Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 100 of 9317
View Anthony Rota Profile
Lib. (ON)

Question No. 682--
Mr. Gary Vidal:
With regard to expenditures related to promoting, advertising, or consulting on Bill C-15, An Act respecting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, by the government, including any that took place prior to the tabling of the legislation, since October 21, 2019, broken down by month and by department, agency or other government entity: (a) what was the total amount spent on (i) consultants, (ii) advertising, (iii) promotion; and (b) what are the details of all contracts related to promoting, advertising or consulting, including (i) the date the contact was signed, (ii) the vendor, (iii) the amount, (iv) the start and end date, (v) the description of goods or services, (vi) whether the contract was sole-sourced or was competitively bid on?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 684--
Mrs. Cathy McLeod:
With regard to fraud involving the Canada Emergency Response Benefit program since the program was launched: (a) what was the number of double payments made under the program; (b) what is the value of the payments in (a); (c) what is the value of double payments made in (b) that have been recouped by the government; (d) what is the number of payments made to applications that were suspected or deemed to be fraudulent; (e) what is the value of the payments in (d); and (f) what is the value recouped by the government related to payments in (e)?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 685--
Mrs. Cathy McLeod:
With regard to Corporations Canada and the deregistration of federally incorporated businesses since 2016, broken down by year: (a) how many businesses have deregistered their corporation; and (b) what is the breakdown of (a) by type of business?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 686--
Mrs. Cathy McLeod:
With regard to the government’s requirements for hotels being used as quarantine facilities: (a) what specific obligations do the hotels have with regard to security standards; (b) what specific measures has the government taken to ensure these security standards are being met; (c) how many instances have occurred where government inspectors have found that the security standards of these hotels were not being met; (d) of the instances in (c), how many times did the security failures jeopardize the safety of (i) the individuals staying in the facility, (ii) public health or the general public; (e) are hotels required to verify that someone has received a negative test prior to leaving the facility, and, if so, how is this specifically being done; and (f) how many individuals have left these facilities without receiving a negative test result?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 687--
Mrs. Cathy McLeod:
With regard to the government’s requirements for hotels to become a government-authorized hotel for the purpose of quarantining returning international air travellers: (a) what specific obligations do the hotels have with regard to security standards; (b) what specific measures has the government taken to ensure these security standards are being met; (c) how many instances have occurred where government inspectors have found that the security standards of these hotels were not being met; (d) of the instances in (c), how many times did the security failures jeopardize the safety of (i) the individuals staying in the facility, (ii) public health or the general public; (e) how many criminal acts have been reported since the hotel quarantine requirement began at each of the properties designated as a government-authorized hotel; (f) what is the breakdown of (e) by type of offence; (g) are the hotels required to verify that someone has received a negative test prior to leaving the facility, and, if so, how is this specifically being done; (h) how many individuals have left these hotels prior to or without receiving a negative test result; and (i) how does the government track whether or not individuals have left these hotels prior to receiving a negative test result?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 688--
Ms. Nelly Shin:
With regard to the requirement that entails individuals entering Canada for compassionate reasons to seek an exemption online, the problems with the Public Health Agency of Canada’s (PHAC) online system, and the resulting actions from the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA): (a) what is the total number of international travellers arriving at Canadian airports who were denied entry, broken down by month since March 18, 2020; (b) how many individuals in (a) were (i) immediately sent back to their country of origin, (ii) permitted to remain in Canada pending an appeal or deportation; (c) what is the number of instances where the PHAC did not make a decision on an application for exemptions on compassionate reasons prior to the traveller’s arrival, or scheduled arrival in Canada; (d) of the instances in (c), where PHAC did not make a decision on time, was the reason due to (i) technical glitches that caused the PHAC to miss the application, (ii) other reasons, broken down by reason; (e) for the instances where the PHAC did not make a decision on time, was the traveller (i) still permitted entry in Canada, (ii) denied entry; and (f) what specific recourse do travellers arriving for compassionate reasons have when they encounter problems with the CBSA or other officials due to the PHAC not making a decision on time?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 689--
Mr. Robert Kitchen:
With regard to expenditures on social media influencers, including any contracts which would use social media influencers as part of a public relations campaign since January 1, 2021: (a) what are the details of all such expenditures, including the (i) vendor, (ii) amount, (iii) campaign description, (iv) date of the contract, (v) name or handle of the influencer; and (b) for each campaign that paid an influencer, was there a requirement to make public, as part of a disclaimer, the fact that the influencer was being paid by the government, and, if not, why not?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 690--
Mr. Robert Kitchen:
With regard to all monetary and non-monetary contracts, grants, agreements and arrangements entered into by the government, including any department, agency, Crown corporation or other government entity, with FLIR Lorex Inc., FLIR Systems , Lorex Technology Inc, March Networks, or Rx Networks Inc., since January 1, 2016: what are the details of such contracts, grants, agreements, or arrangements, including for each (i) the company, (ii) the date, (iii) the amount or value, (iv) the start and end date, (v) the summary of terms, (vi) whether or not the item was made public through proactive disclosure, (vii) the specific details of goods or services provided to the government as a result of the contract, grant, agreement or arrangement, (viii) the related government program, if applicable?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 691--
Mr. Randy Hoback:
With regard to the deal reached between the government and Pfizer Inc. for COVID-19 vaccine doses through 2024: (a) what COVID-19 modelling was used to develop the procurement agreement; and (b) what specific delivery timetables were agreed to?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 692--
Mr. Randy Hoback:
With regard to the testimony of the CEO of BioPharma Services at the House of Commons' Standing Committee on International Trade on Friday, April 23, 2021, pertaining to potential future waves of COVID-19 and the need for trading blocs: (a) have the Minister of Finance and her department been directed to plan supports for Canadians affected by subsequent waves of the virus through 2026; (b) what is the current status of negotiations or discussions the government has entered into with our allies about the creation of trading blocs for vaccines and personal protective equipment; (c) which specific countries have been involved in discussions about potential trading blocs; and (d) what are the details of all meetings where negotiations or discussions that have occurred about potential trading, including the (i) date, (ii) participants, (iii) countries represented by participants, (iv) meeting agenda and summary?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 694--
Ms. Raquel Dancho:
With regard to the Canada Emergency Response Benefit payments being sent to prisoners in federal or provincial or territorial correctional facilities: (a) how many CERB benefit payments were made to incarcerated individuals; (b) what is the value of the payments made to incarcerated individuals; (c) what is the value of the payments in (b) which were later recouped by the government as of April 28, 2021; (d) how many payments were intercepted and or blocked by Correctional Service Canada staff; (e) what is the breakdown of (d) by correctional institution; and (e) how many of the payments in (a) were sent to individuals in (i) federal correctional facilities, (ii) provincial or territorial correctional facilities?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 696--
Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:
With regard to the negotiations between the government and major Canadian airlines that are related to financial assistance, since November 8, 2020: what are the details of all meetings, including any virtual meetings, held between the government and major airlines, including, for each meeting, the (i) date, (ii) number of government representatives, broken down by department and agency, and, if ministers' offices were represented, how many representatives of each office were present, (iii) number of airline representatives, including a breakdown of which airlines were represented and how many representatives of each airline were present?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 697--
Mrs. Alice Wong:
With regard to the Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO): (a) broken down by end of fiscal year, between fiscal years 2011-12 to 2020-21, how many trademark examiners were (i) employed, (ii) contracted by the CIPO; (b) what percentage in (a) were employed with a residence within the National Capital Region of Ottawa-Gatineau, by the end of fiscal years 2015-16 to 2020-21; (c) broken down by fiscal year, during each fiscal year from 2011-12 to 2020-21, how many trademark examiners were (i) hired, (ii) terminated, broken down by (A) for cause and (B) not for cause; (d) is there a requirement for bilingualism for trademark examiners, and, if so, what level of other-official language fluency is required; (e) is there a requirement that trademark examiners reside within the National Capital Region of Ottawa-Gatineau, and, if so, how many trademark examiner candidates have refused offers of employment, and how many trademark examiners have ceased employment, due to such a requirement in the fiscal years from 2011-12 to 2020-21; (f) what was the (i) mean, (ii) median time of a trademark application, for each of the fiscal years between 2011-12 and 2020-21, between filing and a first office action (approval or examiner’s report); (g) for the answer in (f), since June 17, 2019, how many were filed under the (i) direct system, (ii) Madrid System; (h) for the answer in (g), what are the mean and median time, broken down by month for each system since June 17, 2019; (i) does the CIPO prioritize the examination of Madrid system trademark applications designating Canada over direct trademark applications, and, if so, what priority treatment is given; (j) as many applicants and trademark agents have not received correspondence from the CIPO by regular mail and prefer electronic correspondence, does the CIPO have systems in place to allow trademarks examiners and other trademarks staff to send all correspondence by e-mail to applicants and trademark agents of record, and, if not, is the CIPO looking into implementing such system; (k) when is the anticipated date for the execution of such system; (l) what is Canada’s ranking with other countries, as to the speed of trademark examination; and (m) what countries, if any, have a longer period of time between filing and a first office action (approval or examiner’s report) for trademarks compared to Canada?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 699--
Mr. Tom Kmiec:
With regard to the Fiscal Stabilization Program under the Federal-Provincial Arrangements Act, since January 1, 1987: (a) what is the breakdown of every payment or refund made to provinces, broken down by (i) date, (ii) province, (iii) payment amount, (iv) revenue lost by the province, (v) payment as a proportion of revenue lost, (vi) the value of the payment in amount per capita; (b) how many claims have been submitted to the Minister of Finance by each province since its inception, broken down by province and date; (c) how many claims have been accepted, broken down by province and date; and (d) how many claims have been rejected, broken down by province and date?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 700--
Mr. Tom Kmiec:
With regard to voluntary compliance undertakings (VCU) and board orders by the Patented Medicines Prices Review Board (PMPRB), since January 1, 2016: (a) what is the total amount of money that has been made payable from pharmaceutical companies to her Majesty in right of Canada through voluntary compliance undertakings and board orders, both sum total, broken down by (i) company, (ii) product, (iii) summary of guideline application, (iv) amount charged, (v) date; (b) how is the money processed by the PMPRB; (c) how much of the intake from VCUs and board orders are counted as revenue for the PMPRB; (d) how much of the intake from VCUs and board orders are considered revenue for Health Canada; (e) as the Public Accounts lists capital inflow from VCUs as revenue, what has the PMPRB done with the inflow; and (f) who decides the distribution of the capital inflow from VCUs?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 701--
Mr. Tom Kmiec:
With regard to the Patented Medicines Prices Review Board (PMPRB) and the proposed amendments to the “Patented Medicines Regulations”, also referred to as the PMPRB Guidelines, since January 1, 2017: (a) how many organizations, advocacy groups, and members of industry or stakeholders have been consulted, both sum total and broken down in an itemized list by (i) name, (ii) summary of their feedback, (iii) date; (b) how many stakeholders expressed positive feedback about the proposed guidelines; (c) how many stakeholders expressed negative feedback about the proposed guidelines; (d) what is the threshold of negative feedback needed to delay implementation of the proposed guidelines as has been done previously in mid 2020, and start of 2021; (e) have there been any requests made by PMPRB executives to Health Canada officials to delay the implementation of the proposed regulations; and (f) how many times were these requests rejected by Health Canada officials?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 702--
Mr. Tom Kmiec:
With regard to reports, studies, assessments, consultations, evaluations and deliverables prepared for the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation since January 1, 2016: what are the details of all such deliverables, including the (i) date that the deliverable was finished, (ii) title, (iii) summary of recommendations, (iv) file number, (v) website where the deliverable is available online, if applicable, (vi) value of the contract related to the deliverable?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 704--
Mr. Alex Ruff:
With regard to government data relating to the Cannabis Act (2018) Part 14 Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes, broken down by month, year, and province or territory since 2018: (a) how many active personal or designated production registrations were authorized for amounts equal to or above 25 grams per person, per day: (b) how many active personal or designated production registrations are authorized for amounts equal to or above 100 grams per person, per day; (c) how many registrations for the production of cannabis at the same location exist in Canada that allow two, three and four registered persons; (d) of the locations that allow two, three and four registered persons to grow cannabis, how many site locations contain registrations authorized to produce amounts equal to or above 25 grams per person, per day; (e) how many site locations contain registrations authorized to produce amounts equal to or above 100 grams per person, per day; (f) how many Health Canada or other government inspections of these operations were completed each month; (g) how many of those inspections yielded violations, broken down by location; and (h) how many resulted in withdrawal of one or more licences?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 706--
Mr. Jasraj Singh Hallan:
With regard to COVID-19 specimen collection from travellers completed at Canada’s ports of entry and through at home specimen collection kits: (a) what company performs the tests of specimens collected from each port of entry; (b) what company performs the tests of at home specimen collection kits; (c) what city and laboratory are specimens collected from each port of entry, sent to for processing; (d) what city and laboratory are at home specimen collection kits processed; (e) what procurement process did the government undertake in selecting companies to collect and process COVID-19 specimens; (f) what companies submitted bids to collect and process COVID-19 specimens; (g) what are the details of the bids submitted by companies in (f); and (h) what are the details of the contracts entered into between the government and any companies that have been hired to collect and process COVID-19 specimens?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 707--
Mr. Jasraj Singh Hallan:
With regard to Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) requests submitted to Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada (IRCC): (a) what is the current inventory of requests and broken down by the type of request; (b) what is the average processing time of each type of request; (c) what percentage of requests have received extensions in response time and broken down by the type of request; (d) what is the breakdown of the percentage of requests in (c) according to reasons for extensions; (e) what is the average length of extensions for response time overall and for each type of request; (f) what is the average number of extensions for response time overall and for each type of request; (g) what percentage of requests have had exemptions applied; (h) what is the breakdown of the percentage in (g) according to the reasons for exemptions; (i) how many complaints regarding the ATIP process has IRCC received since January 1, 2020, broken down by month; and (j) what is the breakdown of the number of complaints in (i) according to the type of complaint?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 708--
Mr. Jasraj Singh Hallan:
With regard to Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) offices: (a) what lines of business are processed at each case processing centre (CPC), the centralized intake office (CIO), and the Operations Support Centre (OSC); (b) what lines of business in (a) are not currently being processed at each CPC, the CIO, and the OSC; (c) how many applications have been (i) submitted, (ii) approved, (iii) refused, (iv) processed for each line of business, at each CPC, the CIO, and the OSC since January 1, 2020, broken down by month; (d) what is the current processing times and service standard processing times for each line of business at each CPC, the CIO, the OSC; (e) what is the operating status of each IRCC in-person office in Canada; (f) what services are provided at each IRCC in-person office in Canada; (g) what services in (f) are currently (i) available, (ii) unavailable, (iii) offered at limited capacity, at each IRCC in-person office in Canada; (h) what lines of business are processed at each IRCC visa office located in Canadian embassies, high commissions, and consulates; (i) how many applications have been (i) submitted, (ii) approved, (iii) refused, (iv) processed, for each line of business processed at each IRCC visa office in (h) since January 1, 2020, broken down by month; and (j) what is the current processing times and standard processing times for each line of business processed at each IRCC visa office in (h)?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 709--
Mr. Alex Ruff:
With regard to correspondence received by the Minister of Canadian Heritage or the Office of the Prime Minister related to internet censorship or increased regulation of posts on social media sites, since January 1, 2019: (a) how many pieces of correspondence were received; and (b) how many pieces of correspondence asked for more internet censorship or regulation?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 710--
Mr. Martin Shields:
With regard to the planning of the government’s announcement on April 29, 2021, about the launch of an independent external comprehensive review of the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces and reports that some of those involved in the announcement, including Lieutenant-General Jennie Carignan, did not learn about their new roles until the morning of the announcement: (a) on what date was Lieutenant-General Jennie Carignan informed that she would become the Chief, Professional Conduct and Culture, and how was she informed; (b) on what date was Louise Arbour informed that she would be head of the review; (c) was the decision to launch this review made before or after Elder Marques testified at the Standing Committee on National Defence that Katie Telford had knowledge about the accusations against General Vance; and (d) if the decision in (c) was made prior to Mr. Marques’ testimony, what proof does the government have to back-up that claim?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 711--
Mr. Martin Shields:
With regard to free rapid COVID-19 tests distributed by the government directly to companies for the screening of close-contact employees: (a) how many tests were distributed; (b) which companies received the tests; and (c) how many tests did each company in (b) receive?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 712--
Mr. Martin Shields:
With regard to contracts awarded by the government to former public servants since January 1, 2020, broken down by department, agency, or other government entity: (a) how many contracts have been awarded to former public servants; (b) what is the total value of those contracts; and (c) what are the details of each such contract, including the (i) date the contract was signed, (ii) description of the goods or services, including the volume, (iii) final amount, (iv) vendor, (v) start and end date of contract?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 713--
Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:
With regard to sole-sourced contracts signed by the government since February 1, 2020, broken down by department, agency, or other government entity: (a) how many contracts have been sole-sourced; (b) what is the total value of those contracts; and (c) what are the details of each sole-sourced contract, including the (i) date, (ii) description of the goods or services, including the volume, (iii) final amount, (iv) vendor, (v) country of the vendor?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 714--
Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:
With regard to the RCMP’s National Security Criminal Investigations Program, broken down by year since 2015: (a) how many RCMP officers or other personnel were assigned to the program; and (b) what was the program’s budget or total expenditures?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 716--
Mr. Marc Dalton:
With regard to the Interim Protocol for the use of Southern B.C. commercial anchorages: (a) how many (i) days each of the anchorage locations was occupied from January 2019 to March 2021, broken down by month, (ii) complaints received related to vessels occupying these anchorages, between January 1, 2019, and March 31, 2021; and (b) why did the public posting of interim reports cease at the end of 2018?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 717--
Mr. Marc Dalton:
With regard to federal transfer payments to Indigenous communities in British Columbia: (a) what is the total amount of federal transfer payments in fiscal years 2018-19, 2019-20, 2020-21; and (b) of the amounts provided in (a), what amounts were provided specifically to Metis communities?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 718--
Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:
With regard to funding provided by the government to the Canadian Association of Elizabeth Fry Societies (CAEFS): (a) what requirements and stipulations apply for the CAEFS in securing, spending, and reporting financial support received from the government; and (b) what has the government communicated to the CAEFS with respect to the enforcement of Interim Policy Bulletin 584 before and after the coming into force of Bill C-16, An Act to amend the Canadian Human Rights Act and the Criminal Code, on June 19, 2017?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 719--
Mr. Dan Albas:
With regard to government funding in the riding of South Okanagan—West Kootenay, for each fiscal year since 2018-19 inclusive: (a) what are the details of all grants, contributions, and loans to any organization, body, or group, broken down by (i) name of the recipient, (ii) municipality of the recipient, (iii) date on which the funding was received, (iv) amount received, (v) department or agency providing the funding, (vi) program under which the grant, contribution, or loan was made, (vii) nature or purpose; and (b) for each grant, contribution and loan in (a), was a press release issued to announce it and, if so, what is the (i) date, (ii) headline, (iii) file number of the press release?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 722--
Mr. Dan Albas:
With regard to COVID-19 vaccines and having to throw them away due to spoilage or expiration: (a) how much spoilage and waste has been identified; (b) what is the spoilage and waste breakdowns by province; and (c) what is the cost to taxpayers for the loss of spoiled vaccines?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 724--
Mr. Brad Vis:
With regard to the First-Time Home Buyer Incentive (FTHBI) announced by the government in 2019, from September 1, 2019, to date: (a) how many applicants have applied for a mortgage through the FTHBI, broken down by province or territory and municipality; (b) of the applicants in (a), how many applicants have been approved and accepted mortgages through the FTHBI, broken down by province or territory and municipality; (c) of the applicants in (b), how many approved applicants have been issued the incentive in the form of a shared equity mortgage; (d) what is the total value of incentives (shared equity mortgages) under the program that have been issued, in dollars; (e) for those applicants who have been issued mortgages through the FTHBI, what is that value of each of the mortgage loans; (f) for those applicants who have been issued mortgages through the FTHBI, what is that mean value of the mortgage loan; (g) what is the total aggregate amount of money lent to homebuyers through the FTHBI to date; (h) for mortgages approved through the FTHBI, what is the breakdown of the percentage of loans originated with each lender comprising more than 5 per cent of total loans issued; (i) for mortgages approved through the FTHBI, what is the breakdown of the value of outstanding loans insured by each Canadian mortgage insurance company as a percentage of total loans in force; and (j) what date will the promised FTHBI program updates announced in the 2020 Fall Economic Statement be implemented?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question no 682 --
M. Gary Vidal:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses gouvernementales relatives à la promotion, à la publicité ou aux experts conseils pour le projet de loi C-15, Loi concernant la Déclaration des Nations Unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, y compris celles qui ont été engagées avant le dépôt de la mesure législative, depuis le 21 octobre 2019, ventilées par mois et par ministère, organisme ou autre entité gouvernementale: a) quel a été montant total dépensé pour (i) les experts conseils, (ii) la publicité, (iii) la promotion; b) quels sont les détails de tous les contrats liés à la promotion, à la publicité et aux experts conseils, y compris (i) la date de la signature du contrat, (ii) le fournisseur, (iii) le montant, (iv) les dates de début et de fin, (v) la description des biens ou des services, (vi) s’il s’agissait d’un contrat à fournisseur unique ou ayant fait l’objet d’un appel d’offres?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 684 --
Mme Cathy McLeod:
En ce qui concerne la fraude relative à la Prestation canadienne d’urgence depuis sa création: a) combien de paiements ont été faits en double; b) quelle est la valeur des paiement en a); c) quelle est la valeur des paiements faits en double en b) qui ont été récupérés par le gouvernement; d) combien de paiements ont été accordés à des demandes jugées frauduleuses ou soupçonnées de l’être; e) quelle est la valeur des paiements en d); f) quelle est la valeur des paiements en e) qui ont été récupérés par le gouvernement?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 685 --
Mme Cathy McLeod:
En ce qui concerne Corporations Canada et le désenregistrement de sociétés de régime fédéral depuis 2016, ventilé par année: a) combien d’entreprises ont désenregistré leur société; b) quelle est la répartition des entreprises en a) par type d’entreprise?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 686 --
Mme Cathy McLeod:
En ce qui concerne les exigences du gouvernement pour les hôtels utilisés comme installations de quarantaine: a) quelles obligations précises les hôtels ont-ils en ce qui concerne les normes de sécurité; b) quelles mesures précises le gouvernement a-t-il prises pour s’assurer que ces normes de sécurité sont respectées; c) combien de fois les inspecteurs du gouvernement ont-ils constaté que les normes de sécurité de ces hôtels n’étaient pas respectées; d) parmi les cas en c), combien de fois les manquements aux normes de sécurité ont-ils mis en péril (i) la sécurité des personnes séjournant dans l’établissement, (ii) la santé publique ou la sécurité du grand public; e) les hôtels sont-ils tenus de vérifier qu’une personne a subi un test de dépistage négatif avant de quitter l’établissement et, le cas échéant, comment cette vérification est-elle effectuée; f) combien de personnes ont quitté ces établissements sans avoir reçu un résultat négatif?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 687 --
Mme Cathy McLeod:
En ce qui concerne les exigences établies par le gouvernement pour que seuls les hôtels approuvés par les autorités publiques puissent accueillir des voyageurs qui reviennent de l’étranger par voie aérienne et qui doivent faire une quarantaine: a) quelles obligations précises les hôtels doivent-ils remplir concernant les normes de sécurité; b) quelles mesures précises le gouvernement a-t-il prises pour assurer le respect des normes de sécurité; c) combien de cas de non respect des normes de sécurité ont été observés par les inspecteurs des autorités publiques; d) parmi les cas en c), combien concernaient des manquements à la sécurité qui mettaient en péril (i) la sécurité des personnes séjournant dans l’établissement en question, (ii) la santé publique ou la population en général; e) combien d’actes criminels ont été signalés dans chacun des établissements approuvés par les autorités publiques depuis l’entrée en vigueur de l’exigence sur la quarantaine à l’hôtel; f) quels sont les nombres en e), ventilés selon le type d’infraction; g) les hôtels sont-ils tenus de vérifier que le client a reçu un résultat négatif à un test de dépistage avant de quitter l’établissement et, le cas échéant, quelle procédure précise s’applique à cette fin; h) combien de personnes ont quitté leur hôtel avant d’avoir reçu un résultat négatif à un test de dépistage ou sans avoir reçu de résultat négatif; i) comment le gouvernement vérifie-t-il si des gens quittent leur hôtel avant d’avoir reçu un résultat négatif à un test de dépistage?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 688 --
Mme Nelly Shin:
En ce qui concerne l’exigence selon laquelle les personnes entrant au Canada pour des raisons humanitaires doivent demander une exemption en ligne, les problèmes liés au système en ligne de l’Agence de la santé publique du Canada (ASPC) et les mesures prises par l’Agence des services frontaliers du Canada (ASFC) à l’égard de ces voyageurs: a) combien de voyageurs internationaux arrivant dans des aéroports canadiens se sont vus refuser l’entrée, ventilé par mois, depuis le 18 mars 2020; b) combien de personnes en a) ont été (i) immédiatement renvoyées dans leur pays d’origine, (ii) autorisées à rester au Canada en attendant une décision d’appel ou leur expulsion; c) dans combien de cas l’ASPC n’a pas pris de décision concernant une demande d’exemption pour des raisons humanitaires avant l’arrivée ou l’arrivée prévue du voyageur au Canada; d) dans les cas en c), où l’ASPC n’a pas pris de décision à temps, la raison était-elle due (i) à des problèmes techniques qui ont fait que l’ASPC n’a pas reçu la demande, (ii) à d’autres raisons, ventilées par raison; e) dans les cas où l’ASPC n’a pas pris de décision à temps, le voyageur (i) a-t-il été quand même autorisé à entrer au Canada, (ii) s’est-il vu refuser l’entrée; f) quels sont les recours pour les voyageurs qui viennent au pays pour des raisons humanitaires et qui ont des problèmes avec l’ASFC ou d’autres agents parce que l’ASPC n’a pas pris de décision à temps?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 689 --
M. Robert Kitchen:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses liées aux influenceurs sur les réseaux sociaux, y compris tout contrat visant à utiliser des influenceurs dans le cadre d’une campagne de relations publiques depuis le 1er janvier 2021: a) quels sont les détails relatifs à toutes ces dépenses, y compris (i) le fournisseur, (ii) le montant, (iii) la description de la campagne, (iv) la date du contrat, (v) le nom ou le pseudonyme de l’influenceur; b) pour chaque campagne qui a rémunéré un influenceur, était-il exigé que soit divulgué publiquement, sous forme d’avertissement, le fait que l’influenceur était payé par le gouvernement et, si ce n'est pas le cas, pourquoi?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 690 --
M. Robert Kitchen:
En ce qui concerne tous les contrats, subventions, ententes et arrangements monétaires et non monétaires conclus par le gouvernement, y compris tout ministère, organisme, société d’État ou autre entité gouvernementale, avec FLIR Lorex Inc., FLIR Systems, Lorex Technology Inc., March Networks ou Rx Networks Inc. depuis le 1er janvier 2016: quels sont les détails de ces contrats, subventions, ententes ou arrangements, y compris, pour chacun d’entre eux, (i) le nom de l’entreprise, (ii) la date, (iii) le montant ou la valeur, (iv) la date de début et de fin, (v) le résumé des modalités, (vi) le fait que ceux-ci ont fait l’objet ou pas d’une divulgation proactive, (vii) les détails précis des biens ou des services fournis au gouvernement en raison du contrat, de la subvention, de l’entente ou de l’arrangement, (viii) le programme gouvernemental pertinent, le cas échéant?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 691 --
M. Randy Hoback:
En ce qui concerne le marché conclu entre le gouvernement et Pfizer Inc. pour les doses de vaccin contre la COVID-19 jusqu’en 2024: a) quelle modélisation de la COVID-19 a été utilisée pour établir l’entente d’approvisionnement; b) sur quels calendriers de livraison précis s’est-on entendu?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 692 --
M. Randy Hoback:
En ce qui concerne le témoignage du directeur général de BioPharma Services devant le Comité permanent du commerce international de la Chambre des communes, le vendredi 23 avril 2021, au sujet des prochaines vagues possibles de COVID-19 et de la nécessité des blocs commerciaux: a) est-ce que la ministre des Finances et son ministère ont eu la directive de prévoir des soutiens pour les Canadiens touchés par toute vague subséquente du virus d’ici 2026; b) quel est l’état actuel des négociations ou des discussions entre le gouvernement et nos alliés pour ce qui est de la création de blocs commerciaux pour les vaccins et l’équipement de protection personnelle; c) quels sont les pays qui participent aux discussions sur la création potentielle de blocs commerciaux; d) quels sont les détails de toutes les réunions où de possibles échanges commerciaux ont fait l’objet de négociations ou de discussions, y compris (i) la date, (ii) les participants, (iii) les pays représentés par les participants, (iv) l’ordre du jour et le compte rendu des réunions?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 694 --
Mme Raquel Dancho:
En ce qui concerne le versement de la Prestation canadienne d’urgence (PCU) à des détenus dans des établissements correctionnels fédéraux, provinciaux ou territoriaux: a) combien de paiements de la PCU ont été versés à des personnes incarcérées; b) quel est le montant des paiements versés à des personnes incarcérées; c) quel est le montant des paiements en b) que le gouvernement a recouvrés par la suite, en date du 28 avril 2021; d) combien de paiements ont été interceptés ou bloqués par le personnel de Service correctionnel Canada; e) quelle est la ventilation de d) par établissement correctionnel; e) combien des paiements en a) ont été envoyés à des personnes détenues (i) dans des établissements correctionnels fédéraux, (ii) dans des établissements correctionnels provinciaux ou territoriaux?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 696 --
Mme Stephanie Kusie:
En ce qui concerne les négociations entre le gouvernement et les grandes compagnies aériennes du Canada au sujet d’une aide financière, depuis le 8 novembre 2020: quels sont les détails de chacune des réunions, y compris les réunions virtuelles, tenues entre le gouvernement et les grandes compagnies aériennes, y compris, pour chaque réunion, (i) la date, (ii) le nombre de représentants du gouvernement, ventilé par ministère et organisme, et, si des cabinets de ministre étaient représentés, combien de représentants de chaque cabinet étaient présents, (iii) le nombre de représentants des compagnies aériennes, y compris la ventilation des compagnies aériennes qui étaient représentées et le nombre de représentants de chacune des compagnies qui étaient présents?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 697 --
Mme Alice Wong:
En ce qui concerne l’Office de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada (OPIC): a) ventilé par fin d’exercice, des exercices de 2011-2012 à 2020-2021, combien d’examinateurs de marques de commerce étaient (i) des employés, (ii) des contractuels de l’OPIC; b) quel pourcentage en a) étaient des employés et avaient une résidence dans la région de la capitale nationale d'Ottawa-Gatineau à la fin des exercices de 2015-2016 à 2020-2021; c) ventilé par exercice, au cours de chacun des exercices de 2011-2012 à 2020-2021, combien d’examinateurs de marques de commerce ont été (i) embauchés, (ii) licenciés, ventilés par (A) avec justification et (B) sans justification; d) les examinateurs de marques de commerce doivent-ils être bilingues et, le cas échéant, quel est le niveau requis de maîtrise de l’autre langue officielle; e) les examinateurs de marques de commerce doivent-ils résider dans la région de la capitale nationale d'Ottawa-Gatineau et, le cas échéant, combien de candidats à des postes d’examinateur de marques de commerce ont refusé des offres d’emploi, et combien d’examinateurs de marques de commerce ont cessé de travailler, à cause d’une telle exigence au cours des exercices de 2011-2012 à 2020-2021; f) quels étaient le (i) délai moyen, (ii) délai médian d’une demande de marque, pour chacun des exercices entre 2011-2012 et 2020-2021, entre le dépôt et la première intervention de l’autorité compétente (approbation ou rapport de l’examinateur); g) concernant la réponse en f), depuis le 17 juin 2019, combien de demandes ont été déposées selon (i) le système direct, (ii) le système de Madrid; h) concernant la réponse en g), quels sont les délais moyens et médians, ventilés par mois pour chaque système depuis le 17 juin 2019; i) l’OPIC accorde-t-il la priorité à l’examen des demandes de marques de commerce du système de Madrid désignant le Canada au détriment des demandes de marques de commerce directes et, le cas échéant, quel traitement prioritaire est accordé; j) comme de nombreux déposants et agents de marques de commerce ne reçoivent pas de correspondance de l’OPIC par courrier ordinaire, préférant la correspondance électronique, l’OPIC dispose-t-il de systèmes permettant aux examinateurs de marques de commerce et aux autres membres du personnel s’occupant des marques d’envoyer toute la correspondance par courrier électronique aux déposants et aux agents de marques enregistrés et, si ce n’est pas le cas, l’OPIC envisage-t-il de mettre en place un tel système; k) quelle est la date prévue de lancement d’un tel système; l) où le Canada se classe-t-il, par rapport aux autres pays, pour la rapidité de l’examen des marques de commence; m) quels sont les pays, le cas échéant, où le délai entre le dépôt et la première intervention de l’autorité compétente (approbation ou rapport de l’examinateur) pour les marques de commerce est plus long qu’au Canada?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 699 --
M. Tom Kmiec:
En ce qui concerne le programme de stabilisation fiscale prévu dans la Loi sur les arrangements fiscaux entre le gouvernement fédéral et les provinces, du 1er janvier 1987 à aujourd’hui: a) quelle est la ventilation de tous les paiements et remboursements qui ont été versés aux provinces par (i) date, (ii) province, (iii) montant, (iv) recettes provinciales perdues, (v) taux des recettes perdues que les paiements ont compensées, (vi) valeur des paiements par habitant; b) combien de demandes de paiement la ministre des Finances a-t-elle reçues depuis la création du programme, ventilées par province et par date; c) combien de demandes de paiement ont été approuvées, ventilées par province et par date; d) combien de demandes de paiement ont été rejetées, ventilées par province et par date?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 700 --
M. Tom Kmiec:
En ce qui concerne les engagements de conformité volontaire et les ordonnances du Conseil d’examen du prix des médicaments brevetés (CEPMB), depuis le 1er janvier 2016: a) quel est le montant total des sommes payables par les sociétés pharmaceutiques à Sa Majesté du chef par l’intermédiaire d’engagements de conformité volontaire et d’ordonnances, ventilé par (i) entreprise, (ii) produit, (iii) sommaire de l’application des lignes directrices, (iv) montant facturé, (v) date; b) comment l’argent est-il traité par le CEPMB; c) quelle partie des prélèvements effectués au titre des engagements de conformité volontaire et des ordonnances est calculée comme un revenu du CEPMB; d) quelle partie des prélèvements effectués au titre des engagements de conformité volontaire et des ordonnances est calculée comme un revenu de Santé Canada; e) comme les Comptes publics considèrent l’entrée de capitaux provenant des engagements de conformité volontaire comme des revenus, que fait le CEPMB de ces entrées de capitaux; f) qui décide de la répartition des entrées de capitaux découlant des engagements de conformité volontaire?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 701 --
M. Tom Kmiec:
En ce qui concerne le Conseil d’examen du prix des médicaments brevetés (CEPMB) et les modifications proposées au Règlement sur les médicaments brevetés, que l’on appelle également les « Lignes directrices du CEPMB », depuis le 1er janvier 2017: a) combien d’organismes, de groupes de défense d’intérêts et de membres de l’industrie ou d’intervenants ont été consultés, à la fois le nombre total et ventilé selon une liste détaillée par (i) le nom, (ii) le résumé des commentaires, (iii) la date; b) combien d’intervenants ont exprimé des commentaires positifs au sujet des lignes directrices proposées; c) combien d’intervenants ont exprimé des commentaires négatifs au sujet des lignes directrices proposées; d) quel est le seuil de commentaires négatifs permettant de retarder la mise en œuvre des lignes directrices proposées, comme ce qui s’est fait au milieu de 2020 et au début de 2021; e) est-ce que des dirigeants du CEPMB ont demandé à des fonctionnaires de Santé Canada de retarder la mise en œuvre des lignes directrices proposées; f) combien de fois ces demandes ont-elles été rejetées par des fonctionnaires de Santé Canada?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 702 --
M. Tom Kmiec:
En ce qui concerne les rapports, études, évaluations, consultations et documents produits pour la Société canadienne d’hypothèques et de logement depuis le 1er janvier 2016: quels sont les détails de tous ces produits livrables, y compris (i) la date de finalisation du produit, (ii) le titre, (iii) le résumé des recommandations, (iv) le numéro de dossier, (v) le site Web où le produit est affiché en ligne, le cas échéant, (vi) la valeur du contrat lié au produit livrable?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 704 --
M. Alex Ruff:
En ce qui concerne les données du gouvernement sur la partie 14 de la Loi sur le cannabis (2018) relativement à l’accès au cannabis à des fins médicales, ventilé par mois, année et province ou territoire depuis 2018: a) combien d’inscriptions pour la production personnelle ou par une personne désignée ont été autorisées pour la production de quantités égales ou supérieures à 25 grammes par personne quotidiennement; b) combien d’inscriptions pour la production personnelle ou par une personne désignée ont été autorisées pour la production de quantités égales ou supérieures à 100 grammes par personne quotidiennement; c) combien d’inscriptions pour la production de cannabis dans un même lieu compte-on au Canada et conformément auxquelles on autorise la production à deux, trois ou quatre personnes inscrites; d) parmi les lieux qui permettent à deux, trois ou quatre personnes inscrites de cultiver du cannabis, combien sont assortis d’inscriptions permettant la production de quantités égales ou supérieures à 25 grammes par personne quotidiennement; e) combien de sites de production sont assortis d’inscriptions permettant la production de quantités égales ou supérieures à 100 grammes par personne quotidiennement; f) combien d’inspections de Santé Canada ou d’autres inspections gouvernementales ont été effectuées à l’égard de ces activités chaque mois; g) combien de ces inspections ont abouti à des infractions, ventilées par lieu; h) combien ont abouti au retrait d’un ou de plusieurs permis?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 706 --
M. Jasraj Singh Hallan:
En ce qui concerne le prélèvement d’échantillons pour le dépistage de la COVID-19 effectué auprès des voyageurs aux points d’entrée du Canada et au moyen de trousses de prélèvement à domicile: a) quelle entreprise effectue les analyses pour les échantillons prélevés à chaque point d’entrée; b) quelle entreprise effectue les analyses pour les trousses de prélèvement à domicile; c) dans quelle ville et quel laboratoire les échantillons prélevés à chaque point d’entrée sont-ils envoyés aux fins d’analyse; d) dans quelle ville et quel laboratoire les trousses de prélèvement à domicile sont-elles analysées; e) quel processus d’approvisionnement le gouvernement du Canada a-t-il entrepris pour sélectionner les entreprises chargées de recueillir et d’analyser les échantillons aux fins de dépistage de la COVID-19; f) quelles entreprises ont soumis des offres pour le prélèvement et l’analyse des échantillons du test COVID-19; g) quels sont les détails des offres soumises par les entreprises mentionnées en f); h) quels sont les détails des contrats conclus entre le gouvernement du Canada et les entreprises retenues pour le prélèvement et l’analyse des échantillons du test COVID-19?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 707 --
M. Jasraj Singh Hallan:
En ce qui concerne les demandes d’accès à l’information soumises à Immigration, Réfugiés et Citoyenneté Canada (IRCC): a) combien y a-t-il de demandes à traiter et ventilées par type de demande; b) quel est le temps de traitement moyen de chaque type de demande; c) quel pourcentage de demandes ont fait l’objet d’une prolongation du temps de réponse et ventilées par type de demande; d) quelle est la ventilation du pourcentage des demandes en c) en fonction des raisons de la prolongation; e) quelle est la durée moyenne des prolongations du temps de réponse dans l’ensemble et pour chaque type de demande; f) quel est le nombre moyen de prolongations du temps de réponse dans l’ensemble et pour chaque type de demande; g) quel pourcentage de demandes ont fait l’objet d’exemptions; h) quelle est la ventilation du pourcentage en g) en fonction des raisons des exemptions; i) combien de plaintes concernant le processus de demande d’accès à l’information IRCC a-t-il reçues depuis le 1er janvier 2020, ventilées par mois; j) quelle est la ventilation du nombre de plaintes en i) en fonction du type de plainte?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 708 --
M. Jasraj Singh Hallan:
En ce qui concerne les bureaux d’Immigration, Réfugiés et Citoyenneté Canada (IRCC): a) quels sont les secteurs d’activité traités dans chaque centre de traitement des demandes (CTD), au Bureau de réception centralisée des demandes (BRCD) et au Centre de soutien des opérations (CSO); b) quels secteurs d’activité en a) ne sont pas traités actuellement dans chaque CTD, au BRCD et au CSO; c) combien de demandes ont été (i) soumises, (ii) approuvées, (iii) rejetées, (iv) traitées dans chaque secteur d’activité, dans chaque CTD, au BRCD et au CSO depuis le 1er janvier 2020, ventilées par mois; d) quels sont les délais de traitement actuels et les délais de traitement standards pour chaque secteur de service dans chaque CTD, au BRCD et au CSO; e) quelle est la situation de fonctionnement de chaque bureau de service en personne d’IRCC au Canada; f) quels sont les services offerts dans chaque bureau de service en personne d’IRCC au Canada; g) quels services en f) sont actuellement (i) offerts, (ii) non offerts, (iii) offerts dans une mesure limitée, dans chaque bureau de service en personne d’IRCC au Canada; h) quels secteurs d’activité sont traités dans chaque bureau des visas d’IRCC situés dans des ambassades, des hauts-commissariats et des consulats canadiens; i) combien de demandes ont été (i) soumises, (ii) approuvées, (iii) rejetées, (iv) traitées, pour chaque secteur d’activité traité dans chaque bureau des visas d’IRCC en h) depuis le 1er janvier 2020, ventilées par mois; j) quels sont les délais de traitement actuels et les délais de traitement standards pour chaque secteur de service traité dans chaque bureau des visas d’IRCC en h)?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 709 --
M. Alex Ruff:
En ce qui concerne la correspondance reçue par le ministre du Patrimoine canadien ou le Cabinet du premier ministre au sujet de la censure sur Internet ou du resserrement de la réglementation visant les publications sur les sites de médias sociaux, depuis le 1er janvier 2019: a) combien de lettres ont été reçues; b) combien de lettres réclamaient un accroissement de la censure sur Internet ou de la réglementation d’Internet?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 710 --
M. Martin Shields:
En ce qui concerne la planification entourant l’annonce faite par le gouvernement le 29 avril 2021 concernant le lancement d’un examen externe complet et indépendant du ministère de la Défense nationale et des Forces armées canadiennes, et des déclarations selon lesquelles certaines personnes concernées par l’annonce, dont la lieutenante-générale Jennie Carignan, n’ont été mises au courant de leur nouveau rôle que le matin de l’annonce: a) à quelle date la lieutenante-générale Jennie Carignan a-t-elle été informée de sa nomination comme Chef, Conduite professionnelle et culture, et comment le lui a-t-on appris; b) à quelle date Louise Arbour a-t-elle été informée qu’elle allait diriger l’examen; c) la décision de lancer cet examen a-t-elle été prise avant ou après le témoignage d’Elder Marques devant le Comité permanent de la défense nationale et son affirmation selon laquelle Katie Telford était au courant des accusations portées contre le général Vance; d) si la décision en c) a été prise avant le témoignage de M. Marques, quelle preuve le gouvernement peut-il fournir à cet effet?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 711 --
M. Martin Shields:
En ce qui concerne les tests rapides et gratuits de dépistage de la COVID-19 distribués par le gouvernement directement aux entreprises pour les employés en contact étroit: a) combien de tests ont été distribués; b) quelles entreprises ont reçu les tests; c) combien de tests chacune des entreprises en b) a-t-elle reçu?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 712 --
M. Martin Shields:
En ce qui concerne les contrats octroyés par le gouvernement à d’anciens fonctionnaires depuis le 1er janvier 2020, ventilés par ministère, organisation ou autre entité gouvernementale: a) combien de contrats ont été octroyés à d’anciens fonctionnaires; b) quelle est la valeur totale de ces contrats; c) quels sont les détails relatifs à chaque contrat, y compris (i) la date de signature du contrat, (ii) une description des biens ou des services fournis, y compris le volume, (iii) le montant final, (iv) le fournisseur, (v) les dates de début et de fin du contrat?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 713 --
M. Pierre Paul-Hus:
En ce qui concerne les contrats signés par le gouvernement avec des fournisseurs uniques depuis le 1er février 2020, ventilés par ministère, organisation ou autre entité gouvernementale: a) combien de contrats ont été octroyés à un fournisseur unique; b) quelle est la valeur totale de ces contrats; c) quels sont les détails relatifs à chaque contrat octroyé à un fournisseur unique, y compris (i) la date, (ii) une description des biens ou des services fournis, y compris le volume, (iii) le montant final, (iv) le fournisseur, (v) le pays du fournisseur?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 714 --
Mme Shannon Stubbs:
En ce qui concerne le Programme des enquêtes criminelles relatives à la sécurité nationale de la GRC, ventilé par année depuis 2015: a) combien d’agents de la GRC ou autres membres du personnel ont été affectés au Programme; b) quel était le budget total ou les dépenses totales du Programme?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 716 --
M. Marc Dalton:
En ce qui concerne le Protocole provisoire sur l’utilisation des postes de mouillage par les bâtiments commerciaux dans le sud de la Colombie-Britannique: a) combien (i) de jours chaque poste de mouillage a-t-il été occupé de janvier 2019 à mars 2021, ventilé par mois; (ii) de plaintes portant sur les bâtiments occupant ces postes de mouillage a-t-on reçues entre le 1er janvier 2019 et le 31 mars 2021; b) pourquoi a-t-on cessé de publier les rapports provisoires à la fin de 2018?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 717 --
M. Marc Dalton:
En ce qui concerne les paiements de transfert fédéraux aux communautés autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique: a) quel est le montant total des paiements de transfert fédéraux pour les exercices 2018-2019, 2019-2020, 2020-2021; b) des montants en a), quels montants ont été donnés spécifiquement aux communautés de Métis?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 718 --
Mme Cathay Wagantall:
En ce qui concerne le financement offert par le gouvernement à l’Association canadienne des sociétés Elizabeth Fry (ACSEF): a) quelles exigences et dispositions s’appliquent à l’ACSEF en ce qui concerne l’obtention, l’affectation et la déclaration de l’aide financière reçue du gouvernement; b) quels renseignements le gouvernement a-t-il communiqués à l’ACSEF au sujet de l’application du Bulletin de politique provisoire 584 avant et après l’entrée en vigueur du projet de loi C 16, Loi modifiant la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne et le Code criminel, le 19 juin 2017?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 719 --
M. Dan Albas:
En ce qui concerne le financement public dans la circonscription d’Okanagan-Sud—Kootenay-Ouest, pour chaque exercice depuis 2018-2019 inclusivement: a) quels sont les détails de l’ensemble des subventions, des contributions et des prêts accordés à une organisation, un organisme ou un groupe, ventilés selon (i) le nom du bénéficiaire, (ii) la municipalité du bénéficiaire, (iii) la date à laquelle le financement a été reçu, (iv) le montant reçu, (v) le ministère ou l’organisme qui a fourni le financement, (vi) le programme en vertu duquel la subvention, la contribution ou le prêt a été accordé, (vii) la nature ou l’objet; b) pour chaque subvention, contribution et prêt en a), un communiqué de presse a-t-il été publié pour l’annoncer et, le cas échéant, quel est (i) la date, (ii) le titre, (iii) le numéro de dossier du communiqué de presse?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 722 --
M. Dan Albas:
En ce qui concerne les doses de vaccin contre la COVID-19 qu’il a fallu éliminer parce qu’elles étaient gâchées ou périmées: a) combien a-t-on relevé de doses gâchées et gaspillées; b) combien y a-t-il eu de doses gâchées et gaspillées dans chacune des provinces; c) combien coûte aux contribuables la perte de doses gâchées?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 724 --
M. Brad Vis:
En ce qui concerne l’Incitatif à l’achat d’une première maison, annoncé par le gouvernement en 2019, à partir du 1er septembre 2019 jusqu’à aujourd’hui: a) combien de personnes ont présenté une demande d’hypothèque en se prévalant de l’Incitatif, ventilées par province ou territoire et municipalité; b) parmi les demandeurs en a), combien ont pu obtenir une hypothèque grâce à l’incitatif, ventilées par province ou territoire et municipalité; c) parmi les demandeurs en b), combien ont obtenu l’incitatif sous la forme d’un prêt hypothécaire avec participation à la mise de fonds; d) quelle est la valeur globale des incitatifs (prêts hypothécaires avec participation à la mise de fonds) accordés dans le cadre du programme, en dollars; e) pour les demandeurs qui ont obtenu un prêt hypothécaire au moyen de l’Incitatif, quelle est la valeur de chacun des prêts; f) pour les demandeurs qui ont obtenu un prêt hypothécaire au moyen de l’Incitatif, quelle est la valeur moyenne des prêts; g) quel est le montant total agrégé des prêts consentis aux acheteurs de maison par l’entremise de l’Incitatif jusqu’à maintenant; h) pour les hypothèques approuvées au moyen de l’Incitatif, quelle est la ventilation, en pourcentage, des prêts consentis par chacun des prêteurs et représentant plus de 5 % du total des prêts accordés; i) pour les hypothèques approuvées au moyen de l’Incitatif, quelle est la ventilation de la valeur des prêts impayés et assurés par chacune des compagnies d’assurance hypothécaire canadiennes comme pourcentage du total des prêts accordés; j) à quel moment aura lieu la mise à jour promise du programme d’Incitatif à l’achat d’une première maison, prévue dans l’Énoncé économique de l’automne de 2020?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)
8555-432-682 Expenditures related to pro ...8555-432-684 Canada Emergency Response B ...8555-432-685 Corporations Canada and der ...8555-432-686 Quarantine hotels8555-432-687 Quarantine hotels8555-432-688 Applications for exemption ...8555-432-689 Expenditures on social medi ...8555-432-690 Government contracts and ag ...8555-432-691 Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine8555-432-692 Testimony of the Chief Exec ...8555-432-694 Canada Emergency Response B ... ...Show all topics
View Sébastien Lemire Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, thank you for your generosity with regard to my time. By the way, I would like to offer you my congratulations. I had the privilege of witnessing your speech yesterday. It was a great lesson in democracy. I was pleased to hear it.
With Bill C-30, the federal government is demonstrating a flagrant lack of consideration for Quebec, its choices and the will of Quebeckers. I wish to remind members that the Bloc Québécois voted against budget 2021 because the federal government did not respond to our two main requests, namely to permanently and significantly increase the Canada health transfers by raising them from 22% to 35%, a demand shared by the National Assembly and unanimously supported by the provinces, and to increase old age security by $110 a month for people aged 65 and over.
Despite our reservations, the Bloc Québécois recognizes that budget 2021 is geared towards the post-COVID recovery. It will make it easier for Quebec's small businesses to access credit. It was essential that Bill C‑30 include an increase in credit-related funding for small businesses, especially start-ups, which have been struggling during the pandemic. Bill C‑30 encourages innovation and the potential for a greener economic recovery through its expanded lending against intellectual property.
However, access to credit is not the only way to help businesses recover, as credit often leads to debt, which can push businesses into bankruptcy. Credit becomes harmful when it is used to cover fixed and recurring business costs. In some cases, it merely postpones bankruptcy. What has the government done to revitalize businesses and reduce their administrative burden? Little or nothing.
The government could take action. It has no excuse not to. With a deficit of over $1 trillion, I think it has a some leeway. The federal government is not doing enough to help businesses take advantage of opportunities arising from international agreements. These agreements are so complicated and hard to understand, involving so many laws, regulations, measures, norms and provisions, that it is hard for business owners to properly assess them and see all of the possibilities. There needs to be communication. What is the federal government waiting for? When will it reduce this burden in order to better support businesses in getting their goods to market internationally and strengthen the ability of Quebec and Canadian industries and businesses to compete globally?
I care about Quebec businesses, particularly agricultural businesses, so I find it troubling that the government is doing so little to reduce the tax burden on agricultural business owners. What is more, one of the simplest solutions for reducing the administrative burden on businesses in Quebec is to implement a single tax return administered by Quebec. That is something that has been repeatedly called for by the Premier of Quebec, François Legault, and it reflects the unanimous will of the Quebec National Assembly.
I will point out that the Government of Quebec already collects the GST on Ottawa's behalf. That means the Government of Quebec has everything it needs to collect all taxes in Quebec. Direct access to foreign tax information would also give the Government of Quebec the power to fight tax havens. Ottawa has no credibility on that front. If Revenu Québec acquires that expertise, it will be in a better position to ensure tax fairness for all Quebec taxpayers.
Monsieur le Président, je vous remercie de votre générosité pour ce qui est de mon temps de parole. En passant, je vous offre mes félicitations: j'ai été un témoin privilégié de votre discours d'hier et c'était une belle leçon de démocratie. J'étais content d'y assister.
Le projet de loi C‑30 représente de la part du gouvernement fédéral un manque flagrant de considération pour le Québec et pour les choix et les volontés des Québécoises et des Québécois. Je tiens à rappeler que le Bloc québécois a voté contre le budget de 2021 parce que le gouvernement fédéral ne répondait pas à nos deux principales demandes: augmenter de façon significative et durable les transferts canadiens en santé de 22 à 35 % — demande partagée par l'Assemblée nationale et faisant l'unanimité parmi les provinces —, et augmenter de 110 $ par mois la pension de la Sécurité de la vieillesse des gens âgés de 65 ans et plus.
Malgré ses réserves, le Bloc québécois reconnaît que le budget de 2021 est celui d'une relance économique post-COVID. Il permet un meilleur accès au crédit pour les petites entreprises québécoises. Il était essentiel que le projet de loi C-30 prévoie une augmentation des budgets reliés au crédit pour les petites entreprises, particulièrement pour celles en démarrage, qui en ont arraché pendant la pandémie. Par ses prêts liés à la propriété intellectuelle, le projet de loi C‑30 encourage l'innovation et un potentiel de relance économique plus écologique.
Toutefois, pour aider la relance des entreprises, il n'y a pas que l'accès au crédit, car ce dernier mène dans bien des cas à un endettement qui pousse les entreprises à la faillite. Il devient nuisible lorsqu'il est utilisé afin d'assumer les coûts fixes et récurrents des entreprises. Le crédit ne fait que repousser la faillite dans certains cas. Pour relancer les entreprises, qu'est-ce que le gouvernement a fait pour diminuer leur fardeau administratif? Il n'a rien fait, ou si peu.
Pourtant, le gouvernement fédéral peut agir et n'a aucune excuse: avec plus de 1 000 milliards de déficit, je pense qu'il a une certaine marge de manœuvre. Le fédéral n'aide pas suffisamment les entreprises à saisir les occasions soulevées par les accords internationaux, qui sont si complexes à comprendre avec les lois, règlements, mesures, normes et clauses tellement nombreuses qu'il est difficile pour les entrepreneurs de les évaluer adéquatement et d'en voir toutes les possibilités. Il y a un besoin de communication. Qu'est-ce que le gouvernement fédéral attend pour réduire ce fardeau et mieux accompagner les entreprises jusqu'aux marchés internationaux, et pour renforcer la capacité des industries et des entreprises du Québec et du Canada à faire face à la compétition mondialisée?
Ayant à cœur les entreprises québécoises, particulièrement les entreprises agricoles, je déplore que le gouvernement fasse si peu pour réduire le fardeau fiscal des entrepreneurs agricoles. De plus, une des solutions les plus simples pour réduire le fardeau administratif des entreprises du Québec est l'instauration d'une déclaration unique de revenus gérée par l'État du Québec. Il s'agit d'ailleurs d'une demande récurrente du premier ministre du Québec, François Legault, et d'une volonté unanime de l'Assemblée nationale du Québec.
Je rappelle que l'État du Québec perçoit déjà la TPS pour Ottawa. L'État du Québec possède donc toutes les capacités de percevoir l'ensemble des taxes et des impôts sur son territoire. Par le fait même, en ayant directement accès aux renseignements fiscaux des pays étrangers, l'État du Québec posséderait aussi toutes les capacités de lutter contre les paradis fiscaux, domaine dans lequel Ottawa n'a aucune crédibilité. Ce gain d'expertise majeure pour Revenu Québec permettrait une meilleure justice fiscale pour les contribuables québécois.
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the opportunity at this very late hour to stand up today for workers in forestry, contracting and home renovations in Kelowna—Lake Country, British Columbia, and across Canada, and, most importantly, the opportunity to stand up for everyday families.
Softwood lumber plays a critical role in Canada's economy, and thousands of families rely on its production to supply our domestic markets and our exports. A softwood lumber agreement is critical to providing that certainty and stability. With lumber being a North American commodity, Liberal inaction has led to higher prices in Canada. The last agreement Canada had with the United States was negotiated with the previous Conservative government and expired in October of 2015. Leading up to that expiration, the current Prime Minister promised to negotiate a new agreement within his first 100 days in office. There have been three U.S. administrations and over 2,000 days since then, and we have heard of no formal negotiations.
The Liberals were also outmanoeuvred during CUSMA negotiations by failing to include softwood lumber in that agreement. On February 27, 2020, the Conservative members from the trade committee wrote the Deputy Prime Minister, outlining the “adverse impacts of CUSMA” on softwood lumber and warning that CUSMA “does not prevent the United States from applying antidumping and countervailing duties to Canadian softwood lumber.” They gave many recommendations, none of which have been acted on. Taking the easy way out and failing to negotiate softwood lumber into CUSMA put Canadian businesses and workers at risk. Simply put, the Liberals keep getting outmanoeuvred.
There is clear evidence that jobs and investment are going south. The charts of North America production of softwood lumber show that as of 2015, Canadian production has fallen, while it has been steadily rising in the U.S.. We have heard from within the industry that this is due to so much uncertainty over the past almost six years. Lumber production and exports to the United States are key to the industry's long-term stability and viability, as our supply chains are integrated. This situation was further exacerbated when the U.S. commerce department announced that it intended to double the tariffs on our lumber exports on May 21, 2021.
That is why I, along with my Conservative colleagues on the international trade committee, called for an emergency meeting to address this potentially devastating issue. At the June 4 meeting, the minister stated during her testimony, “I think the tariffs that have been imposed are certainly causing concern for home builders and for consumers.” The minister postured, as she was unable to point to any meetings or calls that had taken place with any of her U.S. counterparts in the nearly two weeks it had been at that time since the commerce department's announcement. We have had no negotiations since the last agreement expired that we have heard of, and there are no upcoming scheduled negotiations.
Prior to that meeting, I also had the opportunity to question the minister during debates on the main estimates on May 31, when I wanted to clarify conflicting comments. The U.S. trade representative, Ambassador Tai, had testified during U.S. congressional hearings that Canada has “not expressed interest in engaging” when it came to softwood lumber. Several days later, the Canadian Minister of Natural Resources implied at a natural resources committee meeting that it was in fact the U.S. that was not willing.
My question to the minister is simple. When will the government quite hiding its failures behind a wall of opaque talking points and finger pointing and start getting to work for my constituents in Kelowna—Lake Country, British Columbia and Canada, and when will the government get serious and start negotiations on a new softwood lumber agreement?
Monsieur le Président, je suis heureuse d'avoir l'occasion, à cette heure très tardive, de défendre les travailleurs de l'industrie forestière, de la construction et de la rénovation domiciliaire de Kelowna-Lake Country, en Colombie-Britannique, et de partout au Canada et, surtout, de défendre les familles ordinaires.
Le bois d'œuvre joue un rôle essentiel dans l'économie canadienne, et des milliers de familles dépendent de sa production pour assurer l'approvisionnement de nos marchés intérieurs et nos exportations. Un accord sur le bois d'œuvre est essentiel pour assurer cette réalité et cette stabilité. Le bois d'œuvre étant un produit de base nord-américain, l'inaction des libéraux a entraîné une hausse des prix au Canada. Le dernier accord entre le Canada et les États-Unis a été négocié par le précédent gouvernement conservateur et a expiré en octobre 2015. Avant cela, l'actuel premier ministre avait promis de négocier un nouvel accord dans les 100 premiers jours de son mandat. Il y a eu trois administrations américaines et plus de 2 000 jours ont passé depuis, et il n'y a eu aucune négociation officielle.
View Greg Fergus Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the forestry industry is one of Canada's main economic pillars. We recognize the huge contribution made by the more than 200,000 forestry workers who play a key role in Canada's production of high-quality wood products, which are prized around the world and generate economic spinoffs for all Canadians.
I want to start this morning by unequivocally stating that the tariffs on softwood lumber imposed by the United States are unfair and unjust, and they are hurting workers and the industry on both sides of the border. The minister has raised this question at every opportunity with President Biden, with Katherine Tai, the U.S. trade representative, and with Gina Raimondo, the U.S. secretary of commerce.
As we have always done, our government will continue to vigorously defend Canada's forestry sector, which supports hundreds of thousands of good middle-class jobs for Canadians across the country. We are taking a team Canada approach, working hand in hand with the softwood lumber industry, labour unions and provincial and territorial partners on all fronts.
We have launched a series of challenges against the initial U.S. duties on softwood lumber through both the WTO and the new NAFTA. Over the years, we have consistently been awarded legal victories that clearly demonstrate that our softwood lumber industry is in full compliance with international trade rules and that Canada is a trading partner in good standing in the multilateral rules-based system.
Our support for the softwood lumber industry and its workers is unequivocal. In 2017, our government announced the softwood lumber action plan, providing $867 million in measures to support forestry industry workers and their communities. During the pandemic, we supported around 8,500 forestry firms with a total of nearly $600 million from our government's emergency wage subsidy program.
We know that market diversification for our wood products will create Canadian jobs and benefit the communities that rely on the forestry industry. That is why, in 2019, we made an additional investment of over $250 million for action plan programs to help producers tap into new markets and diversify production.
Budget 2021 includes $54.8 million over two years to enhance investments in forestry industry transformation, including working with municipalities and community organizations ready for new forest-based economic opportunities.
Forestry industry workers can rest assured that we will always be there to stand up for their interests, their families and their communities. Our government is working hard to achieve a result that benefits all Canadians. However, we will only accept an agreement that is good for our softwood lumber industry and protects Canadian jobs.
Monsieur le Président, l'industrie forestière est l'un des principaux piliers de l’économie du Canada. Nous reconnaissons l'énorme contribution de plus de 200 000 travailleurs forestiers qui sont des acteurs clés dans la production canadienne de produits de bois de haute qualité et de renommée mondiale, qui génèrent des retombées économiques pour tous les Canadiens.
Je me permets de commencer ce matin par affirmer sans équivoque que les droits de douane imposés par les États‑Unis sur le bois d'œuvre canadien sont injustifiés et injustes et qu'ils nuisent aux travailleurs et à l'industrie des deux côtés de la frontière. La ministre a soulevé cette question à toutes les occasions possibles auprès du président Biden, de la représentante américaine au Commerce Katherine Tai et de la secrétaire au Commerce Gina Raimondo.
Le gouvernement continuera de défendre, comme il l'a toujours fait, le secteur forestier du Canada, qui soutient des centaines de milliers de bons emplois pour la classe moyenne partout au pays. Nous adoptons une approche « Équipe Canada », travaillant de concert avec l'industrie du bois d'œuvre, les syndicats ainsi que les partenaires provinciaux et territoriaux sur tous les fronts.
Nous avons entrepris, auprès de l'Organisation mondiale du commerce et du groupe spécial constitué aux termes du chapitre 10 de l’Accord Canada—États‑Unis—Mexique, une série de contestations contre les droits de douane imposés par les États‑Unis sur le bois d'œuvre canadien. Au fil des ans, nous avons constamment obtenu gain de cause dans de tels recours juridiques, ce qui montre clairement que notre industrie du bois d'œuvre se conforme entièrement aux règles internationales et que le Canada est un partenaire commercial de très bonne réputation dans le système multilatéral fondé sur des règles.
Notre appui à l'égard de l'industrie du bois d'œuvre et de ses travailleurs est sans équivoque. En 2017, le gouvernement a annoncé le Plan d'action sur le bois d'œuvre, qui fournit 867 millions de dollars en mesures de soutien pour les travailleurs de l'industrie forestière et leurs collectivités. Pendant la pandémie, nous avons aidé environ 8 500 entreprises forestières en leur versant près de 600 millions de dollars dans le cadre du programme de subvention salariale d'urgence.
Nous savons que la diversification du marché pour nos produits du bois créera des emplois canadiens et avantagera les collectivités qui dépendent de l'industrie forestière. Voilà pourquoi, en 2019, nous avons effectué un investissement supplémentaire de plus de 250 millions de dollars pour des programmes du plan d'action visant à aider les producteurs à exploiter de nouveaux marchés et à diversifier leur production.
De plus, le budget de 2021 prévoit 54,8 millions de dollars sur deux ans pour améliorer les investissements dans la transformation de l'industrie forestière, notamment en travaillant avec les municipalités et les organismes communautaires qui sont prêts à saisir de nouvelles occasions économiques liées aux forêts.
Les travailleurs de l'industrie forestière peuvent être assurés que nous serons toujours là pour défendre leurs intérêts, leurs familles et leurs communautés. Notre gouvernement travaille fort pour arriver à un résultat bénéfique pour tous les Canadiens. Cependant, nous accepterons seulement un accord qui est bon pour notre industrie du bois d'œuvre et qui protège les emplois canadiens.
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
Mr. Speaker, it is not just the livelihoods of the workers in the softwood lumber industry that are under threat. Baseless tariffs also have the added bite of increasing costs to Canadians because of integrated markets. The cost of living and the increased cost of housing are the number one concerns for my constituents in Kelowna—Lake Country and across the country.
Our relationship with the U.S. continues to diminish on all fronts because of the mismanagement of our trading relationship. That is why the official opposition put forth a motion, which I tabled and was supported, to create a new Canada-U.S. economic relations committee.
There are 11,000 lost jobs in the forestry sector, over $100 billion of lost investment in oil and gas, and concerns over lost business because of buy American policies. The Prime Minister talks big, yet he all but shrugs at these issues. The minister says softwood lumber is her top priority, but she could not point to any actions or conversations, since the announcement of tariffs, that she has had with any of her U.S. counterparts when she testified at the trade committee.
When is the government going to get off its hands and start taking any concrete actions on a new softwood lumber agreement?
View Greg Fergus Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, with all due respect to my hon. colleague, she is wrong. Canada has always vigorously defended the Canadian softwood lumber industry, and it continues to stand up for our forestry workers and our communities in every way possible.
Our government raises the softwood lumber file with the United States every chance it gets. We firmly believe that a resolution is in the best interest of both countries, and we remain ready to talk about it with the United States. We will continue to legally defend our industry through every means, including the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement, the North American Free Trade Agreement and the World Trade Organization.
This government has had and will continue to have as a priority the challenges faced by the softwood lumber industry. We have won before; we will win again.
Monsieur le Président, avec tout le respect que j'ai pour mon honorable collègue, elle a tort. Le Canada a toujours défendu vigoureusement l'industrie canadienne du bois d'œuvre et continue de défendre nos travailleurs forestiers et nos collectivités par tous les moyens possibles.
Notre gouvernement soulève le dossier du bois d'œuvre avec les États‑Unis à chaque occasion. Nous croyons fermement qu'une résolution est dans l'intérêt supérieur des deux pays et nous restons prêts à en discuter avec les États‑Unis. Nous allons continuer à défendre juridiquement notre industrie par tous les moyens, y compris l'Accord Canada—États-Unis—Mexique, l'Accord de libre-échange nord-américain et l'Organisation mondiale du commerce.
Les défis vécus par l'industrie du bois d'œuvre ont été et continueront d'être un dossier prioritaire pour le gouvernement. Nous avons gagné notre cause par le passé; nous gagnerons encore.
View Richard Martel Profile
CPC (QC)
View Richard Martel Profile
2021-06-15 14:32 [p.8465]
Mr. Speaker, according to an article on the CBC, softwood lumber experts expect that prices will continue to go up. They are also saying that it could take several years before things get back to normal.
In the meantime, the United States is taking advantage of the vulnerability of our forestry sector and threatening our industries with tariffs.
Canadian workers had to deal with a pandemic last year and do not need any more problems. Why is the government leaving them defenceless?
Monsieur le Président, selon un article de la CBC, les experts de l'industrie dubois d'œuvre s'attendent à ce que les prix continuent d'augmenter. Ils disent aussi que cela pourrait prendre plusieurs années avant qu'ils reviennent à la normale.
Pendant ce temps, les États‑Unis profitent de la vulnérabilité de notre secteur forestier et menacent nos industries de tarifs douaniers.
Les travailleurs canadiens ont dû faire face à une pandémie l'année dernière et n'ont pas besoin de plus de problèmes. Pourquoi le gouvernement les laisse-t-il sans défense?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-06-15 14:33 [p.8465]
Mr. Speaker, let me begin by unequivocally stating that duties imposed by the U.S. on Canadian softwood lumber are unwarranted and unfair. I have raised this issue at every opportunity, including with President Biden, with the U.S. trade representative and with the commerce secretary. As we have always done and we will continue to do, we are going to vigorously defend our Canadian softwood lumber industry, its workers and the hundreds of thousands of jobs that it employs.
Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais d'abord dire sans équivoque que les tarifs douaniers imposés par les États‑Unis sur le bois d'œuvre canadien sont à la fois injustifiés et injustes. J'en ai parlé chaque fois que j'en ai eu l'occasion, y compris avec le président Biden, la représentante américaine au Commerce et la secrétaire au Commerce. Nous avons toujours défendu avec vigueur l'industrie canadienne du bois d'œuvre, ses travailleurs et les centaines de milliers d'emplois qu'elle représente, et nous continuerons de la défendre avec la même vigueur.
View Richard Martel Profile
CPC (QC)
View Richard Martel Profile
2021-06-15 14:33 [p.8465]
Mr. Speaker, the Liberals have repeatedly assured workers in our softwood lumber industry that a new agreement with the United States will be negotiated.
It has been nearly seven years since they came to power, five year since the softwood lumber tariffs were imposed and three years since CUSMA was renegotiated, but nothing has been done to protect our forestry workers.
Does the Liberal government have any plan to stop talking and start taking action?
Monsieur le Président, les libéraux ont assuré à maintes reprises aux travailleurs de notre industrie du bois d'œuvre que la négociation d'un nouvel accord avec les États‑Unis se fera.
Cela fait maintenant presque sept ans qu'ils sont au pouvoir, cinq ans que des tarifs sont imposés sur le bois d'œuvre et trois ans que l'ACEUM est renégocié, mais rien n'a été fait pour protéger nos travailleurs forestiers.
Le gouvernement libéral a-t-il l'intention de cesser les belles paroles et de passer aux actes?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-06-15 14:34 [p.8465]
Mr. Speaker, we are taking a team Canada approach, working hand in hand with the softwood lumber industry, with labour unions, with the provincial and territorial partners on all fronts. We have launched challenges in defence of Canadian softwood lumber. Consistently, Canada has seen victories that clearly demonstrate that our softwood lumber industry is in compliance with international trade rules and that Canada is a trading partner in good standing in the multilateral trading system.
We will continue to defend our softwood lumber industry and the workers that it employs.
Monsieur le Président, nous faisons montre d'un esprit d'équipe à l'échelle du pays, et nous travaillons étroitement avec l'industrie du bois d'œuvre, les syndicats et nos partenaires provinciaux et territoriaux sur tous les fronts. Nous avons entamé des recours pour défendre l'industrie canadienne du bois d'œuvre. Le Canada a constamment obtenu gain de cause, ce qui indique clairement que l'industrie canadienne du bois d'œuvre respecte les règles du commerce international et que le Canada est un bon partenaire commercial dans le système commercial multilatéral.
Nous allons continuer de défendre l'industrie canadienne du bois d'œuvre et les travailleurs qu'elle emploie.
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Speaker, over the past several weeks, reconciliation has become a very important topic in the House. The infrastructure, health and education gaps faced by first nations across Canada will not be solved by government programs alone.
In northern Saskatchewan, the forest industry provides tremendous opportunity to address these gaps. Last month, the U.S. announced plans to double the tariffs, literally taking money out of the pockets of indigenous people.
When will the government finally get a softwood lumber agreement? Can the minister confirm that 100% of the duties collected will be returned?
Monsieur le Président, la réconciliation est devenue un enjeu de premier plan à la Chambre depuis quelques semaines. Les Premières Nations d'un bout à l'autre du pays sont confrontées à des lacunes en matière d'infrastructure, de santé et d'éducation que les programmes gouvernementaux ne peuvent pas combler par eux-mêmes.
Ainsi, l'industrie forestière du Nord de la Saskatchewan peut grandement contribuer à combler ces lacunes. Signalons toutefois que le mois dernier, les États‑Unis ont annoncé leur intention de doubler les tarifs douaniers, ce qui retirerait carrément de l'argent des poches des Autochtones.
Quand le gouvernement conclura-t-il un accord sur le bois d'œuvre? Le ministre peut-il nous confirmer que la totalité des droits de douane perçus sera remboursée?
View Seamus O'Regan Profile
Lib. (NL)
Mr. Speaker, we remain disappointed with the American action on softwood lumber. We will continue to work with the administration. Our focus will be, as it always has been, on the workers within the industry and on ensuring that we have an industry that continues to prosper and grow in this country.
Monsieur le Président, le geste posé par les Américains dans le dossier du bois d'oeuvre continue de nous décevoir. Nous continuerons de travailler avec le gouvernement américain. Nous continuerons de nous concentrer, comme nous l'avons toujours fait, sur les travailleurs de l'industrie et de voir à ce que l'industrie canadienne continue de croître et de prospérer.
View Dan Albas Profile
CPC (BC)
Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has had five years to to reach a softwood lumber agreement and he has failed. In fact, in this place, he has referred to the subject of softwood lumber about four times each of the five years he has been in office. Contrast that with the subject of his predecessor, Stephen Harper, whom he has referenced over 220 times.
I have a simple question. When will the Prime Minister start getting focused on his job, like getting a softwood lumber agreement, rather than passing the buck to others or putting the blame on his predecessors?
Monsieur le Président, le premier ministre a eu cinq ans pour conclure un accord sur le bois d’œuvre et il a échoué. En fait, dans cette enceinte, il n’a parlé du sujet qu'environ quatre fois par année depuis qu'il est au pouvoir. Pour donner un ordre d’idée, il a parlé de son prédécesseur, Stephen Harper, plus de 220 fois.
Ma question est simple. Quand le premier ministre se décidera-t-il à se concentrer sur son travail, qui est notamment d’obtenir un accord sur le bois d’œuvre, plutôt que de renvoyer la balle aux autres ou de jeter le blâme sur ses prédécesseurs?
View Rachel Bendayan Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Rachel Bendayan Profile
2021-06-14 15:05 [p.8340]
Mr. Speaker, let us be clear. These American duties are completely unjustified and, quite frankly, counterproductive since they hurt workers and businesses on both sides of the border. The minister has raised this with President Biden directly and with Ambassador Tai, and our government continues to press for a negotiated settlement, because a negotiated settlement is in the best interests of both of our countries.
We will do whatever it takes to defend our softwood lumber industry, including instigating litigation under NAFTA, under CUSMA and before the WTO. All options are on the table.
Monsieur le Président, soyons clair. Ces droits imposés par les Américains sont totalement injustifiés et très franchement contre-productifs, étant donné qu’il y a des répercussions négatives pour les travailleurs et les entreprises des deux côtés de la frontière. La ministre a abordé le sujet directement avec le président Biden et avec l’ambassadrice Tai, et notre gouvernement continue à insister pour négocier un règlement, car une entente négociée est la meilleure solution pour les deux pays.
Nous ferons tout ce qui est en notre pouvoir pour défendre l’industrie du bois d’œuvre, jusqu’à engager des poursuites en vertu de l’ALENA et de l’ACEUM et à déposer une plainte à l’OMC. Toutes ces possibilités sont envisagées.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the eighth report of the Standing Committee on International Trade, entitled “Investor-State Dispute Settlement: Some Considerations for Canada”.
Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the committee requests the government table a comprehensive response to this report.
Monsieur le Président, Monsieur le Président, j'ai l'honneur de présenter, dans les deux langues officielles, le huitième rapport du Comité permanent du commerce international, intitulé « Les règlements des différends entre investisseurs et États: Matière à réflexion pour le Canada ».
Conformément à l'article 109 du Règlement, le Comité demande que le gouvernement dépose une réponse globale à ce rapport.
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2021-06-14 16:12 [p.8348]
Madam Speaker, I will be presenting the dissenting opinion today on behalf of Conservative committee members on the Standing Committee on International Trade. I want to thank the analysts, clerk and staff of the committee in working to prepare the report on select impacts of the investor-state dispute settlement mechanism, also known as ISDS.
Attached with the report is the dissenting opinion from Conservative members and in this we highlight the role ISDS still has in trade agreements and between countries in depoliticizing the process of dispute settlement. We hope the Government of Canada recognizes the importance of this when it comes to settling investment disputes. We heard from many experts, academics and lawyers in the field during our study on why ISDS mechanisms were still relevant in today's world.
When studying these selected impacts of something as important as ISDS, it is important that we paint a comprehensive and well-rounded picture on ISDS. I hope the government will continue to consider the full picture as it looks to negotiate trade agreements in the future.
Madame la Présidente, j'ai l'honneur de présenter l'opinion dissidente des conservateurs qui siègent au Comité permanent du commerce international. J'aimerais remercier les analystes, la greffière et le personnel du comité qui ont préparé le rapport sur certaines des conséquences des mécanismes de règlement des différends entre investisseurs et États.
Nous avons joint au rapport l'opinion dissidente des membres conservateurs afin de mettre en évidence le rôle que jouent encore aujourd'hui les mécanismes de règlement des différends entre investisseurs et États dans les accords commerciaux et entre les pays pour dépolitiser le processus de règlement des différends. Nous espérons que le gouvernement du Canada reconnaîtra l'importance de cet enjeu quand viendra le temps de régler des différends relatifs à des investissements. Nous avons entendu le témoignage de nombreux experts, universitaires et avocats qui travaillent dans ce domaine afin de déterminer à quel point les mécanismes de règlement des différends entre investisseurs et États sont encore pertinents dans le monde actuel.
Quand on étudie certaines des conséquences de ces mécanismes, qui sont primordiaux, il est important de présenter un tableau complet et exhaustif. J'espère que le gouvernement continuera à tenir compte de l'ensemble du tableau quand il négociera de futurs accords commerciaux.
View Rob Morrison Profile
CPC (BC)
View Rob Morrison Profile
2021-06-10 14:59 [p.8227]
Mr. Speaker, Canada has not had a softwood lumber agreement with the United States since the fall of 2015, and the current government neglected to negotiate it into the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement. Hundreds of thousands of Canadian workers, many in Kootenay—Columbia, rely on the softwood lumber industry to put food on the table for their families.
When will the Prime Minister act to protect these jobs by removing the softwood tariffs?
Monsieur le Président, le Canada n'a pas conclu d'accord sur le bois d'œuvre avec les États‑Unis depuis l'automne 2015, et le gouvernement actuel a négligé de négocier l'inclusion d'un tel accord dans l'Accord Canada—États‑Unis—Mexique. Des centaines de milliers de travailleurs canadiens, y compris de nombreux résidants de Kootenay—Columbia, ont besoin de l'industrie du bois d'œuvre pour nourrir leurs familles.
Quand le premier ministre va-t-il agir pour éliminer les droits de douane sur le bois d'œuvre et protéger ces emplois?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-06-10 14:59 [p.8228]
Mr. Speaker, let me begin by saying unequivocally that the duties imposed by the U.S. on Canada's softwood lumber are both unwarranted and unfair. I have raised this issue at every opportunity possible, including with President Biden, Ambassador Tai and the commerce secretary, Secretary Raimondo. As we have always done, we are going to vigorously defend our softwood industry, as well as the hundreds of thousands of workers that it employs.
Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais d'abord dire clairement que les droits de douane que les États‑Unis imposent sur le bois d'œuvre canadien sont injustes et injustifiés. J'ai soulevé cette question à toutes les occasions, notamment auprès du président Biden, de l'ambassadrice Tai, et de la secrétaire au Commerce Raimondo. Comme nous le faisons depuis toujours, nous allons défendre vigoureusement l'industrie canadienne du bois d'œuvre ainsi que les centaines de milliers de travailleurs qu'elle emploie.
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2021-06-07 14:34 [p.8019]
Mr. Speaker, as I said, this government's credibility has simply evaporated. It is incapable of defending Canada's economic interests.
A clear and specific example of this incompetence is the Canadian softwood lumber file. The U.S. Department of Commerce announced its intention to double the tariffs on Canadian softwood lumber. That is 76,000 workers in Quebec who could lose even more.
More than 2,000 days have gone by since the Prime Minister promised to negotiate a new agreement. Six years later and there is still nothing. When will the Prime Minister finally take his role seriously and stand up for Canada's forestry workers?
Monsieur le Président, je l'ai dit: la crédibilité de ce gouvernement a disparu. Il est incapable de défendre les intérêts économiques du Canada.
Un exemple clair et précis de cette incompétence est le bois d'œuvre canadien. Le département américain du Commerce a annoncé son intention de doubler les droits sur le bois d'œuvre canadien. Ce sont 76 000 travailleurs au Québec qui risquent de perdre encore plus.
Plus de 2 000 jours se sont écoulés depuis que le premier ministre s'est engagé à négocier un nouvel accord. Il n'y a toujours rien six ans plus tard. Quand le premier ministre va-t-il prendre enfin son rôle au sérieux et défendre les travailleurs forestiers du Canada?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-06-07 14:35 [p.8019]
Mr. Speaker, I want to assure the hon. member and Canadians in the forestry sector that we will always stand up for them and the hundreds of thousands of workers that they employ across communities in the country.
Let me begin by saying, unequivocally, that the duties against Canadian softwood lumber by the U.S. are unjustified and they hurt workers on both sides of the border. I have raised this issue at every opportunity with the President, the USTR, as well as with the commerce secretary. Our government will continue to work on this issue. We will vigorously defend our softwood lumber industry and our workers.
Monsieur le Président, je tiens à dire au député et aux intervenants de l'industrie forestière canadienne que nous serons toujours là pour défendre leurs intérêts ainsi que ceux des centaines de milliers de travailleurs de cette industrie d'un bout à l'autre du pays.
Sans hésiter, je déclare que les droits sur les exportations de bois d'œuvre canadien imposés par les États-Unis sont injustifiés et qu'ils nuisent aux travailleurs des deux côtés de la frontière. J'ai soulevé cet enjeu à chacune de mes interactions avec le président, le Bureau du représentant américain au Commerce et la secrétaire au Commerce. Le gouvernement continuera de s'occuper de ce dossier. Le gouvernement défend vigoureusement les intérêts de l'industrie forestière canadienne et de ses travailleurs.
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2021-06-07 14:36 [p.8019]
Mr. Speaker, the U.S. Department of Commerce announced it intends to double Canadian softwood lumber duties. This will be devastating to our forestry sector and further increase costs for Canadians due to our integrated market. The last negotiated agreement by the Conservatives expired in 2015.
The Prime Minister promised then to have a new softwood agreement within 100 days of taking office. It has been over 2,000 days and three U.S. presidents. When will the government get serious on this issue, or is it another Liberal broken promise?
Monsieur le Président, le département du Commerce des États-Unis a annoncé son intention de doubler les droits de douane sur le bois d'œuvre canadien, ce qui aura des effets désastreux sur le secteur forestier canadien et fera augmenter encore davantage les coûts pour les Canadiens en raison de l'intégration des marchés. Le dernier accord, qui avait été négocié par les conservateurs, est arrivé à échéance en 2015.
Le premier ministre a promis à l'époque de conclure un nouvel accord sur le bois d'œuvre dans les 100 premiers jours de son mandat. Or, plus de 2 000 jours et trois présidents des États-Unis se sont succédé depuis. Le gouvernement va-t-il bientôt prendre ce dossier au sérieux, ou s'agit-il d'une autre promesse brisée de la part des libéraux?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-06-07 14:37 [p.8020]
Mr. Speaker, let me state, again, unequivocally that the duties imposed by the U.S. on Canadian softwood lumber are unwarranted and unfair.
We will always vigorously defend our softwood lumber industry and workers. We will do this through litigation, whether it is chapter 19 in NAFTA or chapter 10 of CUSMA, as well as at the WTO, and I raise this issue at every opportunity. We will continue to work with the United States on this. We have consistently said, and reiterated, that it is in the best interests of both countries to reach a negotiated settlement.
Monsieur le Président, encore une fois, je tiens à dire sans équivoque que les droits de douane imposés par les États-Unis sur le bois d'œuvre canadien sont injustes et injustifiés.
Nous allons toujours défendre vigoureusement l'industrie canadienne du bois d'œuvre et ses travailleurs, notamment en employant des recours comme ceux prévus au chapitre 19 de l'ALENA ou au chapitre 10 de l'ACEUM, et je soulève cette question à toutes les occasions. Nous avons notamment soulevé cet enjeu auprès de l'Organisation mondiale du commerce. Nous allons continuer de travailler avec les États-Unis dans ce dossier. Nous avons constamment dit et redit qu'il est dans l'intérêt supérieur des deux pays de conclure une entente négociée.
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2021-06-07 14:37 [p.8020]
Mr. Speaker, I would say the Liberals are all talk and no action, but there is not even talk.
On Friday, I questioned the trade minister, and she was unable to say she had taken any action whatsoever to raise this issue with her U.S. counterparts. She could not point to a single meeting or call that had taken place since the May 21 tariff increase announcement, despite claiming it was her “top priority”.
When will the trade minister stand up for Canadians and start doing her job?
Monsieur le Président, j’avais envie de dire que les libéraux sont de grands parleurs et de petits faiseurs, mais il semble qu’ils n’arrivent même plus à dire de belles paroles.
Vendredi, j’ai posé une question à la ministre du Commerce international, et elle a été incapable d’évoquer ne serait-ce qu’une seule mesure qu’elle aurait prise pour soulever cette question auprès de ses homologues américains. Elle n’a pas pu confirmer s’il y avait eu une seule réunion ou un seul appel depuis l’annonce de la hausse des tarifs le 21 mai, alors qu’elle affirme que ce dossier est sa priorité absolue.
Quand la ministre du Commerce international commencera-t-elle à défendre les Canadiens et à faire son travail?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-06-07 14:38 [p.8020]
Mr. Speaker, this is a top priority for the government. I have raised this issue with the President, with the USTR, as well with the commerce secretary.
We have working with Canadian industry, Canadian labour and Canadian communities that this issue impacts. I can assure members that I continue to vigorously defend the Canadian softwood lumber industry and the forestry sector, and we will continue to do this important work.
Monsieur le Président, il s’agit d’une priorité absolue pour le gouvernement. J’en ai parlé avec le président, avec le représentant américain au Commerce et avec la secrétaire au Commerce.
Nous avons collaboré avec le secteur, les syndicats et les collectivités qui sont touchés par cette mesure au Canada. Je peux garantir aux députés que je continuerai à défendre farouchement l’industrie canadienne du bois d’œuvre et le secteur de la foresterie, et que nous poursuivrons notre important travail dans ce dossier.
View Michael Chong Profile
CPC (ON)
Madam Speaker, China is trying to silence the truth abroad after having silenced it at home.
Several months ago, I woke up to the news that China's government had sanctioned me, adding me to a list of officials in the United States, Europe and the United Kingdom who have been sanctioned simply for speaking against Beijing's genocide of its Uighur Muslim minority and speaking against the crackdown in Hong Kong. The sanctions ban me and others who have been sanctioned from visiting China and prohibit Chinese citizens and institutions from doing business with me. Having no plans to travel to China and having no business ties there, they will have no effect on me.
Nevertheless, they should be taken seriously as an attempt to silence the growing criticism of the Chinese government's human rights record and its violations of international law. Since President Xi Jinping came to power in 2012, the Chinese government has become increasingly assertive in shutting down criticism. Increasing threats have accompanied this increasing assertiveness.
China's actions are a threat to Canada.
Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor have now been detained for over two years. Robert Schellenberg has been put on death row. The fate and whereabouts of Hussein Jalil are unknown. The Chinese government has arbitrarily banned the imports of products that target Canadian farmers. Canada is not the only target of China's regime. From its growing intimidation of Taiwan to its recent border skirmishes with India and the unilateral extension of its boundaries into the South China Sea, the Chinese Communist Party is increasingly threatening its neighbours.
It is not only abroad where the Chinese government is challenging the rules-based international order. In its crackdown on Hong Kong, it is violating the Sino-British Joint Declaration of 1984, which guaranteed Hong Kong's autonomy for 50 years from 1997. In its mass detention and sterilization of the Uighur Muslim minorities, it is violating the 1948 genocide convention, the very first international human rights treaty adopted at the United Nations. The abuse of other minorities continues with its treatment of Tibetans, practitioners of Falun Gong and Christians.
We must wake up to the reality in liberal democracies that in recent years, instead of improving their record on human rights, democracy and the rule of law, authoritarian governments have used their new-found prosperity to reinforce that authoritarianism. Here in Canada, CSIS has warned that state-sponsored espionage, through 5G technologies and biotechnology, threatens our national security and intellectual property regime. The government should advise Canadian universities against partnerships with Huawei, and it should issue a directive to the federal granting councils banning such partnerships. It is time that Canada joins our four Five Eyes allies in banning Huawei from participating in our 5G telecommunications network.
In 2016, the government joined the China-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank. So far, it has contributed $50 million of public money to that bank and is asking for another $49 million to contribute to that bank through the estimates. It is part of China's strategy to export its model of authoritarian governance throughout the Indo-Pacific region. It is why President Obama and vice-president Biden at the time, in 2016, asked the Canadian government not to join. Canada should suspend payments to the bank and withdraw.
The Chinese government is intimidating Canadians here at home, particularly those in the Chinese community. Hong Kong pro-democracy activists and students on university campuses across the nation have been subject to threats. A robust plan is needed from the government to counter these intimidation operations, increase enforcement and make it clear to China's diplomats accredited here in Canada, some several hundred of them, that any role in these intimidation operations here on Canadian soil is grounds to be declared persona non grata and expelled from this country.
In China, there is evidence that Uighurs in Xinjiang province are being forced to pick cotton and produce tomatoes through a coercive state-run system. The government needs to introduce new, effective measures to ban the importation of products from China that have been produced using forced labour.
These gross violations of human rights and international law, the treatment of the Uighur people and the treatment of the people of Hong Kong cannot go unanswered. If we do not work with our democratic allies to counter these violations, we will allow the Chinese Communist Party to export its model of authoritarianism and undermine the rules-based international order that has provided relative peace and security since 1945.
The sanctions imposed on me and others have brought us together. They have backfired. I have met with elected parliamentarians who have been sanctioned in the United Kingdom, the European Union and members of national parliaments throughout Europe. The sanctions have brought us together and have brought us together in action.
We are working more closely together now because of these sanctions to counter China's threats to Liberal democracies. For example, recently a European Parliament delegation meeting chaired by a member of the European Parliament, Mr. Reinhard Bütikofer, invited me and a dozen and a half members of the European Parliament, as well as members of national parliaments in the United Kingdom, Belgium, the Netherlands, Lithuania and here in Canada, to talk about countering China's threats. We had a productive meeting, albeit at four o'clock in the morning, since it was on European time. Nevertheless, with copious amounts of coffee, we had a productive meeting and endeavoured to work together.
Out of these discussions has come action. On May 20, the European Parliament overwhelmingly passed a motion freezing ratification of the European Union-China comprehensive agreement on investment, a treaty concluded on December 30 of last year and a treaty that is a signature effort of President Xi Jinping of China.
Just several weeks ago, Australia cancelled two belt and road initiatives of China because of China's threats to Australia. That is the kind of action this House and the government should be taking in response to these sanctions and to the threats China is posing to our citizens, our economy and our values.
The sanctions imposed on me and others are a clumsy effort by the People's Republic of China to silence the free speech and open debate at the heart of Liberal democracies. They will work if we are silent. We cannot be silent. We cannot lose the hard-won and hard-fought-for ideals that underpin our democracies: a belief in liberty and freedom, a belief in human rights, a belief in democratic institutions and a belief in the rule of law. For if we are silent, we will let these hard-won and cherished beliefs be lost to a new ascendant model of authoritarianism, repression and fear.
Madame la Présidente, la Chine essaie d'étouffer la vérité à l'étranger après l'avoir fait chez elle.
Il y a plusieurs mois, j'ai appris à mon réveil que je faisais l'objet de sanctions du gouvernement chinois qui m'a inscrit à une liste où figurent des représentants américains, européens et britanniques, tous sanctionnés parce qu'ils se sont simplement exprimé contre le génocide de la minorité musulmane ouïghoure perpétré par Pékin ainsi que contre la répression à Hong Kong. Les sanctions en question nous interdisent de nous rendre en Chine et interdisent à toute institution et à tout citoyen chinois de faire affaire avec moi. Comme je n'ai pas l'intention de me rendre en Chine et que je n'ai aucun lien d'affaires là-bas, ces sanctions n'auront aucune incidence sur moi.
Il n'empêche qu'elles doivent être vues comme une tentative grave de réduire au silence les critiques croissantes à l'endroit du gouvernement chinois en matière de droits de la personne et de ses violations du droit international. Depuis l'ascension au pouvoir du président Xi Jinping en 2012, le gouvernement chinois jugule les critiques de façon de plus en plus ferme. Et cette fermeté croissante s'accompagne de menaces toujours plus grandes.
Les gestes de la Chine sont une menace pour le Canada.
Michael Kovrig et Michael Spavor sont détenus depuis maintenant plus de deux ans. Robert Schellenberg a été condamné à mort. Le sort et le lieu où se trouve Hussein Jalil sont inconnus. Le gouvernement chinois a interdit de façon arbitraire l'importation de produits en ciblant les agriculteurs canadiens. Le Canada n'est pas la seule cible du régime chinois. De sa campagne d'intimidation de Taïwan qui augmente en intensité à ses récentes escarmouches à la frontière avec l'Inde, en passant par l'élargissement unilatéral de ses frontières dans la mer de Chine méridionale, le Parti communiste chinois menace de plus en plus ses voisins.
Ce n'est pas seulement à l'étranger que le gouvernement chinois conteste l'ordre international fondé sur des règles. En imposant des mesures de répression à Hong Kong, il a violé la Déclaration conjointe sino-britannique de 1984, qui garantissait l'autonomie de la ville pendant 50 ans à partir de 1997. En procédant à la détention et à la stérilisation massive des minorités musulmanes ouïghoures, il viole la convention sur le génocide de 1948, soit le tout premier traité international sur les droits de la personne adopté par les Nations unies. Il inflige aussi de mauvais traitements à d'autres minorités, notamment les Tibétains, les adeptes du Falun Gong et les chrétiens.
Les démocraties libérales doivent prendre conscience que ces dernières années, les gouvernements autoritaires ont profité de leur prospérité retrouvée pour renforcer leur autoritarisme, au lieu d’améliorer leur bilan en ce qui concerne les droits de la personne, la démocratie et la primauté du droit. Ici, au Canada, le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité nous a prévenus que l’espionnage étatique, par l’entremise du réseau 5G et des biotechnologies, représentait une menace pour notre sécurité nationale et notre régime de propriété intellectuelle. Le gouvernement devrait déconseiller aux universités canadiennes d’établir des partenariats avec Huawei, et il devrait donner la directive aux conseils subventionnaires fédéraux d’interdire de tels partenariats. Il est temps que le Canada se rallie au Groupe des cinq pour exclure Huawei de tout accord lui permettant d’accéder à notre réseau de télécommunications 5G.
En 2016, le gouvernement s'est joint à la Banque asiatique d’investissement dans les infrastructures, dirigée par la Chine. Jusqu’ici, il a versé 50 millions de dollars provenant des deniers publics à cette banque, et il demande 49 millions de plus dans son budget des dépenses pour investir dans cette banque. Cette banque s'inscrit dans la stratégie de la Chine qui consiste à exporter son modèle de gouvernance autoritaire dans toute la région indopacifique. C’est la raison pour laquelle le président Obama et le vice-président Biden avaient demandé au gouvernement canadien en 2016 de ne pas se joindre à cette banque. Le Canada devrait suspendre ses paiements et se retirer de cette banque.
Le gouvernement chinois intimide des Canadiens sur leur propre sol, en particulier ceux qui font partie de la communauté chinoise. Partout au pays, des militants en faveur de la démocratie à Hong Kong et des étudiants dans les campus universitaires ont reçu des menaces. Le gouvernement doit se forger un plan solide pour contrecarrer ces manœuvres d’intimidation, pour renforcer l’application de la loi et pour signifier sans ambages aux diplomates chinois qui sont accrédités auprès du Canada — il y en a plusieurs centaines — que toute participation à ces manœuvres d’intimidation sur le sol canadien aura pour effet de les rendre persona non grata et menacés d’expulsion du pays.
En Chine, nous avons la preuve que les Ouïgours de la province du Xinjiang sont forcés de cueillir du coton et de produire des tomates dans le cadre d’un système coercitif administré par l’État. Le gouvernement doit prendre de nouvelles mesures efficaces pour interdire l’importation de produits chinois qui sont issus du travail forcé.
On ne peut laisser se poursuivre sans intervenir ces violations graves des droits de la personne et du droit international, le traitement du peuple ouïghour et le traitement de la population de Hong Kong. Si nous ne travaillons pas avec nos alliés démocratiques pour contrer ces violations, nous permettrons au Parti communiste chinois d'exporter son modèle d'autoritarisme et de miner l'ordre international fondé sur des règles grâce auquel nous vivons relativement dans la paix et la sécurité depuis 1945.
Les sanctions imposées contre moi et contre d'autres nous unissent dans cette cause. Elles se sont retournées contre le gouvernement de la Chine. J'ai rencontré des parlementaires élus du Royaume-Uni, de l'Union européenne et de divers parlements nationaux d'Europe visés par de telles sanctions. Les sanctions imposées contre nous nous rallient et nous incitent à faire front commun.
Ces sanctions nous ont amenés à travailler en collaboration plus étroite pour contrer les menaces de la Chine envers les démocraties libérales. Par exemple, récemment, j'ai été invité, ainsi que d'autres députés nationaux du Royaume-Uni, de la Belgique, des Pays-Bas, de la Lituanie et du Canada, à une réunion d'une délégation parlementaire européenne présidée par un député européen, M. Reinhard Bütikofer, afin de discuter des moyens de contrer les menaces de la Chine. Nous avons eu une réunion productive, quoiqu'elle ait eu lieu à 4 h du matin pour moi en raison du décalage horaire par rapport à l'Europe. Quoi qu'il en soit, revigorés par une généreuse quantité de café, nous avons eu une réunion productive et avons entrepris de collaborer.
Ces discussions ont été suivies de gestes concrets. Le 20 mai, le Parlement européen a largement appuyé une motion visant à suspendre la ratification de l'Accord global sur les investissements entre l'Union européenne et la Chine, un traité conclu le 30 décembre dernier et à l'égard duquel le président de la Chine, Xi Jinping, a déployé des efforts considérables.
Il y a quelques semaines seulement, l'Australie a annulé deux initiatives dans le cadre du projet La Ceinture et la Route en raison de menaces de la Chine à son égard. Voilà le genre de mesures que la Chambre et le gouvernement devraient prendre en réponse à ces sanctions et à la menace que la Chine fait peser sur nos concitoyens, notre économie et nos valeurs.
Les sanctions qui me sont imposées ainsi qu'à d'autres personnes sont une tentative maladroite de la République populaire de Chine d'étouffer la liberté d'expression et de débat qui sont au cœur des démocraties libérales. Cette tactique ne fonctionnera que si nous restons silencieux. Nous ne pouvons pas garder le silence. Nous ne pouvons pas abandonner les principes fondamentaux de notre démocratie que nous avons établis et défendus de haute lutte: la foi dans la liberté, la foi dans les droits de la personne, la foi dans les institutions démocratiques et la foi dans la primauté du droit. Si nous restons silencieux, ces convictions qui nous sont chères et que nous avons chèrement acquises seront abandonnées au profit d'un régime autoritaire en émergence qui s'appuie sur la répression et la peur.
View Brenda Shanahan Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, today is World Milk Day and I would like to thank all our farmers. In Quebec, 11,000 producers on 5,000 farms produce the milk, butter, cream, yogourt, and cheese that we are proud of and even the ice cream that I love.
In 1972, the Trudeau Liberal government put in place the supply management system that protects our Canadian producers.
Would the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food tell us about what our government is doing for the dairy sector?
Monsieur le Président, c'est aujourd'hui la Journée mondiale du lait et j'aimerais remercier tous nos agriculteurs. Au Québec, ce sont 11 000 producteurs et productrices sur 5 000 fermes qui produisent le lait, le beurre, la crème, le yogourt, le fromage dont nous sommes fiers, et même la crème glacée que j'adore.
En 1972, le gouvernement libéral de Trudeau a mis en place le système de la gestion de l'offre qui protège nos producteurs canadiens.
Que peut nous dire la ministre de l'Agriculture et de l'Agroalimentaire sur ce que notre gouvernement fait pour le secteur laitier?
View Marie-Claude Bibeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, our government recognizes the importance of Canada's dairy producers, and we keep our promises to them.
They have already received more than $1 billion in compensation for the agreements signed with the European Union and the trans-Pacific region. They already know what they will receive in 2022 and 2023 and compensation for the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement will follow. We remain committed to protecting the supply management system and not giving up any more market share.
I wish everyone a happy World Milk Day.
Monsieur le Président, notre gouvernement reconnaît l'importance des producteurs et des productrices de lait du Canada, et nous tenons nos promesses envers eux.
Ils ont déjà reçu plus de 1 milliard de dollars en compensations pour les accords signés avec l'Union européenne et la zone transpacifique. Ils savent déjà ce qu'ils vont recevoir en 2022 et en 2023, et les compensations pour l'Accord Canada—États-Unis—Mexique suivront. Nous sommes toujours aussi engagés à protéger le système de la gestion de l'offre et à ne plus céder aucune part de marché.
Je souhaite à tous une bonne Journée mondiale du lait.
View Richard Lehoux Profile
CPC (QC)
View Richard Lehoux Profile
2021-06-01 15:03
Mr. Speaker, today being World Milk Day, my question is for the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food.
Over the past year, the government has finally made some announcements for dairy farmers, but our dairy processors are still waiting. Negotiations on compensation under CUSMA have stalled. Meanwhile, our American counterparts are already disputing the tariff rate quotas.
What will the minister do to better protect the Canadian dairy sector and the products that cross our borders? When will we see real help for processors?
Monsieur le Président, en cette Journée mondiale du lait, ma question s'adresse à la ministre de l'Agriculture et de l'Agroalimentaire.
Au cours de la dernière année, le gouvernement a finalement fait des annonces pour les producteurs laitiers, mais nos transformateurs laitiers attendent toujours. Les négociations au sujet des compensations pour l'ACEUM sont au point mort. Entre-temps, nos homologues des États-Unis contestent déjà les contingents tarifaires.
Que va faire la ministre pour mieux protéger le secteur laitier canadien et les produits qui traversent nos frontières? Quand verrons-nous une aide concrète pour les transformateurs?
View Marie-Claude Bibeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I would remind my hon. colleague that in the last budget, we announced compensation for Canada's dairy, poultry and egg processors. I am also working closely with the Minister of International Trade to follow up with the Canada-Quebec committee. We are confident that we are applying the tariff rate quotas in accordance with the agreement we very carefully negotiated with the United States.
I want to reassure all milk producers that we have their backs.
Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais rappeler à mon collègue que nous avons annoncé dans le dernier budget les compensations pour les transformateurs de lait, de volailles et d'œufs. Je travaille aussi de près avec la ministre du Commerce international pour faire le suivi avec le comité Canada-Québec. Nous avons la certitude que nous appliquons les contingents tarifaires conformément à l'Accord que nous avons négocié de façon très serrée avec les États-Unis.
J'aimerais donc rassurer tous les producteurs de lait: nous veillons à leurs intérêts.
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 20:04 [p.7676]
Madam Chair, good evening to all members attending today's committee.
With the rapid rollout of vaccines, I am optimistic that we will be able to reopen our economy, and with the investments we are making in budget 2021, we can look forward to a strong, sustainable and inclusive economic recovery.
Our government's COVID-19 economic response plan has protected millions of jobs, provided emergency supports to countless families and kept businesses afloat throughout the pandemic. We have had the backs of Canadians and businesses since day one.
Budget 2021 sets us up to finish this fight against COVID-19 and to keep Canadians healthy and safe, all the while building a better, fairer and more prosperous future for generations to come. The time to act is now and this budget puts us on the right path. However, this is not 2009. We cannot afford to take a decade to recover from the COVID recession.
We are taking prompt, decisive, responsible action.
We are making ambitious and targeted investments to accelerate job and business growth, driving toward faster recovery than if we did not take any action. This is the most small-business friendly budget in Canadian history.
We are extending the Canada emergency wage subsidy and the Canada emergency rent subsidy to September, with flexibility to go further than that if public health measures require it.
We are also announcing new supports to bridge the recovery, such as the Canada recovery hiring program, as 500,000 Canadians are still unemployed or have reduced hours because of the pandemic. We will invest $600 million so that businesses can hire more workers or increase hours and compensation for those they already have.
We also announced significant investments to support the success of diverse entrepreneurs through the Black entrepreneurship program, the women entrepreneurship strategy and investments for indigenous entrepreneurs. This is part of the greater action our government is taking to make our economy more inclusive and to bridge the gaps that racialized and under-represented entrepreneurs and businesses have faced for far too long.
Budget 2021 is ambitious.
It will not just get us onto the road to recovery. It will take us where we need to go to be competitive, to be more prosperous and to become even more resilient. Since my first day as minister, I have been focused on ensuring that businesses have the tools they need to start up, scale up and access new global markets. COVID-19 and our economic recovery have only increased the importance of this work.
Our businesses need the tools and the financing to compete in today's economy. That is why we are expanding the Canada small business financing program loans of up to $500,000, with a potential line of credit of up to $150,000, to provide liquidity for start-up costs and intangible assets, such as software for data management and supports for intellectual property. We have also committed to taking decisive action to lowering credit card fees for small businesses, helping to make consumer interactions more beneficial so that our main streets can be even more competitive.
Beyond financing, we want to ensure that our Canadian entrepreneurs have the expertise and tools to protect their Canadian innovations in the increasingly intangible global economy. The pandemic has greatly expedited the shift to the digital economy. More businesses have gone online in the last six months than in the last 10 years.
The pandemic has also shown the importance of businesses needing the latest tools, technologies and expertise to compete. In budget 2021, we are investing $4 billion for small and medium-sized businesses to go digital and to adopt new technology so they can grown and be even more competitive. This will support some 160,000 businesses and create jobs for nearly 30,000 young Canadians.
It will ensure long-term post-recovery growth and competitiveness.
Today, our small businesses are just a click away from being exporters, and we want to support as many as possible to grow around the world, while anchoring their success here in Canada, and to create jobs.
We have seen another global shift, one to sustainability. We know that the environment and the economy go hand in hand, which is why we have also announced $1 billion over five years to help draw in private sector investment for Canadian clean tech projects, ensuring that they remain competitive and on the cutting edge of innovation. This will help us reach our target of net-zero emissions by 2050. Through this budget, we are setting up our businesses to start up and scale up now, and to be ready to succeed and thrive in the economy of the future.
While travel has been limited through COVID-19, I have not let it slow us down in our efforts to create opportunities for trade and investment, to diversify our trade and to develop solutions to supply chain challenges, especially for essential goods. COVID-19 should not and cannot be used as an excuse to stop trading or to turn inward with protectionist policies.
International trade has been critical to create jobs and opportunities for growth. This is truer in our economic recovery more than ever. By working to implement the new NAFTA, CETA and the CPTPP, Canada's businesses are able to access new markets to expand their companies.
Canada and Canadian workers from coast to coast will benefit.
We have continued our work to ensure that Canada's 14 free trade agreements, including the new NAFTA and the recent trade continuity agreement with the United Kingdom, continue to serve Canadian interests and Canadian businesses, entrepreneurs, workers and families.
Earlier this month, I met with my Mexican and U.S. counterparts to discuss the implementation of the new NAFTA, and to work together on our shared priorities, such as the environment, labour and inclusive trade, for our shared economic recovery. From steel and dairy, to forestry and clean tech, we have the backs of Canadian businesses and workers in all sectors.
Our government has pivoted during the pandemic to support Canadian businesses through virtual trade missions to France, Singapore, Taiwan and South Korea; through the first Canada-Africa clean growth symposium; and through our virtual CETA road show last year. With over 2,000 entrepreneurs attending, we have made international trade more accessible. We have led over 150 business-to-business connections for our Canadian businesses.
We continue to take a team Canada approach to help businesses and entrepreneurs succeed here at home and abroad with Canada's trade tool kit: the Trade Commissioner Service, Export Development Canada, the Business Development Bank of Canada, the Canadian Commercial Corporation and Invest in Canada. They are all working together and focused on supporting Canadian businesses and their needs.
Budget 2021 will support the Trade Commissioner Service by providing $21.3 million over the next five years, and $4.3 million on an ongoing basis, to boost Canada's clean tech exports. We will work with our international partners and multilateral institutions to reduce unnecessary trade barriers and restrictions, keep supply chains open and build back a more resilient and inclusive economy. We will continue to work together, as we have done throughout the pandemic, including through our work on the WTO's trade and health initiative, to ensure that our essential health and medical supply chains remain open and resilient.
Crucially, we must also continue our hard work with one another and with all of our international partners to find solutions that accelerate the production and equitable distribution of affordable, effective life-saving vaccines. The pandemic is not over anywhere until it is over everywhere. We are committed to continuing our work toward a speedy and just global recovery.
I look forward to answering questions.
Madame la présidente, bonsoir à tous les députés qui participent au débat du comité plénier d'aujourd'hui.
Grâce à la distribution rapide des vaccins, j'ai bon espoir que nous serons en mesure de relancer notre économie. Les investissements prévus dans le budget de 2021 permettront d'avoir une relance économique forte, durable et inclusive.
Le Plan d’intervention économique pour répondre à la COVID-19 du gouvernement a protégé des millions d'emplois, offert des mesures d'urgence qui ont aidé d'innombrables familles et permis à des entreprises de se maintenir à flot pendant la pandémie. Nous soutenons les citoyens et les entrepreneurs canadiens depuis le début de la pandémie.
Le budget de 2021 prévoit des mesures pour nous aider à venir à bout de la COVID-19 et protéger la santé et la sécurité des Canadiens, tout en assurant un avenir meilleur, plus équitable et plus prospère pour les générations futures. Le moment est venu d'agir, et le budget nous met sur la bonne voie. Toutefois, nous ne sommes pas en 2009. Nous ne pouvons pas nous permettre d'attendre une décennie pour nous remettre de la récession causée par la COVID.
Nous prenons des mesures promptes, décisives et responsables.
Nous procédons à des investissements ambitieux et ciblés pour accélérer la création d'emplois et la croissance des entreprises, ce qui permettra une relance plus rapide que si nous n'avions rien fait. C'est le budget le plus favorable aux petites entreprises de toute l'histoire du Canada.
Nous prolongeons la Subvention salariale d'urgence du Canada et la Subvention d'urgence du Canada pour le loyer jusqu'à septembre, échéance qui pourrait être reportée si les mesures de santé publique l'exigent.
Nous annonçons aussi de nouvelles mesures de soutien pour faciliter la relance, comme le Programme d'embauche pour la relance du Canada, parce que 500 000 Canadiens sont encore au chômage ou ont un horaire de travail réduit à cause de la pandémie. Nous investirons 600 millions de dollars pour permettre aux entreprises d'embaucher plus de travailleurs ou d'augmenter les heures de travail et la rémunération de leurs employés actuels.
Nous avons également annoncé des investissements importants pour favoriser la réussite d'entrepreneurs diversifiés par l'entremise du Programme pour l'entrepreneuriat des communautés noires, de la Stratégie pour les femmes en entrepreneuriat et d'investissements pour les entrepreneurs autochtones. Cela s'inscrit dans l'approche globale adoptée par le gouvernement pour rendre l'économie canadienne plus inclusive et combler les écarts auxquels se heurtent les entrepreneurs racialisés et sous-représentés depuis bien trop longtemps.
Le budget de 2021 est ambitieux.
Il ne nous permettra pas seulement de nous engager sur la voie de la reprise. Il nous mènera là où nous devons aller pour être concurrentiels, plus prospères et encore plus résilients. Dès que j'ai été nommée ministre, j'ai voulu faire en sorte que les entreprises aient les outils dont elles ont besoin pour lancer leurs activités, prendre de l'expansion et accéder aux nouveaux marchés mondiaux. La COVID-19 et la reprise économique n'ont fait que rendre ce travail encore plus important.
Les entreprises d'ici ont besoin des outils et du financement nécessaires pour être concurrentielles dans l'économie d'aujourd'hui. C'est pourquoi nous bonifions le Programme de financement des petites entreprises du Canada en faisant passer le montant maximal des prêts à 500 000 $, avec une marge de crédit potentielle pouvant aller jusqu'à 150 000 $, afin d'offrir des liquidités pour couvrir les frais de démarrage et les actifs incorporels, comme les logiciels de gestion des données et la propriété intellectuelle. Nous nous sommes aussi engagés à prendre des mesures décisives pour baisser les frais de carte de crédit pour les petites entreprises, ce qui contribuera à rendre les transactions avec les clients plus profitables. Nos rues principales deviendront ainsi encore plus concurrentielles.
Au-delà des questions de financement, nous voulons que les entrepreneurs d'ici aient l'expertise et les outils pour protéger les innovations canadiennes dans une économie mondiale de plus en plus intangible. La pandémie a grandement accéléré le virage vers l'économie numérique. Plus d'entreprises ont fait leur entrée dans le monde numérique au cours des six derniers mois que dans les 10 dernières années.
La pandémie a aussi montré le besoin des entreprises d'avoir l'expertise, les technologies et les outils de pointe pour soutenir la concurrence. Dans le budget de 2021, nous investissons 4 milliards de dollars dans les petites et moyennes entreprises pour leur permettre de passer au numérique et d'adopter de nouvelles technologies afin de croître et de renforcer leur compétitivité. Cette mesure soutiendra quelque 160 000 entreprises et permettra de créer des emplois pour près de 30 000 jeunes Canadiens.
Au-delà de la reprise, il vise à assurer la croissance et la compétitivité à long terme.
De nos jours, les petites entreprises sont à un clic de devenir des exportatrices et nous voulons aider le plus grand nombre d'entre elles à prospérer à l'échelle mondiale et à ancrer leur réussite au Canada, où elles créeront des emplois.
Il y a également eu une autre transition planétaire, celle de la durabilité. Nous savons que l'environnement et l'économie vont de pair, et c'est pourquoi nous avons annoncé 1 milliard de dollars sur 5 ans pour inciter le secteur privé à investir dans les projets technologiques propres au Canada, pour que ces derniers demeurent concurrentiels et à la fine pointe de l'innovation. Cela contribuera à l'atteinte de l'objectif de zéro émission nette au Canada d'ici 2050. Grâce au budget, nous aidons les entreprises à démarrer et à prendre de l'expansion dès maintenant et à être prêtes à réussir et à prospérer dans l'économie du futur.
Même si les voyages ont été limités en raison de la COVID-19, cela n'a pas ralenti nos efforts de création de débouchés en matière de commerce et d'investissement, de diversification commerciale et de recherche de solutions aux problèmes de la chaîne d'approvisionnement, surtout en ce qui concerne les biens essentiels. La COVID-19 ne peut servir d'excuse au ralentissement du commerce international ou au repli sur soi par des politiques protectionnistes.
Le commerce international joue un rôle essentiel dans la création d'emplois et de débouchés permettant la croissance. Ce sera plus vrai que jamais pour la relance économique au pays. Grâce à la mise en œuvre du nouvel ALENA, de l'Accord économique et commercial global et de l'Accord de partenariat transpacifique global et progressiste, les entreprises canadiennes ont accès à de nouveaux marchés qui leur permettent de prendre de l'expansion.
Le Canada et nos travailleurs d'un océan à l'autre en bénéficieront.
Nous avons poursuivi notre travail afin que les 14 accords de libre-échange du Canada, y compris le nouvel ALENA et le récent accord de continuité commerciale avec le Royaume-Uni, continuent de servir les intérêts du Canada ainsi que les entreprises, les entrepreneurs, les travailleurs et les familles du pays.
Au début du mois, j'ai rencontré mes homologues mexicains et américains pour discuter de la mise en œuvre du nouvel ALENA et travailler avec eux sur nos priorités communes, dont l'environnement, la main-d'œuvre et le commerce inclusif, dans le cadre de notre reprise économique commune. De l'industrie sidérurgique à l'industrie laitière, en passant par l'industrie forestière et les technologies propres, les entreprises et les travailleurs canadiens de tous les secteurs peuvent compter sur nous.
Le gouvernement a réorienté ses efforts pendant la pandémie pour appuyer les entreprises canadiennes en organisant des missions commerciales par vidéoconférences en France, à Singapour, à Taïwan et en Corée du Sud, en organisant le premier Symposium Canada-Afrique sur la croissance propre et en organisant l'an dernier une tournée de présentation de l'AECG en ligne. Plus de 2 000 entrepreneurs y ont participé; nous avons donc rendu le commerce international plus accessible. Nous avons établi plus de 150 liens entre les entreprises pour les entreprises canadiennes.
Nous continuons à adopter une approche Équipe Canada pour aider les entreprises et les entrepreneurs à réussir au pays et à l'étranger au moyen de la trousse d'outils commerciaux du Canada, qui réunit le Service des délégués commerciaux, Exportation et développement Canada, la Banque de développement du Canada, la Corporation commerciale canadienne et Investir au Canada. Ils travaillent tous ensemble et se concentrent sur le soutien des entreprises canadiennes et de leurs besoins.
Le budget de 2021 appuiera le Service des délégués commerciaux en affectant un montant de 21,3 millions de dollars au cours des cinq prochaines années et de 4,3 millions de dollars par la suite pour stimuler les exportations canadiennes dans le domaine des technologies propres. Nous travaillerons avec nos partenaires internationaux et des institutions multilatérales pour réduire les restrictions et les obstacles au commerce, maintenir l'ouverture des chaînes d'approvisionnement et reconstruire une économie plus inclusive et résiliente qu'avant. Nous continuerons de travailler ensemble, comme nous l'avons fait pendant la pandémie, notamment dans le cadre de l'initiative sur le commerce et la santé de l'Organisation mondiale du commerce, pour maintenir l'ouverture et la résilience de nos chaînes d'approvisionnement cruciales dans le domaine de la santé et des soins médicaux.
Il est essentiel de poursuivre notre travail les uns avec les autres ainsi qu'avec tous nos partenaires internationaux pour trouver des solutions qui permettront d'accélérer la production et la distribution équitable de vaccins abordables et efficaces contre des maladies mortelles. On ne viendra à bout de la pandémie que le jour où on y aura mis fin partout. Nous sommes déterminés à poursuivre notre travail pour qu'il y ait une reprise mondiale équitable et rapide.
Je suis prête à répondre aux questions.
View Rachel Bendayan Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Rachel Bendayan Profile
2021-05-31 20:14 [p.7678]
Madam Chair, I would like to ask the minister for a little more information on something she mentioned in her earlier remarks. I understand the minister was able to meet with her CUSMA counterparts.
For the benefit of all members in the House, I am not sure if everybody realizes that one in six jobs in Canada is supported by exports to either Mexico or the United States. I am hoping the minister could give us a few more details on this important meeting on the new NAFTA and its implementation.
Madame la présidente, j'aimerais demander à la ministre un peu plus d'informations sur un point qu'elle a mentionné plus tôt. Je crois comprendre que la ministre a pu rencontrer ses homologues de l'Accord Canada—États-Unis—Mexique.
Je ne sais pas si les députés le savent, mais un emploi sur six au Canada est soutenu par les exportations vers le Mexique ou les États-Unis. J'espère que la ministre pourra nous donner quelques détails supplémentaires sur cette importante réunion concernant le nouvel ALENA et sa mise en œuvre.
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 20:15 [p.7678]
Madam Chair, very recently we, my colleagues from both Mexico and the United States and I, held our first free trade commission meeting. It was a terrific first meeting. I might also say it was a historic one, where the trade minister, the trade representative and the secretary of economy were all women. We met to discuss the new NAFTA's implementation. We also talked about our shared priorities for recovery, which include the environment, labour and inclusive trade.
Canada's long-standing relationship with the U.S. and Mexico is an important one. Trade in North America creates jobs and economic prosperity for people in all three countries. Our people ties, as well as our business ties, have built one of the most competitive trade regions in the world. We talked about how we could advance climate action, how we can promote digital trade in North America and how to make sure that our economic recovery from COVID-19 is both sustainable and inclusive.
The new NAFTA is historic. Ensuring that we work together to create North American competitiveness for our economic recovery was what our meeting was all about.
Madame la présidente, très récemment, mes homologues du Mexique et des États-Unis et moi avons tenu notre première réunion de la Commission du libre-échange. Ce fut une première réunion formidable. J'ajouterais même que ce fut une réunion historique, car nous étions toutes des femmes: la ministre du Commerce, la représentante au Commerce et la secrétaire à l'Économie. Nous nous sommes réunies pour discuter de la mise en œuvre du nouvel ALENA. Nous avons aussi parlé de nos priorités communes pour la relance, notamment l'environnement, la main-d’œuvre et le commerce inclusif.
La relation de longue date que le Canada entretient avec les États-Unis et le Mexique est importante. Le commerce en Amérique du Nord crée des emplois et de la prospérité économique pour les habitants des trois pays. Les liens entre nos peuples et nos entreprises ont permis de bâtir l'une des régions commerciales les plus compétitives au monde. Nous avons parlé de la façon de faire avancer la lutte contre les changements climatiques, de promouvoir le commerce numérique en Amérique du Nord et de veiller à ce que la relance économique après la pandémie de COVID-19 soit durable et inclusive.
Le nouvel ALENA est historique. Notre réunion avait pour but de favoriser notre collaboration afin de renforcer la compétitivité nord-américaine pour la relance économique.
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2021-05-31 20:19 [p.7678]
Madam Chair, the Prime Minister promised to negotiate a softwood lumber agreement in the first 100 days following his 2015 election. It has now been three U.S. administrations and over 2,000 days since the election. How many more days until an agreement?
Madame la présidente, en 2015, le premier ministre a promis de négocier un accord sur le bois d'œuvre dans les 100 premiers jours suivant son élection. Cela fait maintenant plus de 2 000 jours. Les États-Unis ont connu trois administrations depuis. Combien de jours faudra-t-il encore attendre avant la conclusion de cet accord?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 20:19 [p.7678]
Madam Chair, Canada's forestry industry is incredibly important. It supports hundreds of thousands of jobs across the country. We have been steadfast in supporting them. At every opportunity, I have raised the issue of softwood lumber with the United States—
Madame la présidente, l'industrie forestière du Canada est incroyablement importante. Elle soutient des centaines de milliers d'emplois au pays. Notre appui à son égard est indéfectible. À toutes les occasions, je soulève la question du bois d'œuvre auprès des États-Unis...
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2021-05-31 20:21 [p.7678]
Madam Chair, how many times has the Prime Minister brought up negotiating a softwood lumber agreement with the U.S. President since 2015, which was when we last had an agreement?
Madame la présidente, combien de fois le premier ministre a-t-il évoqué la négociation d'un accord sur le bois d'œuvre dans ses entretiens avec le président américain depuis 2015, année de notre dernier accord?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 20:21 [p.7678]
Madam Chair, we have a new U.S.-Canada road map for economic recovery. As part of that, we have raised softwood lumber with the President. I have also raised it with the commerce secretary, as well as the USTR.
We will continue to do this for our forestry sector.
Madame la présidente, nous avons une nouvelle feuille de route entre les États-Unis et le Canada pour la relance économique, dans le cadre de laquelle nous avons soulevé la question du bois d'oeuvre avec le président. J'ai également soulevé cette question avec la secrétaire au Commerce, de même qu'avec la représentante américaine au Commerce.
Nous continuerons de le faire pour aider le secteur forestier.
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2021-05-31 20:21 [p.7679]
Madam Chair, how many times has the minister met with U.S. counterparts to discuss negotiating a softwood lumber agreement?
Madame la présidente, combien de fois la ministre a-t-elle rencontré ses homologues américains pour discuter de la négociation d'un accord sur le bois d'oeuvre?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 20:22 [p.7679]
Madam Chair, my officials and I meet with interlocutors, from legislators to worker representatives to business owners, and we continue—
Madame la présidente, les fonctionnaires et moi avons rencontré des interlocuteurs, qu'il s'agisse de législateurs, de représentants des travailleurs ou de propriétaires d'entreprise, et nous continuons...
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2021-05-31 20:22 [p.7679]
Madam Chair, how many times has the minister met and specifically spoken about a softwood lumber agreement with her specific counterparts?
Madame la présidente, combien de fois la ministre a-t-elle rencontré ses homologues pour discuter spécifiquement d'un accord sur le bois d'oeuvre?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 20:22 [p.7679]
Madam Chair, I raise it at every opportunity. I meet with worker representatives, and I work with business representatives. I have reiterated that it is in the interests of all to have a negotiated agreement between Canada and the United States.
Madame la présidente, je soulève la question dès que j'en ai l'occasion. J'ai rencontré des représentants des travailleurs et je travaille avec des représentants des entreprises. J'ai réitéré qu'il est dans l'intérêt de tous d'en venir à un accord négocié entre le Canada et les États-Unis.
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2021-05-31 20:22 [p.7679]
Madam Chair, it was reported that Katherine Tai, the U.S. trade representative, stated, “In order to have an agreement and in order to have a negotiation, you need to have a partner. And thus far, the Canadians have not expressed interest in engaging”.
Minister, do you agree with her statement?
Madame la présidente, on dit que Katherine Tai, la représentante américaine au Commerce, a déclaré: « pour en venir à un accord et pour organiser des négociations, il faut avoir un partenaire. Jusqu'ici, les Canadiens n'ont pas manifesté d'intérêt pour un dialogue. »
Madame la ministre, êtes-vous d'accord avec cette déclaration?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 20:23 [p.7679]
Madam Chair, I have had an opportunity to meet with my U.S. counterpart. I have raised it at every opportunity, and I will continue to do so.
Madame la présidente, j'ai eu une occasion de rencontrer mon homologue américaine. J'ai soulevé la question chaque fois que j'en ai eu l'occasion et je continuerai à le faire.
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2021-05-31 20:23 [p.7679]
Madam Chair, maybe I will ask this in a different way.
Is Ambassador Tai's observation correct?
Madame la présidente, je devrais peut-être poser ma question autrement.
L'observation de l'ambassadrice Tai est-elle exacte?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 20:23 [p.7679]
Madam Chair, I think I have already said that I have raised this issue and have reiterated that an agreement—
Madame la présidente, j'ai déjà dit que j'avais soulevé cette question et j'ai répété qu'un accord...
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2021-05-31 20:23 [p.7679]
Madam Chair, well, the question is referring to Ambassador Tai's statement and whether or not her statement is accurate when she said that Canada has not expressed an interest in engaging.
Madame la présidente, ce que je demande, c'est si la déclaration de l'ambassadrice Tai est exacte, à savoir que le Canada ne s'est pas dit intéressé à nouer le dialogue.
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 20:24 [p.7679]
Madam Chair, as I said, I have discussed this with my hon. colleague, the USTR. I have discussed it with the commerce secretary. I have raised it with the President. We will continue to work with the United States on this issue.
Madame la présidente, comme je l'ai dit, j'ai discuté de cela avec ma collègue, la représentante au commerce des États-Unis. J'en ai discuté avec le président. Nous continuerons à travailler avec eux dans ce dossier.
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2021-05-31 20:24 [p.7679]
Madam Chair, when questioned last week at the natural resources standing committee on negotiating a softwood lumber deal, Canada's natural resources minister said that the U.S. has not been willing.
Minister, do you agree with his statement?
Madame la présidente, lorsqu'il a été interrogé la semaine dernière par le Comité permanent des ressources naturelles sur la négociation d'un accord sur le bois d'œuvre, le ministre des Ressources naturelles du Canada a répondu que les États-Unis n'étaient pas disposés à le faire.
Madame la ministre, êtes-vous d'accord avec cette déclaration?
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2021-05-31 20:25 [p.7679]
Madam Chair, I will ask the question again, through you.
Canada's natural resources minister, when questioned last week at the natural resources standing committee on negotiating a softwood lumber deal, said the U.S. has not been willing. Does the minister agree with the statement?
Madame la présidente, je vais reposer la question, par votre intermédiaire.
Lorsqu'il a été interrogé la semaine dernière par le Comité permanent des ressources naturelles concernant la négociation d'un accord sur le bois d'œuvre, le ministre des Ressources naturelles du Canada a déclaré que les États-Unis n'étaient pas disposés à négocier. La ministre est-elle d'accord avec cette déclaration?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 20:25 [p.7679]
Madam Chair, what I have shared with the USTR is that the current duties that are being imposed are unfair and unwarranted. The preliminary results of the second administrative review—
Madame la présidente, ce dont j'ai fait part à la représentante américaine au Commerce, c'est que les droits actuels qui sont imposés sont injustes et injustifiés. Les résultats préliminaires du deuxième examen administratif...
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2021-05-31 20:25 [p.7679]
Madam Chair, Minister, is your cabinet colleague's statement correct? Do you agree with your colleague?
Madame la présidente, madame la ministre, la déclaration de votre collègue du Cabinet est-elle exacte? Êtes-vous d'accord avec votre collègue?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 20:26 [p.7679]
Madam Chair, this is a really important issue. I will continue to work with the United States, as we have been, through the USTR, through our various interlocutors—
Madame la présidente, il s'agit d'une question vraiment importante. Je continuerai à travailler avec les États-Unis, comme nous l'avons fait, par l'intermédiaire de la représentante américaine au Commerce, par l'intermédiaire de nos différents interlocuteurs...
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2021-05-31 20:26 [p.7679]
Madam Chair, we have to remember that it was the Prime Minister who commented that the U.K. did not have the bandwidth to negotiate a deal with Canada, which was a comment the U.K. official adamantly denied. The facts are the U.K. was negotiating and signing deals all over the world.
Therefore, whose statement should we believe at this time? Do we believe that of the U.S. trade representative or that of Canada's natural resources minister?
Madame la présidente, il ne faut pas oublier que c'est le premier ministre qui a déclaré que le Royaume-Uni n'avait pas la marge de manœuvre suffisante pour négocier un accord avec le Canada, une déclaration que les représentants britanniques ont vivement démentie. Le fait est que le Royaume-Uni menait des négociations et signait des accords partout ailleurs dans le monde.
Donc, quelle déclaration devrions-nous croire, actuellement? Devrions-nous croire celle de la représentante américaine au Commerce ou celle du ministre des Ressources naturelles du Canada?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 20:26 [p.7679]
Madam Chair, the question was about the Canada-UK Trade Continuity Agreement, and I am very pleased that we have passed that. We are looking forward to beginning negotiations with the United Kingdom for a trade agreement between our two countries.
Madame la présidente, la question portait sur l'accord de continuité commerciale entre le Canada et le Royaume-Uni, et je suis très heureuse qu'il ait été adopté. Nous avons hâte d'entamer les négociations d'un accord commercial bilatéral avec le Royaume-Uni.
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2021-05-31 20:27 [p.7679]
Madam Chair, the comment had to do with having a minister, or a prime minister, make a statement that is then countered by another government disagreeing.
On February 27, 2020, the Conservative members from the trade committee wrote to the Deputy Prime Minister outlining all of the adverse impacts of CUSMA on softwood lumber, and how CUSMA does nothing to prevent the United States from applying anti-dumping and countervailing duties to Canadian softwood lumber.
Does the minister regret not negotiating softwood lumber into CUSMA?
Madame la présidente, la remarque portait sur le fait que la déclaration d'un ministre, voire du premier ministre, a ensuite été contredite par un autre gouvernement.
Le 27 février 2020, les députés conservateurs du comité du commerce ont écrit à la vice-première ministre pour lui souligner toutes les incidences négatives de l'Accord Canada—États-Unis—Mexique sur le bois d'œuvre et le fait que l'Accord ne prévoit rien pour empêcher l'imposition par les États-Unis de droits antidumping et compensateurs sur le bois d'œuvre canadien.
Est-ce que la ministre regrette de ne pas avoir inclus le bois d'œuvre dans les négociations de l'Accord Canada—États-Unis—Mexique?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 20:27 [p.7680]
Madam Chair, we have reiterated to the U.S. at every opportunity that a negotiated agreement is possible and in the best interests of both countries. I look forward to continuing to work with United States on this matter.
Madame la présidente, chaque fois que l'occasion s'est présentée, nous avons répété aux États-Unis qu'il est possible de négocier une entente et que c'est dans l'intérêt des deux pays. J'ai hâte de poursuivre notre travail avec les États-Unis dans ce dossier.
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 20:28 [p.7680]
Madam Chair, our work has been consistent in standing up for the interest of Canada's forestry sector and the workers that it employs and working with the—
Madame la présidente, nous avons constamment défendu les intérêts du secteur forestier canadien et de ses travailleurs et en collaborant avec...
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2021-05-31 20:28 [p.7680]
Madam Chair, on a different topic, does the government support Taiwan joining the CPTPP?
Madame la présidente, dans un autre ordre d'idées, le gouvernement est-il favorable à ce que Taïwan se joigne à l'Accord de Partenariat transpacifique global et progressiste?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 20:28 [p.7680]
Madam Chair, the CPTPP is a high-standard agreement that welcomes accession for economies and countries who wish to meet the high standards of the CPTPP, and those decisions are made by the CPTPP member countries together.
Madame la présidente, l'Accord de Partenariat transpacifique global et progressiste est un excellent accord qui est ouvert aux économies et aux pays qui souhaitent répondre à ses normes rigoureuses, et ces décisions sont prises collectivement par les pays membres.
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2021-05-31 21:19 [p.7687]
Madam Chair, I will be splitting my time with the member for Thornhill, and my questions are for the Minister of Small Business and Export Promotion.
First, concerning the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement, does the minister acknowledge that Canada gave up part of its sovereignty over dairy policy by eliminating class 7?
Madame la présidente, je vais partager mon temps avec le député de Thornhill et je vais poser des questions à la ministre de la Petite Entreprise, de la Promotion des exportations et du Commerce international.
Premièrement, concernant l'Accord Canada—États-Unis—Mexique, la ministre reconnaît-elle que le Canada a cédé une partie de sa souveraineté sur la politique laitière en éliminant la classe 7?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 21:20 [p.7688]
Madam Chair, our supply management system is fundamental to the overall success of Canada's agriculture and agri-food industry. That is why in the negotiations for the new NAFTA our government fought hard to maintain three pillars of Canada's supply management system: production control, pricing mechanisms and import control. Let's remember—
Madame la présidente, le système de gestion de l'offre du pays est nécessaire à la réussite globale de l'industrie agricole et agroalimentaire canadienne. Voilà pourquoi, lors des négociations pour le nouvel ALENA, le gouvernement s'est battu pour maintenir les trois piliers du système canadien de gestion de l'offre, soit le contrôle de la production, les mécanismes d'établissement des prix et le contrôle des importations. Rappelons que...
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2021-05-31 21:20 [p.7688]
Madam Chair, tomorrow is World Milk Day, and I think that Canadian producers have the right to know if the Liberal government agreed to cap our exports of non-fat dairy solids and if it sees this as a gain for Canadian producers.
Madame la présidente, demain c'est la Journée mondiale du lait et je pense que les producteurs canadiens ont le droit de savoir si le gouvernement libéral a accepté de plafonner nos exportations de solides non gras et s'il considère que c'est un gain pour les producteurs canadiens.
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 21:21 [p.7688]
Madam Chair, it is important to remember that the U.S. administration was calling for a complete dismantling of the supply management system, and our government defended and preserved the system from a very strong U.S. attempt. Today, we continue to work to ensure that we are standing up and helping our Canadian dairy producers—
Madame la présidente, il est important de se rappeler que l'administration américaine réclamait un démantèlement complet du système de gestion de l'offre, et le gouvernement a défendu et préservé le système, malgré une pression très forte de la part des États-Unis. Aujourd'hui, nous poursuivons nos efforts pour nous assurer de défendre et d'aider les producteurs laitiers canadiens...
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2021-05-31 21:22 [p.7688]
Madam Chair, when was the last time the minister spoke with her American counterpart about the dairy issue?
Madame la présidente, quand la ministre a-t-elle parlé la dernière fois de la question laitière avec son homologue américain?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 21:22 [p.7688]
Madam Chair, I had the very good opportunity to meet with my USTR counterpart at a free trade commission recently, and while there, I always tout the importance of our agri-food and our agriculture sector, including—
Madame la présidente, j'ai eu l'occasion de rencontrer mon homologue du Bureau du représentant américain au Commerce à une réunion récente de la Commission du libre-échange et, lors de nos rencontres, je vante sans cesse l'importance du secteur agricole et agroalimentaire du Canada, y compris...
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2021-05-31 21:23 [p.7688]
Madam Chair, it is too bad that the minister does not seem to care about Canada's dairy industry.
Did she bring up the United States' decision to dispute the free trade agreement on the grounds that the Canadian market was closed to the U.S.? Did she bring this up with her counterpart?
Madame la présidente, il est dommage que la ministre ne semble pas avoir à cœur l'industrie laitière au Canada.
Est-ce qu'elle a abordé la question de la décision des États-Unis de contester l'accord de libre-échange, parce que les États-Unis prétextent que le marché canadien leur est fermé? A-t-elle abordé cette question avec son homologue?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 21:23 [p.7688]
Madam Chair, we are certainly disappointed that the United States requested a dispute settlement panel, but what I would say is that we are very confident in the administration of CUSMA and that we take our obligations seriously and that we are in compliance.
Assurément, madame la présidente, nous sommes déçus que les États-Unis aient fait appel à un groupe de règlement des différends, mais nous avons confiance en l'administration de l'Accord Canada-États-Unis-Mexique et le fait que nous nous acquittons de nos obligations avec sérieux et que nous nous conformons aux règles.
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2021-05-31 21:23 [p.7688]
Madam Chair, does the minister acknowledge her part in the failures regarding the cap on the sale of non-fat dairy solids and the loss of sovereignty over dairy policy in the latest agreement, which means that this agreement was poorly negotiated for Canadian dairy farmers?
Madame la présidente, la ministre reconnaît-elle sa responsabilité dans ces échecs concernant le plafond sur la vente de solides non gras du lait et la perte de la souveraineté sur la politique laitière dans le cadre de ce dernier accord, ce qui signifie que le dernier accord a été très mal négocié pour les producteurs de lait canadiens?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 21:24 [p.7688]
Madam Chair, we will always stand up for our Canadian dairy industry and protect Canada's supply-managed system, which is what we are doing. We will continue to do this with our American counterparts. We are confident, as I said, that we are meeting our obligations under CUSMA.
Madame la présidente, nous allons toujours défendre les intérêts de l'industrie laitière canadienne et protéger le système de gestion de l'offre du Canada. C'est ce que nous faisons actuellement. Nous allons continuer à le faire auprès de nos homologues américains. Comme je l'ai dit, nous sommes sûrs que nous respectons nos obligations aux termes de l'Accord Canada-États-Unis-Mexique.
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2021-05-31 21:24 [p.7688]
Madam Chair, why have the minister and the government still not announced compensation for supply-managed dairy farmers in connection with CUSMA?
Madame la présidente, pourquoi la ministre et le gouvernement n'ont-ils pas encore annoncé les compensations pour les producteurs de lait sous gestion de l'offre concernant cette dernière entente entre les États-Unis, le Canada et le Mexique?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 21:25 [p.7688]
Madam Chair, we absolutely believe in a strong supply-managed system. It is critical to our farmers and to Canada's food security, and we will always defend it. We have not granted further access to supply-managed sectors in—
Absolument, madame la présidente, nous croyons en un système solide de gestion de l'offre. Il est crucial pour les agriculteurs et notre sécurité alimentaire, et nous le défendrons toujours. Nous n'avons pas élargi l'accès aux secteurs soumis à la gestion de l'offre...
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2021-05-31 21:25 [p.7689]
Madam Chair, when will the compensation be announced for Canada-U.S.-Mexico trade for the products of Canadian farmers and dairy farmers?
Madame la présidente, quand les dédommagements pour les agriculteurs et les producteurs laitiers canadiens à verser à cause de l'ACEUM seront-ils annoncés?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 21:25 [p.7689]
Madam Chair, we have committed $1.7 billion of compensation to our dairy farmers. We continue to stand up for them and the terrific contribution they make to Canada's economy.
Madame la présidente, nous nous sommes engagés à verser 1,7 milliard de dollars en dédommagement à nos producteurs laitiers. Nous continuons à les défendre et à défendre leur formidable contribution à l'économie canadienne.
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2021-05-31 21:25 [p.7689]
Madam Chair, no compensation figures for CUSMA have been announced, yet the minister claims to defend the dairy industry and know her portfolio.
Can the minister tell us when supply-managed producers will get details about the compensation for CUSMA?
Madame la présidente, aucun montant d'argent n'a été annoncé pour les compensations à la suite du dernier Accord Canada—États-Unis—Mexique, et la ministre prétend défendre l'industrie laitière et connaître son dossier.
Est-ce que la ministre peut nous dire quand les producteurs sous gestion de l'offre vont avoir les détails des compensations pour l'Accord Canada—États-Unis—Mexique?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 21:26 [p.7689]
Madam Chair, I want to assure the hon. member that our work here and the protection of the supply-managed agricultural producers, farmers and workers is something that we work steadfastly on. I work with my colleague, the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, to support their long-term success. We have committed $1.75 billion in compensation for our dairy farmers. We will continue to stand up for our Canadian dairy farmers.
Madame la présidente, je tiens à assurer au député que nous travaillons sans relâche à la protection des producteurs, des agriculteurs et des travailleurs agricoles soumis à la gestion de l'offre. Ma collègue, la ministre de l'Agriculture et de l'Agroalimentaire, et moi travaillons à assurer leur réussite à long terme. Nous avons promis à nos producteurs laitiers 1,75 milliard de dollars en dédommagement. Nous continuerons à défendre les intérêts de nos producteurs laitiers.
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2021-05-31 21:26 [p.7689]
Madam Chair, the minister does not know the difference between the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement and the recent Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement.
I am not talking about the $1.7 billion for the two other announcements.
When will compensation for the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement be announced?
Madame la présidente, la ministre ne peut pas faire la différence entre l'Accord de Partenariat transpacifique global et progressiste, l'Accord économique et commercial global entre le Canada et l'Union européenne et le dernier Accord Canada—États-Unis—Mexique.
Je ne parle pas des 1,7 milliard de dollars pour les deux autres annonces.
Quand les compensations pour l'Accord Canada—États-Unis—Mexique vont-elles être annoncées?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 21:27 [p.7689]
Madam Chair, I want to assure the hon. member that we will continue to work to support our dairy farmers in Quebec and throughout Canada.
Madame la présidente, je tiens à assurer au député que nous continuerons à travailler pour soutenir nos producteurs laitiers au Québec et partout au Canada.
View Anita Vandenbeld Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Anita Vandenbeld Profile
2021-05-31 21:47 [p.7692]
Madam Chair, I would like to thank my hon. colleague for mentioning women entrepreneurs and Black entrepreneurs, including that very important announcement today, which will make a significant difference.
Changing tracks a bit, I would like to ask another question about the benefits of trade. Our government is committed to creating the most favourable conditions for Canadian businesses to compete and succeed internationally. FTAs between Canada and our trading partners create new opportunities for Canadian businesses. Canada's prosperity hinges on modern trade rules, which open markets for our goods, services and investment.
Could the parliamentary secretary please tell us more about how Canada's 14 FTAs are benefiting Canadian businesses, exporters and workers?
Madame la présidente, je remercie ma collègue d'avoir mentionné les femmes entrepreneures et les entrepreneurs noirs, ainsi que l'annonce très importante qui a été faite aujourd'hui au sujet d'une mesure qui fera une grande différence.
Dans un autre ordre d'idées, j'aimerais poser une question sur les avantages du commerce. Le gouvernement est déterminé à créer les conditions les plus favorables pour que les entreprises canadiennes puissent soutenir la concurrence et assurer leur réussite à l'échelle internationale. Les accords de libre-échange entre le Canada et ses partenaires commerciaux créent des débouchés pour les entreprises canadiennes. La prospérité du Canada repose sur des règles commerciales modernes qui ouvrent les marchés à nos produits, nos services et nos investissements.
La secrétaire parlementaire pourrait-elle expliquer en quoi les 14 accords de libre-échange conclus par le Canada sont avantageux pour les entreprises, les exportateurs et les travailleurs canadiens?
View Rachel Bendayan Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Rachel Bendayan Profile
2021-05-31 21:48 [p.7692]
Madam Chair, the Minister of Small Business just a few moments ago, in answer to another colleague's question, mentioned that Canada was a trading nation, and that is so true. Nearly two-thirds of our economy and millions upon millions of Canadian jobs depend on international trade and investment. That is one of the reasons why Canada in fact took a leadership role on the international stage to ensure the free flow of goods worldwide and to ensure we would not fall into protectionist tendencies at a time of international crisis.
It is important we continue to prepare for a strong economic recovery through trade in Canada. We are in fact the only country in the G7 with free trade agreements with all other G7 nations. Our task as a government right now is to ensure that all our businesses are taking advantage of the international trade agreements we do have. We already know that one-in-six jobs in Canada is supported by exports. We want to increase that number even further and also increase the number of companies in Canada exporting abroad, which is why—
Madame la présidente, il y a un instant, en réponse à la question d'un autre collègue, la ministre de la Petite Entreprise a dit que le Canada est un pays commerçant, et c'est bien vrai. Près des deux tiers de notre économie ainsi que des millions d'emplois au Canada sont tributaires du commerce et des investissements internationaux. C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles le Canada a joué un rôle de leader sur la scène internationale pour assurer la libre circulation des biens à l'échelle mondiale et pour qu'on ne tombe pas dans le protectionnisme en période de crise internationale.
Le Canada doit préparer une relance économique vigoureuse grâce au commerce. Le Canada est d'ailleurs le seul pays du G7 à avoir conclu des accords de libre-échange avec tous les autres pays du G7. Le gouvernement a maintenant pour tâche de veiller à ce que toutes les entreprises du pays tirent profit des accords de libre-échange internationaux que le Canada a conclus. Nous savons déjà qu'un emploi sur six au Canada est lié aux exportations. Nous voulons accroître cette proportion encore davantage, tout comme le nombre d'entreprises exportatrices au Canada, et c'est pourquoi...
View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
BQ (QC)
View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
2021-05-31 21:57 [p.7693]
Madam Chair, the minister knows full well that there is a strong movement calling for the boycott of products that come from Israel, a country with which we have a signed free trade agreement.
In light of this, would it not be a good idea, at least as a first step, not to consider products manufactured in the occupied territories as products of Israel?
Madame la présidente, le ministre sait pertinemment qu'il y a un important mouvement qui favorise le boycott des produits provenant d'Israël, pays avec lequel nous avons un accord de libre-échange en bonne et due forme.
Cela dit, ne serait-il pas opportun, du moins dans un premier temps, de faire en sorte de ne pas considérer comme étant produits en Israël des produits qui sont fabriqués dans les territoires occupés?
View Marc Garneau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Madam Chair, to answer the question on the BDS movement, Canada is a steadfast ally and friend to the Palestinian people. However, let me be clear: We condemn BDS.
Canada remains deeply concerned about efforts to isolate Israel internationally. Parliament made its concern about BDS clear in February 2016, when the House voted in favour of a motion to reject this movement.
Madame la présidente, pour répondre à la question sur le mouvement BDS, le Canada est un allié indéfectible et ami du peuple palestinien. Par contre, je vais être clair: nous condamnons le BDS.
Le Canada demeure très préoccupé par les efforts visant à isoler Israël sur la scène internationale. Le Parlement a clairement exprimé sa préoccupation quant au mouvement BDS, lorsque la Chambre a voté en février 2016 en faveur d'une motion rejetant ce mouvement.
View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
BQ (QC)
View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
2021-05-31 22:05 [p.7694]
Madam Chair, I would like to come back to the matter of the Canada-Israel Free Trade Agreement.
Is the minister willing to consider products made in the occupied territories as not being Israeli products?
Madame la présidente, j'aimerais revenir sur le dossier de l'Accord de libre-échange Canada-Israël.
Le ministre est-il disposé à considérer comme n'étant pas des produits israéliens les produits fabriqués dans les territoires occupés?
View Marc Garneau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Madam Chair, I will have to get back to my colleague on that matter.
Madame la présidente, je vais devoir revenir à mon collègue sur cette question.
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2021-05-31 22:05 [p.7694]
Madam Chair, what a pleasure it is to be able to address the House. I found it very interesting listening to my colleagues, in particular the Minister of Foreign Affairs, the Minister of Small Business, Export Promotion and International Trade and of course the Minister of International Development. Listening to the ministers and knowing the background and passion they have for our country and the world, one cannot help but feel good knowing Canada is such a wonderful country to be in. We are a country that truly cares about what is happening around the world.
I want to address a couple of areas, with a special focus on trade.
Before I do that, when I was growing up a number of years back I used to watch hockey and was a Habs fan. We did not have the Winnipeg Jets back then. It was quite nice to see the Habs win this evening, which has already been referenced. The nicer thing is they are coming to my home city of Winnipeg where they will be playing my favourite team, the Winnipeg Jets. I will be rooting on whichever team wins that series for the Stanley Cup. I know Canadians from coast to coast to coast love hockey, and whatever team goes from Canada, rest assured Canadians will be behind the team saying “go team go”.
I started off by talking about foreign affairs. A number of years back, I was in the Philippines in a community known as Cebu, which is a very large city in the southern part of the Philippines. I was at the Canadian consular services office there, and on the wall, I saw a picture of an astronaut. That astronaut was in fact the first astronaut in space, the current Minister of Foreign Affairs. I mention that because earlier this evening someone made reference to the Minister of Foreign Affairs as maybe not having as much experience as he would have liked to have seen.
I have grown an immense amount of respect for the minister's understanding and appreciation of what is taking place around the world. I am very proud of the fact he has taken the time, as other ministers of foreign affairs have, to talk to me personally about areas of interest I have, whether it is India, and in particular the Punjab, or the Philippines and different related issues.
I understand and appreciate the diplomacy necessary when we talk about things like the Middle East, China or Iran. It is not an easy file to have, but I am very grateful to know my friend is in that position, because he excels. I feel very comfortable knowing Canada is in such a great position today.
The Prime Minister often talks about Canada's diversity being our strength. When I think of the world, I think of it in terms of Canada's diversity. We have people in Canada with ancestors from around the world, so when something happens in a country outside Canada, we have a group of people who are genuinely concerned and want to hear from the government. All in all, the government does a fantastic job in appreciating that fact.
I know for many Canadians, in particular immigrants, who have adopted Canada as their home that their home country, their country of birth, always remains in their hearts to a certain degree, and who can blame them? I have been blessed to being affiliated, as a parliamentarian for over 30 years, with a lot of good people.
These are people who I would classify as part of my inner circle and my group of friends of Filipino heritage, Punjabi-speaking heritage or Indo-Canadian heritage. Those are two communities that I am very proud of and very proud to represent, so I know, when things take place in countries like that or Ukraine or others, that I take the time to listen and to talk and share my thoughts. Even though Canada is a country of 37.5 million people, we carry a tremendous amount of clout around the world, and I believe that is something we all need to take very seriously, as I know that the current Prime Minister, the Minister of Foreign Affairs, the Minister of International Trade and the Minister of International Development collectively do on our behalf, day in and day out.
Shortly after the 2015 election, there were a couple of things that really came to the forefront. One is that we are a government that genuinely cares and wants to see the middle class and those aspiring to be a part of it expanded and to be taken care. We were committed to working as hard as possible, and that is the reason we saw things like the Ukraine trade deal ratified as quickly as it was. Months after we were elected, it was signed off. It was the same with the CETA. What about the agreement in regard to the United States, Mexico and Canada, the Pacific agreement or legislation in regard to the World Trade Organization?
As a caucus, we have collectively recognized the true value of trade. Canada is a trading nation, a nation that is diverse and dependent on trade. For us to grow and prosper into the future, we need to keep focused on what is happening in the world around us, to come up with those progressive trade ideas and agreements, and to keep the diplomats talking, trying to fix where we can fix and trying to protect Canadian interests, wherever they might be in the world. Trade was important during the COVID-19 pandemic. That is why we saw a government take such a proactive approach to supporting small businesses.
One of my former bosses, the former government house leader, would say that small businesses are the backbone of our economy. We had to make sure that we supported small businesses, because many of those small businesses today are going to be major exporters in the future. That is why we had to develop programs to not only protect the individual Canadians by putting disposable income into their pockets, but we had to demonstrate that we could be in a better position to be able to, as the Prime Minister and ministers often say, build back better.
That is why we put in the investments that we did. That is why we have a minister responsible today for small businesses, who is being so proactive, and for international trade. Members should look at the agreement that was just achieved, and I know I speak on behalf of all my colleagues in regard to the United Kingdom agreement and the transitional period with which we have bought some time so that we can finalize something and so that we can continue to protect the interests of Canadian workers and Canada's economy and social fabric that we all love so dearly.
I think the Chair is already telling me that my time is expired, but I do have a question. Can I go ahead with the question, Madam Chair?
Madame la présidente, c'est un grand plaisir de prendre la parole. J'ai écouté mes collègues avec beaucoup d'intérêt, surtout le ministre des Affaires étrangères, la ministre de la Petite Entreprise, de la Promotion des exportations et du Commerce international et, bien sûr, la ministre du Développement international. Quand on écoute les ministres et que l’on connaît leurs antécédents et leur passion pour le Canada et le monde entier, on ne peut que se réjouir de vivre dans un pays aussi fantastique. Le Canada se soucie vraiment de ce qui se passe dans le monde.
Je me concentrerai sur quelques points, tout en mettant l'accent sur le commerce.
Avant de me lancer dans le vif du sujet, je prends un instant pour dire que j'avais l'habitude de regarder le hockey et que j'étais un partisan des Canadiens quand j'étais jeune, il y a un certain nombre d'années. Nous n'avions pas les Jets de Winnipeg à l'époque. Comme on l'a dit, c'était bien de voir la victoire des Canadiens ce soir. Ce qui est encore mieux, c'est qu'ils joueront dans ma ville, Winnipeg, où ils affronteront mon équipe préférée, les Jets. Peu importe l'équipe qui remportera ce duel, je serai derrière elle pour qu'elle gagne la Coupe Stanley. Je sais que les Canadiens d'un océan à l'autre aiment le hockey et qu'ils encourageront certainement l'équipe qui représentera le Canada, quelle qu'elle soit.
Je reviens aux affaires étrangères. Il y a un certain nombre d'années, j'ai voyagé aux Philippines, plus précisément à Cebu, une très grande ville dans le Sud de cet État. Sur le mur du bureau des services consulaires canadiens là-bas, j'ai vu une photo d'un astronaute. C'était en fait le premier astronaute canadien à aller dans l'espace, l'actuel ministre des Affaires étrangères. Je le mentionne parce que quelqu'un a dit ce soir que le ministre n'avait peut-être pas autant d'expérience qu'il l'aurait souhaité.
J'ai appris à porter un immense respect au ministre pour sa compréhension de ce qui se passe dans le monde. Je suis très fier que, comme l'ont fait d'autres ministres des Affaires étrangères avant lui, il ait pris le temps de discuter personnellement avec moi des régions qui m'intéressent particulièrement et des divers dossiers connexes, qu'il s'agisse de l'Inde, en particulier du Punjab, ou encore des Philippines.
Je suis conscient de la diplomatie qui s'impose dans les relations avec le Moyen-Orient, la Chine ou l'Iran, par exemple. Ce n'est pas un portefeuille facile à assumer, mais je suis très reconnaissant de savoir que mon collègue occupe cette fonction, car il s'en acquitte avec brio. Je suis très rassuré de savoir que le Canada est en si bonne position aujourd'hui.
Le premier ministre dit souvent que la diversité fait la force du Canada. Quand je pense au monde, j'y pense dans l'optique de la diversité du Canada. La population canadienne compte des gens dont les ancêtres viennent de partout dans le monde. Donc, lorsque quelque chose se produit dans un autre pays, cela préoccupe inévitablement un groupe de gens au Canada, et ces personnes veulent entendre le gouvernement à ce sujet. Dans l'ensemble, le gouvernement fait un travail fantastique pour tenir compte de ce fait.
Je sais que, le pays d'origine de nombreux Canadiens reste toujours dans leur cœur à divers degrés, et qui pourrait le leur reprocher? C'est le pays où ils sont nés, aux qui ont immigré au Canada pour en faire leur patrie. J'ai eu la chance d'établir des liens, en tant que parlementaire depuis plus de 30 ans, avec beaucoup de gens très bien.
Ce sont des personnes qui font partie de mon cercle restreint et de mon groupe d'amis d'origine philippine, panjabi ou indo-canadienne. Ce sont deux communautés dont je suis très fier et que je suis très fier de représenter. Alors je sais que, lorsqu'il se passe quelque chose dans un de ces pays, en Ukraine ou ailleurs, je prends le temps d'écouter, de parler et de donner mon point de vue. Même si le Canada est un pays de 37,5 millions d'habitants, nous avons beaucoup d'influence dans le monde, et je crois que nous devons tous prendre cela très au sérieux, comme le font collectivement, je le sais, le premier ministre actuel, le ministre des Affaires étrangères, la ministre du Commerce international et laministre du Développement international en notre nom tous les jours.
Peu de temps après les élections de 2015, plusieurs choses sont vraiment apparues clairement, notamment le fait que le gouvernement libéral se soucie sincèrement de la classe moyenne et de ceux qui aspirent à en faire partie, qu'il veut élargir la classe moyenne et qu'il souhaite prendre soin d'elle. Nous tenions à y parvenir, peu importe les efforts exigés, et c'est pourquoi nous avons ratifié l'accord commercial avec l'Ukraine si rapidement. Cela s'est fait seulement quelques mois après notre élection. La même situation s'est produite avec l'accord Canada-Union européenne. Que dire de l'Accord Canada—États-Unis—Mexique, du Partenariat transpacifique ou de la mesure législative traitant de l'Organisation mondiale du commerce?
Le caucus libéral a reconnu la juste valeur du commerce. Le Canada est un pays commerçant, un pays diversifié qui est tributaire du commerce. Pour pouvoir croître et prospérer, nous devons nous concentrer sur ce qui se passe dans le monde qui nous entoure, trouver des idées commerciales progressistes, signer des accords commerciaux progressistes et continuer d'adopter une approche diplomatique en tentant de corriger ce qui est possible et de protéger les intérêts des Canadiens, peu importe où ils se trouvent sur la planète. Le commerce a été important dans le contexte de la pandémie de COVID-19. C'est pourquoi le gouvernement a adopté une approche si proactive pour appuyer les petites entreprises.
L'un de mes anciens patrons, l'ancien leader du gouvernement à la Chambre, disait que les petites entreprises étaient l'épine dorsale de l'économie. Nous devions les soutenir, car bon nombre d'entre elles deviendront de grands exportateurs. Voilà pourquoi nous avons dû élaborer des programmes pour non seulement protéger les Canadiens en mettant plus d'argent à leur disposition, mais aussi pour être en meilleure position pour pouvoir bâtir en mieux, comme le premier ministre et les ministres disent souvent.
Voilà qui explique nos investissements. Voilà pourquoi nous avons aujourd'hui une ministre responsable des petites entreprises et du commerce international qui est si proactive. Les députés devraient regarder l'accord qui vient d'être conclu avec le Royaume-Uni. La période de transition nous a permis de mettre au point quelque chose et de continuer de protéger les intérêts des travailleurs canadiens ainsi que l'économie et le tissu social du Canada auxquels nous tenons tant.
Je pense que la présidente me dit déjà que mon temps est écoulé, mais j'ai une question. Puis-je poser ma question, madame la présidente?
View Richard Martel Profile
CPC (QC)
View Richard Martel Profile
2021-05-31 22:32 [p.7698]
Mr. Chair, the Biden administration has announced that it intends to challenge Canada's allocation of dairy tariff-rate quotas through the CUSMA dispute settlement mechanism.
The United States says that Canada's trade policies prevent U.S. dairy producers from taking full advantage of CUSMA. Canadian exporters, importers and farmers cannot afford any more of the Liberal failures in managing Canada-U.S. trade relations that they have witnessed over the past five years.
What does the government plan on doing to protect our dairy producers?
Monsieur le président, l'administration Biden a annoncé son intention de contester l'attribution par le Canada de contingents tarifaires sur les produits laitiers par le truchement du mécanisme de règlement des différends de l'ACEUM.
Les États-Unis affirment que les politiques commerciales du Canada empêchent les producteurs laitiers américains de profiter pleinement de l'ACEUM. Les exportateurs, les importateurs et les agriculteurs canadiens ne peuvent pas se permettre de nouveau les échecs de la part des libéraux dans la gestion des relations commerciales canado-américaines auxquels ils ont eu droit au cours des cinq dernières années.
Qu'est-ce que le gouvernement entend faire pour protéger nos producteurs laitiers?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 22:32 [p.7698]
Mr. Chair, I would first start with reminding my hon. colleague that it is our government that protected the supply-managed sector. We are disappointed that the U.S. has requested a dispute panel, but we are confident in the administration of dairy TRQs and that they are in full compliance with the commitments under CUSMA.
Our government will continue to stand up for Canada's dairy industry, our farmers and our workers, and we will continue to protect and defend our supply management system.
Monsieur le président, je voudrais d'abord rappeler à mon collègue que c'est notre gouvernement qui a défendu les secteurs soumis à la gestion de l'offre. Nous sommes déçus que les États-Unis aient demandé la formation d'un groupe spécial de règlement des différends, mais nous croyons que les contingents tarifaires du secteur laitier sont bien administrés et nous avons la conviction qu'ils respectent entièrement les exigences de l'Accord Canada—États-Unis—Mexique.
Le gouvernement continuera de défendre l'industrie laitière, les agriculteurs et les travailleurs canadiens, et il continuera de protéger et de défendre le régime canadien de gestion de l'offre.
View Richard Martel Profile
CPC (QC)
View Richard Martel Profile
2021-05-31 22:33 [p.7698]
Mr. Chair, Canada is in this situation because the Liberal trade minister was unable to stand up for Canada's dairy producers at the bilateral meeting with her counterpart in early May.
Since this meeting, trade relations between Canada and the United States have only deteriorated, what with the announcement that the U.S. would be doubling softwood lumber tariffs and now this official dispute of Canada's dairy tariff-rate quotas.
When will the Liberal government provide a schedule for compensating dairy producers for concessions made under CUSMA?
Monsieur le président, le Canada se retrouve dans cette situation parce que la ministre libérale du Commerce n'a pas réussi à défendre les producteurs laitiers du Canada lors de la réunion bilatérale avec son homologue américain au début du mois de mai.
Depuis cette réunion, les relations commerciales entre le Canada et les États-Unis n'ont fait que se détériorer avec, entre autres, l'annonce faite par les États-Unis de doubler les tarifs sur le bois-d’œuvre et, maintenant, une contestation officielle du contingent tarifaire du Canada pour les produits laitiers.
Quand le gouvernement libéral va-t-il fournir un échéancier sur les compensations accordées aux producteurs laitiers à la suite de leurs concessions dans le cadre de l'ACEUM?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 22:34 [p.7698]
Mr. Chair, I want to assure the hon. member that our government will always stand up for Canada's dairy industry, our farmers and our workers.
Let me also share with the member that in my meeting with the U.S. trade representative recently, we talked about North American competitiveness. We talked about the new NAFTA and how it will help to create jobs in both of our countries, as well as in Mexico. We talked about economic recovery and how we were going to deal with the very important issues of climate, labour and making trade inclusive so that small and medium-sized businesses will benefit from this very important agreement.
Monsieur le président, je veux assurer au député que le gouvernement sera toujours là pour défendre l'industrie laitière, les agriculteurs et les travailleurs du Canada.
Je dirai par ailleurs au député que, lors d'une rencontre que j'ai eue récemment avec la représentante américaine au commerce, il a été question de la compétitivité de l'Amérique du Nord. Nous avons parlé du nouvel ALENA et des emplois qu'il permettra de créer dans les deux pays, ainsi qu'au Mexique. Nous avons discuté de la relance économique et de ce que nous entendons faire au sujet d'enjeux très importants comme le climat, la main-d'œuvre et les efforts pour rendre le commerce international plus accessible afin que les petites et moyennes entreprises puissent tirer profit de cet important accord.
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2021-05-27 13:44 [p.7489]
Mr. Speaker, before I begin my speech, I would just like to thank everybody who lives in the riding of Huron—Bruce for their tremendous work over the last year and a half in combatting COVID. The rates in Huron County and Bruce County are some of the lowest in Ontario, and may be some of the lowest in Canada.
This is because of everybody, not just one person. Everybody's efforts have made the difference. I thank them. We are all proud of everyone's efforts. That is likely the best news of this speech.
When I look at this budget, I think maybe we could call it the “lack of vaccine” budget. Here we are. Just a few days ago, we had our May long weekend. We are near the end of May. We are in Ottawa today. Sparks Street should be full. The markets should be full. The patios should be out. The restaurants should be busy. There should be kids here on class trips, coming on tours. The hotels should be full.
Why are they not? By and large, the reason, and this is just the microcosm of the entire Canadian economy in the service industry, is that we did not have vaccines quickly enough and we did not have enough of them. That is the reality of why we have spent so much more than we ever would have thought we would have needed to spend.
In the process, the Liberal government, in its lack of action, has decimated tens of thousands of people's equity in their business, their savings and equity in their home. That is the truth. There is no bank manager in the country who would argue that fact.
Maybe someone who sells four-wheelers as a business has had the best year of all time. However, certainly for those in the service sector, this has been a humbling experience, to say the least.
The Bank of Canada, and this is unprecedented, has purchased over 250 billion dollars' worth of bonds. Who would have ever thought that we would be doing this? Who would have ever thought? A high of $6 billion a week, currently around $3 billion or $4 billion a week. Clearly, we cannot sustain this at all.
We all know there is inflation. We could go up and down the streets in our communities and see the homes for sale, going for $100,000, $200,000 or $300,000 over the list price. I talked to a builder the other day. A two by four that is 16 feet long, I think he told me it was $28. It was $7.50 last May. To the member for Timmins—James Bay, $5,000 to spruce up a home is not going far.
The printing of money, the Bank of Canada buying, is creating inflation. The other day I saw some commentary about how, compared to the U.S. dollar, ours is looking pretty good. The U.S. is probably printing more than we are right now. I think last week I saw the fed bought $92 billion in the United States. The Canadian dollar is doing well against the American dollar, but if we look at it as a Canadian dollar and what could be bought, we can buy less.
What the government has tried to do is it has tried to help. I believe the government has tried to help people, but maybe in the wrong ways. This inflation has cost the very people it was trying to help the most, the ones in the service industry, the ones earning an hourly wage who maybe do not have benefits. In Ontario, the province I am from, that wage is $14 to $15 an hour. The last year and a half has made that $15 an hour more like under $10 an hour. Certainly, if anybody had any hopes of buying a home or a condo, almost 40% to 50% has been added to what people thought would reasonably have to be paid.
For a country that had 75% ownership, when Europe has about 25%, in short order we have almost taken away the opportunity for the middle class to ever own a home. That is a shame.
For the ultra-wealthy, the people who have multiple homes, investments and all sorts of apparatus to accumulate wealth, this has been the absolute best time of all time. If we think about it, the last two or three years should have been the opportunity to raise up everybody. The Prime Minister, his finance minister and the party have diminished the middle class and the poor working class. That is an absolute fact. People are now in bidding wars for rental properties, not to buy a home, but to rent. It is not sustainable and will probably go down as one of the darkest moments of the government.
I live in a rural community, a hard-working, resilient rural community, and I have been mystified for the last five or six years as to how the government continually gets it wrong in rural Canada. Money for rural infrastructure is a pittance compared to what urban centres receive. Rural areas do not carry the burden of so many people, but they also have the biggest burden of protecting the most precious resources. In my area, Lake Huron has fresh water. For rural infrastructure, water, sewage, culverts, bridges, just name it, there is not enough money.
Members do not have to think I am biased. They can talk to the mayors or CAOs of Huron County or Bruce County and they will say it is not enough. It is a bidding war to even get it. By the way, the way it works is backward. One has to pitch it to the federal government, it picks over the bones, then says it is approved, but does not even tell the MPP or MP for the area. It should be the other way around. It should be that the federal government allocates money to the provinces, the provinces pick their priorities based on what the mayors and wardens tells them and then they approve the projects. This is just common sense. We have been doing this now for six years and it does not work.
As for low-income and social housing, forget it. Members can talk to any community in my riding, Saugeen Shores, South Huron or Goderich. They apply, apply and apply and it is never approved. No one has to take my word for it because the mayors call me to complain.
Then there is strategic infrastructure. We are going beyond my riding, looking at other areas and what rural areas produce. In my area there are soybeans, corn, red meat, all those different things, and we are constantly under the pressure of not having enough capacity at the ports and other areas.
As for broadband, the SWIFT project was working. The minister changed it and what a mess. We had consistent funding for rural projects and they were starting to work. Now it has changed and what a mess.
There is a chronic labour shortage throughout Ontario, which is certainly exacerbated in my riding. We need workers. We need to motivate people to get to work. We need to speed up the process of bringing in new Canadians to work in our sectors, such as, for example, meat processing. Just name it and we need it.
God bless the trade minister, but she has made a mess of trade, in my opinion. The U.S. is running roughshod over us. Everybody thought that when Trump was gone, Biden would be Canada's best friend. We do not need friends like Joe Biden, the way he has treated us with buy America and softwood lumber tariffs.
How is it that Canada has a beef trade deficit with the United Kingdom? There are those who do not think we are getting treated poorly. We are getting treated poorly. We have a pork and beef deficit with the European Union. That is not fair trade. That is not a fair partner.
I would love to talk about our borders. What a mess the government has created at our borders. Port Huron is about an hour and a half from my hometown and I know there are a lot of business people awfully disappointed with how they have been treated at the border in an arbitrary way. It is not the officials. It is not the hard-working men and women who work there. It is the mixed messages they receive from the health minister and the public safety minister.
It is not a good situation. If they cannot fix it, we will do the heavy lifting. I am saying we are prepared to do it. They let Line 5 go to this state when in Huron—Bruce and many other ridings we need it. We need it to dry our crops and heat our homes and it is willy-nilly with the current government. I know the Liberals send out the resource minister and he has some things to say, but behind the scenes there is no way the message is getting drilled home to the United States. If they want to shut us down, they are going to shut us down.
Monsieur le Président, avant de commencer, j’aimerais remercier tous les citoyens de ma circonscription, Huron— Bruce, pour le travail énorme qu’ils ont accompli au cours des 18 derniers mois pour lutter contre la COVID. Les taux de contagion dans le comté d'Huron et dans celui de Bruce sont parmi les plus bas en Ontario et peut-être même au Canada.
Ce résultat est attribuable à l’ensemble des citoyens, et non à une seule personne. Ce sont les efforts de tous qui ont permis de garder des taux aussi bas. Je les en remercie. Nous sommes tous fiers de ce que tout le monde a accompli. Voilà le point le plus positif de mon allocution.
On pourrait peut-être appeler le budget d’aujourd’hui le budget « du manque de vaccins ». Nous y voilà. Il y a quelques jours seulement, c’était la longue fin de semaine de mai. Nous approchons de la fin du mois. Nous sommes à Ottawa aujourd’hui. La rue Sparks devrait être pleine de monde. Les marchés devraient être bondés. Les terrasses devraient être prêtes à accueillir les clients. Les restaurants devraient être occupés. On devrait voir des enfants en sortie scolaire. Les hôtels devraient être pleins.
Pourquoi n’est-ce pas le cas? Parce que, dans l’ensemble, nous n’avons pas obtenu les vaccins assez rapidement et que nous n’en avons pas obtenus assez, et le secteur des services ne constitue que le microcosme de l’économie canadienne. Voilà pourquoi nous avons dépensé beaucoup plus que nous l’avions envisagé au départ.
À cause de l’inaction du gouvernement libéral, des dizaines de milliers de gens d’affaires et de propriétaires ont perdu leurs économies et l'argent investi dans leur entreprise et leur résidence. Voilà la vérité. Aucun gérant de banque au pays dirait le contraire.
Les vendeurs de véhicules tout terrain ont peut-être connu leur meilleure année. Toutefois, il est certain que, pour les gens du secteur des services, les résultats de cette année ont été à tout le moins modestes.
La Banque du Canada a acheté des obligations à hauteur de plus de 250 milliards de dollars, soit plus que jamais auparavant. Qui aurait cru qu’une telle chose arriverait? Au plus fort, c’était à hauteur de 6 milliards de dollars par semaine, actuellement, c’est 3 ou 4 milliards de dollars par semaine. Franchement, nous ne pouvons vraiment pas continuer comme cela.
Nous savons tous qu’il y a de l’inflation. Nous pouvons tous voir dans nos coins de pays des maisons qui se vendent 100 000 $, 200 000 $ et même 300 000 $ de plus que le prix initial demandé. J’ai parlé à un entrepreneur en construction l’autre jour. Il m’a dit, si je me souviens bien, qu’un deux par quatre qui fait 16 pieds de long se vend 28 $, alors que la même pièce coûtait 7,50 $ en mai dernier. Je signale pour la gouverne du député de Timmins—Baie James qu'on ne va pas loin avec 5 000 $ quand on veut rénover une maison.
La Banque du Canada crée de l’inflation en imprimant de l’argent et en achetant des obligations. L’autre jour, j’ai pris connaissance d’un commentaire selon lequel le dollar canadien se porte assez bien comparativement au dollar américain. Les États-Unis impriment probablement plus d’argent que nous en ce moment. La semaine dernière, je crois avoir vu que la Réserve fédérale a acheté des obligations pour une valeur de 92 milliards de dollars. Le dollar canadien se porte bien comparativement au dollar américain, mais il faut reconnaître qu’il ne permet pas d’acheter autant.
Le gouvernement a essayé d’aider les gens, mais il ne s’y est peut-être pas pris de la bonne manière. L’inflation a nuit à ceux-là mêmes qu’il essayait d’aider le plus, c'est-à-dire les travailleurs du secteur des services, les gens qui sont payés à l'heure et qui n’ont peut-être pas d’avantages sociaux. En Ontario, la province d’où je viens, ces salaires sont de 14 à 15 $ l’heure. Toutefois, au cours des 18 derniers mois, ces salaires de 15 $ l'heure sont tombés à moins de 10 $ l’heure. Une chose est certaine: quiconque espérait s’acheter une maison ou un condo devra débourser de 40 à 50 % de plus que ce qu’il croyait raisonnable de dépenser au départ.
Au Canada, 75 % de la population est propriétaire de son logement, comparativement à 25 % en Europe, mais pourtant, nous avons tout à coup privé la classe moyenne de la possibilité d'accéder à la propriété. C’est une honte.
Pour les ultra-riches, ceux qui possèdent plusieurs maisons, des investissements et toutes sortes de moyens pour accumuler leur richesse, cette période a été la plus faste de tous les temps. Si l’on y réfléchit, les deux ou trois dernières années auraient dû être l’occasion d’élever tout le monde. Le premier ministre, son ministre des Finances et le parti ont réduit la classe moyenne et la classe ouvrière pauvre. C’est un fait irréfutable. Les gens se livrent maintenant à des guerres d’enchères pour des propriétés à louer, non pas pour acheter une maison, mais pour louer. Ce n’est pas viable et cela passera probablement à l’histoire comme l’un des moments les plus sombres de ce gouvernement.
Je vis dans une collectivité rurale résiliente et laborieuse, et depuis cinq ou six ans, je n’arrive pas à comprendre comment le gouvernement ne cesse de se tromper dans le Canada rural. Les fonds destinés aux infrastructures rurales sont dérisoires par rapport à ce que reçoivent les centres urbains. Les régions rurales ne portent pas le fardeau d’un si grand nombre de personnes, mais elles portent le plus lourd fardeau de protéger les ressources les plus précieuses. Dans ma région, le lac Huron renferme de l’eau douce. Pour l’infrastructure rurale, l’eau, les égouts, les ponceaux, les ponts, tout ce que vous voulez, il n’y a pas assez d’argent.
Que les députés ne pensent pas que j’ai un parti pris. Ils peuvent parler aux maires ou aux directeurs généraux des comtés de Huron ou de Bruce qui leur diront que ce n’est pas suffisant. Il y a une guerre d’enchères pour l’obtenir. En passant, ça fonctionne à l’envers. Il faut présenter le projet au gouvernement fédéral, qui en examine les grandes lignes, puis déclare qu’il est approuvé, mais n’en informe même pas le député provincial ou fédéral de la région. Ce devrait être l’inverse. Le gouvernement fédéral devrait attribuer des fonds aux provinces, celles-ci fixent leurs priorités en fonction de ce que les maires et les directeurs généraux leur disent, puis elles approuvent les projets. C’est tout simplement logique. Nous faisons cela depuis six ans maintenant et ça ne fonctionne pas.
Quant aux logements sociaux et à loyer modique, oubliez-les. Les députés peuvent parler à n’importe quelle collectivité de ma circonscription, Saugeen Shores, South Huron ou Goderich. Elles présentent demande après demande et elles ne sont jamais approuvées. Personne n’a à me croire sur parole, car les maires m’appellent pour se plaindre.
Ensuite, il y a l’infrastructure stratégique. Nous dépassons les limites de ma circonscription, nous regardons d’autres régions et ce que les zones rurales produisent. Dans ma région, il y a du soya, du maïs, de la viande rouge, tous ces produits différents, et nous vivons constamment sous la pression de ne pas avoir assez de capacité dans les ports et dans d’autres domaines.
En ce qui concerne la large bande, le projet SWIFT donnait de bons résultats. Le ministre l’a modifié, et quel gâchis. Nous avions un financement constant pour des projets ruraux qui commençaient à donner des résultats. Maintenant, il a été modifié, et quel gâchis!
Il y a une pénurie chronique de main-d’œuvre partout en Ontario, et elle est certainement exacerbée dans ma circonscription. Nous avons besoin de travailleurs. Nous devons motiver les gens à se mettre au travail. Nous devons accélérer le processus pour faire venir des immigrants afin qu'ils travaillent dans nos secteurs, comme celui de la transformation de la viande. Les besoins sont partout.
Sans vouloir manquer de respect à la ministre du Commerce, elle a créé un beau gâchis, à mon avis. Les États-Unis nous malmènent. Tout le monde pensait que lorsque Trump serait parti, Biden serait le meilleur ami du Canada. Nous n’avons pas besoin d’amis comme Joe Biden, à voir la façon dont il nous a traités avec sa politique d'achat aux États-Unis et les tarifs sur le bois d’œuvre.
Comment se fait-il que le Canada ait un déficit dans le commerce du bœuf avec le Royaume-Uni? Certains ne pensent pas que nous sommes malmenés. Nous le sommes. Nous avons un déficit dans le commerce du porc et du bœuf avec l’Union européenne. Ce n’est pas un commerce équitable. Ce n’est pas un partenaire équitable.
J’aimerais beaucoup parler de nos frontières. Le gouvernement a créé un beau gâchis à nos frontières. Port Huron est à environ une heure et demie de ma ville natale, et je sais que beaucoup de gens d’affaires sont terriblement déçus d'avoir été traités de manière arbitraire à la frontière. Ce n’est pas la faute des fonctionnaires. Ce n’est pas la faute des hommes et des femmes qui travaillent dur à la frontière. Le problème, ce sont les messages contradictoires qu’ils reçoivent de la part de la ministre de la Santé et du ministre de la Sécurité publique.
La situation est mauvaise. S’ils ne peuvent pas la corriger, nous nous occuperons de faire le travail. Je dis que nous sommes prêts à le faire. Ils ont laissé faire les choses pour la canalisation 5, alors que dans la circonscription de Huron-Bruce et dans de nombreuses autres circonscriptions, nous en avons besoin. Nous en avons besoin pour sécher nos récoltes et chauffer nos maisons, mais le gouvernement prend des décisions à l'aveuglette. Je sais que les libéraux envoient le ministre des Ressources naturelles et qu’il a des choses à dire, mais en coulisses, il n’y a aucun moyen de faire passer le message aux États-Unis. S’ils veulent nous fermer, ils vont nous fermer.
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the following two reports from the Standing Committee on International Trade: the sixth report, entitled “Trade Between Canada and the United Kingdom: A Potential Transitional Trade Agreement and Beyond”; and the seventh report, entitled “Canada and International Trade: An Interim Report Concerning the Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic and Beyond”.
Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the committee requests that the government table a comprehensive response to each of these two reports.
Monsieur le Président, j'ai l'honneur de présenter, dans les deux langues officielles, les deux rapports suivants du Comité permanent du commerce international: le sixième rapport, intitulé « Les échanges commerciaux entre le Canada et le Royaume-Uni: un éventuel accord commercial de transition et ce que l'avenir nous réserve »; de même que le septième rapport, intitulé « Le Canada et le commerce international: rapport intérimaire sur les répercussions de la pandémie de COVID-19 et ce que l'avenir nous réserve ».
Conformément à l'article 109 du Règlement, le Comité demande que le gouvernement dépose une réponse globale à chacun de ces deux rapports.
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2021-05-13 10:08 [p.7149]
Mr. Speaker, I will be responding to the Canada-U.K. report.
I would like to express my appreciation to the analysts, the clerk and my colleagues on the Standing Committee of International Trade for their work in preparing this final report on trade between Canada and the United Kingdom, and I want to thank them.
Attached to the report is the supplementary opinion of the official opposition Conservatives. In this report, we highlight that we are pleased to see the Canada-United Kingdom Trade Continuity Agreement come into effect on April 1, 2021, though we are disappointed that the government was not able to meet the initial deadline of December 31, 2020, when the CETA's application to the United Kingdom ended. It is truly unfortunate that the government left this critical trade agreement to the final sitting week of the final month of the final year the CETA's term no longer applied to the U.K., having to sign an interim memorandum of understanding to provide trade stability due to this delay.
The Conservative Party of Canada is pleased to see recommendations in the report on negotiations for a successor Canada-U.K. trade agreement, which we hope to see begin negotiations this year, including to address gaps raised by small businesses and those in the agriculture and agri-food sectors. Conservatives support the recommendations in the report and we look forward to the government's response.
Conservatives also recognize that we were in a unique situation where we did this Canada-U.K. trade study and we also had a separate study on Bill C-18,, the Canada-United Kingdom Trade Continuity Agreement Implementation Act, where we also heard from witnesses whose testimony is regrettably not included in this report. We, in the Conservative caucus, do hope that the government takes the time to review the input from stakeholders from the Bill C-18 study, including concerns around non-tariff barriers, as well as non-indexation of frozen British pensions.
Monsieur le Président, je vais commenter le rapport sur les relations commerciales entre le Royaume-Uni et le Canada.
J'aimerais exprimer ma reconnaissance aux analystes, à la greffière et à mes collègues du Comité permanent du commerce international pour leur travail de préparation de ce rapport final sur le commerce entre le Canada et le Royaume-Uni. Je les remercie.
L'opinion complémentaire du Parti conservateur, soit l'opposition officielle, y est annexée. Cela dit, nous sommes ravis que l'Accord de continuité commerciale Canada—Royaume-Uni soit entré en vigueur le 1er avril 2021, même si nous sommes déçus que le gouvernement n'ait pas été en mesure de respecter l'échéance initiale du 31 décembre 2020, date à partir de laquelle les règles de l'Accord économique et commercial global, ou AECG, ne s'appliquaient plus au Royaume-Uni. Il est vraiment regrettable que le gouvernement ait attendu à la toute dernière minute pour s'en occuper et qu'il ait dû signer un protocole d'entente provisoire pour assurer une certaine stabilité commerciale et compenser ce retard.
Le Parti conservateur du Canada est content de voir que le rapport contient des recommandations sur des négociations en vue d'un nouvel accord commercial entre le Canada et le Royaume-Uni — qui, espérons-le, commenceront cette année —, notamment pour combler les lacunes constatées par les petites entreprises et le secteur agricole et agroalimentaire. Les conservateurs appuient les recommandations du rapport et attendent avec impatience la réponse du gouvernement.
Les conservateurs reconnaissent aussi que nous étions dans une situation unique quand nous avons mené l'étude sur l'accord commercial entre le Canada et le Royaume-Uni. Nous avons également mené une étude distincte du projet de loi C-18, Loi de mise en œuvre de l’Accord de continuité commerciale Canada–Royaume-Uni, mais, hélas, le témoignage de certaines personnes n'a pas été inclus dans le rapport. Les membres du caucus conservateurs espèrent que le gouvernement prenne le temps d'examiner les commentaires que les intervenants ont formulés lors de l'étude du projet de loi C-18, notamment les préoccupations entourant les barrières non tarifaires ainsi que la non-indexation des pensions britanniques gelées.
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
View Greg McLean Profile
2021-05-10 15:36 [p.6966]
Mr. Speaker, I move that the first report of the Special Committee on the Economic Relationship between Canada and the United States, presented on Thursday, April 15, be concurred in.
I will be splitting my time today with the member for Chilliwack—Hope.
Today is May 10. In two days, on May 12, the Governor of the State of Michigan has stated that she will shut down Enbridge Line 5, which provides 540,000 barrels of oil per day to Canadian refineries in Sarnia in southern Ontario, and further feeds facilities in Quebec. It is estimated that 30,000 jobs depend on this important international infrastructure in southern Ontario alone. Today, we are debating concurrence of the report of the Special Committee on the Economic Relationship between Canada and the United States, which was presented to this House on April 15. That was 25 days ago and still there are no signs that the Prime Minister is engaged on this file.
How much of Canada's petroleum needs will be disrupted? In fact, 540,000 barrels per day equates to about 25% of Canada's daily consumption of oil. That shortage will fall on the backs of two provinces, Ontario and Quebec, as it will represent approximately half of the supply of this vital energy feedstock to its economic output as the products refine into inputs for petrochemicals, plastics and textiles, and much more that is at the heart of Canada's manufacturing sector, to heating homes, driving cars and getting goods like food and supplies to markets efficiently and quickly.
In short, cutting off this infrastructure will result in a disastrous outcome for Canada. Tens of thousands of jobs in the supply chain that feeds our economy and a manufacturing sector that has been built on and depends on this critical infrastructure, all waiting, with their fingers crossed, for the outcome. It is safe to say that the closure of this energy infrastructure represents a national energy security emergency. Two days away, yet Line 5 has been threatened with closure since November 13, 2020. Six months have passed. I spoke about this matter needing resolution quickly at that time, but the government frittered its time away.
Enbridge, one of Canada's great companies, has actively engaged with the governor's office, and moved the matter to the U.S. federal court where it seems to belong, yet the governor wants the matter heard in a state court. Nevertheless, the federal court did instruct the parties to enter into mediation discussions, which have been ongoing. It should be noted that the governor would not even return calls from Enbridge on the matter prior to the federal court judge's instructions. Although seemingly a productive exercise, the governor has insisted during mediation talks that she would be shutting down Line 5 on May 12, whatever the process, timing or outcome of mediation discussions. This is hardly a productive or a mediatory stance.
Why is the Governor of Michigan taking on this posture, as unreasonable as it seems to a friendly trading partner, international security partner, energy security partner and environmental progress partner for a line that is an energy lifeblood for her state and other neighbouring states, as well as Canada? Ostensibly, for the safety of water in the Great Lakes Basin, they will shut down a pipeline that has never leaked, in which the company operating it is actively going through state regulatory processes to make it even more secure with an underground concrete tunnel.
The outcome of this misguided approach will move that product to trucks, railcars and barges on the Great Lakes. All of those outcomes have larger environmental footprints and greater environmental risks, even to the Great Lakes, than the intrinsically safe pipeline option. By clear analysis, there are other reasons. The governor is a politician, so it must be politics. For whose benefit, we can speculate, but at whose cost it is clear: Those parties dependent upon this energy infrastructure for their livelihood, their jobs, their farms, the goods they produce, and the heat for homes and barns, so that our food supply is safe; and an international trade relationship between two of the world's most friendly trading nations. This is the fallout of what is really at stake.
The economies of our two countries, Canada and the U.S., have prospered over decades, better than economies elsewhere in the developed world because of our strong trade links and the rule of law that governs our institutions, including our trading relationships. The backbone of this mutually beneficial trade relationship is our infrastructure and the fundamentally most important part of that infrastructure is our energy infrastructure. Previous governments, of all stripes in Canada and the U.S., have recognized this importance.
In 1977, our two governments signed the Transit Pipelines Treaty to ensure that the energy transportation and trade between our two nations did not suffer because of political whims or short-term self-interest at the expense of our joint long-term prosperity and security and, yet, here we are. A state government is acting unilaterally, seemingly in direct contravention of our international treaty. It begs the question as to whether there is any meaning behind the words in that treaty or we have a trade partner that recognizes a Canadian government that either does not want to stand up for Canada's energy security or perhaps does not know how. Surely it cannot be because the Government of Canada does not recognize the importance of the infrastructure and the associated energy security.
It follows on our country's disastrous showing in renegotiating the new NAFTA, CUSMA, and a negotiating strategy where Canada did not show up with the real issues to be discussed for our benefit until too late. At one point, we were excluded from the trade discussions because the other parties did not take us seriously. No one was there to solve the emerging issues between our countries. In the end, we ended up with far less in the trade agreement than we had in the previous agreement, and our elected officials were relieved to sign it because it could have been so much worse. A victory is now defined by the current government as doing worse, but not losing completely. The bar is being lowered.
Since then, the U.S. has continued to ignore the trade treaty's terms on steel and aluminum and now is pursuing a buy America policy in which Canada is an outsider. So much for preferential access to our markets. So much for free trade. So much for trade treaties. So much for Canada's standing up for the terms it negotiates in these agreements. The current government will roll over on any trade issue. We need to get serious.
Monsieur le Président, je propose que le premier rapport du Comité spécial sur la relation économique entre le Canada et les États-Unis, présenté le jeudi 15 avril, soit agréé.
Je partagerai mon temps de parole avec le député de Chilliwack—Hope.
Nous sommes aujourd'hui le 10 mai. La gouverneure du Michigan a annoncé que, dans deux jours, soit le 12, elle mettra hors service la canalisation 5, qui fournit 540 000 barils de pétrole par jour aux raffineries de Sarnia, dans le Sud de l'Ontario, et alimente aussi celles du Québec. Seulement en Ontario, ce sont environ 30 000 emplois qui dépendent de cette infrastructure transfrontalière. Aujourd'hui, nous débattons du rapport du Comité spécial sur la relation économique entre le Canada et les États­Unis, dont la Chambre a été saisie le 15 avril. Pas moins de 25 jours se sont écoulés depuis, et le premier ministre n'a pas encore fait mine de s'intéresser à ce dossier.
Dans quelle mesure les besoins en pétrole du Canada seront-ils bouleversés? En fait, 540 000 barils par jour équivalent à environ 25 % de la consommation quotidienne de pétrole du Canada. La pénurie va se faire sentir dans deux provinces, l'Ontario et le Québec, car elle coupera environ de moitié l'approvisionnement en cette matière première énergétique qui est essentielle à la production économique — les produits raffinés servant à la fabrication de produits pétrochimiques, de plastiques et de textiles, et bien d'autres choses encore, qui sont au cœur du secteur manufacturier du Canada —, au chauffage des habitations, au fonctionnement des véhicules et à l'acheminement efficace et rapide de marchandises comme les aliments et les fournitures vers les marchés.
Bref, la fermeture de cette infrastructure aura un effet désastreux pour le Canada. Des dizaines de milliers d'emplois dans la chaîne d'approvisionnement qui alimente l'économie et un secteur manufacturier qui s'est établi grâce à cette infrastructure et qui en dépend; tous attendent, les doigts croisés, l'issue de la situation. On peut dire sans se tromper que la fermeture de cette infrastructure énergétique représente une urgence en matière de sécurité énergétique nationale. La canalisation 5 est pourtant menacée de fermeture depuis le 13 novembre 2020, et nous sommes à deux jours du dénouement. Six mois se sont écoulés. J'ai dit à l'époque que la question devait être résolue rapidement, mais le gouvernement a laissé traîner les choses.
Enbridge, l'une des grandes entreprises du Canada, communique activement avec le bureau de la gouverneure et a soumis le dossier à la Cour fédérale des États-Unis, qui semble être l'entité chargée de ce type de cas. Pourtant, la gouverneure veut que l'affaire soit portée devant un tribunal de l'État. La Cour fédérale a néanmoins statué que les parties devaient entamer des négociations par l'entremise d'un médiateur, et ce processus se poursuit à l'heure actuelle. Il est bon de souligner que la gouverneure ne retournait pas les appels d'Enbridge en lien avec ce dossier avant que le juge de la Cour fédérale ne donne ses instructions. Lors des négociations, bien que ce processus semble productif, la gouverneure a insisté sur le fait qu'elle allait fermer la canalisation 5 le 12 mai, et ce, peu importe la démarche de médiation choisie pour mener les discussions, le moment où elles auront lieu et leur résultat. Il est difficile d'y voir une attitude propice à l'atteinte de résultats ou de compromis.
Pourquoi la gouverneure du Michigan adopte-t-elle une attitude aussi déraisonnable envers un bon partenaire commercial, un partenaire international en matière de sécurité, un partenaire de sécurité énergétique de même qu'un partenaire sur le plan des progrès environnementaux pour une canalisation qui sert de lien énergétique vital pour son État, les États avoisinants et le Canada? Manifestement, pour la sécurité des eaux du bassin des Grands Lacs, elle va fermer un pipeline qui n'a jamais fui et dont l'exploitant respecte rigoureusement les processus réglementaires de l'État afin de le rendre encore plus sécuritaire au moyen d'un tunnel souterrain en béton.
À cause de cette approche malavisée, on en sera réduit à assurer le transport du pétrole par camion, wagon et barge sur les Grands Lacs, toutes des solutions dont l'empreinte et les risques environnementaux sont plus grands, même pour les Grands Lacs, que la solution intrinsèquement sûre du pipeline. Il y a donc d'autres raisons; c'est évident. La gouverneure est une politicienne; il doit donc s'agir de politique. Au bénéfice de qui? On peut faire des hypothèses, mais il est évident que cela se fera au détriment des parties qui dépendent de cette infrastructure énergétique pour leurs subsistances, leurs emplois, leurs fermes, les biens qu'elles produisent et le chauffage dans leurs maisons et leurs granges, et au détriment de liens commerciaux internationaux entre les nations commerçantes les plus amicales au monde. C'est ce qui est réellement en jeu, dans ce dossier.
L'économie du Canada et celle des États-Unis ont prospéré au fil des décennies. Elles ont mieux fait que celle des autres pays développés en raison de la solidité de nos liens commerciaux et de la règle de primauté du droit qui régit nos institutions, notamment nos relations commerciales. L'épine dorsale de ces relations commerciales mutuellement bénéfiques est notre infrastructure et la partie la plus importante de cette infrastructure est, fondamentalement, notre infrastructure énergétique. Les gouvernements canadiens et étatsuniens précédents, toutes allégeances confondues, ont reconnu cela.
En 1977, nos deux gouvernements ont signé l' Accord concernant les pipe-lines de transit afin que le transport et le commerce de l'énergie entre nos deux pays ne souffrent pas de changements d'humeur politique ou d'intérêts personnels à court terme, aux dépens de notre prospérité et de notre sécurité communes à long terme et, pourtant, c'est là où nous en sommes. Le gouvernement d'un État agit unilatéralement, en violation apparente de notre traité international. C'est à se demander si les mots de ce traité ont un sens ou si notre partenaire commercial a compris que le gouvernement canadien ne veut pas défendre la sécurité énergétique du Canada ou, peut-être, ne sait pas comment s'y prendre pour ce faire. La situation ne peut certainement pas s'expliquer par l'incapacité du gouvernement du Canada de reconnaître l'importance de l'infrastructure concernée ni de la sécurité énergétique qui y est associée.
Rappelons que le Canada a vraiment fait piètre figure pendant la négociation du nouvel ALENA, l'Accord Canada-États-Unis-Mexique, alors qu'il a eu pour stratégie d'attendre trop longtemps avant d'aborder les vrais enjeux dont il fallait discuter pour défendre les intérêts du pays. À un certain moment, le Canada a été exclu des discussions commerciales parce que les autres parties ne le prenaient pas au sérieux. Personne n'était sur place pour résoudre les nouvelles questions qui émergeaient. Au final, nous avons obtenu un accord commercial beaucoup moins favorable que le précédent, et nos élus l'ont signé avec soulagement parce qu'il aurait pu être bien pire encore. Le gouvernement actuel considère maintenant comme une victoire le fait de perdre du terrain mais sans perdre complètement. La barre est vraiment basse.
Depuis, les États-Unis continuent de faire fi des dispositions du traité portant sur l'acier et l'aluminium, et ils mettent maintenant de l'avant une politique d'achat de produits américains qui exclut le Canada. L'accès préférentiel aux marchés en prend pour son rhume, tout comme le libre-échange et les traités commerciaux, et le Canada ne lutte pas pour faire respecter les dispositions des traités qu'il a négociés. Le gouvernement actuel s'incline chaque fois. Il faut reprendre les choses en main.
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
View Greg McLean Profile
2021-05-10 15:51 [p.6969]
Madam Speaker, that is a good question. The actual terms of the energy agreement in the former NAFTA was a proportional sharing agreement. It was not an absolute sharing agreement to the highest levels that we provide to the U.S.; it was a proportional sharing agreement so that if in some emergency or international incident we had to cut back one-quarter to the U.S. we would be incumbent to cut back one-quarter of our own supplies, as would the U.S. if we think about the way this product goes across the borders in both its raw and finished states. It is called a treaty for a reason, so that we can get some solidity on our energy security as an economy going forward.
Madame la Présidente, c'est une bonne question. En fait, l'entente sur l'énergie dans l'ancien ALENA prévoyait un partage proportionnel. Il n'était pas question de valeur absolue de la quantité maximale exportée aux États-Unis; il s'agissait d'une entente de partage proportionnel, qui faisait que, advenant une situation d'urgence ou un incident international contraignant le Canada à réduire d'un quart ses exportations aux États-Unis, il aurait dû réduire d'un quart ses propres réserves, et ce serait la même chose pour les États-Unis, si on pense à la façon dont ces produits traversent la frontière, autant sous leur forme brute que sous leurs formes raffinées. Ce n'est pas pour rien qu'on parle d'un traité; l'idée est de consolider la sécurité énergétique du pays en vue de soutenir notre économie dans le futur.
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I will be sharing my time with the member for Mount Royal.
I would like to take some time today to talk about the relationship between Canada and the United States, the trade relationship specifically, because it is germane to the discussion we are having as it relates to understanding what the relationship is like between Canada and the United States and how important it is to both countries.
I will remind members that no two nations are dependent more on each other for their mutual security and prosperity than Canada and the United States. We are stronger together, and as recent history has shown during the COVID-19 pandemic, we can rely on the strength and security of that relationship between Canada and the United States, and the supply chains that exist.
Canada and the U.S. have one of the largest trading relationships in the world, and I will provide a few trade figures that underscore the sheer scale of our cross-border trade.
In 2019, bilateral trade in goods and services totalled $1 trillion. That is more than $2.7 billion in trade every single day. Our level of economic integration is unique. Approximately 76% of Canadian exports to the U.S. are inputs used to make goods in the U.S., and in addition to what we sell to the U.S., contains on average roughly 20% American content. We make things together and value together.
Canada is the number one export market for most U.S. states; 32 in 2019 and 2020 to be more precise. Approximately 75% of Canada's goods export to the U.S. The U.S. is the single greatest investor in Canada. In 2020, the U.S. stock investment in Canada was $457 billion, representing nearly half of all investment in Canada, and Line 5 is part of this relationship.
Our enduring trade relationship, starting with the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement in 1989 and continuing with NAFTA in 1994, has been a model for success in the world. We renewed our commitment to the commercial relationship with the coming into force of the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement, or CUSMA. This new NAFTA addresses modern trade challenges, reduces red tape at the border and provides enhanced predictability and stability for workers and businesses across the integrated North American market. These outcomes strengthen our commercial relationship, promote new opportunities for Canadians and support our collective economic prosperity.
Crucially, the new agreement preserves virtually duty-free trade in North America and ensures continued predictability and secure market access for Canadian exporters to the United States. Under the agreement, Canada and the U.S. offer trade on similar terms, and bilateral trade is generally balanced. These outcomes reinforce integrated North American supply chains and help enhance our competitiveness globally.
Importantly, the new NAFTA also incorporates new and modernized provisions that seek to address 21st century issues, including digital trade, small and medium-sized enterprises, good regulatory practices and binding obligations on labour and environment. The new agreement supports inclusive trade with outcomes that advance interests of importance to gender equality and indigenous peoples.
The U.S. represents an especially attractive market for Canada's under-represented exporters, including women, indigenous and racialized peoples and LGBTQ entrepreneurs. We are pleased to have implemented an agreement that preserves the elements of NAFTA that are most important to Canadians and are fundamental to support cross-border trade and investment, such as the NAFTA chapter 19 binational panel dispute settlement mechanism, the cultural exemption and the provisions on temporary entry for business persons.
Our unique relationship with the United States was recognized in a “Roadmap for a Renewed U.S.-Canada Partnership” announced by the Prime Minister and President Biden on February 23. The two leaders committed to work closely together in many areas, including launching strategies to strengthen that relationship and supply chain security. My colleagues across the government and myself are working with our U.S. counterparts to strengthen and advance our integrated bilateral supply chains in areas critical to growth and seeking other ways to continue to build together.
This collaboration contributes to the North American competitive advantage on the world stage, which, in addition to CUSMA, is bolstered by our integrated energy market, long-standing foreign policy and security co-operation, and is resilient and well-balance in the supply chains. Canada and the U.S. can be competitive internationally with an integrated North American market.
Despite continued collaboration and success, there are always going to be challenges such as those with softwood lumber and what we are seeing today. U.S. duties on Canadian softwood lumber, for example, are unwarranted and unfair. This long-standing trade irritant distracts from the strong commercial relationship with the U.S., hampers current efforts and economic recovery, and harms workers and communities across Canada as well as U.S. consumers and home builders.
Canada remains ready to work together with the United States to find durable, mutually acceptable negotiated outcomes to this dispute. In the meantime, Canada will continue to vigorously pursue its challenges of U.S. duties under NAFTA chapter 19, CUSMA chapter 10, before the WTO.
The COVID-19 pandemic brought into focus the complexity and deep integration of medical supply chains between Canada and the U.S. Our collaboration allows for smooth flow of personal protective equipment across the border and into the hands of health care workers in both countries. It is important to keep our integrated supply chains working and ensure that products can flow across the borders unimpeded.
Canada is a trading nation with the U.S. and is by far the most important export destination. Approximately 80% of new exporters are SMEs that export to a single market, and almost 70% of new exporters choose the U.S. as their first export destination. The U.S. is a proven testing ground for new exporters and established ones piloting a new product or service.
Most Canadian exporters active in overseas markets originally began their exporting journey in the U.S., and the markets remain attractive to new exporters, particularly as the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic both limits international travel and exacerbates the risk of faulty business decision-making in unfamiliar cultural environments.
This is a challenging business environment. Canada's Trade Commissioner Service in the U.S. is continuing to adapt and bring new service offerings to support Canadian companies of all sizes. E-commerce and related technologies are playing a critical role at this time and this will likely accelerate in the coming months. The Trade Commissioner Service is committed to supporting our companies to take advantage of this shift to digital trade by helping more exporters access online e-commerce platforms and helping our digital start-ups access the U.S. and other major players in a global and tangible economy.
To briefly summarize, Canada and the U.S. enjoy one of the most productive, collaborative and mutually beneficial bilateral relationships in the world. The continued safe operation of Line 5 supports this for both nations. Our government is deeply committed to further building on this foundation as we continue to keep our people safe and healthy from the impacts of the global COVID-19 pandemic and work toward our mutual economic recovery and growth.
Monsieur le Président, je partagerai mon temps de parole avec le député de Mont-Royal.
Je souhaite parler un peu aujourd'hui de la relation entre le Canada et les États-Unis, plus précisément de leur relation commerciale, qui est pertinente dans le contexte de notre discussion, puisqu'il est bon de comprendre comment se déroule cette relation et l'importance qu'elle revêt pour nos deux pays.
Je rappelle aux députés qu'il n'y a pas deux pays dans le monde qui dépendent davantage l'un de l'autre, pour leur sécurité et leur prospérité mutuelles, que le Canada et les États-Unis. Nous sommes plus forts ensemble. Comme on a pu le voir depuis le début de la pandémie de COVID-19, nous pouvons compter sur la relation solide et sûre qui unit le Canada et les États-Unis, et sur les chaînes d'approvisionnement en place.
La relation commerciale entre le Canada et les États-Unis est l'une des plus importantes de la planète. Je présenterai quelques chiffres qui illustrent toute l'ampleur de ce commerce transfrontalier.
En 2019, le commerce bilatéral des produits et services totalisait 1 billion de dollars. C'est plus de 2,7 milliards de dollars par jour. L'intégration économique de nos deux pays est sans pareille. Environ 76 % des produits que nous exportons vers les États-Unis servent à fabriquer des biens là-bas, et à peu près 20 % du contenu de ce que nous vendons à nos voisins américains provient de l'autre côté de la frontière. Nous fabriquons des produits ensemble et nous créons des produits à valeur ajoutée ensemble.
Le Canada est le principal marché d'exportation pour la plupart des États américains — 32 pour être exact si l'on se fie aux données de 2019 et de 2020. Approximativement 75 % des exportations canadiennes prennent le chemin des États-Unis. Personne n'investit plus ici que les Américains. En 2020, les Américains ont acheté pour 457 milliards de dollars d'actions d'entreprises au Canada, ce qui représente quasiment la moitié de tous les investissements réalisés en sol canadien, et la canalisation 5 en fait partie.
La relation commerciale durable entre nos deux pays, qui s'est cristallisée pour une première fois en 1989 avec l'Accord de libre-échange entre le Canada et les États-Unis, puis encore en 1994 avec l'ALENA, est un modèle de réussite dans le monde. L'entrée en vigueur de l'Accord Canada—États-Unis—Mexique marque le renouvellement de notre engagement envers cette relation commerciale. Ce nouvel ALENA tient compte des défis modernes du commerce, réduit les formalités administratives à la frontière et procure une prévisibilité et une stabilité accrues pour les travailleurs et les entreprises dans l'ensemble du marché intégré de l'Amérique du Nord. Ces résultats renforcent nos relations commerciales, ouvrent de nouveaux débouchés pour les Canadiens et favorisent notre prospérité économique collective.
Surtout, le nouvel accord préserve un commerce presque entièrement exempt de droits de douane en Amérique du Nord et assure le maintien d'un accès prévisible et sûr au marché américain pour les exportateurs canadiens. Le commerce entre le Canada et les États-Unis s’effectue à des conditions similaires dans le cadre de l’Accord Canada–États-Unis–Mexique, et le commerce bilatéral est généralement équilibré. Ces résultats renforcent les chaînes d'approvisionnement intégrées en Amérique du Nord et contribuent à accroître notre compétitivité à l'échelle mondiale.
Fait important, le nouvel ALENA intègre également des dispositions nouvelles et modernisées en réponse aux enjeux du XXIe siècle, notamment dans les domaines du commerce numérique, des petites et moyennes entreprises, des bonnes pratiques réglementaires et des obligations contraignantes relatives au travail et à l’environnement. Le nouvel accord favorise un commerce inclusif de manière à faire avancer les intérêts d'importance pour l'égalité des genres et les Autochtones.
Les États-Unis représentent un marché particulièrement attrayant pour les exportateurs sous-représentés du Canada, notamment les femmes, les Autochtones, les personnes racialisées et les entrepreneurs LGBTQ. Nous sommes heureux d'avoir mis en œuvre un accord qui préserve les éléments de l'ALENA qui sont de la plus haute importance pour les Canadiens et qui sont fondamentaux pour soutenir le commerce et l'investissement transfrontaliers, tels que le mécanisme de règlement des différends par des groupes spéciaux binationaux, prévu au chapitre 19, l'exception culturelle et les dispositions relatives à l'admission temporaire des gens d'affaires.
Notre relation unique avec les États-Unis a été reconnue dans la « Feuille de route pour un partenariat renouvelé États-Unis—Canada » annoncée par le premier ministre et le président Biden le 23 février. Les deux dirigeants se sont engagés à collaborer étroitement dans de nombreux dossiers, notamment le lancement de stratégies en vue de renforcer cette relation et la sécurité des chaînes d'approvisionnement. Mes collègues ministériels et moi travaillons avec nos homologues américains pour renforcer et faire progresser nos chaînes d'approvisionnement bilatérales intégrées dans des domaines essentiels à la croissance et recherchons d'autres moyens de continuer de bâtir ensemble.
Cette collaboration contribue à l'avantage concurrentiel de l'Amérique du Nord sur la scène internationale, qui est renforcé non seulement par l'ACEUM, mais aussi par l'intégration de notre marché de l'énergie, notre collaboration de longue date en matière de politique étrangère et de sécurité, et nos chaînes d'approvisionnement résilientes et bien équilibrées. Le Canada et les États-Unis peuvent soutenir la concurrence internationale grâce à un marché intégré à l'échelle nord-américaine.
Malgré cette collaboration et cette réussite soutenues, il y aura toujours des différends comme celui qui concerne le bois d'œuvre et les autres défis auxquels nous devons faire face aujourd'hui. Par exemple, les droits que les États-Unis imposent sur le bois d'œuvre canadien sont injustes et injustifiés. Ce différend commercial de longue date détourne l'attention de notre solide relation commerciale avec les États-Unis, freine les efforts de relance économique actuels et cause du tort à des travailleurs et à des collectivités du Canada ainsi qu'aux consommateurs et aux constructeurs d'habitations des États-Unis.
Le Canada est toujours prêt à travailler de concert avec les États-Unis pour négocier une façon durable et mutuellement acceptable de résoudre ce différend. En attendant, le Canada continuera de contester avec vigueur les droits imposés par les États-Unis devant l'OMC, en vertu du chapitre 19 de l'ALENA et du chapitre 10 de l'ACEUM.
La pandémie de COVID-19 a mis en lumière la complexité et l'intégration étroite des chaînes d'approvisionnement médical du Canada et des États-Unis. Notre collaboration permet d'assurer la libre circulation de l'équipement de protection individuelle de part et d'autre de la frontière pour approvisionner les travailleurs de la santé des deux pays. Il est important d'assurer le fonctionnement des chaînes d'approvisionnement pour que les produits puissent circuler librement d'un pays à l'autre sans difficulté.
Le Canada fait beaucoup de commerce avec les États-Unis, un pays qui est de loin notre plus important marché d'exportation. Environ 80 % des nouveaux exportateurs sont des PME qui exportent vers un seul marché et près de 70 % des nouveaux exportateurs choisissent les États-Unis comme première destination à l'exportation. Les États-Unis sont un terrain d'essai éprouvé pour les nouveaux exportateurs et pour les en