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2019-08-21 [p.5750]
— No. 421-04110 concerning the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-115-09;
2019-06-17 [p.5655]
Q-2457 — Mr. Doherty (Cariboo—Prince George) — With regard to the caribou recovery agreements negotiated, proposed, or entered into by the government since November 4, 2015, including those currently under negotiation or consultation: (a) for each agreement, has an economic impact study been conducted and, if so, what are the details, including findings of each study; (b) for each agreement, what is the total projected economic impact, broken down by (i) industry (tourism, logging, transportation, etc.), (ii) region or municipality; and (c) what are the details of all organizations consulted in relation to the economic impact of such agreements, including (i) name of organization, (ii) date, (iii) form of consultation? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2457.
2019-06-05 [p.5448]
— by Mr. Anderson (Cypress Hills—Grasslands), two concerning medical assistance in dying (Nos. 421-04107 and 421-04108), one concerning the grain industry (No. 421-04109) and one concerning the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (No. 421-04110);
2019-05-27 [p.5332]
Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) laid upon the Table, — Government responses, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), to the following petitions:
— Nos. 421-03329 and 421-03330 concerning marine transportation. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-92-23;
2019-05-02 [p.5219]
Mr. Easter (Malpeque), from the Standing Committee on Finance, presented the 29th Report of the Committee (Bill S-6, An Act to implement the Convention between Canada and the Republic of Madagascar for the avoidance of double taxation and the prevention of fiscal evasion with respect to taxes on income, without amendment). — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-556.
A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 200 and 205) was tabled.
2019-03-19 [p.4709]
— No. 421-03199 concerning the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-115-07;
2019-02-20 [p.4595]
— by Mrs. Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster), one concerning the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (No. 421-03236);
2019-02-08 [p.4581]
— by Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford), one concerning marine transportation (No. 421-03214) and one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-03215);
2019-02-06 [p.4566]
— by Mrs. Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek), one concerning warships (No. 421-03198) and one concerning the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (No. 421-03199);
2019-01-28 [p.4496]
Pursuant to Standing Order 69(2), on motion of Mr. Morneau (Minister of Finance), seconded by Mr. Lametti (Minister of Justice), Bill S-6, An Act to implement the Convention between Canada and the Republic of Madagascar for the avoidance of double taxation and the prevention of fiscal evasion with respect to taxes on income, was read the first time and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.
2019-01-28 [p.4515]
Q-2109 — Mr. Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner) — With regard to the Safe Third Country Agreement: how many individuals have been exempted from the Safe Third Country Agreement due to the presence of a relative in Canada who crossed the border “irregularly” since January 1, 2016? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2109.
2018-12-10 [p.4440]
— by Mrs. Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster), one concerning the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (No. 421-03070);
2018-11-05 [p.4227]
Q-1891 — Mr. Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley) — With regard to consultations undertaken by Kinder Morgan with Indigenous groups impacted by the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion and given the impending purchase of the pipeline by the government, will the Minister of Natural Resources: (a) table all mutual benefit agreements previously reached between Kinder Morgan and First Nation band councils given that they will soon constitute agreements reached with the Crown; and (b) guarantee that all such agreements established the free, prior and informed consent to the pipeline from each band? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1891.
2018-06-05 [p.3464]
— by Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands), one concerning marine transportation (No. 421-02419) and one concerning navigable waters (No. 421-02420);
2018-06-05 [p.3464]
Pursuant to Standing Order 39(7), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the returns to the following questions made into Orders for Return:
Q-1660 — Ms. Kwan (Vancouver East) — With regard to the Maritime Labour Convention (MLC) (2006), which came into force in August 2013: (a) what is the yearly breakdown of ships docking in Canadian waters, broken down by (i) type of ship, (ii) flag state of the ship; (b) for ships that spend more than 30 days in Canadian waters, (i) how many have conducted labour market impact assessments (LMIA), (ii) how many are known to have avoided conducting an LMIA by exiting and re-entering Canadian waters, (iii) how many Canadian workers are employed on board, (iv) how many temporary foreign workers are employed on board; (c) for ships docking in Canadian waters, how many of these ships were inspected through port state control, broken down by (i) the agency or department that inspected the ships, (ii) the exact nature of the inspection, (iii) the outcome of the inspection, (iv) the consequences applied if inspection results did not comply with international maritime law and national labour conventions, (v) the compliance rates to MLC 2006 and national labour conventions, (vi) the amount of ships that have been found in violation of maritime and labour laws more than once over the past five years; (d) what is the yearly amount of active employees conducting inspections through port-state control, broken down by (i) type of training provided to all inspectors tasked with carrying out inspections through port state control, (ii) length of training provided to all inspectors tasked with carrying out inspections through port state control, (iii) which department they fall under, (iv) department in charge of their training, (v) amount of inspectors hired to inspect ships in Canada outside of port state control, (vi) nature of the inspections they conduct, (vii) organizations or agencies they belong to, (viii) type of training they receive; (e) what are the enforcement mechanisms at the disposition of the government and individual inspectors, including (i) rates at which these enforcement mechanisms are used or applied, (ii) effectiveness in deterring ship owners from breaking the law; (f) what is the comprehensive list of budget measures that pertain to enforcement of maritime law, including (i) those that cater specifically to the employment of temporary foreign workers, (ii) those that cater specifically to the hiring and training of inspectors; (g) what are the organizations that Transport Canada recognizes as being allowed to conduct inspections on ships in Canada, including (i) NGOs, (ii) unions; (h) when employment of temporary foreign workers on ships is known, (i) what is the average wage received daily, (ii) what is the average wage received monthly, (iii) what is the average wage received yearly, (iv) what is the average length of their contract; (i) according to data accumulated from inspections or from other sources, how much is owed to (i) temporary foreign workers, (ii) Canadian workers in unpaid wages for the past five years; (j) according to data accumulated from inspections and from other sources, how many ships that dock in Canadian waters (i) do not feed their workers adequately, (ii) do not pay their workers adequately, (iii) do not provide their workers with adequate safety and security standards in their environment; (k) based on the inspections that are made into working conditions on ships, how many are made (i) based on complaint or call placed by a temporary foreign worker on board, (ii) based on a complaint or call placed by a Canadian worker on board, (iii) routinely; (l) how many lawsuits have been filed by the Seafarers' International Union of Canada against the government over the past twelve years, including (i) the nature of the lawsuit, (ii) the outcome of the lawsuit; (m) how many lawsuits have been filed against the government by any other party over the past twelve years with regards to the treatment of workers on ships; (n) how many of the lawsuits in (l) and (m) separately have led to (i) legislative reform, (ii) investment in enforcement mechanisms, (iii) reform of enforcement mechanisms and in what way; (o) how many of the lawsuits in (l) and (m) separately dealt with a complaint or injustice of the same nature; (p) what are the government’s primary means of implementing MLC 2006; and (q) which department is responsible for infractions of MLC 2006 (i) on Canadian flag ships, (ii) in Canadian waters, (iii) on ships with Canadian workers? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1660.
2018-04-16 [p.3089]
Q-1529 — Mr. Aubin (Trois-Rivières) — With regard to the agreement between Transport Canada and Air Canada on the safety of Air Canada’s entire operations, including its pilot training: (a) what are the details of the agreement; (b) what are the details of the measures taken to date by Air Canada as a result of the agreement; (c) what is Transport Canada’s detailed assessment of the measures taken to date by Air Canada; (d) what did Transport Canada determine was the level of risk of the safety of Air Canada’s entire operations before the agreement was made; (e) what has Transport Canada determined is the level of risk to date, since the agreement was made; (f) what are the issues associated with managing pilot fatigue identified by Transport Canada during its review of Air Canada’s safety management system; (g) how long had Air Canada had its system in place for the safety of its entire operations before reaching the agreement with Transport Canada; (h) what were the reasons for the six-month delay between the first Air Canada incident in July 2017 and when the agreement was reached with Transport Canada, in January 2018; (i) what was the annual failure rate for Pilot Proficiency Checks (PPCs) when Transport Canada inspectors carried out the PPCs for Air Canada pilots between 2005 and 2016; (j) what was the annual failure rate for Pilot Proficiency Checks when industry Approved Check Pilots finished the PPCs for Air Canada pilots between 2005 and 2016; (k) has Transport Canada estimated the savings achieved by Air Canada regarding the safety of its entire operations before the agreement; (l) if the answer to (k) is affirmative, what are the details of the estimate; (m) how many agreements have Transport Canada and Air Canada entered into since 2005 on the safety of its entire operations; (n) what agreements have been made between Transport Canada and other airlines on the safety of their entire operations and all of their pilots; and (o) what are the details of the agreements in (n)? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1529.
2018-04-16 [p.3094]
Q-1542 — Mrs. Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster) — With regard to the Prime Minister’s trip to India in February 2018: (a) what are the titles and summaries of all agreements signed between the Prime Minister and the Government of India on the trip; (b) for each agreement in (a), what is the website address where the text is located; and (c) if the text of any agreement in (a) is not available on the government’s website, how can the public obtain copies of the relevant texts? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1542.
2018-03-29 [p.3059]
Q-1500 — Mr. Nater (Perth—Wellington) — With regard to the agreement announced by the government in September 2016, related to the export of beef to China: (a) what are the terms of the agreement; and (b) is the text of the agreement available to the public and to Canadian beef producers, and, if so, what is the website location of the agreement? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1500.
2018-02-09 [p.2673]
— by Mr. Saini (Kitchener Centre), one concerning human diseases (No. 421-02047);
2018-01-29 [p.2600]
Q-1347 — Mrs. Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville) — With respect to the Immigration Information Sharing Treaty: (a) what departments and agencies send information to the United States; (b) what departments and agencies receive information from the United States; (c) what Memorandums of Understanding or procedures exist to share data received from the United States with other government departments; (d) what are the data retention and deletion policies for information received from the United States; (e) what databases contain information received from the United States; and (f) if a decision has been rendered on a matter requiring the receipt of data from the United States prior to its receipt, how is the data handled? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1347.
2017-11-09 [p.2383]
Q-1199 — Mr. Lobb (Huron—Bruce) — With regard to the legal settlement paid to Omar Khadr: (a) on which date was the settlement between the parties signed; (b) what was the date of the settlement’s payment; (c) what is the average processing time between the settlement and the payment regarding out-of-court settlements paid by the government; (d) were there any orders given to expedite the payment to Omar Khadr; and (e) if the answer to (d) is affirmative, who gave the order? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1199.
2017-09-27 [p.2161]
— by Mr. Bezan (Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman), one concerning Ukraine (No. 421-01679) and one concerning China (No. 421-01680);
2017-06-12 [p.1902]
Pursuant to Order made Thursday, June 8, 2017, the House proceeded to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion of Ms. Laverdière (Laurier—Sainte-Marie), seconded by Ms. Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona), — That the House:
(a) recognize the catastrophic humanitarian consequences that would result from any use of nuclear weapons, and recognize those consequences transcend national borders and pose grave implications for human survival, the environment, socioeconomic development, the global economy, food security, and for the health of future generations;
(b) reaffirm the need to make every effort to ensure that nuclear weapons are never used again, under any circumstances;
(c) recall the unanimous vote in both Houses of Parliament in 2010 that called on Canada to participate in negotiations for a nuclear weapons convention;
(d) reaffirm its support for the 2008 five-point proposal on nuclear disarmament of the former Secretary-General of the United Nations;
(e) express disappointment in Canada’s vote against, and absence from, initial rounds of negotiations for a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons; and
(f) call upon the government to support the Draft Convention on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, released on May 22, 2017, and to commit to attend, in good faith, future meetings of the United Nations conference to negotiate a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination.
The question was put on the motion and it was negatived on the following division:
(Division No. 313 -- Vote no 313) - View vote details.
YEAS: 44, NAYS: 245
2017-06-08 [p.1886]
By unanimous consent, it was ordered, — That, at the conclusion of today's debate on the opposition motion in the name of the Member for Laurier—Sainte-Marie, all questions necessary to dispose of the motion be deemed put and a recorded division deemed requested and deferred until Monday, June 12, 2017, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions.
2017-06-08 [p.1887]
The Order was read for the consideration of the Business of Supply.
Ms. Laverdière (Laurier—Sainte-Marie), seconded by Ms. Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona), moved, — That the House:
(a) recognize the catastrophic humanitarian consequences that would result from any use of nuclear weapons, and recognize those consequences transcend national borders and pose grave implications for human survival, the environment, socioeconomic development, the global economy, food security, and for the health of future generations;
(b) reaffirm the need to make every effort to ensure that nuclear weapons are never used again, under any circumstances;
(c) recall the unanimous vote in both Houses of Parliament in 2010 that called on Canada to participate in negotiations for a nuclear weapons convention;
(d) reaffirm its support for the 2008 five-point proposal on nuclear disarmament of the former Secretary-General of the United Nations;
(e) express disappointment in Canada’s vote against, and absence from, initial rounds of negotiations for a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons; and
(f) call upon the government to support the Draft Convention on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, released on May 22, 2017, and to commit to attend, in good faith, future meetings of the United Nations conference to negotiate a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination.
Debate arose thereon.
2017-06-08 [p.1891]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Ms. Laverdière (Laurier—Sainte-Marie), seconded by Ms. Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona), in relation to the Business of Supply.
The debate continued.
2017-06-08 [p.1891]
Pursuant to Order made earlier today, the question was deemed put on the motion and the recorded division was deemed requested and deferred until Monday, June 12, 2017, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions.
2017-06-06 [p.1864]
Pursuant to Standing Order 57, Ms. Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons), seconded by Ms. McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change), moved, — That, in relation to the consideration of Government Business No. 15, the debate not be further adjourned.
Pursuant to Standing Order 67.1, the House proceeded to the question period regarding the moving of the closure motion.
2017-06-06 [p.1865]
Pursuant to Standing Order 67.1, the House resumed the question period regarding the moving of the closure motion in relation to Government Business No. 15.
2017-06-06 [p.1865]
The question was put on the motion and it was agreed to on the following division:
(Division No. 305 -- Vote no 305) - View vote details.
YEAS: 161, NAYS: 123
2017-06-06 [p.1867]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Ms. Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons), seconded by Ms. Qualtrough (Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities), — That, in the opinion of the House, climate change is a global problem that requires a global solution; and that, despite the withdrawal of the United States from the Paris Agreement, Canada remain committed to the implementation of the Agreement, as it is in the best interest of all Canadians; (Government Business No. 15)
And of the amendment of Mr. Poilievre (Carleton), seconded by Mr. Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock), — That the motion be amended by adding the following:
“in particular, the interest of taking a realistic and achievable approach, as the previous government did, and finding the appropriate balance between protecting the environment and growing the economy in a way that does not increase the overall tax burden on Canadians”;
And of the subamendment of Mr. Choquette (Drummond), seconded by Ms. Boutin-Sweet (Hochelaga), — That the amendment be amended by deleting all the words after the words “realistic and achievable approach,” and substituting the following:
“and finding the appropriate balance between protecting the environment and growing the economy and that the House therefore call on the government to commit to new science-based targets that deliver on Canada’s undertakings from the Agreement, and to specific measures and investments to achieve those greenhouse gas reductions”.
The debate continued.
2017-06-06 [p.1867]
The question was put on the subamendment and it was negatived on the following division:
(Division No. 306 -- Vote no 306) - View vote details.
YEAS: 45, NAYS: 235
2017-06-06 [p.1869]
The question was put on the amendment and it was negatived on the following division:
(Division No. 307 -- Vote no 307) - View vote details.
YEAS: 75, NAYS: 207
2017-06-06 [p.1870]
The question was put on the main motion and it was agreed to on the following division:
(Division No. 308 -- Vote no 308) - View vote details.
YEAS: 277, NAYS: 1
2017-06-05 [p.1825]
Ms. Monsef (Minister of Status of Women) for Ms. Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons), seconded by Ms. Qualtrough (Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities), moved, — That, in the opinion of the House, climate change is a global problem that requires a global solution; and that, despite the withdrawal of the United States from the Paris Agreement, Canada remain committed to the implementation of the Agreement, as it is in the best interest of all Canadians. (Government Business No. 15)
Debate arose thereon.
2017-06-05 [p.1825]
Mr. Poilievre (Carleton), seconded by Mr. Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock), moved the following amendment, — That the motion be amended by adding the following:
“in particular, the interest of taking a realistic and achievable approach, as the previous government did, and finding the appropriate balance between protecting the environment and growing the economy in a way that does not increase the overall tax burden on Canadians”.
Debate arose thereon.
2017-06-05 [p.1837]
Ms. Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) gave notice of intention to move at the next sitting of the House, pursuant to Standing Order 57, that, in relation to the consideration of Government Business No. 15, the debate not be further adjourned.
2017-04-03 [p.1551]
Q-853 — Mrs. McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo) — With regard to Canada’s Indigenous peoples: how many Memorandum of Understanding agreements did the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs sign with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit peoples between November 4, 2015, and February 9, 2017, broken down by (i) name of group, (ii) location of official signing ceremony, (iii) date of official signing ceremony? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-853.
2017-02-07 [p.1309]
Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. Leslie (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs (Canada-U.S. Relations)) laid upon the Table, — Copy of the Strategic Partnership Agreement between Canada, on the one part, and the European Union and its Member States, of the other part, and Explanatory Memorandum, dated October 30, 2016. — Sessional Paper No. 8532-421-28.
2017-01-30 [p.1265]
Q-773 — Mr. Carrie (Oshawa) — With regard to the visit to Ottawa of Joe Biden, Vice-President of the United States, from December 8 to December 9, 2016: (a) what is the list of agreements signed during the visit; and (b) what are the details of each agreement in (a), including the (i) title, (ii) summary (iii) signatories, (iv) content of the text of the agreement or the website address where it can be found? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-773.
2016-12-07 [p.1165]
Pursuant to Standing Order 69(2), on motion of Ms. Bibeau (Minister of International Development and La Francophonie) for Mr. Morneau (Minister of Finance), seconded by Mr. Carr (Minister of Natural Resources), Bill S-4, An Act to implement a Convention and an Arrangement for the avoidance of double taxation and the prevention of fiscal evasion with respect to taxes on income and to amend an Act in respect of a similar Agreement, was read the first time and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.
2016-12-07 [p.1166]
Q-573 — Mr. Dreeshen (Red Deer—Mountain View) — With regard to contracts under $10 000 granted by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, since November 4, 2015: what are the (i) vendors' names, (ii) contracts' reference and file numbers, (iii) dates of the contracts, (iv) descriptions of the services provided, (v) delivery dates, (vi) original contracts' values, (vii) final contracts' values, if different from the original contracts' values? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-573.
2016-12-02 [p.1132]
Pursuant to Standing Order 39(7), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the returns to the following questions made into Orders for Return:
Q-547 — Mr. Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock) — With regard to a possible extradition treaty with China: (a) how many individuals presently residing or located in Canada are currently wanted for arrest in China, or if firm statistics are not available, how many Chinese arrest warrants issued for Canadian residents is Global Affairs Canada aware of; (b) what is the Prime Minister's official position with regard to the possibility of an extradition treaty with China or with the negotiation of such a treaty; and (c) what is the Minister of Foreign Affairs' official position with regard to the possibility of an extradition treaty with China or with the negotiation of such a treaty? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-547.
2016-11-02 [p.952]
Q-355 — Mr. Kelly (Calgary Rocky Ridge) — With respect to Shared Services Canada and the independent review recently ordered by the President of the Treasury Board: (a) what criteria will be used to select the independent contractor or contractors performing the review; (b) which factors were assessed in estimating the cost of the review at $1.4 million; (c) what measures will be in place to ensure that the review is conducted on time and on budget; (d) should the review not be delivered on time and on budget, how does the Treasury Board plan to address this problem; (e) which factors were assessed in estimating the time that the review will take to execute; (f) what are the terms of reference for the review; (g) once the review is completed, when will the resulting report be made public; and (h) what security screening measures will be used to ensure the trustworthiness of the independent contractor or contractors selected for the review? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-355.
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