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2019-08-21 [p.5749]
— by Ms. Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) — Government responses, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), to the following petitions:
— No. 421-03735 concerning the Republic of Yemen. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-256-01;
2019-07-17 [p.5746]
— by Mr. Sajjan (Minister of National Defence) — Response of the government, pursuant to Standing Order 109, to the 15th Report of the Standing Committee on National Defence, "Canada’s Task Force Mali" (Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-539), presented to the House on Friday, April 5, 2019. — Sessional Paper No. 8512-421-539.
2019-05-27 [p.5334]
Mr. Fuhr (Kelowna—Lake Country), from the Standing Committee on National Defence, presented the 16th Report of the Committee, "Canada’s Role in International Peace Operations and Conflict Resolution". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-566.
Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.
A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 91 to 94, 106 to 110, 132, 133 and 137 to 141) was tabled.
2019-05-13 [p.5291]
— by Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby), one concerning the Republic of Yemen (No. 421-03735).
2019-04-10 [p.5129]
— by Mr. Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York), one concerning refugees (No. 421-03386);
2019-04-05 [p.5080]
Mr. Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore), from the Standing Committee on National Defence, presented the 15th Report of the Committee, "Canada’s Task Force Mali". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-539.
Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.
A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 132 and 133) was tabled.
2018-12-12 [p.4455]
Pursuant to Order made Tuesday, December 11, 2018, the House proceeded to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion of Mr. Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke Centre), seconded by Mr. Ouellette (Winnipeg Centre), — That the House: (a) recognize that Canada has a rich tradition of peacekeeping, peace-making and peacebuilding; (b) recognize that Canada is a world leader in the promotion of human rights and peace, having crafted the wording of the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights, envisioned the creation of the United Nations Department of Peacekeeping Operations, championed the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on their Destruction (the “Ottawa Treaty”) and initiated and led on the Responsibility to Protect doctrine; (c) recognize that the government drafted Article 2 of the North Atlantic Treaty, which calls on member states of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization to contribute to the further development of peaceful international relations, including by seeking to eliminate conflict and promoting conditions of stability and well-being; (d) recognize that harmful practices and social norms, including among women, that uphold gender hierarchies and other intersecting forms of marginalization and exclusion or condone violence are often exacerbated during conflict and that women and men must be equally committed to changing attitudes, behaviours, and roles to support gender equality; (e) acknowledge that overcoming insecurity and achieving sustainable peace are daily concerns for these communities and that women and girls suffer disproportionately in these conflict settings but remain almost entirely excluded from the processes that build peace; (f) recall resolutions adopted by the UN Security Council, notably Resolution 1325 (2000), which reaffirm the important and consequential role in women’s engagement in preventing and resolving conflicts, in peace operations, in humanitarian response, in post-conflict reconstruction, and in counter-terrorism, and countering violent extremism; (g) acknowledge Canada’s own challenges, including gender-based violence and underlying gender inequality and work to develop a framework to implement the Women, Peace and Security agenda domestically; and (h) reaffirm Canada’s commitment to build on our recognized accomplishments and enhance our leadership role in advancing the cause of peace domestically and throughout the world by calling on the government to develop a plan to appoint a Women, Peace and Security Ambassador to: (i) promote research and studies relating to root causes of and preconditions leading to violent conflict and to conflict resolution and prevention, for respect for women’s and girls’ human rights and to conditions conducive to peace, (ii) support the implementation of education, training and counselling in non-violent conflict resolution, (iii) initiate, recommend, coordinate, implement, and promote national policies, projects and programs relating to the reduction and prevention of conflict and empowerment of women and girls and the development and maintenance of conditions conducive to peace, (iv) encourage the development and implementation of gender and peace-based initiatives by governmental and non-governmental entities including engaging with stakeholders, educational institutions and civil society, (v) lead the implementation of the Canadian National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security, (vi) promote gender equality and the integration of gender perspectives into peacebuilding and peacekeeping, (vii) review and assess the Departments' yearly Action Plan reporting. (Private Members' Business M-163)
The question was put on the motion and it was agreed to on the following division:
(Division No. 979 -- Vote no 979) - View vote details.
YEAS: 212, NAYS: 84
2018-12-06 [p.4425]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke Centre), seconded by Mr. Ouellette (Winnipeg Centre), — That the House: (a) recognize that Canada has a rich tradition of peacekeeping, peace-making and peacebuilding; (b) recognize that Canada is a world leader in the promotion of human rights and peace, having crafted the wording of the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights, envisioned the creation of the United Nations Department of Peacekeeping Operations, championed the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on their Destruction (the “Ottawa Treaty”) and initiated and led on the Responsibility to Protect doctrine; (c) recognize that the government drafted Article 2 of the North Atlantic Treaty, which calls on member states of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization to contribute to the further development of peaceful international relations, including by seeking to eliminate conflict and promoting conditions of stability and well-being; (d) recognize that harmful practices and social norms, including among women, that uphold gender hierarchies and other intersecting forms of marginalization and exclusion or condone violence are often exacerbated during conflict and that women and men must be equally committed to changing attitudes, behaviours, and roles to support gender equality; (e) acknowledge that overcoming insecurity and achieving sustainable peace are daily concerns for these communities and that women and girls suffer disproportionately in these conflict settings but remain almost entirely excluded from the processes that build peace; (f) recall resolutions adopted by the UN Security Council, notably Resolution 1325 (2000), which reaffirm the important and consequential role in women’s engagement in preventing and resolving conflicts, in peace operations, in humanitarian response, in post-conflict reconstruction, and in counter-terrorism, and countering violent extremism; (g) acknowledge Canada’s own challenges, including gender-based violence and underlying gender inequality and work to develop a framework to implement the Women, Peace and Security agenda domestically; and (h) reaffirm Canada’s commitment to build on our recognized accomplishments and enhance our leadership role in advancing the cause of peace domestically and throughout the world by calling on the government to develop a plan to appoint a Women, Peace and Security Ambassador to: (i) promote research and studies relating to root causes of and preconditions leading to violent conflict and to conflict resolution and prevention, for respect for women’s and girls’ human rights and to conditions conducive to peace, (ii) support the implementation of education, training and counselling in non-violent conflict resolution, (iii) initiate, recommend, coordinate, implement, and promote national policies, projects and programs relating to the reduction and prevention of conflict and empowerment of women and girls and the development and maintenance of conditions conducive to peace, (iv) encourage the development and implementation of gender and peace-based initiatives by governmental and non-governmental entities including engaging with stakeholders, educational institutions and civil society, (v) lead the implementation of the Canadian National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security, (vi) promote gender equality and the integration of gender perspectives into peacebuilding and peacekeeping, (vii) review and assess the Departments' yearly Action Plan reporting. (Private Members' Business M-163)
The debate continued.
2018-12-06 [p.4426]
The question was put on the motion and, pursuant to Standing Order 93(1), the recorded division was deferred until Wednesday, December 12, 2018, immediately before the time provided for Private Members' Business.
2018-11-29 [p.4371]
Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) laid upon the Table, — Government response, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), to the following petition:
— No. 421-02770 concerning world peace. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-44-03.
2018-10-17 [p.4073]
— by Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands), one concerning world peace (No. 421-02770);
2018-09-20 [p.3985]
Mr. Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke Centre), seconded by Mr. Ouellette (Winnipeg Centre), moved, — That the House: (a) recognize that Canada has a rich tradition of peacekeeping, peace-making and peacebuilding; (b) recognize that Canada is a world leader in the promotion of human rights and peace, having crafted the wording of the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights, envisioned the creation of the United Nations Department of Peacekeeping Operations, championed the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on their Destruction (the “Ottawa Treaty”) and initiated and led on the Responsibility to Protect doctrine; (c) recognize that the government drafted Article 2 of the North Atlantic Treaty, which calls on member states of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization to contribute to the further development of peaceful international relations, including by seeking to eliminate conflict and promoting conditions of stability and well-being; (d) recognize that harmful practices and social norms, including among women, that uphold gender hierarchies and other intersecting forms of marginalization and exclusion or condone violence are often exacerbated during conflict and that women and men must be equally committed to changing attitudes, behaviours, and roles to support gender equality; (e) acknowledge that overcoming insecurity and achieving sustainable peace are daily concerns for these communities and that women and girls suffer disproportionately in these conflict settings but remain almost entirely excluded from the processes that build peace; (f) recall resolutions adopted by the UN Security Council, notably Resolution 1325 (2000), which reaffirm the important and consequential role in women’s engagement in preventing and resolving conflicts, in peace operations, in humanitarian response, in post-conflict reconstruction, and in counter-terrorism, and countering violent extremism; (g) acknowledge Canada’s own challenges, including gender-based violence and underlying gender inequality and work to develop a framework to implement the Women, Peace and Security agenda domestically; and (h) reaffirm Canada’s commitment to build on our recognized accomplishments and enhance our leadership role in advancing the cause of peace domestically and throughout the world by calling on the government to develop a plan to appoint a Women, Peace and Security Ambassador to: (i) promote research and studies relating to root causes of and preconditions leading to violent conflict and to conflict resolution and prevention, for respect for women’s and girls’ human rights and to conditions conducive to peace, (ii) support the implementation of education, training and counselling in non-violent conflict resolution, (iii) initiate, recommend, coordinate, implement, and promote national policies, projects and programs relating to the reduction and prevention of conflict and empowerment of women and girls and the development and maintenance of conditions conducive to peace, (iv) encourage the development and implementation of gender and peace-based initiatives by governmental and non-governmental entities including engaging with stakeholders, educational institutions and civil society, (v) lead the implementation of the Canadian National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security, (vi) promote gender equality and the integration of gender perspectives into peacebuilding and peacekeeping, (vii) review and assess the Departments' yearly Action Plan reporting. (Private Members' Business M-163)
Debate arose thereon.
2018-03-26 [p.3023]
— No. 421-02072 concerning Israel. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-200-02.
2018-02-14 [p.2705]
— by Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie), one concerning Israel (No. 421-02072);
2018-01-29 [p.2583]
— No. 421-01792 concerning world peace. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-44-02;
2017-11-07 [p.2351]
— by Mr. Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay), two concerning nuclear weapons (Nos. 421-01790 and 421-01791) and one concerning world peace (No. 421-01792);
2016-05-31 [p.521]
— No. 421-00192 concerning world peace. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-44-01.
2016-04-19 [p.345]
— by Mr. Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay), one concerning world peace (No. 421-00192) and one concerning assisted suicide (No. 421-00193).
2015-06-17 [p.2811]
Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. Lukiwski (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) laid upon the Table, — Government responses, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), to the following petitions:
— No. 412-5501 concerning world peace. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-412-20-04;
2015-05-04 [p.2463]
— by Mr. Rankin (Victoria), one concerning world peace (No. 412-5501);
2014-11-19 [p.1783]
Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. Obhrai (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and for International Human Rights) laid upon the Table, — Copy of the Exchange of Notes between the Government of Canada and the Multinational Force and Observers constituting an agreement further amending the Agreement on the Participation of Canada in the Sinai Multinational Force and Observers, and Explanatory Memorandum, dated November 12 and 14, 2014. — Sessional Paper No. 8532-412-39.
2014-11-03 [p.1701]
— No. 412-3952 concerning world peace. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-412-20-03;
2014-09-18 [p.1444]
— by Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands), one concerning world peace (No. 412-3952) and one concerning climate change (No. 412-3953).
2013-06-07 [p.3341]
— by Mr. Atamanenko (British Columbia Southern Interior), two concerning world peace (Nos. 411-4099 and 411-4100), two concerning cruelty to animals (Nos. 411-4101 and 411-4102), one concerning genetic engineering (No. 411-4103) and two concerning horse meat (Nos. 411-4104 and 411-4105);
2013-06-05 [p.3306]
— by Mr. Bélanger (Ottawa—Vanier), one concerning world peace (No. 411-4068);
2013-06-03 [p.3257]
— by Mr. McGuinty (Ottawa South), one concerning world peace (No. 411-4019);
2013-05-27 [p.3184]
— by Ms. Boivin (Gatineau), one concerning the Canada Post Corporation (No. 411-3916) and one concerning world peace (No. 411-3917);
2013-01-31 [p.2719]
Mr. Van Loan (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons), seconded by Mr. O'Connor (Minister of State), moved, — That a take-note debate on the subject of the conflict in Mali take place pursuant to Standing Order 53.1 on Tuesday, February 5, 2013.
2013-01-31 [p.2719]
The question was put on the motion and it was agreed to.
2012-05-16 [p.1283]
— No. 411-0797 concerning Canadian foreign policy. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-411-90-01;
2012-04-02 [p.1057]
— by Mr. Hyer (Thunder Bay—Superior North), one concerning Canadian foreign policy (No. 411-0797);
2010-12-06 [p.1002]
Q-478 — Mr. Pearson (London North Centre) — With regard to Canada’s involvement in United Nations' peacekeeping missions: (a) how many Canadian peacekeepers are deployed at present and to what locations; (b) how long have the peacekeepers in (a) been deployed to these areas; and (c) how much money does Canada contribute to United Nations peacekeeping missions? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-403-478.
2010-11-02 [p.851]
— No. 403-0839 concerning world peace. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-403-97-01.
2010-09-29 [p.706]
— by Ms. Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe), one concerning funding aid (No. 403-0838), one concerning world peace (No. 403-0839), one concerning pay equity (No. 403-0840) and one concerning cruelty to animals (No. 403-0841);
2010-09-20 [p.600]
Q-316 — Mr. Rae (Toronto Centre) — With regard to Haiti: (a) how many Canadian peacekeepers are currently serving in Haiti; (b) how many Canadian peacekeepers were serving in Haiti prior to the earthquake on January 12, 2010; (c) how many applications has the government received from Haitians seeking refugee status in Canada since the earthquake on January 12, 2010; (d) how many of the applications in (c) have been approved by the government; (e) how many Haitian children were scheduled to be adopted by Canadians prior to the events of January 12, 2010; and (f) how many Haitian children have been successfully adopted by Canadians since January 12, 2010? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-403-316.
2009-09-14 [p.768]
— by Mr. Cannon (Minister of Foreign Affairs) — Response of the government, pursuant to Standing Order 109, to the Fifth Report of the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development, "Canada and the Crisis in Sri Lanka" (Sessional Paper No. 8510-402-73), presented to the House on Thursday, May 14, 2009. — Sessional Paper No. 8512-402-73.
2009-06-19 [p.520]
— by Mr. Julian (Burnaby—New Westminster), two concerning the fishing industry (Nos. 402-0771 and 402-0772) and two concerning the situation in Sri Lanka (Nos. 402-0773 and 402-0774);
2009-06-19 [p.520]
— by Mrs. Grewal (Fleetwood—Port Kells), one concerning unborn children (No. 402-0812) and one concerning the situation in Sri Lanka (No. 402-0813);
2009-06-17 [p.657]
— Nos. 402-0422, 402-0436, 402-0447 and 402-0454 concerning world peace. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-402-63-01;
2009-06-10 [p.612]
— by Ms. Crowder (Nanaimo—Cowichan), one concerning the situation in Colombia (No. 402-0656), one concerning the situation in Israel (No. 402-0657) and one concerning cruelty to animals (No. 402-0658);
2009-05-14 [p.499]
Mr. Sorenson (Crowfoot), from the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development, presented the Fifth Report of the Committee "Canada and the Crisis in Sri Lanka". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-402-73.
Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.
A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 10 to 18) was tabled.
2009-05-13 [p.487]
— by Mr. Murphy (Charlottetown), one concerning the situation in Sudan (No. 402-0481);
2009-05-08 [p.473]
— by Mr. Rajotte (Edmonton—Leduc), one concerning world peace (No. 402-0454);
2009-05-07 [p.467]
— by Mr. Oliphant (Don Valley West), one concerning world peace (No. 402-0447) and one concerning cruelty to animals (No. 402-0448).
2009-05-06 [p.451]
— No. 402-0276 concerning the situation in Sudan. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-402-5-04.
2009-05-06 [p.454]
— by Ms. Crowder (Nanaimo—Cowichan), one concerning world peace (No. 402-0436) and one concerning transportation (No. 402-0437);
2009-04-01 [p.353]
— by Mr. Cannan (Kelowna—Lake Country), one concerning the situation in Sudan (No. 402-0276);
2009-03-12 [p.243]
— Nos. 402-0010, 402-0046, 402-0047, 402-0074, 402-0075 and 402-0087 concerning the situation in Sri Lanka. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-402-28-01;
2009-03-12 [p.243]
— No. 402-0026 concerning the situation in Sudan. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-402-5-03;
2009-03-09 [p.227]
— Nos. 402-0006, 402-0016 to 402-0018, 402-0033, 402-0057 and 402-0061 concerning the situation in Sudan. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-402-5-02;
2009-02-09 [p.112]
— by Mr. Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke Centre), one concerning the situation in Sudan (No. 402-0057);
2009-02-09 [p.112]
— by Mr. Bains (Mississauga—Brampton South), one concerning the situation in Sudan (No. 402-0061) and one concerning the Canada Post Corporation (No. 402-0062).
2009-02-04 [p.86]
— by Mr. Oliphant (Don Valley West), one concerning the situation in Sri Lanka (No. 402-0046).
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