Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 6 of 6
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2018-06-18 19:20 [p.21189]
Mr. Speaker, I appreciate that the hon. member for Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis has perhaps a more nostalgic and certainly more favourable view of what took place in the 41st Parliament, but I put it to him that my experience in studying BillC-51 convinced me that it made us much less safe. I will give an example and hope my hon. colleague can comment on it.
Far from creating silos, Bill C-59 would help us by creating the security and intelligence review agency because, in the words of former chief justice John Major who chaired the Air India inquiry, we have had no pinnacle review, no oversight over all the actions of all the agencies. This is a real-life example. When Jeffrey Delisle was stealing secrets from the Canadian navy, CSIS knew about it. CSIS knew all about it, but it decided not to tell the RCMP. The RCMP acted when it got a tip from the FBI. We know that in the Air India disaster, various agencies of the Government of Canada—CSIS knew things as did the RCMP—did not talk to each other. The information sharing sections to which the member refers have nothing to do with government agencies sharing the information they have about a threat. They have to do it by sharing personal information of Canadians, such as what occurred to Maher Arar.
To the member's last comment that nothing has gone wrong since BillC-51, my comment is: how would we know? Everything is secret. Rights could have been infringed. No special advocate was in the room. We have no idea what happened to infringe rights during Bill C-51's reign.
Monsieur le Président, je comprends que le député de Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis a peut-être un point de vue plus nostalgique et certainement plus favorable sur ce qui s’est passé au cours de la 41e législature, mais je lui dirai que l’étude du projet de loi C-51 m’a convaincue qu’il contribuait en fait à réduire la sécurité. Je vais donner un exemple et j’espère que le député pourra nous faire part de ses commentaires.
Loin de créer des cloisonnements, le projet de loi  C-59 nous aiderait en créant l’Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement, parce que, pour citer l’ex-juge en chef John Major, qui a présidé l’enquête sur la tragédie d'Air India, nous n’avons eu ni examen ni surveillance au sommet de l’ensemble des actions de l’ensemble des organismes. Voici un exemple concret: quand Jeffrey Delisle dérobait des secrets à la Marine canadienne, le SCRS le savait. Le SCRS savait tout, mais a décidé de ne rien dire à la GRC. La GRC a agi lorsqu’elle a eu un tuyau du FBI. Nous savons qu’en ce qui concerne l’attentat d’Air India, divers organismes du gouvernement du Canada — le SCRS savait des choses, tout comme la GRC — ne se sont pas parlé. Les articles sur la mise en commun de l’information que le député mentionne n’ont rien à voir avec la mise en commun par les organismes gouvernementaux de l’information dont ils disposent à propos des menaces. Elles concernent la mise en commun des renseignements personnels des Canadiens, comme dans le cas de Maher Arar.
Pour ce qui est de ce que le député a dit en dernier, à savoir qu'il n'y a eu aucun problème depuis l'adoption du projet de loi C-51, je réponds: comment peut-il le savoir? Tout est secret. Des droits pourraient avoir été violés. Il n'y avait pas d'avocat spécial dans la pièce. Nous ne savons pas quelles sortes d'atteintes aux droits ont pu survenir sous le projet de loi C-51.
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
Madam Speaker, I rise tonight to speak against Bill C-59 at third reading. Unfortunately, it is yet another example of the Liberals breaking an election promise, only this time it is disguised as promise keeping.
In the climate of fear after the attacks on Parliament Hill and in St. Jean in 2014, the Conservative government brought forward BillC-51. I heard a speech a little earlier from the member for Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, and he remembers things slightly different than I. The difference is that I was in the public safety committee and he, as the minister, was not there. He said that there was a great clamour for new laws to meet this challenge of terrorism. I certainly did not hear that in committee. What I heard repeatedly from law enforcement and security officials coming before us was that they had not been given enough resources to do the basic enforcement work they needed to do to keep Canadians safe from terrorism.
However, when the Conservatives finally managed to pass their Anti-terrorism Act, they somehow managed to infringe our civil liberties without making us any safer.
At that time, the New Democrats remained firm in our conviction that it would be a mistake to sacrifice our freedoms in the name of defending them. BillC-51 was supported by the Liberals, who hedged their bets with a promise to fix what they called “its problematic elements” later if they were elected. Once they were elected in 2015, that determination to fix Bill C-51 seemed to wane. That is why in September of 2016, I introduced BillC-303, a private member's bill to repeal Bill C-51 in its entirety.
Some in the House at that time questioned why I introduced a private member's bill since I knew it would not come forward for a vote. In fact, this was an attempt to get the debate started, as the Liberals had already kept the public waiting for a year at that point. The New Democrats were saying, “You promised a bill. Well, here's our bill. It's very simple. Repeal all of C-51.”
Now, after more than two years and extensive consultations, we have this version of Bill C-59 before us, which does not repeal BillC-51 and fails to fix most of the major problems of Bill C-51, it actually introduces new threats to our privacy and rights.
Let me start with the things that were described, even by the Liberals, as problematic, and remain unfixed in Bill C-59 as it stands before us.
First, there is the definition of “national security” in the Anti-terrorism Act that remains all too broad, despite some improvements in Bill C-59. Bill C-59 does narrow the definition of criminal terrorism speech, which BillC-51 defined as “knowingly advocates or promotes the commission of terrorism offences in general”. That is a problematic definition. Bill C-59 changes the Criminal Code wording to “counsels another person to commit a terrorism offence”. Certainly, that better captures the problem we are trying to get at in the Criminal Code. There is plenty of existing case law around what qualifies as counselling someone to commit an offence. Therefore, that is much better than it was.
Then the government went on to add a clause that purports to protect advocacy and protest from being captured in the Anti-terrorism Act. However, that statement is qualified with an addition that says it will be protected unless the dissent and advocacy are carried out in conjunction with activities that undermine the security of Canada. It completes the circle. It takes us right back to that general definition.
The only broad definition of national security specifically in BillC-51 included threats to critical infrastructure. Therefore, this still raises the spectre of the current government or any other government using national security powers against protesters against things like the pipeline formerly known as Kinder Morgan.
The second problem Bill C-59 fails to fix is that of the broad data collection information sharing authorized by BillC-51, and in fact maintained in Bill C-59. This continues to threaten Canadians' basic privacy rights. Information and privacy commissioners continue to point out that the basis of our privacy law is that information can only be used for the purposes for which it is collected. Bill C-51 and Bill C-59 drive a big wedge in that important protection of our privacy rights.
Bill C-51 allowed sharing information between agencies and with foreign governments about national security under this new broad definition which I just talked about. Therefore, it is not just about terrorism and violence, but a much broader range of things the government could collect and share information on. Most critics would say Bill C-59, while it has tweaked these provisions, has not actually fixed them, and changing the terminology from “information sharing” to “information disclosure” is more akin to a sleight of hand than an actual reform of its provisions.
The third problem that remains are those powers that BillC-51 granted to CSIS to act in secret to counter threats. This new proactive power granted to CSIS by Bill C-51 is especially troubling precisely because CSIS activities are secret and sometimes include the right to break the law. Once again, what we have done is returned to the very origins of CSIS. In other words, when the RCMP was both the investigatory and the enforcement agency, we ran into problems in the area of national security, so CSIS was created. Therefore, what we have done is return right back to that problematic situation of the 1970s, only this time it is CSIS that will be doing the investigating and then actively or proactively countering those threats. We have recreated a problem that CSIS was supposed to solve.
Bill C-59 also maintains the overly narrow list of prohibitions that are placed on those CSIS activities. CSIS can do pretty much anything short of committing bodily harm, murder, or the perversion of the course of democracy or justice. However, it is still problematic that neither justice nor democracy are actually defined in the act. Therefore, this would give CSIS powers that I would argue are fundamentally incompatible with a free and democratic society.
The Liberal change would require that those activities must be consistent with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. That sounds good on its face, except that these activities are exempt from scrutiny because they are secret. Who decides whether they might potentially violate the charter of rights? It is not a judge, because this is not oversight. There is no oversight here. This is the government deciding whether it should go to the judge and request oversight. Therefore, if the government does not think it is a violation of the charter of rights, it goes ahead and authorizes the CSIS activities. Again, this is a fundamental problem in a democracy.
The fourth problem is that Bill C-59 still fails to include an absolute prohibition on the use of information derived from torture. The member for Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan made some eloquent statements on this with which I agree. What we have is the government saying that now it has included a cabinet directive on torture in Bill C-59, which gives the cabinet directive to force of law. The cabinet directive already has the force of law, so it absolutely changes nothing about this.
However, even worse, there is no absolute prohibition in that cabinet directive on the use of torture-implicated information. Instead, the prohibition says that information from torture can be used in some circumstances, and then it sets a very low threshold for when we can actually use information derived from fundamental rights violations. Not only is this morally repugnant, most likely unconstitutional, but it also gives us information that is notoriously unreliable. People who are being tortured will say precisely what they think the torturer wants them to say to stop the torture.
Finally, Bill C-59 would not do one of the things it could have done, and that is create a review agency for the CBSA. The CBSA remains without an independent review and complaints mechanism. It is one of our only law enforcement or security agencies that has no direct review agency. Yes, the new national security intelligence review agency will have some responsibility over the CBSA, but only in terms of national security questions, not in terms of its basic day-to-day operations.
We have seen quite often that the activities carried out by border agencies have a major impact on fundamental rights of people. We can look at the United States right now and see what its border agency is doing in the separation of parents and children. Therefore, it is a concern that there is no place in Canada, if we have a complaint about what CBSA has done, to file that complaint except in a court of law, which requires information, resources, and all kinds of other things that are unlikely to be available to those people who need to make those complaints.
The Liberals will tell us that there are some areas where they have already acted outside of Bill C-59, and we have just heard the member for Winnipeg North talk about BillC-22, which established the national security review committee of parliamentarians.
The New Democrats feel that this is a worthwhile first step toward fixing some of the long-standing weaknesses in our national security arrangements, but it is still only a review agency, still only an agency making recommendations. It is not an oversight agency that makes decisions in real time about what can be done and make binding orders about what changes have to be made.
The government rejected New Democrat amendments on the bill, amendments which would have allowed the committee to be more independent from the government. It would have allowed it to be more transparent in its public reporting and would have given it better integration with existing review bodies.
The other area the Liberals claim they have already acted on is the no-fly list. It was interesting that the minister today in his speech, opening the third reading debate, claimed that the government was on its way to fixing the no-fly list, not that it had actually fixed the no-fly list. Canada still lacks an effective redress system for travellers unintentionally flagged on the no-fly list. I have quite often heard members on the government side say that no one is denied boarding as a result of this. I could give them the names of people who have been denied boarding. It has disrupted their business activities. It has disrupted things like family reunions. All too often we end up with kids on the no-fly list. Their names happen to be Muslim-sounding or Arabic-sounding or whatever presumptions people make and they names happen to be somewhat like someone else already on the list.
The group of no-fly list kids' parents have been demanding that we get some effective measures in place right away to stop the constant harassment they face for no reason at all. The fact that we still have not fixed this problem raises real questions about charter right guarantees of equality, which are supposed to be protected by law in our country.
Not only does Bill C-59 fail to correct the problems in BillC-51, it goes on to create two new threats to fundamental rights and freedoms of Canadians, once again, without any evidence that these measures will make it safer.
Bill C-59 proposes to immediately expand the Communications Security Establishment Canada's mandate beyond just information gathering, and it creates an opportunity for CSE to collect information on Canadians which would normally be prohibited.
Just like we are giving CSIS the ability to not just collect information but to respond to threats, now we are saying that the Communications Security Establishment Canada should not just collect information, but it should be able to conduct what the government calls defensive cyber operations and active cyber operations.
Bill C-59 provides an overly broad list of purposes and targets for these active cyber operations. It says that activities could be carried out to “degrade, disrupt, influence, respond to or interfere with the capabilities, intentions or activities of a foreign individual, state, organization or terrorist group as they relate to international affairs, defence or security.” Imagine anything that is not covered there. That is about as broad as the provision could be written.
CSE would also be allowed to do “anything that is reasonably necessary to maintain the covert nature of the activity.” Let us think about that when it comes to oversight and review of its activities. In my mind that is an invitation for it to obscure or withhold information from review agencies.
These new CSE powers are being expanded without adequate oversight. Once again, there is no independent oversight, only “after the fact” review. To proceed in this case, it does not require a warrant from a court, but only permission from the Minister of National Defence, if the activities are to be domestic based, or from the Minister of Foreign Affairs, if the activities are to be conducted abroad.
These new, active, proactive measures to combat a whole list and series of threats is one problem. The other is while Bill C-59 says that there is a still a prohibition on the Canadian Security Establishment collecting information on Canadians, we should allow for what it calls “incidental” acquisition of information relating to Canadians or persons in Canada. This means that in situations where the information was not deliberately sought, a person's private data could still be captured by CSE and retained and used. The problem remains that this incidental collecting, which is called research by the government and mass surveillance by its critics, remains very much a part of Bill C-59.
Both of these new powers are a bit disturbing, when the Liberal promise was to fix the problematic provisions in BillC-51, not add to them. The changes introduced for Bill C-51 in itself are minor. The member for Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan talked about the changes not being particularly effective. I have to agree with him. I do not think they were designed to be effective. They are unlikely to head off the constitutional challenges to Bill C-51 already in place by organizations such as the Canadian Civil Liberties Association. Those constitutional challenges will proceed, and I believe that they will succeed.
What works best in terrorism cases? Again, when I was the New Democrats' public safety critic sitting on the public safety committee when BillC-51 had its hearings, we heard literally dozens and dozens of witnesses who almost all said the same thing: it is old-fashioned police work on the front line that solves or prevents terrorism. For that, we need resources, and we need to focus the resources on enforcement activities at the front end.
What did we see from the Conservatives when they were in power? There were actual cutbacks in the budgets of the RCMP, the CBSA, and CSIS. The whole time they were in power and they were worried about terrorism, they were denying the basic resources that were needed.
What have the Liberals done since they came back to power? They have actually added some resources to all of those agencies, but not for the terrorism investigation and enforcement activities. They have added them for all kinds of other things they are interested in but not the areas that would actually make a difference.
We have heard quite often in this House, and we have heard some of it again in this debate, that what we are talking about is the need to balance or trade off rights against security. New Democrats have argued very consistently, in the previous Parliament and in this Parliament, that there is no need to trade our rights for security. The need to balance is a false need. Why would we give up our rights and argue that in doing so, we are actually protecting them? This is not logical. In fact, it is the responsibility of our government to provide both protection of our fundamental rights and protection against threats.
The Liberals again will tell us that the promise is kept. What I am here to tell members is that I do not see it in this bill. I see a lot of attempts to confuse and hide what they are really doing, which is to hide the fundamental support they still have for what was the essence of BillC-51. That was to restrict the rights and freedoms of Canadians in the name of national security. The New Democrats reject that false game. Therefore, we will be voting against this bill at third reading.
Madame la Présidente, je prends la parole ce soir contre le projet de loi  C-59 à l'étape de la troisième lecture. Malheureusement, nous avons là un autre exemple de promesse électorale des libéraux qui n'est pas tenue, sauf que, cette fois-ci, il font passer cela pour une promesse tenue.
Dans le climat de peur qui a suivi les attentats sur la Colline du Parlement et à Saint-Jean, en 2014, le gouvernement conservateur a présenté le projet de loi C-51. J'ai entendu une allocution un peu plus tôt du député de Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, et il me semble que ses souvenirs sont légèrement différents des miens. La différence vient du fait que je siégeais au comité de la sécurité publique et lui, qui était ministre, n'y siégeait pas. Il a dit qu'on réclamait à grands cris de nouvelles mesures législatives pour faire face au terrorisme. Je n'ai certainement pas entendu cela au comité. Ce que j'ai entendu à maintes reprises des policiers et des responsables de la sécurité qui ont comparu devant nous, c'est qu'on ne leur avait pas donné suffisamment de ressources pour s'acquitter du travail de base qu'ils devaient faire pour garder les Canadiens à l'abri du terrorisme.
Toutefois, lorsque les conservateurs ont réussi à faire adopter leur loi antiterrorisme, ils ont réussi, d'une certaine façon, à empiéter sur nos libertés civiles sans accroître notre sécurité pour autant.
À l'époque, les néo-démocrates ont toujours maintenu que ce serait une erreur de sacrifier nos libertés au nom de la défense de celles-ci. Les libéraux ont appuyé le projet de loi C-51, et ils se sont couverts avec la promesse de corriger plus tard — une fois qu'ils seraient élus — ce qu'ils ont appelé « ses éléments problématiques ». Une fois élus, en 2015, leur détermination à corriger le projet de loi C-51 est vraisemblablement disparue. C'est pourquoi, en septembre 2016, j'ai présenté le projet de loi C-303, un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire visant à abroger entièrement le projet de loi C-51.
À l'époque, certains députés ont remis en question mon idée de présenter un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire, puisque je savais qu'il ne serait jamais soumis à un vote. En réalité, c'était une tentative de faire entamer le débat, puisque cela faisait déjà une année que les libéraux faisaient attendre le public à ce sujet. C'était une façon, pour les néo-démocrates, de dire: « Vous avez promis un projet de loi. Eh bien, voici le nôtre. C'est très simple: il faut abroger le projet de loi C-51. »
Maintenant, après deux ans et de longues consultations, nous voici, saisis de cette version du projet de loi  C-59, qui n'abroge pas le projet de loi C-51 et qui ne corrige pas la majorité des problèmes que présente ce dernier. En fait, il introduit de nouvelles menaces à notre vie privée et à nos droits.
Je commencerai par les aspects que même les libéraux ont décrits comme étant problématiques, et qui demeurent non corrigés dans le projet de loi  C-59 actuel.
Premièrement, la définition de « sécurité nationale » qui figure dans la Loi antiterroriste reste trop vague, malgré quelques améliorations apportées dans le projet de loi  C-59, qui resserre la définition de discours lié au terrorisme. Le projet de loi C-51 la définissait comme toute personne qui « préconise ou fomente la perpétration d’infraction de terrorisme en général ». Cette définition pose problème. Le projet de loi  C-59 modifie le libellé du Code criminel en ces termes: « conseille à une autre personne de commettre une infraction de terrorisme ». Ce libellé cerne mieux le problème à régler en vertu du Code criminel. La jurisprudence entourant ce qui constitue « conseiller quelqu’un à commettre une infraction » est abondante. En conséquence, la nouvelle définition est bien meilleure que l’ancienne.
Le gouvernement ajoute ensuite un article censé exclure de la Loi antiterroriste les activités de défense d’une cause et de manifestation d’un désaccord. Toutefois, cet article est assorti d'une déclaration d’une réserve selon laquelle les activités de défense d’une cause ou de manifestation d’un désaccord ne doivent avoir aucun lien avec une activité portant atteinte à la sécurité du Canada. La boucle est bouclée et cela nous ramène directement à la définition générale.
La seule définition globale de sécurité nationale qui figure dans le projet de loi C-51 comprend les menaces aux infrastructures essentielles. Cela soulève le spectre que le gouvernement actuel ou un gouvernement à venir se serve de ses pouvoirs relatifs à la sécurité nationale contre des gens qui manifestent par exemple contre le pipeline anciennement appelé Kinder Morgan.
Le deuxième problème que le projet de loi  C-59 ne corrige pas est la vaste autorisation à communiquer les données recueillies qui se trouvait dans le projet de loi C-51 et qui est maintenue dans le projet de loi  C-59. Cela perpétue la menace au droit fondamental des Canadiens à la vie privée. Les commissaires à l'information et à la protection de la vie privée continuent de signaler que le principe de base de notre Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels est que l'information peut uniquement être utilisée aux fins pour lesquelles elle est recueillie. Or, les projets de loi C-51 et C-59 créent une grosse brèche dans cette importante protection de notre droit à la vie privée.
Le projet de loi C-51 autorisait la communication, entre les organismes ainsi qu'à des gouvernements étrangers, de renseignements concernant la sécurité nationale, au sens large de la nouvelle définition dont je viens de parler. Par conséquent, ces renseignements ne portent pas seulement sur le terrorisme et la violence, mais sur un éventail beaucoup plus large de sujets à propos desquels le gouvernement pourrait recueillir de l'information et la communiquer. La plupart des détracteurs du projet de loi  C-59 diraient que, bien que ce dernier modifie les dispositions à ce sujet, il ne les corrige pas, et changer la terminologie anglaise d'« information sharing » à « information disclosure » tient davantage d'un tour de passe-passe que d'une véritable réforme des dispositions de la loi.
Le troisième problème qui reste non résolu est celui des pouvoirs que le projet de loi C-51 a accordé au SCRS et qui lui permettent d'agir en secret pour contrer les menaces. Le nouveau pouvoir proactif accordé au SCRS par le projet de loi C-51 est particulièrement inquiétant précisément parce que les activités du SCRS sont secrètes et qu'il a parfois le droit d'enfreindre la loi. Encore une fois, nous en sommes revenus aux origines du SCRS. Autrement dit, quand la GRC était l'organisme d'enquête et d'application, cela posait des problèmes de sécurité nationale. C'est pourquoi le SCRS a été créé. Ainsi, nous nous retrouvons face à la même situation problématique que dans les années 1970, seulement cette fois-ci, c'est le SCRS qui va faire enquête, pour ensuite contrer les menaces de façon active ou proactive. Nous avons recréé un problème que le SCRS devait régler.
Le projet de loi  C-59 conserve également la liste bien trop étroite d'interdictions qui sont imposées sur les activités du SCRS. Le SCRS peut pratiquement tout faire sauf causer des blessures, commettre un meurtre ou nuire à la démocratie ou à la justice. Toutefois, il est toujours problématique que ni la justice ni la démocratie ne soient définies dans la loi. Ainsi, le projet de loi accorderait au SCRS des pouvoirs qui, selon moi, sont fondamentalement incompatibles avec une société libre et démocratique.
Les activités du SCRS devront encore être conformes à la Charte des droits et libertés. À première vue, cela semble bien, sauf que ces activités étant secrètes, il sera impossible de les passer au crible. Qui déterminera si elles violent la Charte? Pas un juge, puisqu'il ne s'agit pas ici de contrôle. Ce sera donc le gouvernement qui décidera s'il saisira ou non un juge de la question. Autrement dit, si le gouvernement déclare que la Charte n'a pas été enfreinte, il pourra autoriser sans crainte les activités du SCRS. Là encore, il s'agit d'une situation inacceptable en démocratie.
Le quatrième problème du projet de loi  C-59, c'est qu'il n'interdit pas complètement le recours aux renseignements obtenus sous la torture. Le député de Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan l'a démontré de manière éloquente, et je suis d'accord avec lui. Le gouvernement nous dit que nous n'avons rien à craindre puisqu'il a inclus la directive du Cabinet dans le texte du projet de loi, ce qui veut dire qu'elle aura force de loi. Elle a déjà force de loi, alors cette entourloupette ne change absolument rien à l'affaire.
Il y a toutefois pire, puisqu'absolument rien dans cette même directive n'interdit le recours aux renseignements obtenus sous la torture. On y dit que cette information, qui va à l'encontre des droits de la personne les plus fondamentaux, peut être utilisée seulement dans certaines circonstances, sauf que le seuil établi est extrêmement bas. D'abord, c'est moralement répugnant, voire carrément inconstitutionnel, mais en plus, l'information ainsi obtenue est d'une fiabilité à peu près nulle. Sous la torture, les gens vont dire exactement ce que leur bourreau veut entendre pour que cessent leurs supplices.
Enfin, le projet de loi  C-59 ne ferait pas ce qu'on aurait pu faire, c'est-à-dire créer un comité de surveillance pour l'ASFC. Il n'y a toujours pas de mécanisme indépendant d'examen et de traitement des plaintes pour l'ASFC. C'est l'un des rares organismes de sécurité ou d'application de la loi à ne pas faire l'objet d'une surveillance directe. Il est vrai que le nouveau Comité de surveillance des activités de renseignement de sécurité se penchera en partie sur les activités de l'ASFC, mais seulement lorsqu'il est question de sécurité nationale et non de ses activités quotidiennes.
Nous avons très souvent constaté que les activités menées par les organismes responsables des services frontaliers ont d'énormes conséquences sur le plan du respect des droits fondamentaux de la personne. Nous n'avons qu'à observer la situation actuelle aux États-Unis, où l'organisme chargé des services frontaliers sépare des parents de leurs enfants. Il est donc préoccupant qu'il n'y ait aucun recours au Canada, qu'on ne puisse pas porter plainte au sujet d'un incident impliquant l'ASFC, à part en s'adressant à une cour de justice, ce qui nécessite des renseignements, des ressources et toutes sortes d'autres choses qui ne sont probablement pas accessibles à ceux qui pourraient avoir à porter plainte.
Les libéraux nous diront qu'ils ont déjà pris certaines mesures qui ne sont pas couvertes par le projet de loi  C-59. Par exemple, le député de Winnipeg-Nord vient de dire que le projet de loi C-22 a permis d'établir le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement.
Les néo-démocrates pensent que c’est une première étape utile pour corriger certaines lacunes de longue date des arrangements en matière de sécurité nationale, mais cette instance ne reste qu’un organisme d’examen, un organisme qui fait des recommandations. Il ne s'agit pas d'un organisme de contrôle qui prend des décisions en temps réel sur ce qui peut être fait et qui rend des ordonnances contraignantes sur les changements à apporter.
Le gouvernement a rejeté les amendements des néo-démocrates qui auraient permis au comité d’être plus indépendant. Ils lui auraient permis d’être plus transparent dans ses rapports au public et de mieux s’intégrer aux organes de surveillance existants.
L’autre sujet auquel les libéraux prétendent avoir donné suite concerne la liste d’interdiction de vol. Fait intéressant, dans son discours prononcé aujourd’hui, à l’ouverture du débat à l'étape de la troisième lecture, le ministre a affirmé que le gouvernement s’apprêtait à régler le problème de la liste d’interdiction de vol et non pas qu’il l’avait réglé. Le Canada n’a toujours pas de mécanisme efficace de recours que peuvent utiliser les voyageurs dont le nom figure par erreur sur cette liste. J’ai entendu très souvent des députés ministériels déclarer que, de toute façon, on ne refuse à personne l’accès à bord. Je peux leur donner le nom de gens qui se sont vu refuser l’accès à bord, ce qui a perturbé leurs activités commerciales ou d'autres choses, comme des réunions de famille. Bien trop souvent, des enfants se retrouvent sur les listes d’interdiction de vol. Leur nom a une consonance musulmane, arabe ou autre qui le fait ressembler au nom de gens qui figurent déjà sur ces listes.
Le groupe de parents dont les enfants figurent sur ces listes a exigé que des mesures efficaces soient immédiatement mises en oeuvre pour faire cesser le harcèlement constant dont ils sont victimes sans aucune raison. Le fait que nous n’ayons pas encore réglé ce problème suscite des questions sérieuses sur les garanties à l’égalité que confère la Charte et qui sont censées être protégées par la loi dans notre pays.
Non seulement le projet de loi  C-59 ne corrige pas les lacunes du projet de loi C-51, mais il crée deux nouvelles menaces aux droits et aux libertés des Canadiens, là encore, sans preuve que ces mesures accroîtront la sécurité.
Le projet de loi  C-59 propose d'élargir immédiatement le mandat du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications au-delà de la simple collecte de renseignements pour lui donner la possibilité de recueillir sur les Canadiens des renseignements qu'il lui serait normalement interdit de recueillir.
Tout comme nous permettons au SCRS non seulement de recueillir des renseignements, mais aussi de réagir aux menaces, nous disons maintenant que le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications ne devrait pas uniquement recueillir de l'information, mais qu'il devrait aussi pouvoir mener ce que le gouvernement appelle des cyberopérations défensives et des cyberopérations actives.
Le projet de loi  C-59 fournit une liste trop générale de buts et de cibles pour les cyberopérations actives. Il dit que des activités pourraient être menées afin « de réduire, d’interrompre, d’influencer ou de contrecarrer, selon le cas, les capacités, les intentions ou les activités de tout étranger ou État, organisme ou groupe terroriste étrangers, dans la mesure où ces capacités, ces intentions ou ces activités se rapportent aux affaires internationales, à la défense ou à la sécurité, ou afin d’intervenir dans le déroulement de telles intentions ou activités. » Pensons à tout ce qui n'est pas couvert. La disposition ne pourrait être plus générale.
Le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications serait en outre autorisé à prendre « toute mesure qui est raisonnablement nécessaire pour assurer la nature secrète de l'activité ». Pensons à ce que cela suppose pour la surveillance et l'examen de ses activités. Je vois là une invitation à dissimuler de l'information aux organismes de surveillance.
On élargit les pouvoirs du Centre sans prévoir de surveillance adéquate. Encore une fois, il n'y a pas de surveillance indépendante, seulement un examen « après coup ». Ici, pour mener ses activités, il n'a pas à obtenir de mandat d'un tribunal, l'autorisation d'un ministre suffit, celle du ministre de la Défense nationale s'il s'agit d'activités à l'échelle nationale et celle du ministre des Affaires étrangères dans le cas d'activités menées à l'étranger.
Ces nouvelles mesures actives et proactives pour lutter contre toute une série de menaces constituent un des problèmes. Voici l'autre: bien que, aux termes du projet de loi  C-59, il soit toujours interdit au Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications de recueillir des renseignements sur les Canadiens, nous sommes censés lui permettre d'acquérir « incidemment » de l'information qui se rapporte à un Canadien ou à une personne se trouvant au Canada. Ainsi, même si ce n'était pas le but visé, le Centre pourrait tout de même recueillir, conserver et utiliser des renseignements personnels sur une personne. Ce qui ne va pas ici, c'est que la possibilité d'acquérir de l'information incidemment — ce qui est considéré comme de la recherche par le gouvernement et de la surveillance de masse par les détracteurs de cette façon de faire — demeure clairement un élément du projet de loi  C-59.
Ces deux nouveaux pouvoirs sont un peu troublants, quand on pense que la promesse des libéraux était de corriger les dispositions problématiques du projet de loi C-51, et non d'en ajouter d'autres. En soi, les modifications apportées au projet de loi C-51 sont mineures. Le député de Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan a mentionné que les changements n'étaient pas particulièrement efficaces. Je dois avouer que je suis d'accord avec lui. À mon avis, ils n'ont pas été conçus pour être efficaces. Il est peu probablement qu'ils empêchent les contestations constitutionnelles à l'égard du projet de loi C-51 qui ont déjà été déposées par des organismes comme l'Association canadienne des libertés civiles. Ces contestations constitutionnelles iront de l'avant et, selon moi, elles seront couronnées de succès.
Quelle est la meilleure solution dans les cas de terrorisme? Je le répète, lorsque j'étais le porte-parole du NPD en matière de sécurité publique et que je siégeais au comité de la sécurité publique lors des témoignages entourant le projet de loi C-51, nous avons entendu littéralement des dizaines et des dizaines de témoins qui ont presque tous dit la même chose: ce sont les bonnes vieilles méthodes policières en première ligne qui permettent de régler le problème du terrorisme ou d'empêcher des actes terroristes. Pour ce faire, il faut des ressources et il faut concentrer les ressources sur les mécanismes d'application de la loi en amont.
Qu'ont fait les conservateurs lorsqu'ils étaient au pouvoir? Ils ont réduit les budgets de la GRC, de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité. Pendant tout le temps qu'ils ont été au pouvoir et qu'ils s'inquiétaient du terrorisme, ils ont refusé d'accorder les ressources élémentaires dont on avait besoin.
Qu'ont fait les libéraux depuis leur retour au pouvoir? Ils ont affecté de nouvelles ressources à tous ces organismes, mais pas pour les activités d'enquête et d'application de la loi en matière de terrorisme. Ces ressources serviront à toutes sortes de choses qui les intéressent, mais pas à celles qui permettraient vraiment d'améliorer les choses.
On a entendu souvent à la Chambre, notamment au cours du présent débat, qu'il faut faire des compromis entre les droits et la sécurité. Au cours de la dernière législature et durant la présente législature, les néo-démocrates ont soutenu régulièrement qu'il n'est pas nécessaire de faire des compromis entre les droits et la sécurité. Il est faux de prétendre qu'un juste équilibre doit être atteint. Comment pourrions-nous abandonner nos droits et, ce faisant, prétendre que nous les protégeons? Ce n'est pas logique. En fait, il incombe au gouvernement de protéger les droits fondamentaux des Canadiens et de les protéger contre les menaces.
Les libéraux nous diront encore qu'ils ont rempli leur promesse. Or, ce n'est pas ce que je vois dans ce projet de loi. Ce que je vois, ce sont de multiples tentatives de semer la confusion et de cacher ce qu'ils sont vraiment en train de faire, soit qu'ils continuent d'appuyer l'essence même du projet de loi C-51, c'est-à-dire restreindre les droits et libertés des Canadiens au nom de la sécurité nationale. Les néo-démocrates rejettent ce petit jeu. Ils vont donc voter contre ce projet de loi à l'étape de la troisième lecture.
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2018-06-18 20:47 [p.21201]
Madam Speaker, to the last point made by my hon. friend from Durham, that BillC-51 in the 41st Parliament, the Anti-terrorism Act, was there to make us safe, again, the expert evidence we heard, even before that bill passed, was that BillC-51 under the previous government made us less safe.
For that, I cite the evidence of Joe Fogarty, an MI5 agent doing security liaison between Canada and U.K. When asked by the U.K. authorities about what Canadian anti-terrorism legislation they might want to replicate in the U.K., he answered “not a thing”, that they have created a situation which is akin to an accident waiting to happen. It has made Canadians less safe, through the failure to ensure that one agency talks to the other. In the example that the member just gave, agencies have a proactive requirement to talk to each other and not guard their information jealously.
Madame la Présidente, je reviens sur le dernier point soulevé par mon ami de Durham, selon lequel le projet de loi C-51 adopté à la 41e législature, la Loi antiterroriste, devait assurer notre sécurité. Je le répète, les témoignages des experts que nous avons entendus avant même que le projet de loi C-51 ne soit adopté étaient que le projet de loi adopté sous le gouvernement précédent nous mettait en danger.
Pour étayer mon affirmation, je cite le témoignage de Joe Fogarty, agent du MI5 assurant la liaison entre le Canada et le Royaume-Uni en matière de sécurité. Lorsque les autorités britanniques lui ont demandé quelles mesures antiterroristes canadiennes ils pourraient reprendre, il a répondu « pas une seule », car elles créent une situation où un accident ne peut qu’arriver. Cette mesure législative a mis les Canadiens en danger en ne garantissant pas la communication entre organismes. Dans l’exemple que le député vient de donner, les organismes sont tenus de communiquer entre eux sans attendre qu’on le leur demande et ne doivent pas garder jalousement pour eux les informations dont ils disposent.
View Ed Fast Profile
CPC (BC)
View Ed Fast Profile
2018-06-07 12:16 [p.20428]
Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the opportunity to speak to Bill C-59. Listening to our Liberal friends across the way, one would assume that this is all about public safety, that Bill C-59 would improve public safety and the ability of our security agencies to intervene if a terrorist threat presented itself. Nothing could be further from the truth.
Let us go back and understand what this Prime Minister did in the last election. Whether it was his youth, or ignorance, he went out there and said that he was going to undo every single bit of the Stephen Harper legacy, a legacy I am very proud of, by the way. That was his goal.
One of the things he was going to undo was what BillC-51 did. Bill C-51 was a bill our previous Conservative government brought forward to reform and modernize how we approach terrorist threats in Canada. We wanted to provide our government security agencies with the ability to effectively, and in a timely way, intervene when necessary to protect Canadians against terrorist threats. Bill C-51 was actually very well received across the country. Our security agencies welcomed it as providing them with additional tools.
I just heard my Liberal colleagues chuckle and heckle. Did members know that the Liberals, in the previous Parliament, actually supported BillC-51? Here they stand saying that somehow that legislation did not do what it was intended to do. In fact, it did. It made Canadians much safer and allowed our security agencies to intervene in a timely way to protect Canadians. This bill that has come forward would do nothing of the sort.
The committee overseeing this bill had 16 meetings, and at the end of the whole process, there were 235 amendments brought forward. That is how bad this legislation was. Forty-three of those amendments came from Liberals themselves. They rushed forward this legislation, doing what Liberals do best: posture publicly, rush through legislation, and then realize, “What have we done? My goodness.” They had 43 amendments of their own, all of which passed, of course. There were 20-some Conservative amendments, and none of them passed, even though they were intelligently laid-out improvements to this legislation. That is the kind of government we are dealing with here. It was all about optics so that the government would be able to say, “We are taking that old BillC-51 that was not worth anything, although we voted in favour of it, and we are going to replace it with our own legislation.” The reality is that Bill C-51 was a significant step forward in protecting Canadians.
This legislation is quite different. What it would do is take one agency and replace it with another. That is what Liberals do. They take something that is working and replace it with something else that costs a ton of money. In fact, the estimate to implement this bill is $100 million. That is $100 million taxpayers do not have to spend, because the bill would not do one iota to improve the protection of Canadians against terrorist threats. There would be no improved oversight or improved intelligence capabilities.
The bill would do one thing we applaud, which is reaffirm that Canada will not torture. Most Canadians would say that this is something Canada should never do.
The Liberals went further. They ignored warnings from some of our intelligence agencies that the administrative costs were going to get very expensive. In fact, I have a quote here from our former national security adviser, Richard Fadden. Here is what he said about Bill C-59: “It is beginning to rival the Income Tax Act for complexity.” Canadians know how complex that act has become.
He said, “There are sub-sub-subsections that are excluded, that are exempted. If there is anything the committee can do to make it a bit more straightforward, [it would be appreciated].” Did the committee, in fact, do that? No, it did not make it more straightforward.
There is the appointment of a new intelligence commissioner, which is, of course, the old one, but again, with additional costs. The bill would establish how a new commissioner would be appointed. What the Liberals would not do is allow current or past judges to fill that role. As members know, retired and current judges are highly skilled in being able to assess evidence in the courtroom. It is a skill that is critical to being a good commissioner who addresses issues of intelligence.
Another shortcoming of Bill C-59 is that there is excessive emphasis on privacy, which would be a significant deterrent to critical interdepartmental information sharing. In other words, this legislation would highlight privacy concerns to the point that our security agencies and all the departments of government would now become hamstrung. Their hands would become tied when it came to sharing information with other departments and our security agencies, which could be critical information in assessing and deterring terrorist threats.
Why would the government do this? The Liberals say that they want to protect Canadians, but the legislation would actually take a step backwards. It would make it even more difficult and would trip up our security agencies as they tried to do the job we have asked them to do, which is protect us. Why are we erring on the side of the terrorists?
We heard testimony, again from Mr. Fadden, that this proposed legislation would establish more silos. They were his nightmare when he was the national security director. We now have evidence from the Air India bombing. The inquiry determined that the tragedy could have been prevented had one agency in government not withheld critical information from our police and security authorities. Instead, 329 people died at the hands of terrorists.
Again, why are we erring on the side of terrorists? This proposed legislation is a step backward. It is not something Canadians expected from a government that had talked about protecting Canadians better.
There are also challenges with the Criminal Code amendments in Bill C-59. The government chose to move away from criminalizing “advocating or promoting terrorism” and would move towards “counselling” terrorism. The wording has been parsed very carefully by security experts, and they have said that this proposed change in the legislation would mean, for example, that ISIS propaganda being spread on YouTube would not be captured and would not be criminalized. Was the intention of the government when it was elected, when it made its promises to protect Canadians, to now step backward, to revise the Criminal Code in a way that would make it less tough on terrorists, those who are promoting terrorism, those who are advocating terrorism, and those who are counselling terrorism? This would be a step backward on that.
In closing, I have already stated that the Liberals are prepared to err on the side of terrorists rather than on the side of Canadian law enforcement and international security teams. The bill would create more bureaucracy, more costs, and less money and security for Canadians.
When I was in cabinet, we took security very seriously. We trusted our national security experts. The proposed legislation is essentially a vote of non-confidence in those experts we have in government to protect us.
Finally, the message we are sending is that red tape is more important than sharing information and stopping terrorism. That is a sad story. We can do better as Canadians.
Monsieur le Président, je suis ravi d'avoir l'occasion d'intervenir sur le projet de loi  C-59. Les députés libéraux prétendent que le projet de loi permettra d'améliorer la sécurité publique et de renforcer la capacité de nos agences de sécurité d'intervenir en cas de menace terroriste. Or, rien n'est plus faux.
Faisons un retour dans le passé pour tenter de comprendre ce qu'a fait le premier ministre au cours de la dernière campagne électorale. Peut-être était-ce à cause de sa jeunesse ou de son ignorance, mais toujours est-il qu'il a manifesté le désir de démanteler totalement l'héritage de Stephen Harper, héritage dont je suis fier, soit dit en passant. C'était l'objectif du premier ministre.
Il s'est engagé notamment à annuler les mesures prévues dans le projet de loi C-51. Il s'agit du projet de loi que le gouvernement conservateur précédent avait présenté pour réformer et moderniser les mécanismes de lutte contre le terrorisme au Canada. Nous souhaitions habiliter les agences de sécurité de l'État à intervenir de manière efficace et opportune pour protéger les Canadiens contre la menace terroriste, le cas échéant. Le projet de loi C-51 avait suscité des commentaires très positifs partout au pays. Nos agences de sécurité l'ont accueilli favorablement, car il leur permettait d'obtenir des outils supplémentaires.
Je viens d'entendre mes collègues libéraux glousser et chahuter. Les députés savent-ils qu'au cours de la dernière législature, les libéraux étaient, en fait, favorables au projet de loi C-51? Et les voilà qui disent que cette mesure législative n'a, en quelque sorte, pas eu l'effet escompté. En fait, c'est le contraire. Elle a beaucoup rehaussé la sécurité des Canadiens et a permis à nos organismes chargés de la sécurité d'intervenir rapidement pour protéger la population. Le projet de loi à l'étude ne ferait rien de tel.
Le comité responsable de ce projet de loi a tenu 16 réunions et, à la fin du processus, ses membres ont proposé 235 amendements. La mesure législative était à ce point médiocre. De ce nombre, 43 ont été proposés par les libéraux mêmes. Ils ont précipité le dépôt de ce projet de loi et fait ce qu'ils font de mieux: ils ont pris des grands airs en public et déposé le projet de loi à la hâte pour ensuite se demander « Qu'avons-nous fait? Mon Dieu ». Ils ont eux-mêmes proposé 43 amendements, qui ont tous été adoptés, bien sûr. En revanche, la vingtaine d'amendements conservateurs ont été rejetés, même s'il s'agissait d'améliorations judicieuses de ce projet de loi. Voilà le type de gouvernement auquel nous avons ici affaire. Tout était une question d'apparences pour que le gouvernement puisse dire « Nous reprenons l'ancien projet de loi C-51 dont il n'y avait rien à tirer, bien que nous ayons voté en sa faveur, et nous allons le remplacer par notre propre mesure législative ». En réalité, le projet de loi C-51 représentait une importante avancée pour protéger les Canadiens.
Cette mesure est très différente. Elle ne fait que prendre une agence et la remplacer par une autre. C’est ce que les libéraux font. Ils prennent quelque chose qui fonctionne et le remplacent par quelque chose d’autre qui coûte une montagne d’argent. De fait, on estime que mettre en œuvre ce projet de loi coûtera 100 millions de dollars. Ce sont 100 millions de dollars que les contribuables n’ont pas à dépenser, parce que ce projet de loi n’améliore en rien la protection des Canadiens contre les menaces terroristes. Il n’améliore en rien la surveillance, pas plus que les capacités de renseignement.
Ce projet de loi fait une seule chose que nous applaudissons; il réaffirme le fait que le Canada ne pratiquera pas la torture. La plupart des Canadiens seraient d’avis que c’est une chose que le Canada ne devrait jamais faire.
Les libéraux ont été plus loin. Ils ont ignoré les avertissements que leur ont donnés certaines de nos agences du renseignement, qui leur ont dit que les coûts administratifs seraient très élevés. De fait, j’ai une citation ici de notre ancien conseiller à la sécurité nationale, Richard Fadden. Il a dit, en parlant du projet de loi  C-59 « [qu’]il commence à rivaliser de complexité avec la Loi de l’impôt sur le revenu. » Les Canadiens savent à quel point cette loi est devenue complexe.
Il a dit: « Certains sous-alinéas sont exclus. S’il y a quelque chose que le comité peut faire, c’est le simplifier un peu. » Le comité l’a-t-il fait? Non, il ne l’a pas simplifié.
Il prévoit la nomination d’un nouveau commissaire au renseignement, celui-ci étant, bien sûr, le même que l’ancien, mais là encore, avec plus de coûts. Le projet de loi établit la façon dont un nouveau commissaire est nommé. Les libéraux ne permettraient pas que celui-ci soit choisi parmi les anciens juges ou les juges actuels. Comme les députés le savent, les juges actuels ou à la retraite sont experts dans l’évaluation des preuves au tribunal. C’est une compétence qu’un bon commissaire doit absolument avoir pour pouvoir traiter des questions de renseignement.
Une autre lacune du projet de loi  C-59 consiste en son insistance excessive sur la confidentialité, ce qui découragerait considérablement le partage de renseignements cruciaux entre les ministères. En d’autres termes, ce projet de loi insiste tellement sur les questions de confidentialité que nos agences de sécurité et tous les ministères s’en trouveraient paralysés. Ils auraient les mains liées quand il s’agit de partager des renseignements avec d’autres ministères et nos agences de sécurité, des renseignements qui pourraient être cruciaux dans l’évaluation et la dissuasion des menaces terroristes.
Pourquoi le gouvernement fait-il cela? Les libéraux disent qu’ils veulent protéger les Canadiens, mais le projet de loi nous fait faire un pas en arrière. Il rend la tâche encore plus difficile et mettrait des bâtons dans les roues de nos agences de sécurité, les empêchant de faire le travail que nous leur avons demandé de faire, soit nous protéger. Pourquoi penchons-nous du côté des terroristes?
M. Fadden a dit, dans son témoignage, que ce projet de loi créerait encore plus de cloisonnement. Ce cloisonnement était un cauchemar pour lui quand il était directeur de la sécurité nationale. Nous avons maintenant des preuves dans le cas de l’attentat à la bombe contre Air India. L’enquête a déterminé que la tragédie aurait pu être évitée si une agence du gouvernement ne s’était pas abstenue de communiquer des enseignements cruciaux à nos forces policières et organismes de sécurité. Résultat: 329 personnes ont péri aux mains de terroristes.
Une fois de plus, pourquoi penchons-nous du côté des terroristes? Ce projet de loi est un pas en arrière. Ce n’est pas ce à quoi les Canadiens s’attendraient d’un gouvernement qui parlait de mieux les protéger.
Il y a aussi des problèmes en ce qui concerne les modifications au Code criminel proposées dans le projet de loi  C-59. Le gouvernement a choisi de remplacer l'Infraction de « préconiser ou fomenter la commission d’une infraction de terrorisme » par l'infraction de « conseiller » la commission d’infractions de terrorisme. Des experts en matière de sécurité ont analysé très soigneusement la formulation et sont arrivés à la conclusion que ce changement dans le projet de loi signifierait, par exemple, qu’une propagande du groupe État islamique sur YouTube ne serait pas saisie et ne serait pas criminalisée. Le gouvernement avait-il l’intention, quand il a été élu, quand il a promis de protéger les Canadiens, de faire un pas en arrière, de réviser le Code criminel d’une façon qui le rendrait moins sévère pour les terroristes, ceux qui préconisent le terrorisme et ceux qui conseillent la commission d’infractions de terrorisme? Ce serait un pas en arrière.
Pour terminer, j’ai déjà dit que les libéraux sont prêts à pencher du côté des terroristes plutôt que du côté des organismes d’application de la loi canadiens et des équipes de sécurité internationale. Le projet de loi créerait plus de lourdeurs administratives et plus de coûts, mais il permet moins d'investissement et de sécurité pour les Canadiens.
Quand j’étais au Cabinet, nous prenions la sécurité très au sérieux. Nous faisions confiance à nos experts en sécurité nationale. Le projet de loi représente, en fait, un vote de non-confiance à l’égard de ces experts qui sont au gouvernement pour nous protéger.
Enfin, nous envoyons ainsi le message que la paperasserie est plus importante que la communication des renseignements et l’élimination du terrorisme. C’est bien triste. En tant que Canadiens, nous pouvons faire mieux.
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
View Don Davies Profile
2018-06-07 13:46 [p.20440]
Mr. Speaker, it is passing strange to hear the hon. member for Winnipeg Centre go to a dictionary definition of “repudiate” in the context of BillC-51. Last I checked, to repudiate something means to reject it, not to vote for it. The Liberals voted for Stephen Harper's BillC-51. While the Conservatives may have cheered, Canadians did not.
Could the member tell us what has changed since the Liberals voted for Mr. Harper's BillC-51, the bill that did not get the balance correct between civil liberties and the need for security? Could the member tell us what is significantly different about this bill and maybe why her colleagues voted for BillC-51 in the last Parliament?
Monsieur le Président, il est plutôt curieux d’entendre le député de Winnipeg-Centre dire qu’il a consulté un dictionnaire pour trouver la définition de « désavouer » dans le contexte du projet de loi C-51. Pour autant que je sache, désavouer quelque chose, c’est le rejeter, se prononcer contre. Or, les libéraux ont voté en faveur du projet de loi C-51 de Stephen Harper. Les conservateurs ont peut-être applaudi, mais pas les Canadiens.
La députée peut-elle nous dire ce qui a changé depuis que les libéraux ont voté en faveur du projet de loi C-51 de M. Harper qui ne conciliait pas les libertés civiles et les besoins en matière de sécurité? Peut-elle nous dire ce qui est nettement différent dans ce projet de loi et pourquoi ses collègues se sont prononcés en faveur du projet de loi C-51 à la dernière législature?
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2018-06-07 19:42 [p.20491]
Mr. Speaker, I find myself surprised to have a speaking spot tonight. For that I want to thank the New Democratic Party. We do not agree about this bill, but it was a generous gesture to allow me to speak to it.
I have been very engaged in the issue of anti-terrorism legislation for many years. I followed it when, under Prime Minister Chrétien, the anti-terrorism legislation went through this place immediately after 9/11. Although I was executive director of the Sierra Club, I recall well my conversations with former MP Bill Blaikie, who sat on the committee, and we worried as legislation went forward that appeared to do too much to limit our rights as Canadians in its response to the terrorist threat.
That was nothing compared to what happened when we had a shooting, a tragic event in October 2014, when Corporal Nathan Cirillo was murdered at the National War Memorial. I do not regard that event, by the way, as an act of terrorism, but rather of one individual with significant addiction and mental health issues, something that could have been dealt with if he had been allowed to have the help he sought in British Columbia before he came to Ottawa and committed the horrors of October 22, 2014.
It was the excuse and the opening that the former government needed to bring in truly dangerous legislation. I will never forget being here in my seat in Parliament on January 30. It was a Friday morning. One does not really expect ground-shaking legislation to hit without warning on a Friday morning in this place. There was no press release, no briefing, no telling us what was in store for us. I picked up BillC-51, an omnibus bill in five parts, and read it on the airplane flying home, studied it all weekend, and came back here. By Monday morning, February 2, I had a speaking spot during question period and called it the “secret police act”.
I did not wait, holding my finger to the wind, to see which way the political winds were blowing. The NDP did that for two weeks before they decided to oppose it. The Liberals decided they could not win an election if they opposed it, so they would vote for it but promised to fix it later.
I am afraid some of that is still whirling around in this place. I will say I am supporting this effort. I am voting for it. I still see many failures in it. I know the Minister of Justice and the Minister of Public Safety have listened. That is clear; the work they did in the consultation process was real.
Let me go back and review why BillC-51 was so very dangerous.
I said it was a bill in five parts. I hear the Conservatives complaining tonight that the government side is pushing Bill C-59 through too fast. Well, on January 30, 2015, BillC-51, an omnibus bill in five parts, was tabled for first reading. It went all the way through the House by May 6 and all the way through the Senate by June 9, less than six months.
This bill, Bill C-59, was tabled just about a year ago. Before it was tabled, we had consultations. I had time to hold town hall meetings in my riding specifically on public security, espionage, our spy agencies, and what we should do to protect and balance anti-terrorism measures with civil liberties. We worked hard on this issue before the bill ever came for first reading, and we have worked hard on it since.
I will come back to BillC-51, which was forced through so quickly. It was a bill in five parts. What I came to learn through working on that bill was that it made Canadians less safe. That was the advice from many experts in anti-terrorism efforts, from the leading experts in the trenches and from academia, from people like Professor Kent Roach and Professor Craig Forcese, who worked so hard on the Air India inquiry; the chair of the Air India inquiry, former judge John Major; and people in the trenches I mentioned earlier in debate tonight, such as Joseph Fogarty, an MI5 agent from the U.K. who served as anti-terrorism liaison with Canada.
What I learned from all of these people was BillC-51 was dangerous because it would put in concrete silos that would discourage communication between spy agencies. That bill had five parts.
Part 1 was information sharing. It was not about information sharing between spy agencies; it was about information sharing about Canadians to foreign governments. In other words, it was dangerous to the rights of Canadians overseas, and it ignored the advice of the Maher Arar inquiry.
Part 2 was about the no-fly list. Fortunately, this bill fixes that. The previous government never even bothered to consult with the airlines, by the way. That was interesting testimony we got back in the 41st Parliament.
Part 3 I called the “thought chill” section. We heard tonight that the government is not paying attention to the need remove terrorist recruitment from websites. That is nonsense. However, part 3 of BillC-51 created a whole new term with no definition, this idea of terrorism in general, and the idea of promoting terrorism in general. As it was defined, we could imagine someone would be guilty of violating that law if they had a Facebook page that put up an image of a clenched fist. That could be seen as promotion of terrorism in general. Thank goodness we got that improved.
In terms of thought chill, it was so broadly worded that it could have caused, for instance, someone in a community who could see someone was being radicalized a reasonable fear that they could be arrested if they went to talk to that person to talk them out of it. It was very badly drafted.
Part 4 is the part that has not been adequately fixed in this bill. This is the part that, for the first time ever, gave CSIS what are called kinetic powers.
CSIS was created because the RCMP, in response to the FLQ crisis, was cooking up plots that involved, famously, burning down a barn. As a result, we said intelligence gathering would have to be separate from the guys who go out and break up plots, because we cannot have the RCMP burning down barns, so the Canadian Security Intelligence Service was created. It was to be exclusively about collecting information, and then the RCMP could act on that information.
I think it is a huge mistake that in Bill C-59we have left CSIS kinetic powers to disrupt plots. However, we have changed the law quite a bit to deal with CSIS's ability to go to a single judge to get permission to violate our laws and break the charter. I wish the repair in Bill C-59 was stronger, but it is certainly a big improvement on BillC-51.
Part 5 of Bill C-51 is not repaired in Bill C-59. I think that is because it was so strangely worded that most people did not ever figure out what it was about. I know professors Roach and Forcese left part 5 alone because it was about changes to the immigration and refugee act. It really was hard to see what it was about. However, Professor Donald Galloway at the University of Victoria law school said part 5 is about being able to give a judge information in secret hearings about a suspect and not tell the judge that the evidence was obtained by torture, so I really hope the Minister of Public Safety will go back and look at those changes to the refugee and immigration act, and if that is what they are about, it needs fixing.
Let us look at why the bill is enough of an improvement that I am going to vote for it. By the way, in committee I did bring forward 46 amendments to the bill on my own. They went in the direction of ensuring that we would have special advocates in the room so that there would be someone there on behalf of the public interest when a judge was giving a warrant to allow a CSIS agent to break the law or violate the charter. The language around what judges can do and how often they can do it and what respect to the charter they must exercise when they grant such a warrant is much better in this bill, but it is still there, and it does worry me that there will be no special advocate in the room.
I cannot say I am wildly enthusiastic about Bill C-59, but it is a huge improvement over what we saw in the 41st Parliament in BillC-51.
The creation of the security intelligence review agency is something I want to talk about in my remaining minutes.
This point is fundamental. This was what Mr. Justice John Major, who chaired the Air India inquiry, told the committee when it was studying the bill back in 2015: He told us it is just human nature that the RCMP and CSIS will not share information and that we need to have pinnacle oversight.
There is review that happens, and the term “review” is post facto, so SIRC, the Security Intelligence Review Committee, would look at what CSIS had done over the course of the year, but up until this bill we have never had a single security agency that watched what all the guys and girls were doing. We have CSIS, the RCMP, the Canada Border Services Agency, the Communications Security Establishment—five different agencies all looking at collecting intelligence, but not sharing. That is why having the security intelligence review agency created by this bill is a big improvement.
Monsieur le Président, je suis étonnée de pouvoir prendre la parole ce soir. Je dois d'ailleurs remercier le Nouveau Parti démocratique. Nous ne sommes pas d'accord sur la valeur de ce projet de loi, mais il a été assez généreux pour me permettre d'en parler.
Les lois antiterroristes me passionnent depuis de nombreuses années. Déjà à l'époque du premier ministre Jean Chrétien, j'ai suivi le débat sur la loi antiterroriste qui a été présentée tout de suite après les attentats du 11 septembre. J'étais alors directrice générale du Sierra Club, mais je me souviens encore parfaitement de mes conversations avec l'ex-député Bill Blaikie, qui faisait alors partie du comité. Nous trouvions que la loi allait trop loin et restreignait trop les droits des Canadiens par rapport à la menace terroriste.
Ce n'est rien par rapport à ce qui est arrivé après la fusillade d'octobre 2014, lorsque le caporal Nathan Cirillo a été tué près du Monument commémoratif de guerre. Je ne considère pas cet acte comme un geste terroriste, soit dit en passant, mais comme les agissements d'une personne souffrant de toxicomanie et de graves problèmes de santé mentale. D'ailleurs, toute cette tragédie aurait pu être évitée si le tireur avait obtenu les soins qu'il avait réclamés en Colombie-Britannique avant de venir à Ottawa, le 22 octobre 2014, pour commettre les horreurs que l'on sait.
C'était le prétexte et l'occasion rêvée dont le gouvernement avait besoin pour présenter un projet de loi vraiment dangereux. Je n'oublierai jamais le vendredi matin 30 janvier, alors que j'étais assise sur ma banquette, au Parlement. On ne s'attend pas à ce qu'un projet de loi aussi incendiaire soit déposé un vendredi matin dans cette enceinte. Il n'était accompagné d'aucun communiqué ni d'aucune séance d'information. Personne ne nous avait prévenus. J'ai pris le projet de loi C-51, un projet de loi omnibus en cinq parties, et je l'ai lu à bord de l'avion, alors que je rentrais chez moi. Je l'ai étudié toute la fin de semaine, puis je suis rentrée à Ottawa. Lundi matin, le 2 février, j'ai pris la parole pendant la période des questions et j'ai dit que le projet de loi entraînerait la création d'une police secrète.
Je n'ai pas attendu de voir dans quelle direction le vent allait souffler sur le paysage politique, contrairement au NPD, qui a tergiversé pendant deux semaines avant de s'opposer au projet de loi. Les libéraux, eux, ont décidé qu'ils ne pourraient pas remporter les prochaines élections s'ils s'opposaient au projet de loi, alors ils allaient voter pour tout en promettant d'apporter des correctifs plus tard.
J'ai bien peur que cette attitude ne perdure aux Communes. Je précise que je suis favorable à cet effort. Je voterai pour ce projet de loi, même si j'y vois de nombreuses lacunes. Je sais que la ministre de la Justice et le ministre de la Sécurité publique ont écouté les gens. C'est clair. Ils ont fait un travail de consultation bien réel.
Revenons sur les raisons pour lesquelles le projet de loi C-51 était si dangereux.
J'ai dit que c'était un projet de loi divisé en cinq parties. J'entends les conservateurs se plaindre ce soir que les députés ministériels essayent de faire adopter le projet de loi  C-59 trop rapidement. Eh bien, le 30 janvier 2015, le projet de loi C-51, un projet de loi omnibus divisé en cinq parties, a été déposé en première lecture. Le 6 mai, il avait été adopté à la Chambre, et le 9 juin, il avait été adopté au Sénat, soit six mois plus tard.
Le projet de loi  C-59 a été déposé il y a tout près d'un an. Il y a eu des consultations avant qu'il ait été déposé. J'ai eu l'occasion d'organiser des assemblées publiques dans ma circonscription sur la sécurité publique, l'espionnage et les organismes d'espionnage, et sur ce que nous devrions faire pour assurer la sécurité et veiller à ce qu'il y ait un équilibre entre les mesures antiterroristes et les libertés civiles. Nous avons travaillé fort sur cette question avant même que le projet de loi soit présenté pour la première lecture et nous travaillons vaillamment dessus depuis.
Je poursuis ce que je disais au sujet du projet de loi C-51, qui a été adopté à toute vapeur. C'était un projet de loi divisé en cinq parties. En travaillant sur ce projet de loi, j'ai appris qu'il nuisait à la sécurité des Canadiens. C'est ce que nous ont dit de nombreux experts de la lutte contre le terrorisme, de grands spécialistes sur le terrain et des universitaires. Je parle de gens comme les professeurs Kent Roach et Craig Forcese, qui ont travaillé si fort sur l'enquête sur la tragédie d'Air India; le président de l'enquête sur l'affaire d'Air India, l'ancien juge John Major; et les personnes sur le terrain, dont j'ai parlé plus tôt ce soir, comme Joseph Fogarty, un agent du MI5 au Royaume-Uni qui a été l'agent de liaison du Royaume-Uni avec le Canada dans la lutte contre le terrorisme.
Tous ces gens m'ont appris que le projet de loi C-51 était dangereux parce qu'il allait construire des murs de béton qui ne feraient que décourager la communication entre les organismes d'espionnage. Ce projet de loi était composé de cinq parties.
La partie 1 portait sur la communication d'information. Il ne s'agissait pas de communication d'information entre les organismes d'espionnage, mais de communication d'information au sujet des Canadiens à des gouvernements étrangers. Autrement dit, c'était dangereux pour les droits des Canadiens à l'étranger et le projet de loi ne tenait pas compte des conseils de l'enquête sur l'affaire Maher Arar.
La partie 2 portait sur la liste d'interdiction de vol. Heureusement, le présent projet de loi corrige ce problème. En passant, le gouvernement précédent ne s'est même pas donné la peine de consulter les compagnies aériennes. Nous avons entendu des témoignages intéressants à ce sujet lors de la 41e législature.
La partie 3, à mon avis, limitait la liberté de pensée. Nous avons entendu dire ce soir que le gouvernement ne prête pas attention à la nécessité de retirer les messages de recrutement terroriste des sites Web. C'est une accusation ridicule. Par contre, la partie 3 du projet de loi C-51 créait un tout nouveau terme sans définition. On y présentait l'idée du terrorisme et de la fomentation du terrorisme en général. En raison de la façon dont ces concepts étaient définis, une personne aurait pu être reconnue coupable d'avoir violé cette loi si elle publiait sur sa page Facebook une image d'un poing serré. Un tel geste aurait pu être considéré comme une fomentation du terrorisme en général. C'est un élément que nous avons heureusement amélioré.
Le libellé de la partie 3 était si vague qu'un membre d'une communauté, par exemple, qui constatait qu'une personne était en train de se radicaliser aurait eu des motifs raisonnables de craindre qu'il pourrait se faire arrêter s'il tentait d'aller parler à la personne pour lui faire changer d'idée. Cette partie était vraiment mal rédigée.
La partie 4 est celle qui n'a pas été corrigée comme il se doit par ce projet de loi. C'est la partie qui, pour la toute première fois, a accordé au SCRS ce qu'on appelle des pouvoirs cinétiques.
Le SCRS a été créé dans la foulée de la crise du FLQ parce que la GRC mijotait des complots, dont l'un des plus célèbres l'ont amené à incendier une grange. C'est pour cela que nous avons déterminé qu'il fallait que la collecte de renseignements soit menée par une autre entité que celle qui s'occupe de déjouer les complots, car on ne peut pas laisser la GRC incendier des granges. On a donc mis sur pied le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité. Il devait s'occuper exclusivement de la collecte de renseignements, dont la GRC pouvait ensuite se servir pour intervenir.
Dans le projet de loi  C-59, je crois qu'on commet une grave erreur en laissant au SCRS ses pouvoirs cinétiques pour déjouer des complots. Cependant, des modifications législatives importantes ont été proposées relativement à la capacité du SCRS de s'adresser à un seul juge pour obtenir la permission d'aller à l'encontre de nos lois et de la Charte. J'aurais aimé que les corrections proposées dans le projet de loi  C-59 soient plus importantes, mais c'est certainement une nette amélioration par rapport au projet de loi C-51.
Le projet de loi  C-59 ne fait rien pour corriger la partie 5 du projet de loi C-51. Je crois que c'est parce que ces dispositions étaient formulées de manière si étrange que personne n'arrivait à les comprendre. Je sais que les professeurs Roach et Forcese n'en ont pas tenu compte parce que les modifications visaient la Loi sur l’immigration et la protection des réfugiés. Cette partie était très difficile à interpréter. Cependant, selon le professeur Donald Galloway, de la faculté de droit de l'Université de Victoria, la partie 5 permet de tenir des audiences secrètes pour fournir à un juge des renseignements sur un suspect sans dire au juge qu'ils ont été obtenu par la torture. Par conséquent, j'espère vraiment que le ministre de la Sécurité publique se penchera de nouveau sur ces modifications à la Loi sur l’immigration et la protection des réfugiés. Si elles autorisent réellement cette pratique, alors il faut y remédier.
Regardons pourquoi ce projet de loi constitue une amélioration suffisante pour que je puisse voter en sa faveur. En passant, au comité, j'ai moi-même présenté 46 amendements au projet de loi. Ils visaient à garantir que des avocats spéciaux soient présents dans la pièce pour qu'une personne représentant l'intérêt public soit là lorsqu'un juge décernerait à un agent du SCRS un mandat lui permettant d'enfreindre la loi ou de violer la Charte. Le libellé entourant ce que les juges peuvent faire et la fréquence à laquelle ils peuvent le faire ainsi que le respect qu'ils doivent accorder à la Charte lorsqu'ils décernent un tel mandat est bien meilleur dans ce projet de loi, mais il est encore présent, et cela m'inquiète qu'on ne prévoit pas la présence d'avocats spéciaux dans la pièce.
Je ne peux pas dire que je raffole du projet de loi  C-59, mais il s'agit d'une énorme amélioration par rapport à ce que nous avons vu lors de la 41e législature avec le projet de loi C-51.
Pour les minutes qu'il me reste, j'aimerais parler de l'office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité et de renseignement.
C'est un point fondamental. C'est ce que le juge John Major qui présidait l'enquête sur la tragédie d'Air India a dit au comité lorsque ce dernier étudiait le projet de loi, en 2015. Il nous a dit que le fait que la GRC et le SCRS n'échangent pas leurs renseignements était tout simplement un trait de la nature humaine, et qu'il nous fallait un mécanisme de surveillance de haut calibre.
Il y a une certaine surveillance qui se fait — et le terme « surveillance » a ici une dimension d'après-coup —, alors le CSARS, le Comité de surveillance des activités de renseignement de sécurité, garderait un oeil sur ce que le SCRS aurait fait pendant l'année, sauf que jusqu'à ce que ce projet de loi soit proposé, nous n'avons jamais eu d'organisme de sécurité pour surveiller ce que faisait tout ce beau monde. Il y a le SCRS, la GRC, l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications — cinq différents organismes qui s'appliquent à colliger des renseignements, mais toujours en vase clos. C'est pour cette raison que la création de l'office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité et de renseignement prévue aux termes du projet de loi est une grosse amélioration.
Results: 1 - 6 of 6

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data