-Odile et des quatre coins de la circonscription. À Beauport, il y a plus de 2 500 bénévoles. C'est l'arrondissement de la ville de Québec qui compte le plus grand nombre de bénévoles. J'en suis très fier. Sans les bénévoles, nos coûts sociaux seraient bien plus importants. Je félicite donc tous ces gens qui se donnent corps et âme pour aider autrui et leur prochain.
J'aimerais revenir rapidement sur certains commentaires faits par la députée libérale de Markham—Thornhill. Elle se vantait du fait que le gouvernement libéral était ouvert et transparent. J'aimerais quand même lui rappeler que le voyage sur l'île de l'Aga Khan de notre cher premier ministre était plus ou moins transparent. Il a fallu qu'une commissaire fasse une étude et un rapport, donc une enquête, sur ce voyage pour savoir ce qu'il en était. De prime abord, je trouve que c'est une hérésie pour un premier ministre d'aller dans le Sud lorsqu'il est en fonction. Il devrait rester au Canada, comme la plupart des Canadiens le font.
En outre, la réforme fiscale que les libéraux ont imposée aux petites et moyennes entreprises était plus ou moins transparente. L'objectif était de hausser le taux d'imposition de toutes les petites et moyennes entreprises et de créer des emplois au Canada, et ce, par la porte arrière, en augmentant, dans le cadre de dividendes et de plusieurs véhicules financiers différents, l'impôt des sociétés et des petites et moyennes entreprises.
Il y a également eu toutes les actions du ministre des Finances. Il a caché certains fonds provenant de son entreprise familiale, Morneau Shepell. On a découvert qu'il cachait ces fonds dans une société à numéro en Alberta.
Bref, la liste qui démontre que le gouvernement n'est pas si ouvert et transparent que cela est très longue. Cette liste comprend également les modifications et les amendements que les libéraux ont apportés à la Loi sur l'accès à l'information. La commissaire a stipulé, noir sur blanc, que cela va empirer l'accès à l'information. De plus, les libéraux n'ont pas donné l'accès à l'information du bureau du premier ministre, comme ils avaient promis lors de la campagne électorale.
Je voudrais quand même parler du projet de loi du député de Beauce, un homme que je respecte énormément. Il est courageux et il a des principes. Ce projet de loi cadre justement avec ses principes. C'est un individu qui n'aime pas beaucoup les subventions, le bien-être social, accordées aux grandes entreprises. Cependant, dans ce projet de loi, il ne s'oppose pas à l'argent donné aux entreprises pour les aider. Il dit quelque chose de très simple: le programme de Partenariat technologique Canada a dépensé environ 3,3 milliards de dollars. Pour 200 entreprises, cela représente 700 millions de dollars en prêts et 45 % des cas. Le député de Beauce n'est pas en désaccord avec ces prêts, il demande tout simplement au gouvernement de nous dire si ces entreprises ont remboursé les 700 millions de dollars, répartis de différentes façons, par exemple, 800 000 $, 300 000 $ et 2 millions de dollars. Si les entreprises n'ont pas remboursé les prêts, on pourra dire aux Canadiens et aux Canadiennes que ce n'était pas des prêts mais plutôt des subventions.
Je vais revenir sur ce que j'ai dit lors de ma question préalable. Lorsque j'étais étudiant à l'Université Laval, je me rappelle avoir dit à un professeur, avec ma belle naïveté de l'époque, que j'irais au Parlement pour parler de philosophie, de la Constitution et des grands débats qui nous animent. Il m'a répondu qu'il y aurait des débats sur ce genre d'enjeux, mais que foncièrement, ce qui était au coeur même du parlementarisme au XIIIe siècle, en Angleterre, c'était la reddition de comptes, à savoir ce qui se passe avec l'argent.
Ce n'est pas pour rien qu'on passe un ou deux mois à parler du budget. C'est tellement important. Le budget est au coeur du parlementarisme. Parfois, je trouve cela un peu embêtant. Je me demande si on peut parler des problèmes liés à la Constitution, de la société distincte du Québec, de la judiciarisation, de la politique et de différents enjeux. Toutefois, à mon grand dam, on parle d'argent la majorité du temps. Il y a quand même une raison louable à cela: chacun d'entre nous est ici pour représenter, grosso modo, 100 000 individus dont la plupart paie des impôts. Tous les programmes, toutes les initiatives et toutes les politiques publiques du gouvernement, bons ou mauvais, sont vivants et dépendent des fonds publics.
Au XIIIe siècle, en Angleterre, les capitalistes bourgeois sont allés voir le roi pour lui dire que ses projets de grandes guerres commençaient à être un peu lourds. Ils lui ont demandé de créer un endroit où ils pourraient discuter avec lui ou son représentant afin de savoir ce qu'il faisait avec leur argent. C'était le début de la démocratie libérale, ni plus ni moins, dans l'histoire de l'humanité.
L'autre exemple qui démontre l'importance de savoir ce qu'on fait avec l'argent, c'est la révolution américaine. C'est complexe et on pourrait remplir des millions de pages, mais grosso modo, la révolution américaine est arrivée parce que l'Angleterre ne voulait pas accepter la representation with taxation. Les Américains ont dit qu'ils en avaient assez: si on allait taxer davantage leur thé — d'où le Tea Party —, ils voulaient savoir ce qu'on faisait avec leur argent. Or la seule façon dont les Américains pouvaient savoir ce que les Britanniques faisaient avec l'argent, c'était d'être représentés par des élus au Parlement britannique de la colonie américaine. Cependant, le roi, avec sa grande arrogance et son conseil de gouvernance britannique, a dit à la colonie de se taire et de payer ses taxes à Sa Majesté comme il se doit. La révolution américaine s'en est suivie.
De grands exemples historiques de ce genre nous démontrent à quel point la reddition de comptes se trouve au coeur même du parlementarisme et de la démocratie libérale, qui garantit la protection des droits et libertés individuelles qui est si chère à nos libéraux ici.
Maintenant, voici ce que je ne comprends pas. Les députés de l'opposition, qu'ils soient du NPD, du Parti conservateur ou du Groupe parlementaire québécois, proposent des projets de loi sensés et assez simples. Pourquoi le gouvernement ne peut-il jamais l'admettre et les remercier? Non seulement c'est le but du Parlement d'informer la population au sujet de ce qu'on fait avec son argent, mais le gouvernement devrait lui-même savoir ce qui se passe.
Si c'est la moitié des 700 millions de dollars qui n'ont pas été remboursés, le gouvernement pourrait utiliser cet argent pour mettre en oeuvre plus rapidement son fameux programme de logement social ou son fameux programme Pharmacare 2020. Ce sont quand même entre 400 millions et 700 millions de dollars qui n'ont pas été remboursés au gouvernement fédéral. Il est donc tout à fait inacceptable et illogique que des libéraux nous disent que ce n'est pas un projet de loi louable ou justifiable.
J'ai eu la chance de travailler au Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires, un comité très complexe, lorsque je suis arrivé au Parlement. J'étais un peu dépassé par cela, mais j'ai pris cela au sérieux et j'ai fait toutes mes lectures. À ce comité, on n'arrête pas de voter sur des crédits, et ce, pendant des mois, puisqu'on y approuve toutes les dépenses. Or j'ai vu le président du Conseil du Trésor assister à nos rencontres trois fois pour nous expliquer les réformes qu'il voulait effectuer en ce qui a trait au Budget principal des dépenses. Il s'agissait de réformes désastreuses qui visaient à enlever aux députés de l'opposition le pouvoir d'analyser les dépenses crédit par crédit pendant plus de deux mois. Il voulait limiter cela à environ deux semaines. C'est une tentative de la part des libéraux d'amoindrir progressivement le travail et la transparence en cette institution démocratique.
De plus, les libéraux ont voulu procéder à une réforme afin de réduire notre temps de parole à la Chambre des communes. Bon Dieu! À l'époque de la Confédération, nos aïeux parlaient parfois pendant six ou sept heures. Maintenant, 20 minutes c'est presque trop. Aujourd'hui, j'ai 10 minutes, par exemple. Les libéraux voulaient diminuer notre temps de parole de 20 minutes à 10 minutes. Ce gouvernement tente sans cesse de réduire le temps de parole des députés de l'opposition, et c'est sans parler des 7 milliards de dollars qui n'ont toujours pas été affectés.
Bref, le projet de loi du député de Beauce est un projet de loi louable qui va au coeur même du principe qui sous-tend la démocratie libérale et le parlementarisme britannique: savoir où va l'argent des contribuables.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2017-09-20 15:57 [p.13285]
Madam Speaker, it is a beautiful contrast, because it is absurd.
My constituents are extremely unhappy. Just this morning, many of them contacted my office, saying that I had to ask questions about this, that I had to put pressure on the government, and that I had to ensure it changed on its mind on the issue of tax reform. They said that it was extremely bad for the economic well-being of their small and medium-sized enterprises. This party will do everything it has to do to stop the changes.
Madame la Présidente, c'est une très belle comparaison, car le contraste est absurde.
Les gens de ma circonscription sont très mécontents. Ce matin même, un grand nombre d'entre eux ont communiqué avec mon bureau pour demander que je pose des questions à ce sujet et que j'exerce des pressions sur le gouvernement pour qu'il se ravise sur la question de la réforme fiscale. Ils disent que cette mesure est extrêmement néfaste pour le bien-être économique de leurs petites et moyennes entreprises. Notre parti fera tout ce qu'il doit pour empêcher ces changements.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2016-12-06 13:40 [p.7714]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to congratulate my colleague for his great electoral victory. I have great confidence that he will serve his constituents with all his strength.
Our colleague was on the electoral trail just a few weeks ago. He had the chance to knock on doors, go to many events and organizations, and hear from his constituents. We all did that during the election. Now we might do it a bit less because we are always here.
As the member was there a few weeks ago, I would like him to tell us what was the most common criticism that always came back again and again against the current government from his constituents.
Monsieur le Président, je tiens à féliciter mon collègue pour sa grande victoire électorale. Je suis convaincu qu'il fera profiter les électeurs de sa circonscription de son dynamisme.
Notre collègue faisait encore campagne il y a quelques semaines à peine. Il a eu la chance de faire du porte-à-porte, d'assister à diverses activités, de se rendre dans les locaux de toutes sortes d'organismes et de prendre le pouls de l'électorat, comme nous l'avons tous fait pendant la campagne électorale, mais que nous faisons un peu moins souvent dorénavant, puisque nous sommes toujours ici.
Comme c'est encore tout frais à la mémoire du député, j'aimerais qu'il nous indique quelles critiques à l'endroit du gouvernement revenaient le plus souvent dans ses conversations avec les électeurs de sa circonscription.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2016-10-07 11:59 [p.5651]
Mr. Speaker, approximately 150 people participated in the veterans summit this week, yet one-quarter of them had never been in the Canadian Armed Forces and nearly half were not recipients of Veterans Affairs Canada programs or services.
Must I remind the minister that the point of this type of summit is to improve the benefits offered by his department, not to serve the Liberal government's own agenda?
The minister told veterans to be patient because he was still working on identifying the most pressing issues.
Why then does he not consult the veterans who are most affected by his department?
Monsieur le Président, parmi les quelque 150 personnes qui ont participé au sommet des vétérans, cette semaine, un quart n'avaient jamais été dans les Forces armées canadiennes et près de la moitié n'étaient même pas des bénéficiaires de programmes ou de services du ministère des Anciens Combattants du Canada.
Dois-je rappeler au ministre que ce type de sommet a pour objectif d'améliorer les prestations de son ministère et non de servir les objectifs du gouvernement libéral?
Le ministre a dit aux vétérans d'être patients, car il ne pouvait pas encore convenablement cibler les problématiques les plus pressantes.
Alors, pourquoi ne consulte-t-il pas les vétérans qui sont les plus touchés par son ministère?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2016-09-22 13:26 [p.4971]
Mr. Speaker, I, too, believe that I am the voice of the people of Atlantic Canada, where I lived between the ages of two and 11. Acadia is still very much a part of me, and that is why I absolutely had to speak about it today.
Right in the middle of summer, the Prime Minister arrogantly and unabashedly announced that he intended to change the historic process for appointing Supreme Court justices that has been in place since 1875.
More than any other, this government announcement has made me dislike the political party that currently governs our great country. Yes, like many Canadians, I am outraged by such actions and attitudes that show the true arrogance of this government.
I am saddened by this unsettling desire, so brazenly expressed by the Prime Minister, to radically alter our constitutional customs, the very customs that have informed government policy for so long in Canada.
If this Liberal government decides to change the constitutional convention for choosing Supreme Court justices without first obtaining the consent of all parliamentarians in the House, it will be going too far. Therefore, and I am choosing my words carefully, this government's actions in the past few months make me fear the worst for the federal unity of this great country.
The Prime Minister is not just interfering in provincial jurisdictions whenever he feels like it, but also interfering in his own areas of jurisdiction by planning to make sweeping changes without even consulting the opposition parties or the public. This is nothing short of anti-democratic. There are other examples of this.
First, the Prime Minister plans to change Canada's nearly 150-year-old voting system without holding a referendum to do so. It is no secret that he and his acolytes are doing this for partisan reasons and to protect their political interests as well.
Then, this same Prime Minister shamelessly suggested just this morning that he wanted to put an end to a 141-year-old constitutional convention. I am talking about the constitutional convention whereby a Prime Minister selects and appoints a judge to the Supreme Court when a seat becomes vacant while ensuring that the new appointee comes from a region similar to that of the person who occupied the vacant seat.
The purpose of this constitutional convention is to guarantee that the decisions rendered by the highest court in the country reflect the regional differences in our federation. Must I remind the political party before me that Canada has five distinct regions and that those regions are legally recognized?
The fact is that Jean Chrétien's Liberal government passed a law that provides for and gives each of the regions of Canada a quasi-constitutional right of veto. Accordingly, the Atlantic provinces, and their region as a whole, do have a say when it comes to the Constitution Act of 1982.
What is more, the British North America Act guarantees the Atlantic provinces fair and effective representation in the House of Commons. For example, New Brunswick is guaranteed 10 seats. The same is true in the Senate, where it is guaranteed just as many seats. Under the same convention, each of the Atlantic provinces holds at least one seat on the Council of Ministers.
How can our friends opposite justify threatening, out of the blue, to reduce to nil the Atlantic provinces' presence in the highest court of the country? If the government moves forward with this new approach, will it do the same to Quebec, the national stronghold of French Canadians? That does not make any sense.
I invite the government to think about this: can the Supreme Court of Canada really render fair and informed decisions on cases affecting the Atlantic provinces without any representation from that region?
Justice for Atlantic Canadians means treating them as equals. It seems the Liberals could not care less about the regions even though every one of them includes distinct communities that want Supreme Court decisions to reflect their values, goals and ideas about the world.
For the Prime Minister to suggest, if only in passing, we defy the convention whereby one seat on the Supreme Court of Canada's bench is reserved for Atlantic Canada is offensive to many legal experts and associations, including Janet Fuhrer, a past president of the Canadian Bar Association, and Ann Whiteway Brown, president of the New Brunswick branch of the Canadian Bar Association.
Echoing this sentiment are the Law Society of New Brunswick, the Atlantic Provinces Trial Lawyers Association, and the Société nationale de l'Acadie, which advocates on behalf of Acadians worldwide.
Disregarding this constitutional convention is tantamount to stripping four out of ten provinces of their voice in the highest court in the land.
Must I also remind members that the Atlantic provinces have a large pool of extremely qualified legal professionals who come from every region and background and who are perfectly bilingual? More importantly, these are candidates who have a vast knowledge of the Atlantic provinces' legal systems and issues. Is there anyone in this House, or elsewhere, who would dispute that?
Even more importantly, there are a few significant constitutional cases on the horizon that could have major repercussions on the Atlantic provinces. Consider, for example, the case referred to the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal regarding the elimination of protected Acadian ridings. Hearings on this are currently under way.
Is the Prime Minister really thinking about having judges from other regions rule on a case that deals with how Acadians are represented, when Acadians have been fighting for their survival on this continent for generations?
Is that really what our friends across the aisle want? Do the Liberals from Atlantic Canada really want to muzzle New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, two founding provinces of this great country?
The change that the Prime Minister wants to make to how judges are lawfully appointed to the Supreme Court is essentially a total and complete reversal of this country's established constitutional practices. How shameful and how arrogant.
It would seem the son is following in his father's footsteps. Do hon. members not see what is happening? Just like his father before him, the Prime Minister wants to alter the constitutional order of our country.
Fear not, however, because we in the Conservative Party are not buying it. We not only see what this Prime Minister is doing, but we also see know full well that behind this change in convention is a much greater ideological design.
There is an underlying desire to profoundly change Canadian constitutional arrangements and replace them with a post-materialist world view that is a departure from our constitutional traditions.
In this world view, the main objective is to eliminate from our government institutions, in this case the Supreme Court, the historical and traditional community characteristics that have defined Canada since day one by replacing them with individual and associational characteristics.
In other words, the Prime Minister obviously wants to eliminate the political predominance of certain constituencies in the Canadian constitutional order, at the Supreme Court in particular. He wants to promote a new political predominance, that of associational groups that bring together individuals who share individual rights rather than constituent rights.
Although that may be commendable in some ways, it is a major change because the Prime Minister is ensuring that the very essence of political representativeness and the concept of diversity within the judiciary is changed. The Prime Minister wants a representativeness based on a concept of individual diversity and fragmented by idiosyncratic characteristics.
In light of this potential change, Canadians across the country, including those from Atlantic Canada, must protest and call on the Prime Minister to answer for this. The Prime Minister cannot act unilaterally in this case and must involve all the players concerned.
Monsieur le Président, moi aussi, j'ai bien la certitude d'être la voix des gens de l'Atlantique, où j'ai grandi de l'âge de 2 ans à 11 ans. L'Acadie résonne encore en moi, et c'est pourquoi je tenais absolument à en parler aujourd'hui.
Au beau milieu de l'été, le premier ministre a annoncé, de manière arrogante et sans vergogne, qu'il avait l'intention de changer la procédure historique par laquelle sont choisis les juges de la Cour suprême depuis 1875.
Plus que toute autre, cette annonce faite par ce gouvernement engendre chez moi une aversion définitive à l'égard de la formation politique qui gouverne actuellement notre grand pays. Oui, comme de nombreux Canadiens, je suis outré par de telles actions et attitudes qui témoignent d'une arrogance authentique, celle de ce gouvernement.
Je suis attristé par cette volonté déconcertante, exprimée sans timidité, faut-il le dire, par le premier ministre, qui vise à engendrer un changement significatif à nos moeurs constitutionnelles, celles qui, après tout, guident nos actions gouvernementales depuis si longtemps ici, au Canada.
Si ce gouvernement libéral décide de changer la convention constitutionnelle relative à la sélection des juges de la Cour suprême sans d'abord avoir eu l'assentiment de l'ensemble des parlementaires de la Chambre, il va bien trop loin. Suivant ce raisonnement, et je pèse bien mes mots, les actions posées par ce gouvernement dans les derniers mois me font craindre le pire pour l'unité fédérale de ce grand pays.
En effet, le premier ministre s'adonne non seulement à de l'ingérence dans les compétences provinciales quand bon lui semble, mais de plus, dans ses propres compétences, il prévoit y conduire des changements d'envergure sans toutefois consulter les partis de l'opposition ni même la population. Cela n'est ni plus ni moins qu'antidémocratique. D'ailleurs, quelques exemples en témoignent d'ores et déjà.
D'abord, le premier ministre entend changer notre mode de scrutin canadien, vieux de presque 150 ans, sans faire de référendum. C'est un secret de Polichinelle: lui et ses acolytes le font pour des raisons partisanes et pour assurer leur intérêt politique de surcroît.
Ensuite, ce même premier ministre a laissé entendre jusqu'à ce matin, sans honte, qu'il voulait mettre fin à une convention constitutionnelle vieille de 141 années. Je parle ici de la convention constitutionnelle qui veut qu'un premier ministre choisisse et nomme un juge à la Cour suprême, lorsqu'un siège est libéré, tout en s'assurant que la nouvelle nomination est issue d'une région semblable à celle de la personne qui occupait le siège laissé vacant.
Cette convention constitutionnelle a comme objectif de garantir que les décisions rendues par la plus haute institution judiciaire du pays reflètent les particularités régionales qui composent notre fédération. Dois-je rappeler à ce parti politique qui est devant moi que nous avons, au Canada, cinq régions distinctes et que ces mêmes régions ont une reconnaissance légale de fait?
Notons à ce sujet que le gouvernement libéral de l'honorable Jean Chrétien a adopté une loi qui prévoit et alloue un droit de veto quasi-constitutionnel à chacune des régions du Canada. Ainsi, on accorde aux provinces de l'Atlantique et à leur région dans son ensemble un droit de regard en ce qui concerne la Loi constitutionnelle de 1982.
De plus, nonobstant cet état de fait, notons que l'Acte de l'Amérique du Nord britannique garantit aux provinces de l'Atlantique une représentation efficace et équitable à la Chambre des communes. Par exemple, 10 sièges sont garantis au Nouveau-Brunswick, et il en va de même au Sénat, où autant de sièges lui sont garantis. La même convention veut que chacune des provinces de l'Atlantique reçoive au moins un siège au Conseil des ministres.
Alors, comment nos amis d'en face peuvent-ils justifier que, du jour au lendemain, on ait menacé de réduire à néant la présence des provinces de l'Atlantique au plus haut tribunal du pays? Si cette nouvelle façon de faire voit le jour, sera-t-elle répétée dans le cas du Québec également, le bastion national des Canadiens français de ce grand pays? Cela n'a aucun sens.
J'invite ce gouvernement à songer à la chose suivante: la Cour suprême du Canada peut-elle vraiment rendre des jugements justes et éclairés sur des causes qui concernent les provinces de l'Atlantique en l'absence de toute représentation de cette région?
Traiter les Canadiens de l'Atlantique avec justice, c'est les mettre sur un pied d'égalité. Toutefois, peut-être les libéraux veulent-ils tout simplement faire fi de nos régions canadiennes. Pourtant, chacune d'entre elles détient en son sein des communautés constitutives bien distinctes dont chacune espère voir ses valeurs, ses aspirations et ses visions du monde reflétées dans des décisions rendues par la Cour suprême.
Laisser entendre, comme le premier ministre l'a fait, ne serait-ce que quelques secondes, qu'on ne veut pas respecter la convention qui veut qu'on réserve pour la région de l'Atlantique un siège à la Cour suprême du Canada est très grave aux yeux de plusieurs juristes et associations. C'est le cas notamment de Janet Fuhrer, qui fut présidente de l'Association du Barreau canadien, et d'Ann Whiteway Brown, présidente de la division du Nouveau-Brunswick de l'Association du Barreau canadien.
C'est le cas également pour le Barreau du Nouveau Brunswick, pour l'Association des avocats plaideurs de l'Atlantique et pour la Société nationale de l'Acadie, présente dans le monde entier à la défense des Acadiens.
Songer à ne pas respecter cette convention constitutionnelle, c'est songer à priver quatre provinces sur dix de toute voix au chapitre au sein de la plus haute institution judiciaire du pays.
Doit-on aussi rappeler que les provinces de l'Atlantique possèdent un grand bassin de juristes candidats des plus qualifiés, originaires de toutes les communautés de la région et, qui plus est, parfaitement bilingues. Surtout, il s'agit de candidats qui possèdent une connaissance approfondie des systèmes judiciaires et des enjeux de l'Atlantique. Y a-t-il quelqu'un à la Chambre ou ailleurs pour dire le contraire?
Plus important encore, d'importantes causes à caractère constitutionnel ou qui auront des retentissements majeurs dans les provinces de l'Atlantique sont à l'horizon au moment même où on se parle. À titre d'exemple, mentionnons le renvoi de la Cour d'appel de la Nouvelle-Écosse dans la cause portant sur l'abolition des circonscriptions électorales acadiennes. Les audiences sont en cours en ce moment même.
Le premier ministre a-t-il vraiment songé à faire en sorte que des juges d'autres régions déterminent l'issue d'une cause qui porte sur la représentativité des Acadiens, ce peuple qui se bat depuis des générations pour survivre sur ce continent?
Est-ce bien cela que veulent nos amis d'en face, les libéraux des provinces atlantiques, faire taire le Nouveau-Brunswick et la Nouvelle-Écosse, deux provinces fondatrices de ce grand pays?
Le changement que veut apporter le premier ministre à la façon dont il lui est loisible de choisir les juges de la Cour suprême n'est ni plus ni moins qu'un renversement radical des coutumes constitutionnelles du pays. Quelle honte et quelle arrogance!
De toute évidence, le fils suit les traces de son père. Ne voit-on pas ce qui se passe? Tout comme son aïeul, le premier ministre veut aujourd'hui altérer l'ordre constitutionnel de notre pays.
Cependant, que l'on soit sans crainte, car au Parti conservateur du Canada, nous ne sommes pas dupes. Non seulement nous voyons ce à quoi s'adonne ce premier ministre, mais nous savons aussi très bien que derrière cette modification conventionnelle loge un dessein idéologique bien plus grand.
En effet, il y a une volonté sous-jacente qui vise à changer de manière profonde les arrangements constitutionnels canadiens afin de les remplacer par une vision post-matérialiste du monde qui fait route à part avec nos traditions constitutionnelles.
Dans cette vision du monde, l'objectif principal consiste à effacer de nos institutions gouvernementales, en l'occurrence la Cour suprême, les particularités communautaires historiques et traditionnelles dont est composé le Canada depuis sa naissance, et, pour ce faire, à les remplacer par des particularités individuelles et associationnelles.
En d'autres mots, il est évident que le premier ministre veut mettre fin à la prédominance politique des communautés constitutives dans l'ordre constitutionnel canadien, tout particulièrement à la Cour suprême. Il veut ainsi favoriser une nouvelle prédominance politique, celle des groupes associationnels qui regroupent des individus partageant des droits individuels plutôt que des droits constitutifs.
Bien que cela puisse être louable à certains égards, bien entendu, il s'agit d'un changement profond, car ce faisant, le premier ministre fait en sorte que l'essence même de la représentativité politique et du concept de diversité au sein du pouvoir judiciaire soit modifiée. Le premier ministre veut donc voir une représentativité basée sur un concept de diversité individuelle et atomisée basée sur des particularités idiosyncratiques.
Devant un tel changement potentiel, les Canadiens de tout le pays, incluant ceux de l'Atlantique, doivent protester et amener le premier ministre à répondre de ses intentions. Le premier ministre ne peut agir de manière unilatérale dans ce dossier et se doit de faire appel à tous les acteurs concernés.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2016-09-22 13:36 [p.4973]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to say to my dear colleague from Louis-Hébert that it is all well and good that the committee will consider regional representation, but that it should not be a consideration. It should be a given for the government, which would do well to accept it and choose a judge from Atlantic Canada.
As for the new consultative groups, I believe that they are puppets whose role is to hide the true interests of the Prime Minister.
Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais répondre à mon cher collègue de Louis-Hébert que c'est très bien que le comité prenne en considération les représentativités régionales, mais que cela ne devrait pas être une considération. En effet, cela devrait être un état de fait. Le gouvernement devrait l'assumer et choisir un juge de l'Atlantique.
Pour ce qui est des nouveaux groupes consultatifs, selon moi, ce sont des groupes de polichinelles qui sont là pour cacher les vrais intérêts du premier ministre.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2016-05-04 15:08 [p.2865]
Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Veterans Affairs has created six advisory groups whose mandate will apparently be to assess various urgent issues affecting our veterans and to advise the minister accordingly.
However, veterans themselves find that the mandate and membership of those groups remain nebulous. On April 22, 2016, right here in the House, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Veterans Affairs remained silent when I asked her questions about this.
Can the minister share a few salient details about these advisory groups with the members of this House, in order to provide some clarity?
Monsieur le Président, le ministre des Anciens Combattants a mis sur pied six groupes consultatifs, lesquels ont comme mandat, apparemment, d'évaluer et de conseiller le ministre au sujet des divers enjeux urgents qui touchent nos vétérans.
Néanmoins, aux yeux de ces derniers, le mandat et la composition de ces groupes demeurent flous. Le 22 avril dernier, à la Chambre, la secrétaire parlementaire du ministre des Anciens Combattants est restée muette lorsque je lui ai posé des questions à ce sujet.
Le ministre peut-il partager avec les députés de la Chambre quelques détails saillants au sujet de ces groupes consultatifs, afin d'y apporter un peu de lumière?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2016-04-22 11:47 [p.2594]
Madam Speaker, the Liberal government recently announced that it was setting up six ministerial advisory groups at Veterans Affairs Canada. Veterans are wondering about that and are talking to me about it more and more.
Can the minister explain to the House the precise mandate of these groups?
Madame la Présidente, récemment, le gouvernement libéral a annoncé la mise sur pied de six groupes consultatifs ministériels au sein du ministère Anciens Combattants Canada. Les vétérans du pays se questionnent à ce sujet, et ils m'en parlent de plus en plus.
Le ministre peut-il expliquer à la Chambre quel est le mandat exact de ces groupes?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2016-04-22 11:48 [p.2595]
Madam Speaker, that is very good and quite commendable.
Nonetheless, beyond the mandate of these six advisory groups, the veterans want to know the following. Who will be part of these groups? What qualifications are needed to sit on them? Do members of the group have to sign non-disclosure agreements?
Veterans expect transparency. They want to know why the list of members of each of these advisory groups has not been made public yet.
Madame la Présidente, cela est très bien et très louable.
Néanmoins, au-delà du mandat de ces six groupes consultatifs, les vétérans veulent savoir ce qui suit. Quelle est la composition de ces groupes? Quelles sont les qualifications pour y siéger? Les membres doivent-ils signer une entente de non-divulgation pour y accéder?
Les vétérans s'attendent à de la transparence. Ils veulent savoir pourquoi la liste des membres de chacun de ces groupes consultatifs n'est pas encore rendue publique.
Results: 1 - 13 of 13