Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 100 of 149
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2021-05-31 20:33 [p.7680]
Madam Chair, does the Invest in Canada Hub promote foreign direct investments in Canada and facilitate that investment from foreign state-owned enterprises?
Madame la présidente, Investir au Canada vise-t-il à faire la promotion des investissements étrangers directs et à faciliter les investissements d'entreprises appartenant à des États étrangers?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 20:34 [p.7680]
Madam Chair, Invest in Canada conducts its work in the interests of and in response to Canadian trade policy—
Madame la présidente, Investir au Canada travaille en réponse à la politique commerciale du Canada et dans l'intérêt de celui-ci...
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
2021-05-12 14:31 [p.7106]
Mr. Speaker, the military report into the long-term care home crisis in Ontario and Quebec has revealed additional shocking details. Many of the people who died in long-term care did not die because of COVID-19. They died because of neglect. They were dehydrated and malnourished. Despite knowing this, the Prime Minister has yet to take action on bringing in national standards or a commitment to removing profit from long-term care.
What will it take for the Prime Minister to take concrete action to save lives in long-term care?
Monsieur le Président, le rapport militaire concernant la crise des établissements de soins de longue durée en Ontario et au Québec révèle des détails supplémentaires choquants. Bon nombre des personnes décédées dans un établissement de soins de longue durée ne sont pas décédées de la COVID-19, mais de négligence. Ces personnes étaient déshydratées et mal nourries. Malgré cette information, le premier ministre tarde toujours à instaurer des normes nationales ou à s'engager à éliminer le modèle à but lucratif dans le secteur des soins de longue durée.
Que faudra-t-il pour que le premier ministre prenne des mesures concrètes afin de sauver des vies dans les établissements de soins de longue durée?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Justin Trudeau Profile
2021-05-12 14:31 [p.7106]
Mr. Speaker, only the NDP would consider that $3 billion in budget 2021 towards long-term care would not be enough or would not be action.
People living in long-term care deserve safe, quality care and to be treated with dignity. This pandemic has shown us that there are systemic issues affecting long-term care homes across Canada. That is why we invested that $3 billion to create standards for long-term care and make permanent changes.
We will continue working with our partners to protect our loved ones in long-term care right across the country.
Monsieur le Président, seul le NPD considérerait comme étant insuffisants ou comme équivalant à de l'inaction de la part du gouvernement les 3 milliards de dollars prévus pour les soins de longue durée dans le budget de 2021.
Les personnes qui résident dans un établissement de soins de longue durée méritent de vivre en toute sécurité, de recevoir des soins de qualité et d'être traitées avec dignité. Cette pandémie nous montre qu'il existe des problèmes systémiques dans les établissements de soins de longue durée au Canada. Voilà pourquoi nous investissons ces 3 milliards de dollars afin d'instaurer des normes de soins de longue durée et d'opérer un changement permanent.
Nous continuerons de collaborer avec nos partenaires pour protéger nos êtres chers qui ont besoin de soins de longue durée, où qu'ils vivent au pays.
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
2021-05-12 14:32 [p.7106]
Mr. Speaker, only the Liberals and the Prime Minister would think that their actions were sufficient. People are still dying in long-term care, it is still clear that neglect is ongoing and it is still clear that there are no national standards in place to protect seniors and residents of long-term care.
Certainly, the government has failed to do something as basic as make a commitment to remove profit from long-term care, starting with Revera. Again, I ask when will the Prime Minister take concrete action to save lives in long-term care?
Monsieur le Président, seuls les libéraux et le premier ministre pourraient croire que leurs gestes étaient suffisants. Des gens continuent de mourir dans des établissements de soins de longue durée, il est clair que la négligence persiste et il est clair qu'il n'existe aucune norme nationale pour protéger les aînés et les résidants des établissements de soins de longue durée.
Manifestement, le gouvernement a omis de faire quelque chose d'aussi fondamental que de s'engager à éliminer la recherche du profit dans le domaine des soins de longue durée, en commençant par Revera. Je répète ma question. Quand le premier ministre va-t-il prendre des mesures concrètes pour sauver des vies dans les établissements de soins de longue durée?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Justin Trudeau Profile
2021-05-12 14:33 [p.7107]
Mr. Speaker, the situation facing residents in long-term care across the country is absolutely deplorable. We have seen far too many lives lost because of unacceptable situations. That is why as a federal government, we have stepped up and worked with the provinces and territories, whose jurisdiction it is, to send them supports and create standards so that every senior right across the country can be properly protected. They can retire and live in safety and dignity. That is something that we know, but it is also something that we understand is led by the provinces.
Monsieur le Président, la situation des résidants des établissements de soins de longue durée est absolument déplorable partout au pays. Beaucoup trop de vies ont été perdues à cause de situations inacceptables. Voilà pourquoi le gouvernement fédéral est intervenu afin de collaborer avec les provinces et les territoires, de qui relèvent ces établissements, pour leur envoyer de l'aide et établir des normes afin de protéger adéquatement tous les aînés du pays. Ces aînés pourront ainsi prendre leur retraite et vivre de façon digne, en toute sécurité. Nous savons tout cela, mais nous comprenons aussi qu'il s'agit d'un dossier de compétence provinciale.
View Brian Masse Profile
NDP (ON)
View Brian Masse Profile
2021-05-10 20:09 [p.7006]
Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise today to talk about this report. It is a very important one. The discussion of the Investment Canada Act has been very lively for many years.
This report is the result of a motion from the member for Calgary Nose Hill, and there was much support to bring it to fruition. I want to thank all the witnesses who came forward to present and also those who made submissions. I also want to thank the staff. Our legislative crew is excellent. The researchers and analysts always did a good job during the process on a very complicated issue. We have a report that is quite extensive, about 50 pages of materials that have been condensed, reflecting some of the concerns that emerged from the sale of Canadian companies, but also the loss of sovereignty, in some respects, in the lost investments.
I will start, though, by discussing something that took place in the debate tonight that related to the parliamentary secretary. It will be interesting to see how the Liberals configure their position out of that. I asked about recommendation 2, which is, “That the Government of Canada introduce legislation to amend the Investment Canada Act so that thresholds are reviewed on an annual basis.” The Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister, if we think it is significant, responded by saying he supported the recommendations of the committee, yet the Liberals put in a dissenting opinion. They could have put in a supplementary opinion, but they put in a dissenting opinion, which said, “Under the ICA, the annual net benefit review thresholds are reviewed and revised by the Minister on an annual basis, rendering the proposed legislative amendments unnecessary.”
Since the parliamentary secretary represents the Prime Minister, I am wondering whether he is having second thoughts to the committee members or to the Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry, who did not address this, or whether the parliamentary secretary is freelancing by himself on this issue. I do not know which it is, but it will be interesting to sort that out because that is the reality of what has been presented to us today.
The reality is that the thresholds have been raised over a number of years and have created quite a concern among Canadians and businesses. They have been raised because of the iconic ones that we have lost, Falconbridge, Inco, a whole series that are name- and brand-recognizable firms. However, what has been presented, and what the previous speaker so eloquently discussed, is that there are smaller firms right now that go under the radar of the threshold and are gobbled up on a regular basis. In fact, there has been an exponential increase.
Part of the discussion we had at committee and part of the report is that, under COVID-19, a lot of vulnerable businesses could be purchased by non-democratic governments. I do not want to speak to just one particular country at the moment, but the reality is that some countries are using their public assets to purchase Canadian companies. With the COVID-19 issue related to the vulnerability of businesses, we have a lot of start-ups and medium-sized businesses that are very vulnerable to this.
This issue goes back quite some time, at least from my perspective. I first raised it at the industry committee with regard to non-democratic governments buying Canadian companies back in 2004. I had discussed it before, but we actually had hearings at that time. There was a headline in The Globe and Mail, “Chinese bid prompts MPs to eye revising investment act”. That was because of Noranda being purchased by China Minmetals.
At that time, I raised the question as to whether it is appropriate to have that type of investment, because it is a non-democratic government. It is not necessarily that it is China, but there are others as well. China decided to go on a purchasing spree after 2000 across the globe, and that included Canada. If we look at the sliding scale of purchases and investments, they are quite significant. That brings up a lot of questions about privacy and control of ownership of different types of assets, and, I would say, it has played itself out in terms of the housing market and speculative approaches that have had significant consequences for Canadians.
I pushed for it, and it came back in Parliament again in 2007. A Toronto Star article said, “Security may be factor in buyout review”. When I pushed for Industry Canada to look at this again, it was about looking at a national security clause in review, which has now been introduced as part of it, because a lot of companies were being purchased that were important to our national security.
This comes from my interest in it representing Windsor, Ontario where the manufacturing centre has been part of our DNA since our establishment as a community and as part of Canada. During the First and Second World War and recently, manufacturing has been part of our heritage. In fact, during the Second World War, we were very much a logistics centre for producing materials to fight fascism.
I have always viewed manufacturing as part of our national structure of defence and also our national importance of connecting people to jobs and meaningfulness and also self-determination. If we did not have that capability, we would not be able to do the things that we do today. Back at that time, it was maybe more raw materials and turning them into things that were used, versus today where there is lack of that vision.
I will always remember and I reference quite often the Prime Minister going to London, Ontario and saying that we actually had to transition out of manufacturing. That was pretty offensive because we do not need to just do rip and ship. One of the tragic things about our oil and gas industry is that we do not have enough refining capacity. I have seen Oakville, for example, lose Petro-Canada. I have seen several other refineries close down as opposed to being invested in, often because of the loss of Canadian control or they no longer became investment opportunities because of a lot of different issues. We lost the capability there.
We have lost some of the capability right now for our forestry industry, as we have a lot of our industry co-owned between Canada and the United States. There does not even have to be collusion, there can just be a disinterest in competing against ourselves and lowering market prices because there is no real interest to do so.
Canada has had some of our natural resources purchased. I mentioned the mining industry to be prioritized because it goes to foreign markets for value-added manufacturing that the Prime Minister wants us to transition out of. That is unfortunate because the value-added economy of manufacturing is important today in this new age for innovation.
When we are looking at solar, wind, alternative energy and also the innovation that is taking place, I often point to what is taking place in Detroit, basically two kilometres from where I am right now. It has billions of dollars going into new electric vehicles and manufacturing there and we do not have the same here. We have some piecemeal and some very important projects taking place that are exciting, but we do not have a national strategy and we do not have the same type of investment taking place. In fact, in Detroit there was over $12 billion of investment in the last number of years and for all of the Canada in the last five or six years, we were at around $6 billion, which is basically not in the game any more with respect to where we should be.
This report did get a response from the minister. There have been some modest improvements to the bill and there has been some strengthening related to national security review, but they did not make some of the bigger changes that we had asked for. I had done some work with Unite, a labour union in British Columbia. It represented a number of companies that had basically been taken over by the Chinese state. I will not get into the full details, but I am going to read this recommendation that has not been implemented:
That the government of Canada immediately introduce legislation amending the Investment Canada Act to allow for the establishment of a privacy protection review of and the ability to enforce Canadians’ privacy and digital rights in any ICA approved acquisition, merger, or investment.
That is the one that I want to talk about. The one that did get pushed through, which I am pleased about, also allows for divestment issues to take place and the minister did move on that. That is important.
I want to pivot because we are looking at some of our privacy laws right now and people need to be aware that we have a Privacy Commissioner in Canada. The United States does not have that; other places do not have privacy. Our privacy laws affect everything from our capability to be involved as a citizen and our own personal life, but also our businesses, and our ability to share information, to work collaboratively and to be connected in terms of mergers and so forth in a more modest way.
We have asked for this to be part of the actual law, because with those expectations we can keep data and information under a review process. I will give a specific example of the Canada census, which I had worked on, to show the vulnerabilities.
It is ironic, because the census is taking place right now, and I encourage everybody to sign up for it. My riding, for a lot of different reasons, has one of the lower rates of compliance, which needs to be improved. Often it is because of language, but there are other reasons as well. However, it is important to fill out the census for government supports and services, and a whole series of things.
At any rate, at the time, our census was actually outsourced to Lockheed Martin. It may sound bizarre to some people that an arms manufacturer would actually get hold of our Canada census, but it did. It had won the contract, and it did that in a number of places. However, because of the Patriot Act, it was going to assemble our data in the United States. It would have allowed all of our census information to be vulnerable to the Patriot Act.
The way the Patriot Act works in the United States is that we would not have control over our data. The U.S. can access that data and then the company that is actually giving it up through the act is not even allowed to report it to us. The act is a fallout from 9/11, when a series of laws were put in place.
The data was going to be moved from Canada, but we fought hard, and we were able to get the data to stay in Canada and actually be processed here, protecting the data from that.
Ironically, Lockheed Martin is no longer doing our census. It was one of those things where we outsourced to be “efficient”, but it turned out to be a loss, because we had to actually pay more money. On top of that, the company is no longer around, and we are back to where we started from, and so that shortcut did not work.
I really believe that there should be a privacy screen as part of takeovers. When we look at the complications that Facebook and other companies have had with some of the privacy breaches, even being held hostage, it is important to note that we are very vulnerable, but we still do not have laws to protect companies.
The University of Calgary had a security breach and actually paid money to have its privacy protected. We do not even have a sense of the entire situation right now, because a number of companies have compromised privacy. They make payouts and different types of restitution, but they do not have to make it public. Some of it does go public but some of it does not; it just depends upon the situation.
When we look at foreign takeovers and the Investment Canada Act, I would point to a few takeovers that have really affected people in their day-to-day lives.
My colleague raised Lowe's and Rona, and I thank him for that, but it is a great example of the consequences, because we have lost competition there. We basically had two competing companies that have been erased off the chessboard, so to speak. Now we are very vulnerable, and there is no motivation to compete. In fact, not only is there less competition, it has made housing more difficult, fixing up our properties more difficult and small businesses are more dependent upon one provider. It has had significant economic consequences.
I opposed that merger and appealed to the government to stop it, but the government refused. I think the parties signed a side agreement to maybe keep their headquarters here and that is about it. However, eventually the stores closed, and I cannot think of a worse situation that we have right now, because we are now dependent upon a one-source provider. We have lost those jobs, but more importantly, the competition.
Another example, which may seem less significant but true, is when Future Shop was taken over by Best Buy. Again, how did that benefit consumers? We lost another competitor, the Canadian franchise company of Future Shop, and for electronics, we are made very vulnerable to being one-source supplied. We have lost that competitive element.
One of the worst examples ever is Zellers being bought out by Target. Here we had Zellers making a profit during a time when chain retail was having difficulty. It had a union, wages just above minimum wage and benefits. Then Target came in, bought up Zellers and promptly shut the stores down in a failed operation. The jobs were lost, the workers lost their benefits, and we lost competition, and for nothing. We had a phony U.S. chain come in here and basically do a social experiment. We lost a significant part of our retail market economy. We have not recovered from that in many respects, because we do not have that type of competition any more.
I think about London, Ontario, where Caterpillar took over Electro-Motive. That was an important one, because those were good manufacturing jobs. That was about union busting and driving out competition.
One of the more iconic ones was when Stelco was taken over by U.S. Steel in Hamilton. We still are feeling the repercussions of that. We lost production capacity, which was an important part of our long-term history of manufacturing steel in the Hamilton region. An exceptional skilled-labour workforce was thrown out because U.S. Steel wanted to wind down operations.
I do not think we are going to continue having the type of situation we are seeing at the moment because of COVID. However, we have a lot of situations with smaller companies. There can be a better way.
I do not want this to be a negative speech because it is about raising awareness. There have been some wonderful cases where we have fought back and we have seen Canadian companies remain. I would point to the Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan. In 2004, the Australian company BHP Billiton was trying to take over the Potash Corporation. We fought that and were successful.
The second example I can think of is MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates and Canadian space and satellite technology. We were able to prevent some of that takeover, and some of that is Canadian innovation.
I want to touch on something that is often forgotten. When we look at some of the tax on research and development, and incentives such as SR&ED credits and a whole series of others, we have to remember that as we are building up some of these companies, and providing subsidies for them to do research and development, we should have an obligation to stay Canadian and so should they. That is one of the things that we have to recognize. When we are giving incentives, whether they are direct or indirect subsidies, there is an obligation and an investment by the Canadian public. Therefore, if we were going to have a so-called free-market economy, where we get government out of the way, we would not be doing tax credits or subsidies for a whole series of things. We choose them as a democracy and as an innovative society to make advancements. If we do not actually get the fruits of those investments, they do not make any sense at the end of the day.
We have talked a bit about thresholds, but we are not seeing the action that we need to. We have much more work to do on this, and so much awareness is necessary. It is a very complicated file, but there is no doubt that it is sometimes captured in some of the iconic companies in the bigger acquisitions that take place. Let us not forget the small and medium-sized businesses that fly under the radar and under the requirements for review, that we just get notifications that we are losing. That is a poor choice for a country, especially if we are trying to build up our small and medium-sized businesses. We need to protect those assets and develop them better.
I will conclude my speech by again thanking the staff and the analysts for all the work that went behind this report. I know that some have diminished the importance of this debate for different reasons in the House of Commons, but I appreciate it because it has been important. At least we have it on the record, and I know that the House of Commons worked really hard to present issues in front of the government and the minister, as food for thought and also for making a difference.
Monsieur le Président, je suis heureux de participer au débat d'aujourd'hui concernant le rapport. Il s'agit d'un rapport très important. La Loi sur Investissement Canada a fait l'objet de discussions très animées pendant de nombreuses années.
Ce rapport est le résultat d'une motion de la députée de Calgary Nose Hill et il y a eu beaucoup de soutien pour le mener à bien. Je tiens à remercier tous les témoins qui ont comparu et ceux qui ont présenté des mémoires. Je tiens également à remercier le personnel. L'équipe législative est excellente. Les recherchistes et les analystes ont toujours fait un bon travail au cours du processus portant sur une question très complexe. Nous disposons d'un rapport assez complet d'environ 60 pages de matériel qui a été synthétisé, qui reflète certaines des préoccupations qui sont ressorties de la vente d'entreprises canadiennes, mais aussi de la perte de souveraineté, à certains égards, dans les investissements perdus.
Dans un premier temps, je me concentrerai toutefois sur une chose qui s'est produite pendant le débat de ce soir et qui concerne le secrétaire parlementaire. Je me demande comment les libéraux ajusteront leur position en conséquence. J'ai posé une question à propos de la recommandation 2, qui dit ceci: « Que le gouvernement du Canada dépose un projet de loi pour modifier la Loi sur Investissement Canada afin de revoir les seuils chaque année. » Le secrétaire parlementaire du premier ministre a répondu, ce qui peut sembler significatif, qu'il appuie les recommandations du comité. Les libéraux ont pourtant produit une opinion dissidente. Ils auraient pu présenter une opinion complémentaire, mais ils ont présenté une opinion dissidente qui dit ceci: « Aux termes de la [Loi sur Investissement Canada], les seuils annuels d’examen des avantages nets sont examinés et révisés annuellement par le ministre, ce qui rend inutiles les modifications législatives proposées. »
Comme le secrétaire parlementaire représente le premier ministre, je me demande s'il remet en question ce qu'ont dit les membres du comité, s'il invite à la réflexion le ministre de l’Innovation, des Sciences et de l’Industrie, qui n'a pas parlé de ce point, ou s'il rompt les rangs avec son parti sur ce sujet. Je ne sais pas quel scénario est le bon, mais il serait intéressant de le savoir étant donné ce qui nous a été présenté aujourd'hui.
Dans les faits, les seuils ont remonté au fil des ans, ce qui n'a pas été sans causer une certaine inquiétude chez les Canadiens, surtout parmi les entreprises. Les seuils ont été haussés parce que nous avons perdu plusieurs fleurons, comme Falconbridge et Inco, mais il y en a d'autres, que l'on peut tous reconnaître à leur nom et à leur image de marque. Le problème, au risque de répéter ce que l'intervenant précédent a si éloquemment expliqué, c'est qu'à l'heure qu'on se parle, il y a des petites entreprises qui sont laissées pour compte parce qu'elles n'atteignent pas le seuil et qui se font gober. Pour tout dire, la hausse est exponentielle.
Il est ressorti des discussions du comité — et c'est notamment ce que dit le rapport — qu'à cause de la COVID-19, beaucoup d'entreprises vulnérables pourraient être achetées par des gouvernements non démocratiques. Loin de moi l'idée de vouloir pointer un pays du doigt, mais il n'en demeure pas moins que certains pays utilisent des fonds publics pour acheter des entreprises canadiennes. La COVID ayant accentué la vulnérabilité des entreprises, énormément de jeunes pousses et de moyennes entreprises risquent de connaître le même sort.
Si on me demande mon avis, ce problème est loin de dater d'hier. La première fois que j'ai parlé des gouvernements non démocratiques qui achètent des entreprises canadiennes au comité de l'industrie, c'était en 2004. Encore là, ce n'était pas la première fois que j'abordais la question, c'est juste qu'à l'époque, le comité tenait des audiences là-dessus. Je me souviens même d'une manchette dans le Globe and Mail qui disait que la Chine faisait pression sur les députés pour qu'ils revoient la loi sur les investissements. Noranda venait d'être achetée par China Minmetals.
À ce moment-là, j'ai demandé s'il était approprié de permettre ce genre d'investissements parce qu'ils provenaient d'un gouvernement non démocratique. Ce n'est pas forcément parce qu'il s'agit de la Chine, étant donné qu'il y a aussi d'autres pays. Après l'an 2000, la Chine s'est lancée dans une frénésie d'acquisitions partout dans le monde, notamment au Canada. Si on examine l'échelle mobile des acquisitions et des investissements, on constate qu'ils sont très importants. Cela soulève beaucoup de questions au sujet de la protection des renseignements personnels et du contrôle de la propriété des différents types de biens. Je dirais que cela s'est joué sur le marché immobilier et au moyen d'approches spéculatives qui ont eu des conséquences importantes pour les Canadiens.
J'ai insisté sur cette question, et elle est revenue au Parlement en 2007. Un article du Toronto Star disait ceci: « La sécurité est peut-être un facteur dans les examens d'opérations de rachat ». Quand j'ai réclamé qu'Industrie Canada examine de nouveau cette question, je parlais d'envisager une disposition sur la sécurité nationale dans les examens, disposition qui en fait maintenant partie parce que de nombreuses entreprises rachetées étaient importantes pour la sécurité nationale.
Si je m'intéresse à ce dossier, c'est parce que je représente Windsor, en Ontario, où le centre manufacturier fait partie de l'ADN de la ville depuis sa fondation au Canada. Lors de la Première et de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, le secteur manufacturier faisait partie de notre patrimoine, et c'est encore le cas aujourd'hui. En fait, lors de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, nous étions un centre de logistique pour la production de matériel servant à lutter contre le fascisme.
J'ai toujours considéré que le secteur manufacturier faisait partie de la structure nationale de la défense et qu'il revêtait aussi une importance nationale, car il donne aux gens des emplois, le sentiment d'être utiles et de l'autodétermination. Si nous n'avions pas cette capacité, nous ne pourrions pas accomplir les choses que nous accomplissons aujourd'hui. À l'époque, il fallait davantage transformer des matières premières en objets qui étaient utilisés, alors que, aujourd'hui, nous n'avons plus cette vision.
Je parle assez souvent d'une visite du premier ministre à London, en Ontario, que je n'oublierai jamais, où il a déclaré qu'il fallait abandonner progressivement l'industrie manufacturière. C'était assez insultant, car nous ne devrions pas seulement nous concentrer sur l'extraction et l'expédition. L'un des aspects tragiques de la situation de notre industrie pétrolière et gazière est l'insuffisance de notre capacité en matière de raffinage. J'ai vu Oakville, par exemple, perdre Petro-Canada. J'ai vu plusieurs autres raffineries fermer parce qu'on n'y avait pas investi, souvent parce qu'elles n'étaient plus contrôlées par des intérêts canadiens ou parce qu'elles ne présentaient plus d'intérêt pour les investisseurs en raison de divers problèmes. Il y a donc eu perte de capacité.
Le secteur forestier canadien a perdu une partie de sa capacité, car une bonne partie de notre industrie appartient à des intérêts canadiens et américains. Il ne s'agit pas nécessairement de collusion. Il est possible que nous ne souhaitions pas nous concurrencer nous-mêmes et baisser les prix, parce que cela ne nous donnerait rien.
Le Canada vend ses matières premières. J'ai mentionné qu'il fallait accorder la priorité à l'industrie minière parce que nos matières premières sont exportées vers des marchés étrangers pour de la production à valeur ajoutée, que nous devrions abandonner progressivement, d'après le premier ministre. C'est regrettable, car la fabrication à valeur ajoutée est importante de nos jours, en cette nouvelle ère de l'innovation.
Quand nous parlons d'énergies de remplacement, comme l'énergie solaire et éolienne, et d'innovation, je souligne souvent ce qui se passe à Detroit, qui se trouve essentiellement à deux kilomètres de l'endroit où je suis actuellement. On y investit des milliards de dollars dans la construction de nouveaux véhicules électriques. Ce n'est pas ce que l'on fait ici. Nous sommes en train de réaliser des projets majeurs et emballants, mais nous n'avons pas de stratégie nationale, uniquement une stratégie fragmentaire. Nous n'investissons pas non plus autant d'argent. En effet, à Detroit, on a vu des investissements de plus de 12 milliards de dollars au cours des dernières années, alors que, dans l'ensemble du Canada, on n'a investi qu'environ 6 milliards de dollars au cours des cinq à six dernières années, ce qui nous met bien loin de l'endroit où nous devrions être dans la course.
Le ministre a répondu au rapport. Le gouvernement a apporté quelques légères améliorations au projet de loi, et il a resserré quelque peu les mécanismes d'examen relatif à la sécurité nationale, mais il n'a pas apporté certains des changements plus importants que nous avons réclamés. J'avais travaillé un peu avec Unite, un syndicat de la Colombie-Britannique qui représentait plusieurs entreprises qui étaient essentiellement passées sous le contrôle de l'État chinois. Je n'entrerai pas dans les détails, mais je vais lire cette recommandation à laquelle le gouvernement n'a pas donné suite:
Que le gouvernement du Canada présente immédiatement un projet de loi modifiant la Loi sur Investissement Canada afin de permettre l'établissement d'un examen de la protection de la vie privée et la capacité de faire respecter la vie privée et les droits numériques des Canadiens dans toute acquisition, fusion ou investissement approuvé par la LIC.
C'est la recommandation dont je veux parler. La recommandation qui a été adoptée — et je m'en réjouis — permet aussi d'ordonner le dessaisissement d'entreprises, et le ministre a agi dans ce dossier. C'est important.
Je veux en parler parce que nous examinons en ce moment certaines de nos lois sur la protection des renseignements personnels, et les gens doivent savoir que nous avons un commissaire à la protection de la vie privée au Canada. Les États-Unis n'en ont pas; d'autres endroits n'ont pas de telles protections. Les lois canadiennes sur la protection des renseignements personnels touchent toutes les facettes: notre capacité à nous impliquer en tant que citoyen et notre vie personnelle, mais aussi nos entreprises et notre capacité à échanger de l'information, à travailler en collaboration et à être reliés par des fusions et autres, d'une façon plus modeste.
Nous demandons donc que ce soit inscrit dans la loi, de manière à ce que nous puissions assujettir les données et les renseignements à un processus d'examen. Je donne un exemple précis pour montrer les vulnérabilités. J'ai choisi le recensement du Canada, auquel j'ai d'ailleurs travaillé.
C'est ironique, puisque le recensement est en cours en ce moment. D'ailleurs, j'encourage chacun à y participer. Pour de nombreuses raisons, ma circonscription affiche l'un des taux de conformité les plus faibles. Il faut améliorer cela. C'est souvent une question de langue, mais il y a d'autres raisons. Quoi qu'il en soit, il est important de remplir le formulaire de recensement pour éclairer et justifier les mesures de soutien et les services offerts par le gouvernement, et bien d'autres choses.
À l'époque où je travaillais pour le recensement, celui-ci était en fait confié à Lockheed Martin. Il peut sembler curieux qu'un fabricant d'armes soit saisi du recensement du Canada, mais c'était bel et bien le cas. L'entreprise avait obtenu le contrat, et elle réalisait le recensement de divers pays. Toutefois, en raison de la Patriot Act, elle devait compiler nos données aux États-Unis. Cela aurait exposé toutes nos données de recensement à la Patriot Act.
La façon dont la Patriot Act fonctionne aux États-Unis ferait en sorte que nous n'aurions pas le contrôle sur nos données. Les États-Unis peuvent accéder à ces données et l'entreprise qui les produit aux termes de la loi ne peut même pas nous en avertir. La loi a été adoptée dans la foulée du 11 septembre en compagnie d'autres lois.
Les données allaient être déplacées hors du Canada, mais nous nous sommes battus et nous avons réussi à faire en sorte qu'elles demeurent au pays et qu'elles soient traitées ici, de façon à les protéger.
Ironiquement, Lockheed Martin ne s'occupe plus du recensement canadien. C'est l'un des exemples de tâche envoyée en sous-traitance par souhait d'efficacité qui ne s'est finalement pas réalisé, puisque ça a coûté plus cher. En outre, l'entreprise n'existe plus et nous nous retrouvons à la case départ, alors ce fut plutôt une perte de temps.
Je crois réellement qu'il devrait y avoir une cloison pour protéger les données personnelles en cas de prise de contrôle. Quand on songe aux complications auxquelles ont dû faire face Facebook ou d'autres entreprises qui ont été victimes de fuites de renseignements personnels — voire prises en otage—, il est important de réaliser que nous sommes très vulnérables, mais que le pays n'a toujours pas de lois pour protéger les entreprises.
L'Université de Calgary a été victime d'une fuite de renseignements personnels et elle a dû payer une rançon pour protéger ces renseignements. Nous n'avons pas à l'heure actuelle une idée juste de l'ampleur du problème, parce que, même si un certain nombre d'entreprises ont été attaquées, elles paient les rançons demandées, sous différentes formes, mais elles n'ont pas à le déclarer publiquement. Parfois, l'information est révélée, mais pas toujours; cela dépend de la situation.
À l'aune de la Loi sur Investissement Canada, certaines prises de contrôle par des intérêts étrangers ont eu des impacts sur le quotidien des gens.
Mon collègue a parlé de Lowe's et de Rona, et je l'en remercie. C'est un bon exemple des conséquences que peut entraîner une acquisition. La concurrence en a pris un coup. En gros, deux entreprises concurrentes ont été rayées de l'échiquier, pour ainsi dire, et aujourd'hui, nous sommes très vulnérables. Il n'y a plus de raison de se faire concurrence. De fait, non seulement il y a moins de concurrence, mais en plus, cela a aggravé la situation du logement, il est plus difficile de rénover nos habitations et les petites entreprises sont devenues dépendantes d'un seul fournisseur. Cela a eu des conséquences économiques énormes.
Je me suis opposé à cette fusion et j'ai demandé au gouvernement de la bloquer, mais il a refusé. Je pense que les parties ont signé un accord parallèle pour peut-être garder leur siège social ici et c'est à peu près tout. Les magasins ont quand même fini par fermer. Je ne peux imaginer pire situation, parce qu'il n'y a plus qu'un fournisseur unique. Nous avons perdu ces emplois, mais plus important encore, nous avons perdu l'élément concurrentiel.
Prenons un autre exemple, qui est vrai, même s'il peut paraître moins remarquable: c'est celui de l'achat de Future Shop par Best Buy. En quoi a-t-il été bénéfique aux consommateurs? Nous avons perdu un autre concurrent, l'entreprise canadienne franchisée de Future Shop, et en matière d'électronique, il ne nous reste qu'un seul fournisseur, ce qui nous rend très vulnérables. Nous avons perdu cet élément concurrentiel.
Un des pires exemples de l'histoire est l'achat de Zellers par Target. Zellers était une entreprise rentable à une époque très difficile pour les grandes chaînes de vente au détail. Ses employés étaient syndiqués, gagnaient un salaire légèrement supérieur au salaire minimum et avaient des avantages sociaux. Puis Target a acheté Zellers et a aussitôt fermé les magasins. Ce fut un véritable gâchis. Les emplois sont disparus, les employés ont perdu leurs avantages sociaux et l'industrie a perdu un joueur, tout cela pour rien. Une entreprise américaine bidon est venue ici pour faire ni plus ni moins qu'une expérience sociale. Nous avons perdu une grosse partie de notre marché de la vente au détail. À bien des égards, nous ne nous en sommes pas remis, parce que ce genre de concurrence n'existe plus.
Je pense à London, en Ontario, où Caterpillar a acheté Electro-Motive. C'est un événement majeur, car il s'agissait de bons emplois dans le secteur manufacturier. Si cet achat a eu lieu, c'était purement pour briser le syndicat et faire disparaître un concurrent.
Un des exemples les plus marquants est l'achat de Stelco par la U.S. Steel à Hamilton. Les effets s'en font encore sentir. Nous avons perdu de la capacité de production, ce qui est une facette importante de notre longue histoire de fabrication d'acier dans la région d'Hamilton. Une main-d'œuvre exceptionnellement spécialisée a été sacrifiée parce que la U.S. Steel voulait réduire ses opérations.
Je ne crois pas que la situation actuelle causée par la COVID va perdurer. Par contre, beaucoup de petites entreprises connaissent leur lot de difficultés. Il y a un meilleur moyen de faire les choses.
Mon but n'est pas de faire un discours pessimiste, car l'important, c'est la sensibilisation. Il y a aussi de nombreux exemples où nous avons su combattre et conserver nos entreprises canadiennes. Je pense à la Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan. En 2004, BHP Billiton, une entreprise australienne, avait tenté de faire l'acquisition de la Potash Corporation. Nous avons contesté et nous avons eu gain de cause.
Le deuxième exemple auquel je pense est MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates et la technologie spatiale et satellitaire canadienne. Nous avons réussi à empêcher en partie la prise de contrôle de cette entreprise, qui développe dans une certaine mesure des innovations canadiennes.
Je tiens à parler d'un sujet qui est souvent oublié. Quand on examine l'impôt sur la recherche-développement, les incitatifs comme le crédit d'impôt pour la recherche scientifique et le développement expérimental, et j'en passe, il faut se rappeler que, alors que nous bâtissons ces entreprises et que nous leur accordons des subventions pour faire de la recherche-développement, nous devrions avoir l'obligation de demeurer canadiens, et elles aussi. C'est l'une des choses qu'il faut reconnaître. Quand nous accordons des incitatifs, que ce soit des subventions directes ou indirectes, c'est la population canadienne qui investit, alors ces fonds devraient s'accompagner d'une obligation. Par conséquent, si nous étions dans une soi-disant économie de libre marché, où le gouvernement reste à l'écart, il n'y aurait pas de crédit d'impôt ou de subvention pour toutes sortes de choses. En tant que démocratie et société novatrice, nous choisissons ces entreprises pour faire des progrès technologiques. Si nous ne récoltons pas les fruits de ces investissements, en définitive, ils n'ont aucun sens.
Nous avons parlé un peu des seuils, mais nous ne voyons pas les mesures qui doivent être prises. Nous avons encore beaucoup de travail à cet égard, et une prise de conscience est nécessaire. C'est un dossier très compliqué, dont l'importance devient sans doute plus évidente lorsqu'un fleuron de l'économie est vendu à des intérêts étrangers. Toutefois, n'oublions pas les PME, qui ne sont pas assujetties à des examens et qui, nous apprend-on, vont fermer leurs portes. C'est un mauvais choix pour le pays, surtout si nous essayons de développer les PME. Ce sont des atouts que nous devons protéger et mieux développer.
Je vais terminer en remerciant une nouvelle fois le personnel et les analystes pour tout le travail accompli dans le cadre du rapport. Je sais que certains ont minimisé l'importance du débat pour différentes raisons, mais je me réjouis qu'il ait lieu, car il est réellement important. Au moins, le rapport est là, et je sais que la Chambre des communes a travaillé très fort pour soumettre des questions au gouvernement et au ministre, pour leur donner matière à réflexion et pour essayer d'améliorer la situation.
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for Windsor West who is the dean of the industry committee. We always learn a lot by listening to him. I believe at our last meeting, we had Dan McTeague lamenting the lost Liberal legacy as far as industry and business are concerned.
I would like to ask the member if he could comment on the expert testimony that we have seen. Although he did not mention it in his speech, could the member comment on one of the recommendations, and the discussion that we had, where the Liberals felt there was no need to compel the minister to consult with our security agencies during a national security review? In the past, the minister actually did not consult with CSIS or RCMP while doing these reviews. Most experts we heard said the minister does not normally even bother consulting with them.
Is it a good idea to leave it as it is, with so much discretion of the minister?
Monsieur le Président, je remercie le député de Windsor-Ouest, qui est aussi le doyen du comité de l'industrie. On apprend toujours beaucoup à l'écouter. Si je me souviens bien, c'est pendant notre dernière séance que Dan McTeague a dit regretter l'héritage disparu des libéraux dans le domaine de l'industrie et des affaires.
Peut-être le député pourrait-il commenter les témoignages d'experts que nous avons entendus. Pourrait-il parler de la recommandation selon laquelle le ministre devrait être tenu de consulter les organismes de sécurité canadiens au cours de l'examen relatif à la sécurité nationale et des discussions que nous avons eues à ce sujet? Par le passé, le ministre n'a pas consulté le Service canadien du renseignement ni la GRC pendant de tels examens. La plupart des experts que nous avons entendus ont dit que le ministre ne prenait généralement pas la peine de les consulter.
Est-ce une bonne idée de maintenir le statu quo et de continuer de laisser autant de pouvoir discrétionnaire au ministre?
View Brian Masse Profile
NDP (ON)
View Brian Masse Profile
2021-05-10 20:30 [p.7009]
Mr. Speaker, I have had a chance to serve with my colleague a couple of times at committee and it has always been very positive. I am glad he raised this question. Although I did have it circled at one point, I did not mention it. The recommendation states:
That the Government of Canada immediately introduce legislation amending the Investment Canada Act to compel the Minister to consult with the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and the Canadian Security Establishment in the national security process.
The member brought up a really good point that this would mandate it and ensure that it would get done, as it has not always been done. He made an excellent point that it is about best practices and good practices, ensuring everything is thorough and consistent. The most important thing about the Investment Canada Act, especially when it comes under the scrutiny and fairness review, is that this consistency should be there. I know he had raised this and had been a champion of it. It has been a missed opportunity, because some of it gets done, but not all of it. It is not consistent. That would bring some solid resolution to even the challenge of a decision under the Investment Canada Act.
Monsieur le Président, j'ai eu la chance de côtoyer mon collègue à quelques reprises au sein du comité et c'est toujours un plaisir. Je suis content qu'il ait posé cette question, car même si j'avais encerclé ce point, je n'en ai pas parlé. Voici ce que dit la recommandation:
Que le gouvernement du Canada dépose sans tarder un projet de loi modifiant la Loi sur Investissement Canada afin que le ministre soit tenu de consulter le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité, la Gendarmerie royale du Canada et le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications au cours de l’examen relatif à la sécurité nationale.
Le député a raison de dire que, si c'était dans la Loi, le ministre n'aurait pas le choix de consulter ces organismes, ce qui n'est pas toujours le cas à l'heure actuelle. Il a aussi parlé des pratiques exemplaires et du fait que les choses doivent être faites avec constance et rigueur. La constance doit être au cœur de tout examen visant à déterminer si la Loi sur Investissement Canada est équitable. Je sais d'ailleurs que ce sujet tient à cœur au député et qu'il en parle souvent. On passe à côté de quelque chose, parce qu'il y a toujours une partie qui manque. Ce n'est pas constant. Cette solution permettrait de résoudre le problème et de faciliter la prise de décisions dans le cadre de la Loi.
View Anthony Rota Profile
Lib. (ON)

Question No. 479--
Ms. Rachel Blaney:
With regard to consultations held by the Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages since January 2021 to launch a regional economic development agency for British Columbia: (a) how many meetings were held; (b) who attended each meeting; (c) what was the location of each meeting; (d) excluding any expenditures which have yet to be finalized, what are the details of all expenditures related to each meeting, broken down by meeting; (e) what is the itemized breakdown of the expenditures in (d), broken down by (i) venue or location rental, (ii) audiovisual and media equipment, (iii) travel, (iv) food and beverages, (v) security, (vi) translation and interpretation, (vii) advertising, (viii) other expenditures, indicating the nature of each expenditure; (f) how much was spent on contractors and subcontractors; (g) of the contractors and subcontractors in (f), what is the initial and final value of each contract; and (h) among the contractors and subcontractors in (f), what is the description of each service contract?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 480--
Mr. Brad Redekopp:
With regard to communications, public relations or consulting contracts signed by the government or ministers' offices since January 1, 2018, in relation to goods or services provided to ministers offices: what are the details of all such contracts, including (i) the start and end date, (ii) the amount, (iii) the vendor, (iv) the description of goods or services provided, (v) whether the contract was sole-sourced or tendered?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 481--
Mr. Brad Redekopp:
With regard to meetings between ministers or ministerial exempt staff and federal ombudsmen since January 1, 2016: what are the details of all such meetings, including (i) individuals in attendance, (ii) the date, (iii) agenda items or topics discussed?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 482--
Mr. Brad Redekopp:
With regard to the relationship between the government and Canada 2020 since January 1, 2016: (a) what is the total amount of expenditures provided to Canada 2020, broken down by year, for (i) ticket purchases, (ii) sponsorships, (iii) conference fees, (iv) other expenditures; and (b) what is the total number of (i) days, (ii) hours, government officials have spent providing support to Canada 2020 initiatives or programs or attending Canada 2020 events, broken down by year and initiative or event?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 483--
Mr. Ben Lobb:
With regard to contracts provided by the government to McKinsey & Company since November 4, 2015, broken down by department, agency, Crown corporation, or other government entity: (a) what is the total amount spent on contracts; and (b) what are the details of all such contracts, including (i) the amount, (ii) the vendor, (iii) the date and duration, (iv) the description of goods or services provided, (v) topics on which goods or services were related to, (vi) specific goals or objectives related to the contract, (vii) whether or not goals or objectives were met, (viii) whether the contract was sole-sourced or tendered?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 485--
Mr. Ben Lobb:
With regard to meetings between the government, including ministers or ministerial exempt staff, and MCAP since January 1, 2019, broken down by department, agency, Crown corporation, or other government entity: what are the details of all such meetings, including the (i) individuals in attendance, (ii) date, (iii) agenda items or topics discussed?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 486--
Mr. Rob Moore:
With regard to An Act respecting the office of the Director of Public Prosecutions, since October 21, 2019: (a) how many directives has the Attorney General issued to the director of public prosecutions as per (i) subsection 10(1) of the act, (ii) subsection 10(2) of the act; and (b) broken down by (a)(i) and (a)(ii), what (i) were those directives, (ii) was the rationale for these directives?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 488--
Mr. Phil McColeman:
With regard to Canada’s relationship with the Government of China, since October 21, 2019: (a) what is the total amount of official development assistance that has been provided to the People’s Republic of China; (b) what are the details of each project in (a), including the (i) amount, (ii) description of the project, (iii) goal of the project, (iv) rationale for funding the project; (c) what is Global Affairs Canada’s (GAC) best estimate of China’s current annual military budget; and (d) what is GAC’s best estimate of the total annual budget of China’s Belt and Road Initiative?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 489--
Mr. Phil McColeman:
With regard to the government’s announcement of $2.75 billion to purchase zero emission buses: (a) what is the estimated median and average amount each bus will cost; (b) in what municipalities will the buses be located; and (c) how many buses will be located in each of the municipalities in (b), broken down by year for each of the next five years?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 491--
Mr. John Nater:
With regard to the Highly Affected Sectors Credit Availability Program: (a) how many applications have been (i) received, (ii) approved, (iii) denied; (b) what are the details of all approved fundings, including the (i) recipient, (ii) amount; and (c) what are the details of all denied applications, including the (i) applicant, (ii) amount requested, (iii) reason for denial?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 492--
Mr. John Nater:
With regard to the government funding of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) and the genocide of the Uyghurs in China: does the government know which of the projects currently funded by the AIIB and located in China are using forced Uyghur labour, and if so, which ones?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 495--
Mrs. Cheryl Gallant:
With regard to how the Canadian Armed Forces deal with sexual misconduct: (a) since November 4, 2015, what is the total number of alleged incidents of sexual assault; (b) what is the breakdown of (a) by type of allegation (for example male perpetrator and female victim, male perpetrator and male victim, etc.); (c) what is the breakdown of (b) by type of force, (for example Royal Canadian Air Force, Royal Canadian Naval Reserve, etc.); (d) for each breakdown in (c), in how many cases did the (i) Canadian Forces National Investigation Service assumed jurisdiction, (ii) local military police detachment assumed jurisdiction, (iii) local unit assumed jurisdiction; (e) for each breakdown in (c), in how many cases (i) were charges laid, (ii) were cases proceeded by a summary trial, (iii) were cases proceeded by a courts martial, (iv) was there a finding of guilt, (v) were administrative actions taken, (vi) was the complaint withdrawn or discontinued by the victim; (f) since November 4, 2015, what is the total number of alleged incidents of sexual harassment; (g) what is the breakdown of (f) by type of allegation (for example male perpetrator and female victim, male perpetrator and male victim, etc.); (h) what is the breakdown of (g) by type of force (for example Royal Canadian Air Force, Royal Canadian Naval Reserve, etc.); and (i) how many of the incidents in (h) resulted in (i) an investigation, (ii) a finding of harassment, (iii) administrative actions or sanctions, (iv) disciplinary actions?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 498--
Mr. Tako Van Popta:
With regard to government statistics related to small businesses: (a) how many small businesses have debt levels that put them at serious risk of insolvency or closure; and (b) what is the breakdown of (a) by sector?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 503--
Mr. Blake Richards:
With regard to the government's statistics and estimates related to small businesses: (a) how many small business have filed for bankruptcy since March 1, 2020, broken down by month; and (b) how many small businesses have either closed or ceased operations since March 1, 2020?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 505--
Mr. Daniel Blaikie:
With regard to call centres across the government, from fiscal year 2019-20 to date, broken down by fiscal year, department and call centre: (a) what is the rate of inaccurate information provided by call agents; (b) what is the annual funding allocated; (c) how many full-time call agents have been assigned; (d) how many calls could not be directed to a call agent; (e) what is the wait time target set; (f) what is the actual performance against the wait time target; (g) what is the average wait time to speak to a call agent; (h) what is the established call volume threshold above which callers are directed to the automated system; and (i) what is the method used to test the accuracy of responses given by call agents to callers?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 506--
Mr. Daniel Blaikie:
With regard to the compliance monitoring of the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) since its inception, broken down by period of eligibility, category of eligible employers (corporation, trust, charity other than a public institution, partnership, non-resident corporation), value of claim (less than $100,000, $100,000 to $1 million, $1 million to $5 million, and over $5 million), size of business (small, medium and large), and industry sector: (a) how many prepayment review audits were conducted; (b) of the audits in (a), what is the average audit duration; (c) how many postpayment audits were conducted; (d) of the audits in (c), what is the average audit duration; (e) how many times has the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) determined that an amount of the CEWS is an overpayment; (f) to date, what is the total amount of the CEWS overpayment; (g) how many notices of determination for overpayment have been issued; (h) what is the total amount and interest refunded to date as a result of the notices of determination for overpayment; (i) how many applications for the CEWS have been denied; (j) of the applications denied in (i), how many were subject to a second level review; (k) of the second level reviews in (j), what was the average processing time for the review; (l) of the second level reviews in (j), in how many cases was the original decision upheld; (m) of the cases in (l), how many of the applications were the subject of a notice of objection or an appeal to the Tax Court of Canada; (n) what was the rate of non-compliance; (o) excluding applications from businesses convicted of tax evasion, does the CRA also screen applications for aggressive tax avoidance practices, and, if so, how many applications were denied because the applicant engaged in aggressive tax avoidance; (p) among the businesses receiving the CEWS, has the CRA verified whether each business has a subsidiary or subsidiaries domiciled in a foreign jurisdiction of concern for Canada as defined by the CRA, and, if so, how many of the businesses that received the CEWS have a subsidiary or subsidiaries in foreign jurisdictions of concern for Canada; and (q) among the businesses in (p), has the CRA cross-referenced the data of businesses submitted for the CEWS application and their level of risk of non-compliance with tax laws?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 507--
Mr. Kenny Chiu:
With regard to government statistics related to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on racialized Canadians: (a) how many racialized Canadians, in total, were employed at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic or as of March 1, 2020; (b) how many racialized Canadians are currently employed; (c) how many racialized Canadians, in total, have left the workforce since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic; (d) what information or statistics does the government have on how the pandemic has hurt self-employed racialized Canadians; (e) how many businesses owned by racialized Canadians have seen their earnings decrease over the pandemic, and what was the average percentage of those decreases; and (f) how many businesses owned by racialized Canadians have ceased operations or faced bankruptcy as a result of the pandemic?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 508--
Mr. Dan Mazier:
With regard to Service Canada, since January 2020, and broken down by month: (a) how many calls did Service Canada receive from the general public via phone; (b) what was the average wait time for an individual who contacted Service Canada via phone before first making contact with a live employee; (c) what was the average wait or on hold time after first being connected with a live employee; (d) what was the average duration of total call time, including all waiting times, for an individual who contacted Service Canada via phone; and (e) how many documented server, website, portal or system errors occurred on the Service Canada website?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 509--
Mr. Charlie Angus:
With regard to the Fall Economic Statement 2020 and the additional $606 million over five years, starting in 2021-22, to enable the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) to fund new initiatives and extend existing programs aimed at international tax evasion and abusive tax avoidance, broken down by year: (a) how does the CRA plan to allocate the additional funding, broken down by CRA programs and services; (b) what is the target number of auditors to be hired in terms of full-time equivalents, broken down by auditor category; (c) what portion of the additional funding is solely directed to combating international tax evasion; and (d) what portion of the additional funding is solely directed to aggressive international tax avoidance?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 510--
Mr. Charlie Angus:
With regard to the government's commitment to launch consultations in the coming months on modernizing Canada's anti-avoidance rules as stated in the Fall Economic Statement 2020: (a) is funding already allocated to the consultation process, and, if so, what is the amount; (b) are staff already assigned, and, if so, how many full-time equivalents are assigned; (c) what is the anticipated list of issues and proposed changes to the consultation process; and (d) when is the consultation process expected to begin?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 511--
Mr. Charlie Angus:
With regard to budget 2016 and the government's commitment to provide $350 million per year in ongoing funding to enable the Canada Revenue Agency to combat tax evasion and abusive tax avoidance, broken down by fiscal year, from 2016 to date: (a) how much of this annual funding has gone to programs and services for (i) high-risk audits, (ii) international large business sector, (iii) high net worth compliance, (iv) flow-through share audits, (v) the foreign tax whistleblower program; (b) has this annual funding resulted in the hiring of additional auditors, and, if so, how many additional auditors have been hired, broken down by the programs and services in (a); (c) has this annual funding resulted in an increase in audits, and, if so, how many audits have been completed, broken down by the programs and services in (a); (d) has this annual funding resulted in an increase in assessments, and, if so, how many reassessments have been issued; (e) has this annual funding resulted in an increase in the number of convictions for international tax evasion, and, if so, how many convictions for international tax evasion have occurred; and (f) how much of this annual funding was not spent, and, if applicable, why?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 512--
Mr. James Bezan:
With regard to Canada-Chinese military cooperation, since January 1, 2017: (a) how many joint exercises or training activities have occurred involving the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) of the People’s Republic of China; (b) what was the date of these exercises or training activities; (c) what was the nature of these exercises or training activities; (d) what was the location of these exercises or training activities; (e) how many PLA and CAF personnel were involved; (f) what was the rank of each of the PLA personnel involved; (g) what were the costs of these exercises or training activities incurred by the Department of National Defence; and (h) who is responsible for approving these exercises or training activities?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 513--
Ms. Michelle Rempel Garner:
With regard to the National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) and Health Canada respectively: (a) what scientific evidence, expert opinions, and other factors went into the decision to extend the dosing schedule up to four months between doses of the COVID-19 vaccines; and (b) what is the summary of the minutes of each meeting the NACI had in which dosing timelines were discussed?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 514--
Ms. Michelle Rempel Garner:
With regard to the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC): (a) how many doctors and other designated medical professionals have been employed by the agency, broken down by year since 2015; and (b) what percentage of PHAC employees do each of the numbers in (a) represent?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 516--
Mr. Dave Epp:
With regard to all contracts awarded by the government since November 1, 2019, broken down by department or agency: (a) how many contracts have been awarded to (i) a foreign firm, (ii) an individual, (iii) a business, (iv) another entity with a mailing address outside of Canada; (b) what is the total value of the contracts in (a); (c) for each contract in (a), what is the (i) name of the vendor, (ii) country of the vendor's mailing address, (iii) date of the contract, (iv) summary or description of goods or services provided; and (d) for each contract in (a), was the contract awarded competitively or sole-sourced?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 517--
Mr. Dave Epp:
With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), since January 1, 2019: (a) what was the call volume, broken down by month and by type of caller (personal, business, professional accountant, etc.); and (b) what was the (i) average, (ii) median length of time callers spent on hold or waiting to talk to the CRA, broken down by month and type of caller?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 518--
Mr. Dave Epp:
With regard to government statistics on wireless service prices for Canadian consumers: (a) what was the average wireless service price as of November 1, 2019; (b) what is the current average wireless service price; and (c) what is the average decrease in wireless service price since November 1, 2019?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 520--
Mr. Blaine Calkins:
With regard to government contracts, since January 1, 2020, and broken down by department or agency: (a) how many tendered contracts were not awarded to the lowest bidder; and (b) what are the details of all such contracts, including the (i) vendor, (ii) value of the contract, (iii) date and duration of the contract, (iv) description of goods or services, (v) reason the contract was awarded to the vendor as opposed to the lowest bidder?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 521--
Mr. Blaine Calkins:
With regard to government statistics on the effect of the pandemic on the workforce: what are the government's estimates related to how many Canadians, in total, have left the workforce since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 522--
Mrs. Kelly Block:
With regard to government contribution agreements: (a) how many contribution agreements ended or were not renewed since January 1, 2016; (b) what is the total value of the agreements in (a); and (c) what are the details of each agreement in (a), including the (i) summary of agreement, including list of parties, (ii) amount of federal contribution prior to the agreement ending, (iii) last day the agreement was in force, (iv) reason for ending the agreement?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 525--
Ms. Jag Sahota:
With regard to the report in the March 9, 2021 Toronto Star that federal officials are researching and monitoring problematic supply chains, in relation to the use or forced labour to produce imported goods: (a) which supply chains are problematic; (b) how many supply chains have been identified as problematic; (c) in which countries are the problematic supply chains located; (d) what specific issues had the government identified that made the government identify these supply chains as problematic; and (e) has the government purchased any products that were either made or potentially made from forced labour, since November 1, 2019, and, if so, what are the details of the products, and why did the government purchase products that were potentially made using forced labour?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 528--
Ms. Jag Sahota:
With regard to the government's plan to use the savings of Canadians to stimulate the economy: what are the government's estimates or calculations related to the average per capita amount of savings for each Canadian family?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 531--
Mr. John Barlow:
With regard to government programs, and broken down by department, agency, Crown corporation, or other government entity: (a) how many programs were ended or have been suspended since January 1, 2016; (b) what are the details of each such program, including the (i) name of the program, (ii) date the program ended or was suspended, (iii) reason for ending or suspending the program, (iv) dollar value in savings as a result of ending or suspending the program?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 533--
Mr. John Williamson:
With regard to government contracts, since October 21, 2019, broken down by department, agency, Crown corporation, or other government entity: (a) how many contracts have been awarded to companies based in China or owned by entities based in China; (b) of the contracts in (a), what are the details, including (i) the value, (ii) the vendor, (iii) the date the contract was awarded, (iv) whether or not a national security review was conducted prior to the awarding of the contract, and, if so, what was the result; and (c) what is the government’s policy regarding the awarding of contracts to (i) companies based in China, (ii) companies with ties to the Chinese Communist Party?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 534--
Mr. John Williamson:
With regard to foreign investments, since January 1, 2016, broken down by year: (a) how many foreign takeovers of Canadian companies have occurred in accordance with the Investment Canada Act; (b) how many of the takeovers were initiated by Chinese state-owned enterprises; (c) for the takeovers in (b), what are the details, including (i) the name of the company doing the takeover, (ii) the name of the company subject to the takeover, (iii) whether a national security review was conducted, (iv) the result of the national security review, if applicable; and (d) what is the government’s policy regarding foreign takeovers initiated by Chinese state-owned enterprises?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 535--
Mr. Charlie Angus:
With regard to the Canada Infrastructure Bank, since May 2019: (a) what is the number of meetings held with Canadian and foreign investors, broken down by (i) month, (ii) country, (iii) investor class; (b) what is the complete list of investors met; (c) what are the details of the contracts awarded by the Canada Infrastructure Bank, including the (i) date of the contract, (ii) initial and final value of the contract, (iii) vendor name, (iv) file number, (v) description of services provided; (d) how many full-time equivalents were working at the bank in total, broken down by (i) month, (ii) job title; (e) what are the total costs of managing the bank, broken down by (i) fiscal year, from 2019-20 to date, (ii) leases costs, (iii) salaries of full-time equivalents and corresponding job classifications, (iv) operating expenses; (f) how many projects have applied for funding through the bank, broken down by (i) month, (ii) description of the project, (iii) value of the project; (g) of the projects in (f), how many have been approved; (h) how many projects assigned through the bank have begun operations, broken down by region; (i) of the projects in (h), what is the number of jobs created, broken down by region; (j) what is the renumeration range for its board of directors and its chief executive officer, broken down by fiscal year, from 2019-20 to date; (k) were any performance-based bonuses or incentives distributed to the board of directors and the chief executive officer, and, if so, how much, broken down by fiscal year from 2019-20 to date?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 536--
Mr. Andrew Scheer:
With regard to the Canada Infrastructure Bank (CIB): (a) how much private sector capital has the CIB been able to secure for its existing projects; (b) what is the overall ratio of private sector investment dollars to public investment dollars for all announced CIB projects; and (c) what is the ratio in (b), broken down by each project?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 537--
Mr. Andrew Scheer:
With regard to infrastructure projects announced by the government since November 4, 2015: what are the details of all projects announced by the government that are behind schedule, including the (i) description of the project, including the location, (ii) original federal contribution, (iii) original estimated total cost of the project, (iv) original scheduled date of completion, (v) revised scheduled date of completion, (vi) length of delay, (vii) reason for the delay, (viii) revised federal contribution, if applicable, (ix) revised estimated total cost of the project?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 538--
Mr. Andrew Scheer:
With regard to applications for Infrastructure funding between November 4, 2015, and September 11, 2019, and broken down by each funding program, excluding the Gas Tax Fund: what is the (i) name of program, (ii) number of applications received under each program, (iii) number of applications approved under each program, (iv) amount of funding commitment under each program, (v) amount of funding actually delivered to date under each program?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 539--
Mr. Andrew Scheer:
With regard to applications for Infrastructure funding since October 22, 2019, and broken down by each funding program, excluding the Gas Tax Fund: what is the (i) name of program, (ii) number of applications received under each program, (iii) number of applications approved under each program, (iv) amount of funding commitment under each program, (v) amount of funding actually delivered to date under each program?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 542--
Mr. Matthew Green:
With regard to Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) high net worth compliance program, broken down by year, from November 2015 to date: (a) how many audits were completed; (b) what is the number of auditors; (c) how many new files were opened; (d) how many files were closed; (e) of the files in (d), what was the average time taken to process the file before it was closed; (f) of the files in (d), what was the risk level of non-compliance of each file; (g) how much was spent on contractors and subcontractors; (h) of the contractors and subcontractors in (g), what is the initial and final value of each contract; (i) among the contractors and subcontractors in (g), what is the description of each service contract; (j) how many reassessments were issued; (k) what is the total amount recovered; (l) how many taxpayer files were referred to the CRA's Criminal Investigations Program; (m) of the investigations in (l), how many were referred to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada; and (n) of the investigations in (m), how many resulted in convictions?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 544--
Mr. Jasraj Singh Hallan:
With regard to the processing of applications by Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada (IRCC): (a) how many applications did IRCC process each month since January 2020, broken down by month; (b) what is the breakdown of (a) by visa category and type of application; (c) how many applications did IRCC process each month in 2019, broken down by month; (d) what is the breakdown of (c) by visa category and type of application; (e) how many IRCC employees were placed on leave code 699 at some point since March 1, 2020; (f) what is the average duration the employees in (e) were on leave code 699; (g) what is the current processing times and application inventories of each visa category and type of application; and (h) what specific impact has the pandemic had on IRCC’s ability to process applications?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 545--
Mr. Jasraj Singh Hallan:
With regard to the Canadian Experience Class Program and the round of invitations issued on February 13, 2021: (a) what is the total number of invitations extended to applicants with Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) scores of (i) 75, (ii) 76 to 99, (iii) 100 to 199, (iv) 200 to 299, (v) 300 to 399, (vi) 400 to 430, (vii) 431 and higher; and (b) what is the distribution of the total number of invitations across the individual categories of points within each factor of the CRS?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 546--
Mr. Jasraj Singh Hallan:
With regard to compliance inspections for employers of the Temporary Foreign Worker Program during the COVID-19 pandemic from March 13, 2020, to the present: (a) what is the total number of inspections conducted; (b) what is the total number of tips or allegations received through the 1-800 tip line or on-line portal reporting any suspected non-compliance or in response to information received, and broken down by type of alleged non-compliance; and (c) what is the total number of confirmed non-compliance, and broken down by type of non-compliance?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 547--
Mr. Scott Duvall:
With regard to the proposal, as indicated in the 2020 Fall Economic Statement, for an additional $606 million over five years, beginning in 2021-22, to enable the Canada Revenue Agency to fund new initiatives and extend existing programs aimed at international tax evasion and abusive tax avoidance: (a) what specific modeling was used by the government to support its assertion that these measures to combat international tax evasion and abusive tax avoidance will recover $1.4 billion in revenue over five years; (b) who did the modeling in (a); (c) what were the modeling projections; and (d) does the $1.4 billion estimate come solely from the proposed additional $606 million over five years or does it also come from the 2016 budget commitment of $350 million per year?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 548--
Mr. Scott Duvall:
With regard to events hosted by Facebook, Google, Netflix, and Apple that ministers have attended, since November 2015, broken down by each company, year, and department: (a) what is the number of events each minister attended; (b) of the attendance in (a), what were the costs associated with (i) lodging, (ii) food, (iii) any other expenses, including a description of each expense; and (c) what are the details of any meetings the minister and others attended, including (i) the date, (ii) the summary or description, (iii) attendees, (iv) topics discussed?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 549--
Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:
With regard to government contracts awarded to Cisco, broken down by department, agency, or other government entity: (a) broken down by year, what is the (i) number, (ii) total value, of all contracts awarded to Cisco since January 1, 2016; and (b) what are the details of all contracts awarded to Cisco since January 1, 2016, including (i) the vendor, (ii) the date, (iii) the amount, (iv) the description of goods or services, (v) whether contract was sole-sourced?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 551--
Ms. Jenny Kwan:
With regard to loans approved by the Canada Enterprise Emergency Funding Corporation (CEEFC) under the Large Employer Emergency Financing Facility, broken down by approved loan for each borrower: (a) what are the terms and the conditions of the loan in terms of (i) dividends, (ii) capital distributions and share repurchases, (iii) executive compensation; (b) for the terms and conditions of the loan in (a), from what date do these terms apply and until what date do they expire; (c) what are the consequences provided for in the terms and conditions of the loan if a company does not comply with one or more of the terms and conditions in (a); (d) by what process does the CEEFC verify that the company complies with the terms and the conditions in (a); and (e) has the CEEFC appointed an observer to the board of directors of each of the borrowers, and, if so, what is the duration of his mandate?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 552--
Ms. Jenny Kwan:
With regard to housing: (a) since 2010, broken down by year, how much insured lending did the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation approve for rental financing and refinancing to real estate income trusts and large capital equity funds; (b) of the insured lending in (a), how much is associated with the purchase of existing moderate-rent assets; (c) broken down by project receiving funding in (a), what is the (i) average rent of units prior to the acquisition, (ii) average rent of units for each year following the acquisition up until the most current average rent; (d) broken down by province, funding commitment status (e.g. finalized agreement, conditional commitment), whether funding has been advanced and type of funding (grant or loan), what is the total funding that has been provided through the (i) National Co-Investment Fund, (ii) Rental Construction Financing Initiative, (iii) application stream of the Rapid Housing Initiative?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 553--
Ms. Jenny Kwan:
With regard to the government’s contracting of visa application services: (a) on which dates did Public Works and Government Services Canada and Public Services and Procurement Canada each become aware that Beijing Shuangxiong is owned by the Beijing Public Security Bureau; (b) since learning of the ownership structure of Beijing Shuangxiong, what reviews have been conducted in response to this information, and when did they begin; (c) regarding the process that resulted in the awarding of the contract to VFS Global in 2018, (i) how many bids were submitted, (ii) did any other companies win the contract prior to it being awarded to VFS Global, (iii) what was assessed in the consideration of these contracts, (iv) was the Communications Security Establishment or the Canadian Security Intelligence Service involved in the vetting of the contracts; (d) is there an escape clause in this VFS Global’s contract that would allow the government to unilaterally exit the contract; and (e) the government having tasked VFS Global with the creation of digital services, what measures are being taken to ensure that the government is not providing VFS Global with a competitive advantage in future bids?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question no 479 --
Mme Rachel Blaney:
En ce qui concerne les consultations menées par la ministre du Développement économique et des Langues officielles depuis janvier 2021 en vue de la création d’une agence de développement économique régionale pour la Colombie-Britannique: a) combien de réunions ont eu lieu; b) qui a participé à chacune des réunions; c) à quel endroit ces réunions se sont-elles déroulées; d) à l’exclusion des dépenses qui n’ont pas encore été traitées, quels sont les détails de toutes les dépenses associées à chacune de ces réunions, ventilés par réunion; e) quelle est la ventilation de chacune des dépenses en d) pour (i) la location des lieux ou des salles, (ii) le matériel audiovisuel et multimédia, (iii) les déplacements, (iv) la nourriture et les boissons, (v) la sécurité, (vi) la traduction et l’interprétation, (vii) la publicité, (viii) les autres dépenses, en précisant la nature de chacune de ces dépenses; f) quelle somme a été remise aux entrepreneurs et aux sous-traitants; g) pour les entrepreneurs et sous-traitants en f), quelle était la valeur initiale et finale des contrats; h) parmi les entrepreneurs et sous-traitants en f), quelle était la description de chacun des contrats de service?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 480 --
M. Brad Redekopp:
En ce qui concerne les contrats liés aux communications, aux relations publiques et aux experts-conseils conclus par le gouvernement ou les cabinets de ministres depuis le 1er janvier 2018, en rapport avec des biens ou des services fournis aux cabinets de ministres: quels sont les détails de tous ces contrats, y compris (i) la date de début et de fin, (ii) le montant, (iii) le fournisseur, (iv) la description des biens ou des services fournis, (v) si le contrat a été attribué à un fournisseur unique ou fait l’objet d’un appel d’offres?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 481 --
M. Brad Redekopp:
En ce qui concerne les réunions entre les ministres ou le personnel exonéré des ministres et les ombudsmans fédéraux depuis le 1er janvier 2016: quels sont les détails de toutes ces réunions, y compris (i) les personnes présentes, (ii) la date, (iii) les points à l’ordre du jour ou les sujets abordés?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 482 --
M. Brad Redekopp:
En ce qui concerne la relation que le gouvernement entretient avec l’organisme Canada 2020 depuis le 1er janvier 2016: a) quel est le montant total, ventilé par année, que le gouvernement a versé à Canada 2020 pour (i) acheter des billets, (ii) parrainer des activités, (iii) participer à des conférences, (iv) d’autres types de dépenses; b) quel est le nombre total (i) de jours et (ii) d’heures que des représentants du gouvernement ont consacrés au soutien d’initiatives ou de programmes de Canada 2020 ou ont passés à participer à des événements de Canada 2020, ventilé par année et par initiative ou événement?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 483 --
M. Ben Lobb:
En ce qui concerne les contrats accordés par le gouvernement à la firme McKinsey & Company depuis le 4 novembre 2015, ventilés par ministère, organisme, société d’État ou autre entité gouvernementale: a) quel est le montant total dépensé pour les contrats; b) quels sont les détails pour tous ces contrats, y compris (i) le montant, (ii) le fournisseur, (iii) la date et la durée, (iv) la description des biens ou des services fournis, (v) les sujets liés aux biens ou aux services, (vi) les buts ou les objectifs précis liés au contrat, (vii) si les buts ou les objectifs ont été atteints, (viii) s’il s’agit d’un contrat à fournisseur unique ou d’un contrat soumis à un appel d’offres?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 485 --
M. Ben Lobb:
En ce qui concerne les rencontres entre le gouvernement, y compris des ministres ou du personnel exonéré des ministères, et MCAP depuis le 1er janvier 2019, ventilés par ministère, organisme, société d’État ou autre entité gouvernementale: quels sont les détails de toutes ces rencontres, y compris (i) les personnes y ayant assisté, (ii) la date, (iii) les points à l’ordre du jour ou les sujets dont il a été question?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 486 --
M. Rob Moore:
En ce qui concerne la Loi sur le directeur des poursuites pénales, depuis le 21 octobre 2019: a) combien de directives le procureur général a-t-il données au directeur des poursuites pénales, en application du (i) paragraphe 10(1) de la Loi, (ii) paragraphe 10(2) de la Loi; b) ventilées selon a)(i) et a)(ii), quelles étaient (i) ces directives, (ii) les justifications de ces directives?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 488 --
M. Phil McColeman:
En ce qui concerne la relation du Canada avec le gouvernement chinois, depuis le 21 octobre 2019: a) quel est le montant total de l’aide publique au développement fournie à la République populaire de Chine; b) quels sont les détails de chaque projet en a), y compris (i) le montant, (ii) la description du projet, (iii) l’objectif du projet, (iv) la justification du financement du projet; c) quelle est la meilleure estimation du budget militaire annuel actuel de la Chine faite par Affaires mondiales Canada (AMC); d) quelle est la meilleure estimation d'AMC du budget annuel total de l’Initiative des nouvelles routes de la soie de la Chine?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 489 --
M. Phil McColeman:
En ce qui concerne l’annonce de 2,75 milliards de dollars faite par le gouvernement pour l’achat d’autobus zéro émission: a) quel est le montant médian et moyen estimé du coût de chaque autobus; b) dans quelles municipalités ces autobus circuleront-ils; c) combien d’autobus seront mis en circulation dans chacune des municipalités mentionnées en b), ventilés par année pour chacune des cinq prochaines années?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 491 --
M. John Nater:
En ce qui concerne la Garantie du Programme de crédit pour les secteurs très touchés: a) combien de demandes ont été (i) reçues, (ii) approuvées, (iii) rejetées; b) quels sont les détails de toutes les demandes de financement approuvées, y compris (i) le bénéficiaire, (ii) le montant; c) quels sont les détails de toutes les demandes de financement rejetées, y compris (i) le demandeur, (ii) le montant demandé, (iii) le motif du rejet?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 492 --
M. John Nater:
En ce qui concerne le financement accordé par le gouvernement à la Banque asiatique d’investissement pour les infrastructures (BAII) et le génocide dont sont victimes les Ouïghours en Chine: parmi les projets qui se déroulent en Chine et qui sont financés par la BAII à l’heure actuelle, le gouvernement sait-il quels projets font appel au travail forcé des Ouïghours et, le cas échéant, desquels il s’agit?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 495 --
Mme Cheryl Gallant:
En ce qui concerne la manière dont les Forces armées canadiennes traitent les cas d’inconduite sexuelle: a) depuis le 4 novembre 2015, quel est le nombre total de cas d’allégations d’agression sexuelle; b) quelle est la ventilation du nombre mentionné en a) par type d’allégation (par exemple, agresseur masculin et victime féminine, agresseur masculin et victime masculine); c) quelle est la ventilation de l'information mentionnée en b) selon le type de force (par exemple, l’Aviation royale canadienne, la Réserve de la Marine royale canadienne); d) pour chaque donnée ventilée en c), (i) dans combien de cas, le Service national des enquêtes des Forces canadiennes avait-il compétence, (ii) le détachement local de la Police militaire avait-il compétence, (iii) l’unité locale avait-elle compétence; e) pour chaque ventilation en c), dans combien de cas (i) des accusations ont été portées, (ii) les cas ont fait l’objet de procès sommaires, (iii) les cas ont été traités par une cour martiale, (iv) il y a eu un verdict de culpabilité, (v) des mesures administratives ont été prises, (vi) la plainte a été retirée ou abandonnée par la victime; f) depuis le 4 novembre 2015, quel est le nombre total de cas d’allégations de harcèlement sexuel; g) quelle est la ventilation du nombre mentionné en f) par type d’allégation (par exemple, agresseur masculin et victime féminine, agresseur masculin et victime masculine); h) quelle est la ventilation de l'information mentionnée en g) par type de force (par exemple, l’Aviation royale canadienne, la Réserve de la Marine royale canadienne); i) combien de cas mentionnés en h) ont donné lieu (i) à une enquête, (ii) à un verdict de harcèlement, (iii) à des mesures ou à des sanctions administratives, (iv) à des mesures disciplinaires?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 498 --
M. Tako Van Popta:
En ce qui concerne les données gouvernementales sur les petites entreprises: a) combien de petites entreprises sont endettées au point d’être sérieusement menacées d’insolvabilité ou de fermeture; b) quelle est la ventilation des données en a) par secteur?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 503 --
M. Blake Richards:
En ce qui concerne les statistiques et les estimations du gouvernement portant sur les petites entreprises: a) combien de petites entreprises ont déclaré faillite depuis le 1er mars 2020, ventilées par mois; b) combien de petites entreprises ont fermé leurs portes ou cessé leurs activités depuis le 1er mars 2020?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 505 --
M. Daniel Blaikie:
En ce qui concerne les centres d’appels du gouvernement, à partir de l’exercice 2019-2020 jusqu’à maintenant, ventilé par exercice financier, ministère et centre d’appels: a) quel est le taux de renseignements inexacts donnés par les agents d’appel; b) quel est le financement annuel accordé; c) combien d’agents d’appels à temps plein y sont affectés; d) combien d’appels n’ont pas pu être acheminés à un agent; e) quelle est la cible pour ce qui est du temps d’attente; f) dans quelle mesure la cible de temps d’attente est-elle atteinte; g) quel est le temps d’attente moyen pour parler à un agent; h) quel est le seuil de volume d’appels devant être atteint avant que les appels soient acheminés au système automatisé; i) quelle est la méthode employée pour vérifier l’exactitude des réponses données par les agents d’appel?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 506 --
M. Daniel Blaikie:
En ce qui concerne la surveillance de la conformité de la Subvention salariale d'urgence du Canada (SSUC) depuis sa création, ventilée par période de référence, catégorie d’employeurs admissibles (société, fiducie, organisme de bienfaisance autre qu’une institution publique, société de personnes, société non-résidente), montant de la demande (moins de 100 000 $, de 100 000 $ à 1 million, de 1 million à 5 millions, et plus de 5 millions), taille d’entreprise (petite, moyenne ou grande) et secteur industriel: a) combien a-t-on effectué d’examens avant paiement; b) pour les examens en a), quelle est la durée moyenne des examens; c) combien a-t-on effectué d’examens après paiement; d) pour les examens en c), quelle est la durée moyenne des examens; e) combien de fois l’Agence du revenu du Canada (ARC) a-t-elle conclu qu’un montant de la SSUC était un trop-payé; f) jusqu’à présent, quel est le montant total des trop-payés en SSUC; g) combien a-t-on émis d’avis de trop-payé; h) quel est le montant total et quel est le montant des intérêts remboursés jusqu’à présent à la suite des avis de trop-payé; i) combien de demandes de SSUC a-t-on rejetées; j) sur les demandes rejetées en i), combien ont fait l’objet d’un examen de deuxième niveau; k) pour les examens de deuxième niveau en j), quelle a été la durée moyenne de traitement; l) pour les examens de deuxième niveau en j), dans combien de cas a-t-on maintenu la décision originale; m) sur les cas en l), combien de demandes ont fait l’objet d’un avis d’opposition ou d’appel auprès de la Cour canadienne de l’impôt; n) quel a été le taux de non-conformité; o) à l’exclusion des entreprises trouvées coupables d’évasion fiscale, est-ce que l’ARC examine aussi les demandeurs pour déceler les cas d’évitement fiscal abusif, et, le cas échéant, combien de demandes a-t-elle rejetées parce que le demandeur pratiquait l’évitement fiscal abusif; p) parmi les entreprises recevant la SSUC, l’ARC a-t-elle vérifié si ces entreprises avaient une ou des filiales situées dans des pays étrangers suscitant des préoccupations pour le Canada, selon la définition de l’ARC, et, le cas échéant, combien d’entreprises ayant reçu la SSUC ont une ou des filiales situées dans des pays étrangers suscitant des préoccupations pour le Canada; q) pour les entreprises en p), l’ARC a-t-elle recoupé les données soumises par les entreprises dans leur demande de SSUC avec leur niveau de risque de non-conformité aux lois fiscales?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 507 --
M. Kenny Chiu:
En ce qui concerne les statistiques du gouvernement relatives aux répercussions de la pandémie de COVID-19 sur les Canadiens racisés: a) combien de Canadiens racisés en tout avaient un emploi au début de la pandémie de COVID-19 ou au 1er mars 2020; b) combien de Canadiens racisés ont présentement un emploi; c) combien de Canadiens racisés en tout ont quitté le marché du travail depuis le début de la pandémie de COVID-19; d) quelle information ou quelles statistiques le gouvernement a-t-il sur les préjudices causés par la pandémie aux travailleurs autonomes racisés; e) combien d’entreprises appartenant à des Canadiens racisés ont connu des baisses de revenus pendant la pandémie, et quel était le pourcentage moyen de ces baisses; f) combien d’entreprises appartenant à des Canadiens racisés ont cessé leurs activités ou ont été acculées à la faillite à cause de la pandémie?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 508 --
M. Dan Mazier:
En ce qui concerne Service Canada, depuis janvier 2020, les données ventilées par mois: a) combien d’appels téléphoniques Service Canada a-t-il reçus du grand public; b) combien de temps en moyenne un particulier qui appelle Service Canada doit-il attendre avant de parler à un employé; c) combien de temps en moyenne un particulier doit-il patienter après avoir réussi à parler à un employé; d) quelle est la durée moyenne totale d’un appel, y compris le temps d’attente, d’un particulier qui appelle Service Canada; e) combien d’erreurs documentées dans les serveurs, le site Web, les portails et les systèmes sont survenues sur le site Web de Service Canada?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 509 --
M. Charlie Angus:
En ce qui concerne l’Énoncé économique de l’automne 2020 et les 606 millions de dollars supplémentaires sur cinq ans, à partir de 2021-2022, pour permettre à l’Agence du revenu du Canada (ARC) de financer de nouvelles initiatives et de prolonger les programmes existants visant la fraude fiscale internationale et l’évitement fiscal abusif, ventilés par année: a) comment l’ARC prévoit-elle répartir les fonds supplémentaires, ventilés par programmes et services de l’ARC; b) quel est le nombre cible de vérificateurs à embaucher en matière d’équivalents temps plein, ventilé par catégorie de vérificateurs; c) quelle partie des fonds supplémentaires est uniquement destinée à la lutte contre la fraude fiscale internationale; d) quelle partie des fonds supplémentaires est uniquement destinée à l’évitement fiscal international abusif?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 510 --
M. Charlie Angus:
En ce qui concerne l’engagement du gouvernement de lancer des consultations sur la modernisation des règles anti évitement canadiennes au cours des prochains mois, comme il a été énoncé dans l’Énoncé économique de l’automne 2020: a) y a-t-il déjà des fonds affectés au processus de consultation et, le cas échéant, de quel montant s’agit-il; b) y a-t-il déjà des employés affectés aux consultations et, le cas échéant, de combien d’équivalents temps plein s’agit-il; c) quelle est la liste prévue des problèmes et des changements proposés au processus de consultation; d) quand le processus de consultation devrait-il commencer?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 511 --
M. Charlie Angus:
En ce qui concerne le budget de 2016 et de l’engagement du gouvernement à investir annuellement 350 millions de dollars dans la lutte de l’Agence du revenu du Canada contre l’évasion fiscale et l’évitement fiscal abusif, pour chaque exercice de 2016 à aujourd’hui: a) quelle quantité du montant annuel versé par le gouvernement a été investie dans des programmes et des services concernant (i) la vérification de dossiers présentant les risques les plus élevés, (ii) le secteur des grandes entreprises internationales, (iii) la vérification de l’observation fiscale des particuliers fortunés, (iv) la vérification des actions accréditives, (v) le Programme de dénonciateurs de l’inobservation fiscale à l’étranger; b) ce financement annuel a-t-il donné lieu à l’embauche de vérificateurs supplémentaires, et, le cas échéant, quel est le nombre de vérificateurs qui ont été embauchés pour chaque programme et service en a); c) ce financement annuel a-t-il donné lieu à une hausse du nombre de vérifications et, le cas échéant, quel est le nombre de vérifications qui ont été effectuées pour chaque programme et service en a); d) ce financement annuel a-t-il donné lieu à une hausse du nombre d’évaluations et, le cas échéant, combien de nouvelles cotisations ont été établies; e) ce financement annuel a-t-il donné lieu à une hausse du nombre de condamnations pour évasion fiscale internationale et, le cas échéant, combien y a-t-il eu de condamnations pour ce motif; f) quel montant de ce financement annuel n’a pas été dépensé, et pour quelles raisons?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 512 --
M. James Bezan:
En ce qui concerne la coopération militaire entre le Canada et la Chine, depuis le 1er janvier 2017: a) combien y a-t-il eu d’exercices conjoints ou d’activités de formation regroupant les Forces armées canadiennes (FAC) et l’Armée populaire de libération (APL) de la République populaire de Chine; b) à quelle date ces exercices ou activités de formation ont-ils eu lieu; c) quelle est la nature de ces exercices ou activités de formation; d) où se sont déroulés ces exercices ou activités de formation; e) combien de membres du personnel des FAC et de l’APL y ont participé; f) quel rang occupait chacun des membres de l’APL concernés; g) quels étaient les coûts de ces exercices ou activités de formation pour le ministère de la Défense nationale; h) qui est responsable de l’approbation de ces exercices ou activités de formation?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 513 --
Mme Michelle Rempel Garner:
À propos du Comité consultatif national de l’immunisation (CCNI) et de Santé Canada respectivement: a) quels sont les données scientifiques, les avis d’experts et les autres facteurs qui ont motivé la décision de fixer à au plus quatre mois l’intervalle entre les deux doses de vaccin administrées contre la COVID-19; b) quel est le résumé du compte rendu de chaque réunion du CCNI pendant laquelle celui-ci a discuté de l’intervalle entre les deux doses de vaccin?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 514 --
Mme Michelle Rempel Garner:
En ce qui concerne l’Agence de la santé publique du Canada (ASPC): a) combien de médecins et autres professionnels de la médecine désignés ont-ils été employés par l’Agence, ventilé par année depuis 2015; b) quel pourcentage des employés de l’ASPC chacun des chiffres en a) représente-t-il?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 516 --
M. Dave Epp:
En ce qui concerne tous les contrats octroyés par le gouvernement depuis le 1er novembre 2019, ventilés par ministère ou organisme: a) combien de contrats ont été octroyés à (i) une société étrangère, (ii) un particulier, (iii) une entreprise, (iv) une autre entité dont l’adresse postale est à l’extérieur du Canada; b) quelle est la valeur totale des contrats en a); c) pour chacun des contrats en a), quels sont (i) le nom du fournisseur, (ii) le pays dans lequel se situe l’adresse postale du fournisseur, (iii) la date du contrat, (iv) le résumé ou la description des produits ou services fournis; d) pour chacun des contrats en a), le contrat a-t-il fait l’objet d’un processus concurrentiel ou s’agissait-il d’un octroi à fournisseur unique?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 517 --
M. Dave Epp:
En ce qui concerne l’Agence du revenu du Canada (ARC), depuis le 1er janvier 2019: a) quel a été le volume d’appels, ventilé par mois et par type de personne ayant appelé (particulier, représentant d’entreprise, expert-comptable, etc.); et b) quelle a été la durée (i) moyenne, (ii) médiane d’attente de ces personnes avant de pouvoir parler à un agent de l’ARC, ventilée par mois et par type de personne ayant appelé?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 518 --
M. Dave Epp:
En ce qui concerne les statistiques gouvernementales sur les prix des services sans fil pour les consommateurs canadiens: a) quel était le prix moyen des services sans fil au 1er novembre 2019; b) quel est le prix moyen actuel des services sans fil; et c) à combien se chiffre la diminution moyenne du prix des services sans fil depuis le 1er novembre 2019?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 520 --
M. Blaine Calkins:
En ce qui concerne les marchés publics, depuis le 1er janvier 2020, et ventilés par ministère ou organisme: a) combien de contrats soumis à un appel d’offres n’ont pas été attribués au plus bas soumissionnaire; et b) quels sont les détails de tous ces contrats, dont (i) le fournisseur, (ii) la valeur du contrat, (iii) la date et la durée du contrat, (iv) la description des biens ou des services, (v) la raison pour laquelle le contrat a été attribué à ce fournisseur plutôt qu’au plus bas soumissionnaire?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 521 --
M. Blaine Calkins:
En ce qui concerne les statistiques gouvernementales sur les répercussions de la pandémie sur la main-d’œuvre: quelles sont les estimations du gouvernement concernant le nombre total de Canadiens qui sont sortis du marché du travail depuis le début de la pandémie de COVID-19?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 522 --
Mme Kelly Block:
En ce qui concerne les ententes de contribution du gouvernement: a) combien d’ententes de contribution ont-elles pris fin ou n’ont pas été renouvelées depuis le 1er janvier 2016; b) quelle est la valeur totale des ententes en a); c) quels sont les détails de chaque entente en a), dont (i) le résumé de l’entente, y compris la liste des parties, (ii) le montant de la contribution fédérale avant la fin de l’entente, (iii) la dernière journée où l’entente était en vigueur, (iv) la raison pour mettre fin à l’entente?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 525 --
Mme Jag Sahota:
En ce qui concerne l’article publié le 9 mars 2021 dans le Toronto Star dans lequel il est écrit que des fonctionnaires fédéraux font des recherches sur des chaînes d’approvisionnement problématiques et les surveillent, pour vérifier si des manufacturiers font appel au travail forcé pour fabriquer les produits importés: a) quelles chaînes d’approvisionnement sont problématiques; b) combien de chaînes d’approvisionnement sont jugées problématiques; c) dans quels pays sont situées les chaînes d’approvisionnement problématiques; d) quels problèmes précis le gouvernement a-t-il relevés pour déterminer que ces chaînes d’approvisionnement sont problématiques; e) le gouvernement a-t-il acheté des articles qui ont été fabriqués ou qui pourraient avoir été fabriqués au moyen du travail forcé depuis le 1er novembre 2019 et, le cas échéant, quels sont les détails de ces articles et pourquoi le gouvernement a-t-il acheté des articles qui pourraient avoir été fabriqués au moyen du travail forcé?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 528 --
Mme Jag Sahota:
En ce qui concerne le projet du gouvernement d’utiliser les économies des Canadiens pour stimuler l’économie: quels sont les estimations ou les calculs du gouvernement relativement au montant moyen d’économies par personne pour chaque famille canadienne?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 531 --
M. John Barlow:
En ce qui concerne les programmes gouvernementaux, ventilés par ministère, agence, société d’État ou autre organisme gouvernemental: a) combien de programmes ont pris fin ou ont été suspendus depuis le 1er janvier 2016; b) quels sont les détails de chacun de ces programmes, y compris (i) le nom du programme, (ii) la date à laquelle le programme a pris fin ou a été suspendu, (iii) la raison pour laquelle le programme a pris fin ou a été suspendu, (iv) la valeur, en dollars, des économies résultant de la fin ou de la suspension du programme?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 533 --
M. John Williamson:
En ce qui concerne les contrats du gouvernement depuis le 21 octobre 2019, ventilés par ministère, organisme, société d’État ou autre entité du gouvernement: a) combien de contrats ont été attribués à des entreprises basées en Chine ou appartenant à des entités basées en Chine; b) pour les contrats en a), quels sont les détails, y compris (i) la valeur, (ii) le fournisseur, (iii) la date d’adjudication du contrat, (iv) la tenue ou non d’un examen de la sécurité nationale avant l’adjudication du contrat et, le cas échéant, le résultat de l’examen; c) quelle est la politique du gouvernement sur l’adjudication de contrats à (i) des entreprises basées en Chine, (ii) des entreprises ayant des liens avec le Parti communiste chinois?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 534 --
M. John Williamson:
En ce qui concerne les investissements étrangers depuis le 1er janvier 2016, ventilés par année: a) combien de prises de contrôle d’entreprises canadiennes par des intérêts étrangers ont eu lieu conformément à la Loi sur Investissement Canada; b) combien des prises de contrôle ont eu lieu à l’initiative d’entreprises d’État chinoises; c) quels sont les détails des prises de contrôle en b), y compris (i) le nom de l’entreprise ayant effectué la prise de contrôle, (ii) le nom de l’entreprise ayant fait l’objet de la prise de contrôle, (iii) la tenue ou non d’un examen de la sécurité nationale, (iv) le résultat de l’examen de la sécurité nationale, le cas échéant; d) quelle est la politique du gouvernement sur les prises de contrôle faites à l’initiative d’entreprises d’État chinoises?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 535 --
M. Charlie Angus:
En ce qui concerne la Banque de l’infrastructure du Canada, depuis mai 2019: a) quel est le nombre de réunions tenues avec des investisseurs canadiens et étrangers, ventilé par (i) mois, (ii) pays, (iii) catégorie d’investisseurs; b) quelle est la liste complète des investisseurs rencontrés; c) quels sont les détails des contrats attribués par la Banque de l’infrastructure du Canada, y compris (i) la date du contrat, (ii) la valeur initiale et finale du contrat, (iii) le nom du fournisseur, (iv) le numéro de référence, (v) la description des services rendus; d) combien d’équivalents temps plein travaillaient à la Banque au total, ventilés par (i) mois, (ii) titre du poste; e) quels sont les coûts totaux relatifs à la gestion de la Banque, ventilés par (i) exercice, de 2019-2020 à ce jour, (ii) coûts des baux, (iii) salaires des équivalents temps plein assortis de la classification de poste correspondante, (iv) dépenses de fonctionnement; f) combien de projets ont fait l’objet d’une demande de financement auprès de la Banque, ventilés par (i) mois, (ii) description du projet, (iii) valeur du projet; g) parmi les projets en f), combien ont été approuvés; h) combien de projets financés par la Banque ont été lancés, ventilés par région; i) pour les projets en h), quel est le nombre d’emplois créés, ventilé par région; j) quelle est la fourchette de rémunération de son conseil d’administration et de son président-directeur général, ventilée par exercice, de 2019-2020 à ce jour; k) des incitatifs ou des primes liés au rendement ont-ils été versés aux membres du conseil d’administration et au président-directeur général et, le cas échéant, à combien s’élevaient-ils, ventilés par exercice, de 2019-2020 à ce jour?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 536 --
M. Andrew Scheer:
En ce qui concerne la Banque de l’infrastructure du Canada (BIC): a) à combien s’élèvent les capitaux du secteur privé que la BIC a pu obtenir pour ses projets existants; b) quel est le ratio global de fonds du secteur privé par rapport aux fonds publics pour le financement de l’ensemble des projets annoncés par la BIC; c) quel est le ratio en b), ventilé par projet?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 537 --
M. Andrew Scheer:
En ce qui concerne les projets d’infrastructure annoncés par le gouvernement depuis le 4 novembre 2015: quels sont les détails de chacun des projets annoncés par le gouvernement qui sont en retard, y compris (i) la description du projet, dont son emplacement, (ii) la contribution fédérale initiale, (iii) le coût estimatif total initial du projet, (iv) la date d’achèvement initialement prévue, (v) la date d’achèvement révisée, (vi) la durée du retard, (vii) la raison du retard, (viii) la contribution fédérale révisée, s’il y a lieu, (ix) le coût estimatif total révisé du projet?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 538 --
M. Andrew Scheer:
En ce qui concerne les demandes de financement des infrastructures entre le 4 novembre 2015 et le 11 septembre 2019, ventilées par programme de financement, à l’exclusion du Fonds de la taxe sur l’essence: quels sont (i) le nom du programme, (ii) le nombre de demandes reçues au titre de chaque programme, (iii) le nombre de demandes approuvées dans le cadre de chaque programme, (iv) le montant de l’engagement financier au titre de chaque programme, (v) le montant du financement versé à ce jour dans le cadre de chaque programme?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 539 --
M. Andrew Scheer:
En ce qui concerne les demandes de financement des infrastructures présentées depuis le 22 octobre 2019 et ventilées par programme de financement, à l’exclusion du Fonds de la taxe sur l’essence: quels sont (i) le nom du programme, (ii) le nombre de demandes reçues au titre de chaque programme, (iii) le nombre de demandes approuvées dans le cadre de chaque programme, (iv) le montant de l’engagement financier au titre de chaque programme, (v) le montant du financement versé à ce jour dans le cadre de chaque programme?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 542 --
M. Matthew Green:
En ce qui concerne le programme de l’Agence du revenu du Canada (ARC) d’observation des contribuables à valeur nette élevée, ventilé par année, de novembre 2015 à ce jour: a) combien de vérifications ont été effectuées; b) quel est le nombre de vérificateurs; c) combien de nouveaux dossiers ont été ouverts; d) combien de dossiers ont été fermés; e) parmi les dossiers en d), quel était le temps moyen de traitement du dossier avant sa fermeture; f) parmi les dossiers en d), quel était le niveau de risque de non-conformité dans chaque dossier; g) combien a été dépensé pour les entrepreneurs et les sous-traitants; h) parmi les entrepreneurs et les sous-traitants en g), quelle est la valeur initiale et finale de chaque contrat; i) parmi les entrepreneurs et les sous-traitants en g), quelle est la description de chaque contrat de service; j) combien de nouvelles cotisations ont été établies; k) quel est le montant total recouvré; l) combien de dossiers de contribuables ont été renvoyés au Programme des enquêtes criminelles de l’ARC; m) parmi les enquêtes en l), combien ont été renvoyées au Service des poursuites pénales du Canada; n) parmi les enquêtes en m), combien ont donné lieu à des condamnations?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 544 --
M. Jasraj Singh Hallan:
En ce qui concerne le traitement des demandes par Immigration, Réfugiés et Citoyenneté Canada (IRCC): a) combien de demandes IRCC a-t-elle traitées chaque mois depuis janvier 2020, ventilées par mois; b) quelle est la ventilation des demandes en a) par catégorie de visa et type de demande; c) combien de demandes IRCC a-t-elle traitées chaque mois en 2019, ventilées par mois; d) quelle est la ventilation des demandes en c) par catégorie de visa et type de demande; e) combien d’employés d’IRCC se sont vu accorder un congé en vertu du code 699 à un moment ou à un autre depuis le 1er mars 2020; f) pour les employés en e), quelle était la durée moyenne du congé accordé en vertu du code 699; g) à l’heure actuelle, quels sont les délais de traitement et le volume de demandes en attente pour chaque catégorie de visa et type de demande; h) quelle est l’incidence précise de la pandémie sur la capacité d’IRCC à traiter les demandes?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 545 --
M. Jasraj Singh Hallan:
En ce qui concerne la catégorie de l’expérience canadienne et la ronde d’invitations du 13 février 2021: a) quel est le nombre total d’invitations adressées aux demandeurs dont la note du Système de classement global (SCG) est de (i) 75, (ii) 76 à 99, (iii) 100 à 199, (iv) 200 à 299, (v) 300 à 399, (vi) 400 à 430, vii) 431 et plus; b) quelle est la répartition du nombre total d’invitations entre les catégories individuelles de points pour chacun des facteurs du SCG?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 546 --
M. Jasraj Singh Hallan:
En ce qui concerne les inspections de conformité visant les employeurs du Programme des travailleurs étrangers temporaires pendant la pandémie de COVID-19 du 13 mars 2020 à ce jour: a) quel est le nombre total d’inspections effectuées; b) quel est le nombre total de dénonciations ou d’allégations de non-conformité reçues par l’entremise de la ligne d’appel 1 800 ou du portail en ligne signalant tout cas de non-conformité soupçonnée ou en réponse aux informations reçues, et ventilé selon le type de non-conformité présumée; c) quel est le nombre total de cas de non-conformité avérée, et ventilé selon le type de non-conformité?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 547 --
M. Scott Duvall:
En ce qui concerne la proposition contenue dans l’Énoncé économique de l’automne 2020 relativement à une somme supplémentaire de 606 millions de dollars sur cinq ans, à compter de 2021-2022, afin de permettre à l’Agence du revenu du Canada de financer de nouvelles initiatives et de prolonger les programmes existants visant l’évasion fiscale internationale et l’évitement fiscal abusif: a) quelle modélisation précise le gouvernement a-t-il utilisée pour appuyer son affirmation voulant que les mesures pour lutter contre l’évasion fiscale internationale et l’évitement fiscal abusif permettront de recouvrer des recettes de 1,4 milliard de dollars sur cinq ans; b) qui a établi la modélisation en a); c) quelles étaient les prévisions de la modélisation; d) le montant estimatif de 1,4 milliard de dollars vient-il seulement de la somme supplémentaire de 606 millions de dollars sur cinq ans ou vient-il aussi de l’engagement budgétaire de 2016 de 350 millions de dollars par année?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 548 --
M. Scott Duvall:
En ce qui concerne les activités organisées par Facebook, Google, Netflix et Apple auxquelles des ministres ont assisté depuis novembre 2015, ventilées par entreprise, année et ministère: a) quel est le nombre d’activités auxquelles chaque ministre a participé; b) pour chaque participation en a), quels ont été les coûts associés à (i) l’hébergement, (ii) la nourriture, (iii) toute autre dépense, y compris une description de chaque dépense; c) quels sont les détails de toute réunion à laquelle un ministre et d’autres personnes ont participé, y compris (i) la date, (ii) le résumé ou la description, (iii) les personnes présentes, (iv) les sujets abordés?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 549 --
Mme Shannon Stubbs:
En ce qui concerne les contrats gouvernementaux octroyés à Cisco, ventilés par ministère, organisme ou autre entité gouvernementale: a) ventilé par année, quels sont (i) le nombre, (ii) la valeur totale, de tous les contrats octroyés à Cisco depuis le 1er janvier 2016; b) quels sont les détails de chacun des contrats octroyés à Cisco depuis le 1er janvier 2016, y compris (i) le fournisseur, (ii) la date, (iii) la valeur, (iv) la description des produits ou services, (v) s’il s’agissait d’un octroi à fournisseur unique?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 551 --
Mme Jenny Kwan:
En ce qui concerne les prêts approuvés par la Corporation de financement d’urgence d’entreprises du Canada (CFUEC) au titre du crédit d’urgence pour les grands employeurs, ventilés par prêt approuvé pour chaque emprunteur: a) quelles sont les modalités du prêt en ce qui concerne (i) les dividendes, (ii) les distributions prélevées sur les capitaux propres et les rachats d’actions, (iii) la rémunération des cadres; b) pour les modalités du prêt en a), à partir de quelle date les modalités s’appliquent-elles et à quelle date expirent-elles; c) quelles conséquences les modalités du prêt prévoient-elles si l’entreprise ne respecte pas l’une ou plusieurs des modalités en a); d) quel processus la CFUEC utilise-t-elle pour vérifier que l’entreprise respecte les modalités en a); e) la CFUEC a-t-elle nommé un observateur au conseil d’administration de chaque emprunteur et, si tel est le cas, quelle est la durée de son mandat?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 552 --
Mme Jenny Kwan:
En ce qui concerne le logement: a) depuis 2010, ventilé par année, combien de prêts assurés la Société canadienne d’hypothèques et de logement a-t-elle approuvés pour le financement et le refinancement de logements locatifs par des fiducies de revenu immobilier et de grands fonds d’investissement; b) parmi les prêts assurés en a), combien sont associés à l’achat de biens existants à loyer modéré; c) ventilé par projet bénéficiant du financement en a), quel est (i) le loyer moyen des logements avant l’acquisition, (ii) le loyer moyen des logements chaque année après l’acquisition jusqu’au loyer moyen le plus récent; d) ventilé par province, l’état de l’engagement financier (p. ex. entente finale, engagement conditionnel), l’état du versement et le type de financement (subvention ou prêt), quel est le total du financement accordé au titre (i) du Fonds national de co-investissement pour le logement, (ii) de l’initiative Financement de la construction de logements locatifs, (iii) du volet des projets de l’Initiative pour la création rapide de logements?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 553 --
Mme Jenny Kwan:
En ce qui concerne l’attribution de contrats pour les services de demande de visas par le gouvernement: a) à quelles dates Travaux publics et Services gouvernementaux Canada et Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada ont-ils respectivement appris que Beijing Shuangxiong appartient au bureau de la sécurité publique de Beijing; b) depuis que l’on connaît le régime de propriété de Beijing Shuangxiong, quels examens ont été effectués pour donner suite à ces renseignements, et quand ont-ils commencé; c) en ce qui concerne le processus ayant donné lieu à l’adjudication du contrat à VFS Global en 2018, (i) combien de soumissions ont été présentées, (ii) d’autres entreprises ont-elles obtenu le contrat avant qu’il soit attribué à VFS Global, (iii) quels éléments ont été évalués dans l’examen de ces contrats, (iv) le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications ou le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité ont-ils participé à la vérification de ces contrats; d) le contrat de VFS Global comporte t-il une clause dérogatoire qui permettrait au gouvernement de résilier le contrat unilatéralement; e) le gouvernement ayant confié à VFS Global la création de services numériques, quelles mesures sont prises pour veiller à ce que le gouvernement ne donne pas à VFS Global un avantage concurrentiel pour des soumissions futures?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)
8555-432-479 Regional economic developme ...8555-432-480 Contracts for goods or serv ...8555-432-481 Meetings with federal ombudsmen8555-432-482 Canada 20208555-432-483 Contracts with McKinsey &am ...8555-432-485 Meetings with MCAP8555-432-486 An Act respecting the offic ...8555-432-488 Canada-China relationship8555-432-489 Purchase of zero emission buses8555-432-491 Highly Affected Sectors Cre ...8555-432-492 Asian Infrastructure Invest ... ...Show all topics
View Charlie Angus Profile
NDP (ON)
moved:
That this House do now adjourn.
He said: Madam Speaker, I am very proud to be here this evening as the NDP spokesperson for the greater Timmins—James Bay region. I am very touched to open the debate on the future of Laurentian University.
For the people from all around northern Ontario, Laurentian University is a symbol that opened the door to several generations of young Franco‑Ontarians, indigenous and young anglophones from small towns in northern Ontario.
It is important for Parliament to look at the crisis at Laurentian University and come up with a solution.
I will be sharing my time with the member for Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie.
People in Canada might be wondering why the Parliament of Canada is talking about the future of a university in Sudbury. There are national implications about what is happening there right now. The use of the CCAA, the Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act, to demolish a public institution is something that we have to deal with at the federal level to make sure it will never happen again. If we allow this precedent to happen at Laurentian, we can bet our bottom dollar that premiers like Jason Kenney and other right wingers will use the CCAA to attack public institutions.
This is not an example of the reason that legislation was put in place, and it cannot be used at Laurentian today. A number of programs that have national significance are being attacked and undermined at Laurentian. That is the issue to be debated in this House, and I thank my colleagues from all parties for being present for this debate.
When I look at Laurentian, it is very emotional. My father was in his thirties and never had a chance to go to school. My dad had to quit school when he was 16 because he was a miner's son. There was no opportunity for post-secondary education. My mom quit school at 15 to go to work.
When my dad was 35, he had the opportunity to get a post-secondary education, and he got that because Laurentian University was there. The fact that we had a university in the north made it possible for my father to get the education that had been denied him, and he became a professor of economics. That is what Laurentian did for him.
I was speaking to a young, single mother yesterday who never got to go to school, as she had a child very young. She phoned me and said she was going to go to university next year. She asked where she will go now. Doug Ford and his buddies probably do not think it is a problem if people are in Kapuskasing or Hearst. He would say they should just go to Toronto or Guelph. They cannot.
Laurentian makes that possible. Laurentian removed the barriers for so many people in a region that has suffered such massive youth out-migration, year in and year out. Laurentian was the tool that we used. It is 60 years of public investment. I think particularly of the Franco-Ontarian community that has built a level of expertise and capacity that was second to none.
I think of the indigenous community. The university had the tricultural mandate, and the decision of the board of governors to attack indigenous services as part of their restructuring is an attack on truth and reconciliation.
Call to action 16 states, “We call upon post-secondary institutions to create university and college degree and diploma programs in Aboriginal languages.” Guess what, with the CCAA, that is gone. Gone as well are the massive and important programs for francophone youth to get educated in key areas.
I believe we have to step up at the federal level. We have to come to the table to work with Laurentian on its future, but I would say part of that has to be that we get rid of the president and board of governors who made this deal possible. If we look at what they put in their plan, this is not a restructuring. This is an act of intellectual vandalism that is without precedent.
They are destroying the engineering program in the land of the deepest mines in the world. They are destroying the francophone mining engineering program when the majority of young people coming into the mining trades are francophone and work all over the world. They have taken that away.
They made a decision to get rid of the physics program when we have the world-class Neutrino Observatory, which has won awards around the world. Now scientists will be coming in from elsewhere, but the local university will not be part of it. What kind of thinking is that?
The decision to cut the nursing program in a region where the majority of the population is francophone goes against the principle of access to equitable services for francophone communities.
We need to look at a couple of key areas to see why this matters at the federal level. The attack on the programs that were designed for the northern indigenous is an attack on reconciliation. The federal government has an obligation there.
The attack on the francophone language rights, services, programming and training is denying opportunities, and it will have an effect for decades to come. It is also going to have an immediate impact on the right for people in rural regions to receive service in their language because young people are being trained in their language to work in those communities. I would point to the decision to kill the midwifery program, which was fought so hard for.
For rural people, that program was essential. It is essential for the far north, in communities like Attawapiskat, where the midwives went to work.
This is showing us it does not matter, in this so-called restructuring, what the mandate of that university was, which was to provide opportunity and education that was second to none in North America.
Anyone who has not read the filings being used under the CCAA should really take a look at them, because this is the road map for the destruction of public education and public services in Canada. What we heard on Monday was a shocking attack on education, programs and opportunities. It was slash after slash after slash, but what is in here is what comes next. It is the ability of this board of governors, the Doug Ford crowd, to go after and destroy the pensions.
Coming from northern Ontario, we are no strangers to the attack on pensions. I remember when Peggy Witte destroyed Pamour mine and the workers had their pensions stolen. I remember when the Kerr-Addison mine, one of the richest mines in the history of Canada, was stripped bare by the creditors, so there was nothing left but a bunch of unpaid bills, and the workers had their pension rights denied. Is that is the plan for the post-secondary education? That cannot happen. Not on our watch.
Were there mistakes made at Laurentian? Absolutely, but it is indicative of the larger crisis in post-secondary education, where students are forced to pay massive amounts to get access to education. They come out with major levels of debt. We see university administrators putting money into new buildings, into all the bells and whistles, and denying tenure and adequate work for the professors.
We saw another university in northern Ontario that fired a whole crop of young, dedicated professors and put the money into the sports program. What we are seeing with Laurentian and other universities is the creation of a new level of precarious worker, the university professors and staff, who take on enormous amounts of student debt and are given no opportunity or security and now even their pensions are going to be undermined.
I am calling on my colleagues tonight that the federal government has a role to play. We have to change the CCAA laws so we never again can have a precedent where a public institution can be ripped apart and destroyed and where the pension rights and protections of the people who work in that public service are erased.
That is not what the CCAA was established for. It was established for private companies. It was also to give them security while they restructured. What is happening at Laurentian is not a restructuring, so we need to deal with the CCAA.
We need a commitment from the federal government about the Francophone services. We need to speak up for the indigenous programs that are being cut. We have to recognize northern Ontario is not going to go back to third-class status, where the young people, who are the greatest assets we have, have to leave year in, year out because we do not have the services. Laurentian is a service we put 60 years into. We have to protect it.
I am calling on the Prime Minister to show up and come to the table with a plan to work to save Laurentian.
propose:
Que la Chambre s'ajourne maintenant.
— Madame la Présidente, je suis très fier d'être ici ce soir en tant que porte-parole du NPD pour la grande région de Timmins—Baie James. Je suis très touché d'ouvrir le débat sur l'avenir de l'Université Laurentienne.
Pour les gens de partout dans le Nord de l'Ontario, l'Université Laurentienne est un symbole qui a ouvert la porte à plusieurs générations de jeunes Franco-ontariens, d'Autochtones et de jeunes anglophones des petites villes du Nord de l'Ontario.
Il est important que le Parlement du Canada examine la crise de l'Université Laurentienne et mette en place une solution.
Je partagerai mon temps de parole avec le député de Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie.
Les Canadiens se demandent peut‑être pourquoi le Parlement du Canada débat de l'avenir d'une université située à Sudbury. Ce qui se passe là‑bas en ce moment a des implications à l'échelle nationale. Le recours à la Loi sur les arrangements avec les créanciers des compagnies pour démolir une institution publique est un problème qui doit se régler au niveau fédéral pour éviter que cela ne se reproduise. Si nous admettons ce précédent avec l'Université Laurentienne, il y a fort à parier que des premiers ministres comme Jason Kenney et d'autres personnes de droite utiliseront la Loi sur les arrangements avec les créanciers des compagnies pour s'en prendre à des institutions publiques.
Cette loi n'a pas été élaborée dans ce but et l'Université Laurentienne ne peut y avoir recours aujourd'hui. Un certain nombre de programmes d'une importance nationale de l'Univesité Laurentienne ont été attaqués et éviscérés. Voilà la question qui doit être débattue à la Chambre, et je remercie mes collègues de tous les partis de participer à ce débat.
Mon rapport avec l'Université Laurentienne est très émotif. Avant la trentaine, mon père n'avait jamais pu poursuivre des études postsecondaires. Il avait dû quitter l'école à 16 ans parce qu'il était fils de mineur. Les études postsecondaires, ce n'était pas fait pour lui. Ma mère, elle, a quitté l'école à 15 ans pour aller travailler.
À 35 ans, mon père a eu l'occasion de poursuivre des études postsecondaires grâce à la présence de l'Université Laurentienne. La présence de cette université dans le Nord lui a permis d'obtenir l'éducation dont il avait été privé, et il est devenu professeur d'économie. Voilà ce que l'Université Laurentienne lui a permis d'accomplir.
Hier, j'ai discuté avec une jeune mère seule qui n'avait jamais pu aller à l'école, car elle avait eu son enfant très jeune. Elle m'a téléphoné pour me dire qu'elle comptait aller à l'université l'an prochain, mais que maintenant elle ne savait plus ce qu'elle ferait. Doug Ford et ses copains ne pensent probablement pas que cela pose problème pour les gens de Kapuskasing ou de Hearst. Ils n'ont qu'à aller étudier à Toronto ou à Guelph. Eh bien, non, ils ne le peuvent pas.
L'Université Laurentienne leur offre cette possibilité. Elle a éliminé des obstacles pour tellement de gens dans une région qui souffre depuis des années d'un exode de ses jeunes. L'Université Laurentienne nous permettait d'endiguer cet exode. Cela fait 60 ans qu'elle bénéficie d'un investissement public. Je songe plus particulièrement à la communauté franco-ontarienne, qui a su bâtir une expertise et une capacité d'un niveau inégalé.
À propos de la communauté autochtone, l'université avait un mandat triculturel. Or, la décision du conseil des gouverneurs de s'attaquer aux services aux Autochtones dans le cadre de sa restructuration est une attaque contre la Commission de vérité et réconciliation.
En effet, l'appel à l'action no 16 indique ceci : « Nous demandons aux établissements d'enseignement postsecondaire de créer des programmes et des diplômes collégiaux et universitaires en langues autochtones. » Sans surprise, avec la Loi sur les arrangements avec les créanciers des compagnies, cela n'existe plus. Les vastes programmes qui permettaient aux jeunes francophones de poursuivre des études importantes dans des domaines clés n'existent plus non plus.
Selon moi, le fédéral doit intervenir et négocier avec l'Université Laurentienne l'avenir de cette dernière. Dans cette optique, il faut, à mon avis, se débarrasser du président et du conseil des gouverneurs, qui ont rendu possible cet accord. Ce qui est prévu dans le plan qui en découle n'est pas une restructuration, mais un acte de vandalisme intellectuel sans précédent.
Ils ont éliminé le programme de génie dans le pays où on trouve les mines les plus profondes au monde. Ils ont éliminé le programme francophone de génie minier alors que la majorité des jeunes qui choisissent un métier dans les mines sont francophones et travaillent partout dans le monde. Ils ont éliminé tous ces programmes.
Ils ont choisi d'éliminer le programme de physique alors que nous disposons de l'Observatoire de neutrinos, qui est de calibre mondial et qui a remporté des prix dans le monde entier. Maintenant, les scientifiques viendront d'ailleurs, mais l'université locale ne fera plus partie des recherches. À quoi ont-ils bien pu penser?
La décision de mettre fin au programme pour la formation des soins infirmiers dans une région dont la majorité de la population est francophone va à l'encontre du principe d'accès à des services équitables pour les communautés francophones.
Nous devons examiner certains aspects essentiels pour comprendre pourquoi cette situation concerne l'échelon fédéral. La charge menée contre les programmes conçus pour les Autochtones des régions du Nord est une charge contre la réconciliation. Le gouvernement fédéral a une obligation à cet égard.
L'offensive contre les droits, les services, les programmes et la formation des francophones les prive de possibilités, et les conséquences se feront sentir pendant des décennies. En outre, il y aura un impact direct sur les droits des habitants des régions rurales de recevoir des services dans leur langue parce que les jeunes sont formés dans leur langue pour travailler dans ces communautés. J'attire votre attention sur la décision d'annuler le programme de formation des sages-femmes, pour lequel des gens se sont battus si fort.
Pour les habitants des régions rurales, ce programme était essentiel. Il est essentiel pour le Grand Nord, dans des communautés comme Attawapiskat, où les sages-femmes se rendaient pour leur travail.
Cela nous démontre que cette soi-disant restructuration ne tient absolument pas compte du mandat de cette université, c'est-à-dire d'offrir des possibilités et de l'éducation qui n'ont pas leur égal ailleurs en Amérique du Nord.
Quiconque n'a pas lu les documents déposés en vertu de la Loi sur les arrangements avec les créanciers des compagnies devrait y jeter un œil, parce qu'ils pavent la voie vers la destruction de l'éducation et des services publics au Canada. Ce que nous avons entendu lundi est ni plus ni moins qu'une attaque scandaleuse contre l'éducation, les programmes et les possibilités. Ce n'est qu'une suite de coups de hache, mais ce qu'il y a présage de ce qui s'en vient: la possibilité pour le conseil d'administration, la bande de Doug Ford, de s'en prendre aux régimes de retraite et de les supprimer.
Ce n'est pas la première fois que nous, les gens du Nord de l'Ontario, voyons des attaques contre des régimes de retraite. Je me souviens lorsque Peggy Witte a détruit la mine Pamour et que les travailleurs se sont fait voler leur caisse de retraite. Je me souviens de la mine Kerr-Addison, l'une des plus riches de toute l'histoire du Canada, dont les coffres ont été complètement vidés par les créanciers. Il ne restait qu'une pile de factures impayées et les travailleurs ont été privés de leurs droits en vertu de leur régime de retraite. Est-ce ce qui est prévu pour l'éducation postsecondaire? Cela ne se produira pas. Pas tant que nous serons là.
L'Université Laurentienne a-t-elle commis des erreurs? Oui, absolument, mais cela reflète la crise qui touche plus largement l'enseignement postsecondaire, alors que les étudiants doivent débourser des sommes énormes pour avoir accès à l'université et terminent leurs études fortement endettés. De leur côté, des administrateurs d'université investissent dans la construction de nouveaux édifices et toutes sortes de gadgets dernier cri tout en refusant de donner aux professeurs leur permanence et une charge de travail adéquate.
Autre exemple, une université du Nord de l'Ontario a congédié tout un groupe de jeunes professeurs dévoués pour investir dans un programme de sports. On assiste, à l'Université Laurentienne et dans d'autres universités, à la création d'un nouveau groupe de travailleurs précaires, les professeurs et les employés universitaires. Après s'être lourdement endettés pendant leurs études, ils n'ont aucune chance d'avancer et aucune sécurité, et voient même désormais remis en question leur fonds de retraite.
J'invite tous les députés à reconnaître que le gouvernement fédéral a un rôle à jouer. Nous devons modifier la Loi sur les arrangements avec les créanciers des compagnies afin qu'il n'y ait plus jamais de situation où une institution publique pourrait être démantelée et détruite tandis que les travailleurs de ce service public voient disparaître les droits et les protections entourant leur pension.
Ce n'est pas pour cela que la Loi sur les arrangements avec les créanciers des compagnies a été créée. Elle a été conçue pour les entreprises privées, notamment pour leur fournir une certaine sécurité pendant leur restructuration. Ce qui se produit à l'Université Laurentienne n'a rien d'une restructuration. Nous devons donc nous pencher sur la Loi sur les arrangements avec les créanciers des compagnies.
Le gouvernement fédéral doit prendre un engagement à propos des services en français. Nous devons prendre la défense des programmes autochtones qui sont en train d'être éliminés. Nous devons reconnaître qu'il n'est pas question que le Nord de l'Ontario redevienne une région de troisième ordre, une région que les jeunes, qui sont notre plus grande richesse, doivent quitter année après année parce que nous n'avons pas les services dont ils ont besoin. Nous avons investi 60 ans dans ce service qu'est l'Université Laurentienne. Nous devons la protéger.
Je demande au premier ministre de répondre à l'appel et de se présenter à la table avec un plan pour sauver l'Université Laurentienne.
View Scott Duvall Profile
NDP (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague from Timmins—James Bay and my colleague from London—Fanshawe for bringing forward this important emergency debate this evening.
Members who have already spoken have made it clear Laurentian University in Sudbury is of importance. I am concerned about a number of aspects about this. There are important protections of the CCAA that provide safeguards other than relief of debts for assets. There are certain protections for pensions of workers in these situations.
I know some of these protections do not go far enough. In fact, I have a bill before Parliament that would expand those protections. We need a comprehensive solution that maintains some of the protections for workers that exist with the CCAA.
With that being said, I do fear invoking the CCAA in this way for a public university might be a sneaky way to privatize it. If this were done by the board or the administration of the university, I wonder if the province should not have had the opportunity to step in here and protect the state of the university, including ensuring it remains a public university. I wonder if the member would like to speak to some of those points.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mon collègue de Timmins—Baie James et ma collègue de London—Fanshawe d'avoir demandé la tenue de cet important débat d'urgence ce soir.
Les députés ont déjà expliqué clairement l'importance de l'Université Laurentienne à Sudbury. Il y a un certain nombre de choses qui me préoccupent dans cette affaire. La Loi sur les arrangements avec les créanciers des compagnies prévoit d'importantes mesures de protection qui permettent d'éviter la vente d'actifs en échange d'un allégement de la dette. Il y a des mesures de protection des pensions des travailleurs, dans ce genre de situations.
Je sais que certaines de ces mesures ne vont pas assez loin. De fait, j'ai déposé un projet de loi à la Chambre qui renforcerait ces mesures. Nous avons besoin d'une solution exhaustive qui conserve certaines des mesures de protection concernant les travailleurs déjà présentes dans la Loi.
Cela dit, je crains que le fait d'invoquer la Loi de cette manière dans le cas d'une université publique ne soit une façon sournoise de la privatiser. Si c'est le conseil d'administration ou l'administration de l'université qui a décidé d'agir ainsi, je me demande si la province n'aurait pas dû avoir la possibilité d'intervenir et de la protéger, notamment en s'assurant qu'elle demeure publique. Je me demande si le député a des choses à dire à ce sujet.
View Joël Godin Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, it is important to be able to see what is happening in the institutions. In the preamble, there are indicators that call on us to react, observe and demand accountability. It is not interference. It is about holding those in charge accountable.
On the other hand, we have a responsibility to ensure that everything is going well. In this case, we could see this problem coming a mile off. Let me be clear: We are going to see more problems at other post-secondary institutions. We have to put mechanisms in place to protect our institutions and, most importantly, to protect the French fact.
Monsieur le Président, il est important que l'on puisse voir ce qui se passe dans les institutions. Il y a eu, au préalable, des indicateurs pour nous amener à réagir, à observer et à demander une reddition de comptes. Ce n'est pas de l'ingérence, c'est de la responsabilisation des gens en place.
D'un autre côté, nous avons la responsabilité de nous assurer que tout va bien. Dans ce cas-ci, tout le nécessaire était en place pour voir sur l'écran radar qu'un problème arrivait. J'en fais l'annonce: des problèmes vont arriver ailleurs, dans d'autres établissements postsecondaires. Nous devons donc mettre en place les mécanismes pour protéger nos institutions et, en premier lieu, le fait français.
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
View Don Davies Profile
2021-04-13 15:19 [p.5520]
Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to speak today to Bill C-14, the economic statement that was introduced last fall. As has been noted by a number of speakers, there is a little irony to the debate today on this bill, because it has been superseded by a federal budget that will be introduced next week.
I have to point out for the record that it has been over two years since the last budget was presented by the government, and that is a record, but not a record of which any government ought to be proud. Every G7 country and every province and territory in Canada tabled a budget last year. When there is no budget presented by a government in Parliament, that constitutes a fundamental breach of accountability to the Canadian people and to Parliament.
When I was first privileged to be elected to this House some 12 years ago, one of the first things I learned was that one of the prime responsibilities of a parliamentarian is to scrutinize the spending of government. That is what we are sent here by our constituents to do. When a budget is not presented by a federal government, that is a fundamental violation of that core responsibility we hold to the people who elected us.
Having said that, this bill does give me a chance to raise certain critical issues that I believe Canadians wanted expressed back in the fall, when this financial statement and this bill were introduced, and as they want to see addressed in the upcoming budget. I am going to speak to several of these priorities that not only are priorities to the people of Vancouver Kingsway, but reflect the aspirations and needs of people across this country, in every single community.
It will not surprise my colleagues to hear me, as health critic, start off with some core health issues that I believe this upcoming budget needs to address and that the statement does not address in any real, meaningful way. It has been noted many times throughout the COVID pandemic that while this crisis has created many problems, it has also exposed many other problems of a serious and long-standing character. One of them is Canada's long-standing crisis in long-term care.
Recently, the Canadian Institute for Health Information published data that reveals Canada has the worst record of all developed countries when it comes to COVID-19 deaths in long-term care homes. This follows previous reports that showed Canada's death rate in seniors congregate settings is the highest among OECD states. That is a matter of international shame. The data also reveals that many provinces and territories were slow to act and that steps could have been taken to avoid many of the deaths that occurred. The data internationally highlights that many other countries were better prepared for a potential outbreak of infectious disease and dedicated more resources and funding to this sector.
With notable exceptions, such as the province I come from, British Columbia, the CIHI report notes that the lessons learned from the first wave of the pandemic did not lead to changes in outcomes during the second wave last fall, resulting in a larger number of outbreaks, infections and deaths. This is inexcusable. It means that there were many deaths of Canadian seniors that could have and should have been avoided.
Certain provinces did take early and effective steps to address the long-standing issues in long-term care. Again, the NDP government in British Columbia was one such leader, taking timely action to expand resources to staff, prohibit working between multiple sites and raise standards of care. This leadership is borne out by the data, which shows that B.C. had the best numbers of all comparable jurisdictions. However, the crisis in long-term care, and the urgent need for resources and legislative change, is a national one. Seniors have a right to proper care in every province and territory, not just those fortunate enough to reside in select provinces that are responding to the problems.
The upcoming budget provides a timely and powerful moment to deal with the NDP's repeated call for urgent federal action to establish binding national standards in Canada's long-term care sector backed up by federal funding tied to meeting those standards.
These include very critical factors like meeting minimum hours of care, which I note recently has been described as a minimum of six hours of care for every senior in long-term care. We need patient-aide ratios that allow people who work in these homes to be able to give the kind of quality care they are trained to do and so desperately want to provide, and we need decent working conditions for all staff. It has been said that the conditions of work are the conditions of care. We must ensure that this skilled work performed by skilled workers, predominantly women, by the way, often racialized and historically undervalued, is finally recognized for the essential public health care it is, and paid accordingly.
Speaking of public health care, we finally must address the problems in for-profit delivery. It is time we built a long-term care sector that is built on non-profit delivery, preferably through our public health care system and the non-profit sector. The data is overwhelming, long-standing and clear that for-profit care reduces standards of care, because it is obvious it diverts money to shareholders and profit that ought to be going directly to our seniors, and it incentivizes cost-cutting. That is borne out in the fact that, generally speaking, the death rate, infection rate and poor standards of care are higher in for-profit delivery systems.
National problems require national solutions. It is time our federal government acted. Our Canadian seniors deserve it.
I also want to state that another long-standing problem that has been profoundly revealed to all Canadians as a serious failure of public policy for decades has been revealed for all to see, and that is Canada's lack of domestic capacity for producing vaccines and, indeed, most essential medicines. Some of my colleagues may remember that just a summer or two ago we faced a serious shortage of EpiPens in this country, and we were only weeks away from having Canadians, particularly young Canadians, left without this life-saving medication.
Clearly, this has been one of the key problems behind Canada's painfully slow vaccine rollout, but it is not limited to pandemic vaccines. Our lack of Canadian production capacity is felt across many therapeutics, including numerous life-saving drugs Canadians rely on that routinely face crises in availability. This situation reveals how vulnerable Canadians are to the multinational private drug industry and indeed foreign governments in a time of crisis.
Of course, that was not always the case. For seven decades, Canada was home to Connaught Labs, a Canadian publicly owned enterprise that was one of the world's leading medicine and vaccine producers. Connaught Medical Research Laboratories was a non-commercial public health entity established in Toronto in 1914 to produce the diphtheria antitoxin.
It expanded significantly after the discovery of insulin by Canadians at the University of Toronto in 1921 and became a leading manufacturer and distributor of insulin at cost in Canada and overseas. Its non-commercial mandate mediated commercial interests and kept medicine accessible to millions of people who otherwise could not have afforded it. It also contributed to some of the key medical breakthroughs of the 20th century, including insulin, penicillin and the polio vaccine.
In 1972, Connaught was purchased by the Canada Development Corporation, a federally owned corporation charged with developing and maintaining Canadian-controlled companies through a mixture of public and private investment. Connaught provided vaccines to Canadians at cost, manufactured them here in our country, and sold vaccines to other countries at affordable prices. It operated without government financial support. It even made profits, which it reinvested in medical research. This was a fabulous example of public enterprise.
Despite this remarkable record, Connaught was privatized in 1986 by the Mulroney Conservatives for purely ideological reasons. The Liberals share squarely in the blame for this appalling, short-sighted public policy debacle that has left Canadians vulnerable in 2021. Despite being in power for 19 years after the privatization, 15 years in a majority government when they could have done anything they wanted to do, the Liberals never lifted a finger to re-establish public medicine production in Canada, so when they turn to Canadians and say that we cannot produce vaccines fast enough in Canada because we do not have the production capacity, Canadians have every right to look them squarely in the eye and ask them why they let them down.
Why did the successive Conservative and Liberal federal governments let Canadians down and leave us in this vulnerable position where we are dependent on a handful of multinational vaccine producers situated in other countries of the world for our essential life-saving vaccines? That is the result of the public policy decisions of the Liberals and Conservatives up to now, and Canadians need to hold them accountable for it.
Never again must Canadians be left in such a vulnerable position. As a G7 country, we deserve to be self-sufficient in all essential medications and vaccines as a public health priority of the highest order, so I am looking to the budget next week, and I would point out that this economic statement makes no mention of the establishment of a public drug manufacturer in Canada. By doing that, we could leverage public research done in Canada's universities, where, by the way, most of the new molecules and research for new pharmaceuticals actually comes from, and turn those into innovative medicines at a reasonable cost for the public good and not for private profit.
As we stand at the 100th anniversary of the discovery of insulin in Canada by Canadians, let us honour that legacy by building our Canadian medicine capacity. We have done it before. Let us do it again. I would like to see that in the budget next week or hear from my Liberal colleagues as to why they do not think it is a good idea.
Turning to another core foundational issue, the Liberals have been in power for six years now. That is long enough to be measured by their record. When they came into office in 2015, this country was facing a serious housing crisis. They have had six years to deal with it. Where is the affordable housing? The reality is that the crisis today is worse than it was prior to them taking office. Young Canadians across this country have no hope of purchasing any housing, and there are millions of Canadians in precarious housing who cannot live in dignified secure housing, whether rented or owned.
In my view, housing is a fundamental human right and a core foundational need. It is key to individual health and self-realization. It is also a foundation of health, as it is a central component of the social determinants that are so essential to keeping Canadians healthy. Housing should be available to every Canadian. It is simply unacceptable that a country as wealthy as Canada is unable to provide every citizen with the opportunity to own their own home. This is especially the case when we consider how large Canada is, how much land we have and how small our population is. Real estate is not just a commodity. It is a necessity.
I believe homelessness and precarious housing are social scourges that ought to shame us as a society, but homelessness and precarious housing are neither inevitable nor unsolvable. With enough political commitment and economic resources, there is simply no reason why a wealthy G7 nation such as Canada ought not to be able to ensure that every citizen can live in an affordable, secure and decent home.
Clearly, the present situation is a result of decades of poor policies at every level of government, federal, provincial and municipal. I believe there are a number of contributors to this calamity. These include a federal government that has been largely absent from the housing file since the late eighties, a lack of public investment in affordable housing of all types, extremely lax laws that permit extensive foreign capital into our communities that destabilizes domestic housing prices, and a misguided belief that the private sector development industry can and will provide affordable housing. All of these have contributed to a disastrous situation where people who have sacrificed enormously and done everything right cannot even purchase a modest home in the communities in which they live and work.
I believe we need a multipronged approach to address this unacceptable situation, and we will be keeping a keen eye on the budget coming up to see if these suggestions are contained in that budget. I think this requires a national program with federal leadership and harnessing local creativity and innovation. Most importantly, it involves public enterprise.
Solutions include strong and effective curbs on foreign capital investments in residential real estate, particularly in overheated local markets where the cost of housing bears no relationship whatsoever to the average income or wages earned by people in that community. If anybody is looking for any proof of the destabilizing impact of foreign capital, they only have to look to a place like the Lower Mainland where houses are going for $2 million, $3 million, $4 million and $5 million, and 98% of the people who work here cannot afford those houses. Who is buying them? It is certainly not people in our communities.
We need tax incentives that promote the construction of affordable rental buildings, not just market rental buildings, but affordable rental buildings. We must ensure that all developments over a certain size include a minimum number of truly affordable units owned, perhaps, by the municipalities in perpetuity, like they do in Vienna.
We must create an ambitious national co-op housing program, targeted at building 500,000 units of housing over the next 10 years. This could be a modern version of the extremely successful program of the 1970s and 1980s with expanded targets and with an ironclad commitment to the principle of tying rent to income, say no more than 30%. While I know that co-operative living is not for everyone, it does represent a demonstrated successful model that houses people from varied family situations across all age limits and socio-economic categories and permits security of tenure, affordable housing and ability to age in place.
Vancouver Kingsway has many of these wonderful communities still in operation, and I believe this concept can be harnessed to house a new generation of Canadians. Let us see if next week the Liberal government has the creativity to bring in a strong national co-op housing program.
We need to implement each of the suggestions in the recovery for all campaign's initiatives. I think every parliamentarian has likely received this, which contains excellent suggestions for federal policy on things that they can do in their jurisdiction. We need an effective national housing strategy act, the appointment of a federal housing advocate and members of a national housing council with teeth.
In the end, secure, dignified housing represents a foundational, core need for people without which their ability to participate meaningfully in society or to reach their potential is seriously impaired. It must be a priority of the first order. I wish I could say that this is regarded as such by the current Liberal government, but its lack of meaningful progress to date on this critical file leaves me with no other conclusion than that they are not prepared to allocate the kinds of resources or policies that are truly needed to adequately address this crisis.
Now I know that Liberals will stand up in this House and say it is a priority for them, but I ask them once again to show me the housing. After six years in office, can they show me where the tens of thousands of affordable housing units are that could and should have been built in the last six years. They cannot. They will make all sorts of weak excuses like housing takes time. I would remind them after World War II, the Government of Canada built 300,000 units of affordable housing for returning soldiers in 36 months. That is what a government committed to housing can and will do.
I urge the present government to make the creation, building and expansion of affordable housing of all types as a matter of prime political priority in the upcoming budget. After all, making sure everyone in our community has appropriate housing is the responsibility of us all.
Finally, I want to say a word about climate change. There are few issues that are existential in nature in politics. The climate crisis facing our planet is one of those. The IPCC has repeatedly stated that we have less than 10 years to take meaningful action and reverse the calamitous impacts that will occur if we do not do so. I would note that carbon emissions have gone up over the course of the government's tenure since 2015. In fact, since the early 1990s, despite repeated pledges to reduce carbon emissions by such or such a date, no government has ever hit them. This must change—
Monsieur le Président, je suis heureux de prendre la parole aujourd’hui au sujet du projet de loi C-14, l’énoncé économique qui a été présenté l’automne dernier. Comme l’ont fait remarquer un certain nombre d’intervenants, le débat d’aujourd’hui sur ce projet de loi est quelque peu ironique, car il est supplanté par un budget fédéral qui sera présenté la semaine prochaine.
Je dois souligner que cela fait plus de deux ans que le dernier budget a été présenté par le gouvernement, et c’est un record, mais pas un record dont un gouvernement devrait être fier. Tous les pays du G7 et toutes les provinces et tous les territoires du Canada ont déposé un budget l’an dernier. Lorsqu’un gouvernement ne présente pas de budget au Parlement, cela constitue un manquement fondamental à l’obligation de rendre des comptes à la population canadienne et au Parlement.
Lorsque j’ai eu le privilège d’être élu à la Chambre des communes il y a une douzaine d’années, l’une des premières choses que j’ai apprises est que l’une des principales responsabilités d’un parlementaire est d’examiner les dépenses du gouvernement. C’est pour cela que nous sommes envoyés ici par nos électeurs. Lorsqu’un gouvernement fédéral ne présente pas de budget, c’est une violation fondamentale de la responsabilité que nous avons envers les gens qui nous ont élus.
Cela dit, ce projet de loi me donne l’occasion de soulever certaines questions cruciales que, à mon avis, les Canadiens voulaient voir exprimer à l’automne, lorsque cet énoncé financier et ce projet de loi ont été présentés, et qu’ils veulent voir traiter dans le prochain budget. Je vais parler de plusieurs de ces priorités qui ne sont pas seulement des priorités pour les gens de Vancouver Kingsway, mais qui reflètent les aspirations et les besoins des gens partout au pays, dans toutes les collectivités.
Mes collègues ne seront pas surpris de m’entendre, en tant que porte-parole en matière de santé, commencer par certains problèmes de santé fondamentaux qui, à mon sens, doivent être abordés dans le prochain budget et que l’énoncé n’aborde pas de façon tangible et importante. Il a été noté à maintes reprises tout au long de la pandémie de COVID que si cette crise a créé de nombreux problèmes, elle en a également révélé d’autres, qui sont graves et de longue date. L’un d’eux est la crise de longue date des soins de longue durée au Canada.
Récemment, l’Institut canadien d’information sur la santé a publié des renseignements qui révèlent que le Canada a le pire bilan de tous les pays développés en ce qui concerne les décès dus à la COVID dans les établissements de soins de longue durée. Cela fait suite à des rapports antérieurs qui montraient que le taux de mortalité au Canada dans les établissements pour personnes âgées est le plus élevé parmi les pays de l’OCDE. C’est une honte internationale. Les données révèlent également que bon nombre de provinces et territoires ont tardé à agir et que des mesures auraient pu être prises pour éviter un grand nombre des décès survenus. À l’échelle internationale, les données soulignent que de nombreux autres pays étaient mieux préparés à une éventuelle épidémie de maladies infectieuses et ont consacré davantage de ressources et de fonds à ce secteur.
À quelques exceptions notables près, comme la province dont je suis originaire, la Colombie-Britannique, le rapport de l’ICIS indique que les leçons tirées de la première vague de la pandémie n’ont pas donné lieu à des changements dans les résultats lors de la deuxième vague, l’automne dernier, ce qui s’est traduit par un plus grand nombre d’éclosions, d’infections et de décès. Cette situation est inexcusable. Cela signifie que de nombreux décès d’aînés canadiens auraient pu et auraient dû être évités.
Certaines provinces ont pris des mesures rapides et efficaces pour régler les problèmes de longue date dans le domaine des soins de longue durée. Encore une fois, le gouvernement néo-démocrate de la Colombie-Britannique a été l’un de ces chefs de file, prenant des mesures opportunes pour augmenter les ressources en personnel, interdire le travail entre plusieurs emplacements et relever les normes de soins. Ce leadership est confirmé par les données qui montrent que la Colombie-Britannique avait les meilleurs chiffres de toutes les administrations comparables. Cependant, la crise des soins de longue durée et le besoin urgent en ressources et changements législatifs sont d’envergure nationale. Les aînés ont le droit de recevoir des soins adéquats dans chaque province et chaque territoire, et pas seulement ceux qui ont la chance de résider dans certaines provinces qui réagissent aux problèmes.
Le prochain budget est le moment idéal pour répondre à l’appel répété du NPD pour une action fédérale urgente afin d’établir des normes nationales contraignantes dans le secteur des soins de longue durée au Canada, avec un financement fédéral lié au respect de ces normes.
Il s’agit notamment de facteurs très importants comme le respect des heures minimales de soins qui, je le note, ont été décrites récemment comme un minimum de six heures de soins pour chaque personne âgée en établissement de soins de longue durée. Nous avons besoin de ratios patient-aide qui permettent aux personnes qui travaillent dans ces foyers d’être en mesure de donner le genre de soins de qualité pour lesquels elles sont formées et qu’elles veulent désespérément fournir, et nous avons besoin de conditions de travail décentes pour tout le personnel. Il a été dit que les conditions de travail sont les conditions des soins. Nous devons veiller à ce que ce travail qualifié effectué par des travailleurs qualifiés — majoritairement des femmes d’ailleurs, souvent racialisées et historiquement sous-estimées — soit enfin reconnu pour les soins de santé publique essentiels qu’il représente, et rémunéré en conséquence.
En parlant de soins de santé publique, nous devons enfin nous attaquer aux problèmes de la prestation de services à but lucratif. Il est temps que nous construisions un secteur de soins de longue durée fondé sur la prestation de services à but non lucratif, de préférence par l’intermédiaire de notre système de santé publique et du secteur à but non lucratif. Les données sont accablantes, anciennes et claires: les soins à but lucratif réduisent les normes de soins, car il est évident qu’ils détournent vers les actionnaires et les profits de l’argent qui devraient aller directement à nos aînés, et qu’ils incitent à la réduction des coûts. Cela est confirmé par le fait que, de manière générale, le taux de mortalité, le taux d’infection et les mauvaises normes de soins sont plus élevés dans les systèmes de prestation à but lucratif.
Les problèmes nationaux exigent des solutions nationales. Il est temps que notre gouvernement fédéral agisse. Nos aînés canadiens le méritent.
Je voudrais parler d’un autre problème qui ne date pas d’hier et qui souligne le grave dysfonctionnement des politiques publiques, depuis des années, en ce qui concerne la capacité du Canada de produire des vaccins et, à vrai dire, la plupart des médicaments essentiels. Mes collègues se souviendront que l’été dernier, ou l’été d’avant, nous avons connu une grave pénurie d’Epipens au Canada, et qu’à quelques semaines près, nous aurions carrément manqué de ce médicament indispensable à la survie de Canadiens, surtout de jeunes Canadiens.
C’est manifestement là ce qui explique, entre autres, le déploiement particulièrement difficile de la campagne de vaccination, mais pas que. L’insuffisance de notre capacité de production se fait ressentir dans toutes sortes de domaines, notamment des médicaments d’importance vitale pour bon nombre de Canadiens, qui doivent alors faire face à des problèmes d’approvisionnement. Cette situation montre combien les Canadiens sont vulnérables face aux entreprises pharmaceutiques internationales et même aux gouvernements étrangers, en temps de crise.
Or, la situation était bien différente auparavant. Pendant sept décennies, les laboratoires de recherche médicale Connaught ont été une entreprise canadienne publique non commerciale, qui faisait partie des grands producteurs mondiaux de médicaments et de vaccins et qui, à partir de leur siège établi à Toronto en 1914, produisait un vaccin contre la diphtérie.
Cette entreprise s’est considérablement développée après la découverte de l’insuline par des Canadiens, à l’Université de Toronto, en 1921, si bien qu’elle est devenue un grand fabricant et distributeur d’insuline, au prix coûtant, au Canada et à l’étranger. De par son mandat non commercial, elle a permis de garder ce médicament accessible à des millions de gens qui, sinon, n’auraient pas pu se permettre de l’acheter. L’entreprise a également contribué à de grandes avancées médicales au XXe siècle, notamment l’insuline, la pénicilline et le vaccin contre la poliomyélite.
En 1972, Connaught a été rachetée par la Corporation de développement du Canada, laquelle appartenait au gouvernement fédéral et était chargée de développer et de financer des sociétés sous contrôle canadien, avec des investissements publics et privés. Connaught fournissait des vaccins aux Canadiens au prix coûtant, les fabriquait dans notre pays, et les exportait à des prix raisonnables. Elle n’avait pas besoin de l’appui financier du gouvernement. Elle faisait même des profits, qu’elle réinvestissait dans la recherche médicale. C’était un magnifique exemple d’entreprise publique.
Malgré ce bilan remarquable, Connaught a été privatisée en 1986 par les conservateurs de Mulroney pour des raisons purement idéologiques. Les libéraux sont tout autant à blâmer pour ce manque de vision catastrophique qui a rendu les Canadiens particulièrement vulnérables en 2021. Ils ont été au pouvoir pendant 19 ans après la privatisation, ils ont eu 15 ans de gouvernement majoritaire pendant lesquels ils pouvaient faire tout ce qu’ils voulaient, mais malgré cela, les libéraux n’ont jamais levé le petit doigt pour rétablir un système public de fabrication de médicaments, de sorte que, lorsqu’ils disent aux Canadiens que nous ne pouvons pas produire des vaccins à un rythme suffisant au Canada parce que nous n’avons pas la capacité de production, les Canadiens sont tout à fait justifiés de les regarder droit dans les yeux et de leur demander pourquoi ils les ont laissé tomber.
Pourquoi les gouvernements fédéraux conservateurs et libéraux qui se sont succédé ont-ils laissé tomber les Canadiens au point de les rendre tributaires d’une poignée de fabricants de vaccins établis dans d’autres pays, pour des vaccins d’importance vitale? C’est là le résultat des décisions prises par les gouvernements libéraux et conservateurs, et les Canadiens sont aujourd’hui en droit de leur demander des comptes.
Les Canadiens ne doivent plus jamais se retrouver dans une position aussi vulnérable. En tant que pays du G7, nous devons avoir pour priorité sanitaire absolue d’être autosuffisants pour tous les médicaments et vaccins essentiels, et j’attends avec impatience le budget de la semaine prochaine. Je rappelle que l’énoncé économique ne parlait absolument pas de la création d’une entreprise publique de fabrication de médicaments au Canada. Or, en créant ce genre d’entreprise, on pourrait démultiplier la recherche publique faite dans les universités canadiennes où, soit dit en passant, la plupart des nouvelles molécules et des nouveaux médicaments trouvent leur origine, et les transformer en médicaments novateurs, à un coût raisonnable, dans l’intérêt du public et pas dans celui des entreprises privées.
En cette année où nous allons célébrer le centième anniversaire de la découverte de l’insuline au Canada par des Canadiens, profitons-en pour renforcer notre capacité de fabrication de médicaments. Nous l’avons déjà fait. Nous en sommes capables. J’aimerais bien que cela figure dans le budget de la semaine prochaine, faute de quoi, j’invite mes collègues libéraux à m’expliquer pourquoi ce ne serait pas une bonne idée.
Pour passer à une autre question fondamentale, je dirai que les libéraux sont au pouvoir depuis six ans maintenant. C’est suffisant pour dresser un bilan. Lorsqu’ils sont arrivés au pouvoir en 2015, notre pays faisait face à une grave crise du logement. Les libéraux ont eu six ans pour la régler. Où sont les logements abordables? Le fait est que la crise n’a cessé d’empirer depuis qu’ils ont pris le pouvoir. Les jeunes Canadiens de toutes les régions du pays n’ont aucune chance de pouvoir acheter un logement, et on compte aujourd’hui des millions de Canadiens qui vivent dans des logements précaires et qui ne peuvent pas trouver de logements décents, pas plus à louer qu’à acheter.
À mon avis, le logement est un droit humain fondamental et répond à un besoin essentiel à la santé et à l’épanouissement de tout individu. C’est aussi un déterminant fondamental de la santé, parmi l’ensemble des déterminants sociaux qui contribuent au bien-être des Canadiens. Chaque Canadien doit pouvoir avoir accès à un logement. Il est tout simplement inacceptable qu’un pays aussi riche que le Canada soit incapable de fournir à chaque citoyen la possibilité d’acquérir son propre logement, surtout quand on pense à la vaste superficie du pays et à sa faible densité démographique. Posséder un logement n’est pas un luxe, c’est une nécessité.
Je crois que l’itinérance et le logement précaire sont des fléaux sociaux qui devraient nous faire honte en tant que société, mais ils ne sont ni inévitables ni insolubles. Avec des ressources financières et un engagement politique suffisants, il n’y a tout simplement aucune raison pour qu’un pays riche du G7 comme le Canada ne soit pas en mesure de garantir que chaque citoyen puisse avoir un foyer abordable, sûr et décent.
La situation actuelle est manifestement le fruit de décennies de mauvaises politiques à tous les paliers de gouvernement, qu’ils soient fédéral, provincial ou municipal. À mon avis, plusieurs facteurs ont contribué à cette calamité, notamment un gouvernement fédéral qui a été largement absent du dossier du logement depuis la fin des années 1980, un manque d’investissement public dans le logement abordable de tout type, des lois extrêmement laxistes qui permettent l’entrée de capitaux étrangers considérables dans nos collectivités, des capitaux qui déstabilisent les prix des maisons au pays, et une croyance erronée selon laquelle l’industrie du développement immobilier privé peut fournir des logements abordables et le fera. Tous ces facteurs ont contribué à créer une situation désastreuse dans laquelle des personnes qui ont fait d’énormes sacrifices et qui ont tout fait dans les règles ne peuvent même pas acheter une maison modeste dans les collectivités où elles vivent et travaillent.
Je crois que nous avons besoin d’une approche sur plusieurs fronts pour remédier à cette situation inacceptable et nous garderons un œil attentif sur le budget à venir pour voir s’il fait une place à ces suggestions. Je pense que la solution passe par un programme national avec un leadership fédéral et l’exploitation de la créativité et de l’innovation locales. Plus important encore, l’approche met à contribution l’entreprise publique.
Les solutions comprennent des restrictions musclées et efficaces visant les investissements de capitaux étrangers dans l’immobilier résidentiel, en particulier dans les marchés locaux en surchauffe où le coût du logement n’a aucune commune mesure avec le revenu moyen ou les salaires des habitants locaux. Pour quiconque cherche une preuve de l’effet déstabilisant des capitaux étrangers, qu’il suffise de regarder un endroit comme le Lower Mainland, où les maisons se vendent, 2, 3, 4 et 5 millions de dollars alors que 98 % des personnes qui travaillent ici ne peuvent pas se les payer. Qui les achète? Ce ne sont certainement pas les habitants de nos collectivités.
Nous avons besoin d’encouragements fiscaux qui favorisent la construction d’immeubles locatifs abordables, pas seulement des immeubles locatifs du marché, mais des immeubles locatifs abordables. Nous devons veiller à ce que tous les lotissements au-delà d’une certaine taille comportent un nombre minimum de logements vraiment abordables appartenant peut-être à perpétuité aux municipalités, comme on le fait à Vienne.
Nous devons créer un ambitieux programme national de coopératives d’habitation en vue de construire 500 000 logements au cours des 10 prochaines années. Il pourrait s’agir d’une version moderne du programme extrêmement efficace des années 1970 et 1980, avec des objectifs élargis et un engagement ferme envers le principe de l’établissement du loyer en fonction du revenu, disons au plus 30 %. Je sais que la vie en coopérative ne convient pas à tout le monde, mais elle représente un modèle éprouvé qui permet de loger des personnes de différentes situations familiales, de tous âges et de toutes catégories socioéconomiques et qui offre la sécurité d’occupation, un logement abordable et la possibilité de vieillir sur place.
On trouve encore un grand nombre de ces merveilleuses collectivités à Vancouver Kingsway et je crois que ce concept peut être exploité pour loger une nouvelle génération de Canadiens. Voyons si, la semaine prochaine, le gouvernement fédéral fera preuve de la créativité nécessaire en proposant un solide programme national de coopératives d’habitation.
Nous devons donner suite à chacune des suggestions liées aux initiatives qui s’inscrivent dans la campagne Recovery for All. Je pense que tous les parlementaires ont probablement reçu ce document qui suggère d’excellentes politiques fédérales sur des choses qu’ils peuvent mettre en place dans leur coin de pays. Nous avons besoin d’une loi efficace sur la stratégie nationale du logement, de la nomination d’un défenseur fédéral du logement et de membres d’un conseil national du logement ayant du mordant.
Au bout du compte, un logement sûr et digne représente un besoin fondamental et essentiel sans lequel la capacité de chacun à participer de façon utile à la société ou à réaliser son potentiel est sérieusement compromise. Il doit s’agir d’une priorité de premier plan. J’aimerais pouvoir dire que c’est ainsi que pense le gouvernement fédéral, mais vu son manque de progrès significatif à ce jour dans ce dossier crucial, je ne peux que conclure qu’il n’est pas disposé à affecter les ressources ou à adopter les politiques qui sont vraiment nécessaires pour réagir convenablement à cette crise.
Je sais que les libéraux vont se lever pour dire que c’est une priorité pour eux, mais je leur demande une fois de plus de me montrer les logements. Après six ans au pouvoir, peuvent-ils me montrer où sont les dizaines de milliers de logements abordables qui auraient pu et qui auraient dû être construits au cours des six dernières années. Ils ne peuvent pas le faire. Ils vont trouver toutes sortes de piètres excuses, comme le fait que le logement prend du temps. Je leur rappellerais qu’après la Seconde Guerre mondiale, le gouvernement du Canada a construit en 36 mois 300 000 logements abordables pour les soldats de retour au pays. Voilà ce qu’un gouvernement qui a le logement à cœur peut faire et fera.
J’exhorte le gouvernement actuel à faire de la création, de la construction et de la multiplication de logements abordables de toutes catégories une priorité politique de premier plan dans le budget à venir. Après tout, il nous incombe à tous de veiller à ce que chaque membre de notre communauté dispose d’un logement convenable.
Enfin, je tiens à dire un mot sur les changements climatiques. En politique, peu d’enjeux sont de nature existentielle. La crise climatique à laquelle notre planète est confrontée en est un. Le GIEC a déclaré à maintes reprises que nous avons moins de 10 ans pour prendre des mesures concrètes et inverser les répercussions calamiteuses qui se produiront si nous ne le faisons pas. Je tiens à souligner que les émissions de carbone ont augmenté au cours du mandat du gouvernement depuis 2015. En fait, depuis le début des années 1990, malgré les promesses répétées de réduire les émissions de carbone d’ici telle ou telle date, aucun gouvernement n’a jamais atteint ces cibles. Cela doit changer…
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
2021-03-22 12:06 [p.5013]
moved:
That, given that,
(i) during the first wave, 82% of COVID deaths in Canada happened in long-term care, the highest proportion in the OECD,
(ii) there have been over 12,000 long-term care resident and worker deaths in Canada since the beginning of the pandemic,
(iii) residents and workers in for-profit long-term care homes have a higher risk of infection and death than those in non-profit homes,
the House call upon the government to ensure that national standards for long-term care which are currently being developed fully remove profit from the sector, including by:
(a) immediately bringing Revera, a for-profit long-term care operator owned by a federal agency, under public ownership;
(b) transitioning all for-profit care to not-for-profit hands by 2030;
(c) working with provinces and territories to stop licensing any new for-profit care facilities, and making sure that measures are in place to keep all existing beds open during the transition; and
(d) investing an additional $5 billion over the next four years in long-term care, with funding tied to respect for the principles of the Canada Health Act, to boost the number of non-profit homes.
He said: Madam Speaker, I will be sharing my time with the member for Vancouver East.
As members know, this pandemic has gripped the entire world and everyone in the world has felt the impact of it. However, what I have referred to as a “national shame” is the fact that in our country it was our loved ones in long-term care, particularly seniors, who bore the brunt of this pandemic with their lives. This should never have happened.
Today, we are calling on the House to recognize this national shame and to do something about it.
What we have learned with incontrovertible evidence, an overwhelming amount of evidence, is that for-profit long-term care homes have had worse conditions of care, more rates of infection and more deadlier infection, which has meant that more people have lost their lives. I will be very clear: For-profit care means that more of our loved ones were killed. They did not get the care they deserved, because for those for-profit long-term care homes, profit was more important than people.
We know that 82% of COVID deaths in Canada happened in long-term care, which is a scathing statistic. This is the highest proportion in the entire OECD. We also know that this is not a new problem. The underfunding of long-term care homes has been chronic. The lack of care for our loved ones in long-term care has been chronic and long-lasting. COVID-19 simply exposed what was there for a long time.
The pandemic has shown us the effects of years of neglect and inaction on the part of past Liberal and Conservative governments. Our seniors in long-term care homes have been hit hardest by the pandemic. It is a national disgrace that our most vulnerable seniors, those in long-term care homes, are being hit the hardest. This is not only unacceptable, it is inexcusable. Our parents and grandparents built this country, and they deserve to retire with respect and dignity. There is clear evidence that conditions were worse in for-profit long-term care homes and more seniors died in those facilities.
What do we need to do? We need to immediately, with national and federal leadership, declare clearly that profit has no place in the care of our loved ones, that profit has no place in health care at all, but certainly not in the care of vulnerable loved ones in long-term care.
I will provide some of the clear and compelling reasons why we need to do this. For every dollar we spend on long-term care, if we spend that dollar on for-profit long-term care, not every dollar will make it to the care of our loved ones. Some of that dollar ends up in the pockets of shareholders, for profit. It ends up in the pay for executives. Not all of it will make it to caring for our loved ones.
We have some clear examples in two for-profit operators in Ontario, Extendicare and Sienna Senior Living. During this pandemic, during the worst outbreaks that our country has seen when it comes to long-term care homes, when our seniors were being ravaged by COVID-19, when workers did not have access to the necessary PPE and seniors were worried for their lives, instead of investing in caring for our loved ones, these two for-profit long-term care home operators paid out $74 million in dividends. Imagine that. In the worst outbreak in the history of our country when it comes to long-term care, gripped with a global pandemic these two for-profit operators, who had horrible conditions in their homes, paid out $74 million in dividends instead of investing in workers and in care. At the same time, they paid out $98.3 million to shareholders and received the Canada wage subsidy. They took public money with one hand and with the other hand paid, they out dividends.
No one should make a profit from neglecting our seniors.
We have also seen some terrible numbers out of Quebec. Nearly 5,000 seniors have died in almost 300 residential and long-term care facilities in Quebec. A recent media report revealed that the death rate is higher in the non-unionized private sector than in public and private institutions with collective agreements in place. This must never happen again. We need to immediately do away with the profiteering in long-term care homes, full stop.
We need to take profit out of long-term care homes immediately. We also immediately need to fix the long-standing problems that the Liberals and Conservatives have contributed to. We need to invest more in our health care and we need to act specifically to fix this problem.
There are a couple of key steps. First, Revera is owned by a federal agency. We need to immediately make it public. We must work with provinces and territories to ensure that Revera is delivering care in a public model and make it public immediately. We also need to transition all of our for-profit long-term care homes to not-for-profit and public homes by 2030. That is our plan.
We need to work with provinces and territories to stop licensing any new for-profit care facilities, and make sure that measures are in place to keep all the existing beds and spaces. We need to invest an additional $5 billion over the next four years in long-term care, with funding tied to respecting the same principles that are already agreed upon by all provinces and territories and are enshrined in the Canada Health Act. Those same principles helped us achieve what Canadians now are most proud of: universal health care. We can use those same principles to lift up our vulnerable seniors in long-term care homes.
We cannot go back to a health care system where making money and profit was more important than the care of our vulnerable seniors. We cannot go back to a time when, if a pandemic or an outbreak happened, our loved ones in long-term care would bear the brunt of it. We cannot go back to that.
Now is the time. This is when we can tell the people in this country that we are committed to moving forward in a way that honours the lives lost, by committing to never having it happen again. It is not enough to hear people in the House of Commons pay tribute to the lives lost. It is not enough for people to have moments of silence. It is not enough to talk about being sorry or to wring our hands. Here is the moment to do something about it. The evidence is overwhelming: We need to get profit out of long-term care homes. We need to protect our seniors and our loved ones, and we need to do it now.
I implore everyone in the House to support this motion, so that we can take a clear and bold step forward to protect our loved ones in long-term care homes. I do not want to hear excuses. We can work with the jurisdictions. We can work with the provinces and territories. People are not looking to hear excuses. They are looking for solutions. Here is a solution. The time for leadership is now. Let us see what leadership is.
propose:
Que, étant donné que,
(i) lors de la première vague, 82 % des morts liées à la COVID au Canada sont survenues dans des établissements de soins de longue durée, la proportion la plus élevée de toute l’OCDE,
(ii) plus de 12 000 résidents et travailleurs des établissements de soins de longue durée sont morts au Canada depuis le début de la pandémie,
(iii) le risque d’infection et de décès des résidents et des travailleurs des établissements de soins de longue durée à but lucratif est plus élevé que dans les établissements sans but lucratif,
la Chambre demande au gouvernement de veiller à ce que les normes nationales en cours d’élaboration pour les soins de longue durée excluent entièrement le profit dans ce secteur, y compris en:
a) transformant immédiatement Revera, un exploitant d’établissements de soins de longue durée à but lucratif, en organisme de propriété publique;
b) confiant la gestion de tous les soins à but lucratif à des organismes sans but lucratif d’ici 2030;
c) travaillant avec les provinces et les territoires pour mettre un terme à l’octroi de licences aux nouveaux établissements de soins à but lucratif et pour veiller à ce que les mesures requises soient en place afin que tous les lits restent ouverts pendant la transition;
d) investissant au cours des quatre prochaines années une somme supplémentaire de 5 milliards de dollars dans les soins de longue durée, tout en rendant l’accès aux fonds conditionnel au respect des principes de la Loi canadienne sur la santé, afin d’accroître le nombre de résidences sans but lucratif.
— Madame la Présidente, je partagerai mon temps de parole avec la députée de Vancouver-Est.
Comme les députés le savent, la pandémie a frappé le monde entier, et tout le monde en a subi les conséquences. Toutefois, ce que j'ai qualifié de « honte nationale », c'est le fait que, au Canada, ce sont nos proches dans les établissements de soins de longue durée, particulièrement les aînés, qui ont été les principales victimes de la pandémie en le payant de leur vie. Une telle chose n'aurait jamais dû arriver.
Aujourd'hui, nous demandons à la Chambre de reconnaître cette honte nationale et de remédier à la situation.
Grâce à une quantité importante de preuves incontestables, nous avons appris que les établissements de soins de longue durée à but lucratif offrent les pires conditions de soins et que le risque d’infection et de décès y était plus élevé, ce qui signifie que davantage de personnes y ont perdu la vie. Je serai très clair: à cause des établissements à but lucratif, davantage de nos proches sont morts. Nos proches n'ont pas obtenu les soins qu'ils méritaient parce que, pour les établissements à but lucratif, les profits étaient plus importants que les gens.
Nous savons que 82 % des décès dus à la COVID-19 au Canada sont survenus dans des établissements de soins de longue durée, ce qui est une statistique accablante. C'est la proportion la plus élevée de tous les pays membres de l'OCDE. Nous savons également que le problème n'est pas nouveau. Le sous-financement des établissements de soins de longue durée est chronique. Le manque de soins pour les proches dans les établissements de soins de longue durée est chronique et persistant. La COVID-19 a simplement exposé des problèmes qui existent depuis longtemps.
La pandémie nous a montré les impacts de la négligence, ainsi que l'inaction des gouvernements libéraux et conservateurs par le passé. Nos aînés dans les centres de soins de longue durée ont été les plus touchés par la pandémie. C'est une honte nationale que nos aînés les plus vulnérables, ceux dans les centres de soins de longue durée, soient les plus frappés. C'est non seulement inacceptable, mais c'est aussi inexcusable. Nos parents et nos grands-parents ont bâti ce pays, ils méritent une retraite dans le respect et la dignité. On a la preuve qui montre clairement que, dans les centres de soins de longue durée à but lucratif, les conditions étaient pires et que plus d'aînés y sont morts.
Que devons-nous faire? Les leaders à l'échelle fédérale et nationale doivent déclarer clairement que le profit n'a pas sa place dans le système de soins de nos êtres chers, que le profit n'a pas sa place dans les soins de santé du tout, mais certainement pas dans les établissements de soins de longue durée à qui nous confions nos proches vulnérables.
Voici quelques-unes des raisons claires et convaincantes pour lesquelles il est nécessaire de faire ce que demande la motion. Pour chaque dollar que nous dépensons en soins de longue durée, si ce dollar est dépensé en soins de longue durée à but lucratif, ce n'est pas la totalité du dollar qui sera consacrée aux soins de nos proches. Une partie se retrouvera dans les poches des actionnaires, pour leur profit. Elle servira à payer les dirigeants. Tout l'argent ne servira pas à prendre soin des gens qui nous sont chers.
Nous en avons deux excellents exemples avec les entreprises Extendicare et Sienna Senior Living, toutes deux de l'Ontario. Pendant la pandémie, c'est-à-dire pendant les pires éclosions que les établissements de soins de longue durée du pays aient jamais vues, alors que les aînés étaient accablés par la COVID-19 et craignaient pour leur vie et que les travailleurs manquaient d'équipement de protection individuelle, ces deux exploitants de maisons de soins de longue durée, au lieu d'investir dans les soins aux aînés, on versé 74 millions de dollars en dividendes. Imaginons un peu. Alors que les établissements de soins de longue durée connaissaient la pire éclosion de l'histoire et que le pays se débattait contre une pandémie mondiale, ces deux entreprises à but lucratif, qui obligeaient les aînés à vivre dans des conditions pitoyables, ont préféré verser 74 millions de dollars en dividendes au lieu d'investir dans les travailleurs et les soins. C'est sans parler des 98,3 millions qu'ils ont remis à leurs actionnaires et de l'argent public qu'ils ont reçu grâce à la Subvention salariale d'urgence du Canada. Ils ont pris l'argent de l'État et s'en sont aussitôt servis pour verser des dividendes.
Personne ne devrait faire du profit sur la négligence envers nos aînés.
On a vu aussi au Québec des chiffres horribles. Près de 5 000 aînés sont morts dans près de 300 centres d'hébergement et de soins de longue durée au Québec. Un récent rapport par la presse a montré que le taux de mortalité est plus élevé dans le secteur privé non conventionné que dans les établissements publics et privés conventionnés. Il ne faut pas que cela se reproduise. Nous devons éliminer tout de suite les profits dans les centres de soins de longue durée, un point c'est tout.
Nous devons éliminer sans plus tarder l'aspect lucratif des établissements de soins de longue durée. Il est également grand temps de régler les problèmes de longue date auxquels les libéraux comme les conservateurs ont contribué. Nous devons investir davantage dans les soins de santé et prendre des mesures concrètes pour remédier au problème.
Nous allons devoir prendre certaines mesures clés. D'abord, Revera est la propriété d'une agence fédérale; nous devons immédiatement mettre en place un modèle public. Nous devons travailler avec les provinces et les territoires pour veiller à ce que Revera soit en mesure de fournir des soins aux résidents dans le cadre d'un modèle public. Nous devons également faire passer les établissements de soins de longue durée à but lucratif à un modèle public sans but lucratif d'ici 2030. Voilà notre projet.
Nous devons collaborer avec les provinces et les territoires afin de cesser d'octroyer des permis à de nouveaux établissements de soins à but lucratif et veiller à ce que des mesures soient mises en place pour conserver les lits et les places qui existent déjà. Nous devons investir 5 milliards de dollars supplémentaires au cours des quatre prochaines années dans les soins de longue durée. Le financement devra être lié au respect des principes déjà convenus par les provinces et les territoires et qui sont inscrits dans la Loi canadienne sur la santé. Ces principes nous ont permis de mettre en place ce qui procure le plus de fierté aux Canadiens, c'est-à-dire un régime universel de soins de santé. Ces principes nous permettront d'améliorer la qualité de vie de nos aînés vulnérables dans les établissements de soins de longue durée.
Nous ne pouvons pas revenir à un système de soins de santé où faire de l'argent et des profits importe plus que de prendre soin des aînés vulnérables. Nous ne pouvons pas revenir à une situation où nos êtres chers dans les établissements de soins de longue durée sont les plus durement touchés par une pandémie ou l'éclosion d'un virus. Il ne faut pas qu'une telle chose se reproduise.
Il est temps d'agir. Le moment est venu de signifier aux gens du pays que nous nous engageons à réaliser des progrès qui rendront honneur aux vies perdues et à ne jamais laisser cela se reproduire. Il ne suffit pas de rendre hommage aux disparus à la Chambre des communes. Il ne suffit pas d'observer des moments de silence. Il ne suffit pas d'exprimer des regrets et de faire acte de contrition. C'est le moment de passer à l'action. Les preuves sont accablantes: il faut éliminer les profits des soins de longue durée. Nous devons protéger les aînés et nos êtres chers, et ce, dès maintenant.
Je supplie tous les députés d'appuyer la motion, pour que nous agissions de manière résolue et énergique en vue protéger nos êtres chers dans les établissements de soins de longue durée. Je ne veux pas entendre d'excuses. Nous pouvons travailler avec les autres ordres de gouvernement. Nous pouvons travailler avec les provinces et les territoires. Les gens ne veulent pas entendre d'excuses. Ils veulent des solutions. Voilà une solution. Il est temps de faire preuve de leadership. Voyons voir ce qu'est le leadership.
View Jenny Kwan Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jenny Kwan Profile
2021-03-22 12:22 [p.5016]
Madam Speaker, I am honoured to second this motion and rise to speak in support of it.
As we heard from the leader of the NDP, the motion basically calls for the federal government to act now to take profit out of long-term care, put people before profit and say that we, as a society, value the lives of seniors more than money.
Seniors in long-term care facilities have been especially hard hit by the pandemic. In the first wave of the pandemic, more than 80% of all COVID-19 deaths in the country were reported in long-term care facilities and retirement homes. That means one in five of the total COVID cases in Canada was among long-term care residents.
Of course, COVID-19 also affected the workers in those facilities. In Canada, more than 9,600 staff in long-term care facilities were infected with COVID-19, representing more than 10% of the total cases.
The pandemic has exposed severe cracks in our system, and some of the elderly and most vulnerable people paid the ultimate price for that. Across the country, more than a quarter of Canada's long-term care homes are for-profit. We have learned that for-profit care homes were more likely to see extensive COVID-19 outbreaks, and more deaths, than non-profit facilities.
Things got so bad in Ontario that the military and the Red Cross had to be called in to help care for seniors. How did things get so bad? In the for-profit care homes, care aides and personal support workers are underpaid and are often part-time or casual workers, which means they often have to work at multiple job sites to make ends meet. This can be deadly in the face of a pandemic, when social distancing is an essential health measure. To be clear, the reason they are underpaid is so the company can have a larger profit margin. They are part-time or casual workers, which also means they are not paid benefits or sick leave. In addition, long-term care homes often subcontract out services such as laundry, cleaning and cooking, and it is also very likely that subcontracted staff do not have paid sick leave. Without paid sick leave, workers may be compelled to go to work even if they are feeling ill.
All of these conditions contributed to an increased risk of transmission. The outcome was devastating for far too many seniors and their families, as well as the workers. The horror stories we hear in the media of the conditions the seniors were in take one's breath away. It is not supposed to be that way. The seniors in our communities helped build this country. Their retirement years are supposed to be their golden years. They deserve to live in comfort, with dignity and safety, as do people with disabilities. However, because of decades of cuts, underfunding and privatization, our continuing care system is broken.
The bottom line is that Canada has failed to protect long-term care residents and workers throughout this pandemic. We have to ask ourselves how it is possible that seniors in some care homes were abandoned in their beds for weeks on end. Some cried for help for hours before assistance was provided. Some had to be bathed as they had not been bathed for weeks. Can members imagine if those were their mothers or grandmothers? Such horrific stories are not just stories. They are the real experiences of loved ones.
Report after report revealed what we should know instinctively: that profit should never be the bottom line when it comes to continuing care. The evidence is overwhelming. It is undeniable that for-profit homes have seen worse results than other homes, with deadlier COVID outbreaks. However, at the same time, for-profit operators were getting public subsidies and paying out millions in dividends to shareholders while workers were underpaid, with some making minimum wage. Things were so desperate for some of them they had to resort to living in shelters. In fact, there was an outbreak in an Ottawa homeless shelter under exactly such a circumstance. It helps no one if essential front-line health care workers are pushed into homelessness. The colossal failure of the system is Canada's national shame.
Even outside of the pandemic situation, research has shown that homes run on a for-profit basis tend to have lower staffing levels, more verified complaints and more transfers to hospitals, as well as residents with higher rates of both ulcers and morbidity. We as parliamentarians have the power to do something about this. We must act now to prevent a repeat of this in the future. We must transition the for-profit model in long-term care to a non-profit model.
The NDP members want to see an end to for-profit long-term care by 2030. That is why we are calling for a national task force to devise a plan to get the job done. We must also set national standards. Let us work collaboratively with provincial, territorial leaders, experts and workers alike to set national standards for long-term care and continuing care that would include accountability mechanisms. Without national standards, the federal government is leaving the door wide open for the for-profit companies to cut corners and put profit first at the expense our loved ones. That cannot be allowed to continue.
Those standards should be tied to $5 billion in federal funding and the principles in Canada's Health Care Act. We can put in place a seniors care guarantee. Seniors deserve to know that they will have safe, dignified care both at home and in care homes available to them as they age. Families deserve to know that their loved ones will have the care they deserve, with inspections and appropriate levels of care and staffing ratios.
Workers deserve to know that their wages will reflect the value of their work and allow them to live in dignity without having to work multiple jobs or end up in a shelter because they cannot afford housing. They deserve to know that the government has their back and that they will have access to protective equipment and safe working conditions.
The federal government can show leadership by transforming Revera from a for-profit long-term care chain owned by a crown pension fund into a publicly managed entity. Public ownership of long-term care facilities would allow workers to work full-time at one home at competitive union rates, which would address understaffing and prevent the transmission of illness. The benchmark for quality long-term care is 4.1 hours of hands-on care per resident per day. However, no province or territory currently meets this standard of care.
Long-term care homes are chronically understaffed across Canada. Nurses and personal support workers at these facilities are often paid low wages, saddled with overwhelming workloads and are subjected to high levels of stress, burnout and even violence. Precarious and part-time employment often forces these health care workers to move between facilities to earn a living.
Waitlists for long-term care can have lengthy backlogs because the care facilities are not keeping pace with Canada’s aging population. This shortage leads to overcrowding at long-term care facilities and overuse of the hospital system by those without access to appropriate care.
There is a lack of accountability for long-term care facility operators due to lax enforcement of standards and regulations. For example, a recent CBC investigation revealed that 85% of long-term care homes in Ontario have routinely violated health care standards for decades with near total impunity.
We have the power within us to end this for this generation and beyond. Seniors deserve better. Families deserve better. Workers deserve better. Let us never forget these words from Canada's Chief Public Health Officer:
I think the tragedy and the massive lesson learned for everyone in Canada is that we were at every level, not able to protect our seniors, particularly those in long-term care homes. Even worse is that in that second wave, as we warned of the resurgence, there was a repeat of the huge impact on that population.
For those who want to say that we cannot do it because of jurisdictional issues, I will quote Marcy Cohen, research associate for the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, who said that “The setting of clear standards in health care as a condition of federal funding is not an attack on provincial jurisdiction—it is the only path”—
Madame la Présidente, j'ai l'honneur d'appuyer cette motion et de prendre la parole en sa faveur.
Comme l'a expliqué le chef du NPD, la motion demande au gouvernement fédéral d'agir dès maintenant pour exclure la notion de profit des soins de longue durée, pour faire passer les Canadiens avant le profit, et pour affirmer qu'en tant que société, nous accordons plus de valeur aux aînés qu'à l'argent.
Les aînés des établissements de soins de longue durée ont été frappés de plein fouet par la pandémie. Lors de la première vague, plus de 80 % des décès attribuables à la COVID-19 au pays ont été rapportés dans des établissements de soins de longue durée et dans des maisons de retraite. Autrement dit, on a dénombré un cas de COVID-19 sur cinq au Canada chez les résidants des établissements de soins de longue durée.
Bien entendu, la COVID-19 a également touché les travailleurs de ces établissements. Au Canada, plus de 9 600 employés d'établissements de soins de longue durée ont été infectés par la COVID-19, ce qui représente plus de 10 % du nombre total de cas.
La pandémie a mis au jour des failles majeures dans notre système, et certains aînés et personnes vulnérables en ont payé le prix ultime. À l'échelle du pays, plus du quart des établissements de soins de longue durée sont à but lucratif. Or, nous avons appris que les établissements à but lucratif étaient plus susceptibles de connaître des éclosions de COVID-19, et donc d'enregistrer des décès, que les établissements à but non lucratif.
En Ontario, la situation a empiré au point qu'il a fallu appeler à l'aide l'armée et la Croix rouge pour s'occuper des personnes âgées. Comment en est-on arrivé là? Dans les établissements de soins à but lucratif, les aides-soignants et les préposés aux bénéficiaires sont sous-payés et sont souvent des travailleurs à temps partiel ou occasionnels, ce qui veut dire qu'ils doivent souvent travailler à plusieurs endroits pour joindre les deux bouts. Cela peut être mortel, en temps de pandémie, lorsque l'éloignement social est une mesure de santé essentielle. Pour dire les choses clairement, la raison pour laquelle ces gens sont sous-payés, c'est pour que l'entreprise engrange plus de profits. Ce sont des employés à temps partiel ou occasionnels, c'est-à-dire qu'ils n'ont droit ni à des avantages sociaux ni à des congés de maladie payés. En outre, les établissements de soins de longue durée sous-traitent souvent les services comme la lessive, le ménage et la cuisine, et il est également très probable que le personnel en sous-traitance ne bénéficie pas de congés de maladie payés non plus. Sans congé de maladie payé, les travailleurs peuvent se sentir obligés de se rendre au travail même s'ils ont l'impression d'être malades.
Toutes ces circonstances ont contribué à accroître le risque de transmission, ce qui a eu des conséquences désastreuses pour un trop grand nombre d'aînés, pour leurs familles et pour les travailleurs concernés. Les histoires d'horreur que nous entendons dans les médias au sujet des conditions dans lesquelles les aînés ont dû vivre sont stupéfiantes. Les aînés de nos collectivités ont contribué à bâtir ce pays. L'âge de la retraite est censé être leur âge d'or. Ils méritent de vivre dans le confort, la dignité et la sécurité, tout comme les personnes handicapées. Cependant, après des décennies de compressions, de sous-financement et de privatisation, le système de soins de longue durée est défaillant.
En résumé, le Canada n'a pas su protéger les résidants et les travailleurs des établissements de soins de longue durée pendant cette pandémie. Nous devons nous demander comment des aînés alités ont pu être laissés à eux-mêmes pendant des semaines dans certains centres de soins. Certains ont dû crier à l'aide pendant des heures avant de recevoir de l'aide. Certains avaient besoin d'un bain parce qu'ils n'en avaient pas reçu depuis des semaines. Les députés peuvent-ils imaginer leur propre mère ou grand-mère dans une telle situation? Ce ne sont pas des histoires inventées. Ce sont de vraies situations vécues par des proches.
Tous les rapports révèlent ce que nous devrions savoir instinctivement: les profits ne devraient jamais être l'objectif premier au chapitre des soins continus. Les preuves sont accablantes: les établissements à but lucratif ont obtenu de résultats pires que les autres et des éclosions de COVID plus meurtrières. Cela ne les a pas empêchés de toucher des subventions publiques et de verser des millions de dollars de dividendes à leurs actionnaires, alors que leurs employés étaient mal payés, certains ne touchant que le salaire minimum et se trouvant même acculés à aller vivre dans des refuges. C'est d'ailleurs dans ces circonstances qu'il y a eu une éclosion dans un refuge pour sans-abri d'Ottawa. Cela ne profite à personne que des travailleurs de la santé de première ligne soient acculés à l'itinérance. L'échec monumental du système est une honte nationale pour le Canada.
Même si on exclut la pandémie, les recherches ont montré que les établissements à but lucratif ont tendance à avoir moins de personnel, plus de plaintes justifiées et plus de transferts vers les hôpitaux, et que leurs résidants présentent généralement des taux plus élevés d'ulcères et de morbidité. En tant que parlementaires, nous avons le pouvoir de faire quelque chose pour améliorer la situation. Nous devons agir maintenant pour empêcher que l'histoire se répète. Dans le secteur des soins de longue durée, nous devons délaisser le modèle d'établissements à but lucratif pour adopter celui des centres sans but lucratif.
Les néo-démocrates veulent que les établissements de soins de longue durée à but lucratif disparaissent d'ici 2030. C'est pourquoi nous demandons qu'un groupe de travail national définisse un plan pour procéder à la transition. Nous devons également établir des normes nationales. Collaborons avec les dirigeants, les experts et les travailleurs des provinces et des territoires afin d'établir des normes nationales pour les soins de longue durée et les soins continus, des normes qui incluraient des mécanismes de reddition de comptes. Faute de normes nationales, le gouvernement fédéral laisse aux entreprises à but lucratif toute latitude pour prendre des raccourcis et privilégier le profit au détriment des êtres qui nous sont chers. Une telle situation ne peut plus être tolérée.
Ces normes devraient découler d'un financement fédéral de 5 milliards de dollars et des principes de la Loi canadienne sur la santé. Nous pouvons offrir une garantie de soins aux aînés. Les aînés méritent de savoir qu'ils obtiendront des soins sûrs et dignes à domicile et dans les foyers où ils pourraient être placés à ce stade de leur vie. Les familles doivent avoir la garantie que leurs êtres chers recevront les soins qu'ils méritent, que des inspections seront menées pour assurer des niveaux de soins et de personnel appropriés.
Les travailleurs, quant à eux, méritent de savoir que leur salaire correspondra à la valeur de leur travail et leur permettra de vivre dignement sans devoir occuper plusieurs emplois ou se retrouver dans un refuge parce qu'ils n'ont pas les moyens de se loger. Ils ont le droit de savoir que le gouvernement est là pour eux, qu'ils auront accès à de l'équipement de protection et qu'ils travailleront dans des conditions sûres.
Le gouvernement fédéral peut faire preuve de leadership en faisant passer Revera d'une chaîne d’établissements de soins de longue durée à but lucratif appartenant à l'État en organisme de propriété publique. L'étatisation des établissements de soins de longue durée permettrait aux employés de travailler à temps plein dans un seul établissement à des taux syndicaux concurrentiels, ce qui résoudrait le problème de sous-effectif et préviendrait la transmission de maladies. Le point de référence pour des soins de longue durée de qualité est de 4,1 heures de soins directs par résidant et par jour. Or, aucune province ou aucun territoire ne respecte actuellement cette norme de soins.
Au Canada, les établissements de soins de longue durée souffrent d'une pénurie chronique de personnel. Les membres du personnel infirmier et de soutien de ces établissements sont souvent mal rémunérés, croulent sous le travail et vivent des niveaux de stress intense, ce qui provoque de l'épuisement professionnel et des épisodes de violence. Des emplois précaires et à temps partiel obligent souvent ces travailleurs de la santé à œuvrer dans plusieurs établissements pour gagner leur vie.
Les listes d'attente pour les établissements de soins de santé sont longues, car ces établissements n'arrivent pas à suivre le rythme du vieillissement de la population. Cette pénurie de places entraîne un surpeuplement des établissements de soins de longue durée et une surutilisation du système hospitalier par ceux qui n'ont pas accès à des soins appropriés.
Les exploitants d'établissements de soins de longue durée ont peu de comptes à rendre en raison d'un laxisme dans l'application des normes et des règlements. Par exemple, selon une enquête menée récemment par la CBC, 85 % des établissements de soins de longue durée de l'Ontario enfreignent régulièrement les normes en matière de soins de santé depuis des décennies en jouissant d'une impunité presque complète.
Nous avons le pouvoir de mettre fin à cela pour la génération actuelle et celles à venir. Les aînés méritent mieux. Les familles méritent mieux. Les travailleurs méritent mieux. N'oublions jamais ces paroles de l'administratrice en chef de la santé publique du Canada:
À mon avis, cette tragédie et la grande leçon qu'en ont tirée tous les Canadiens est que, à tous les niveaux, nous avons été incapables de protéger nos aînés, en particulier ceux vivant dans des établissements de soins de longue durée. Pire, malgré nos avertissements concernant l'arrivée d'une deuxième vague, cette partie de la population a été frappée de plein fouet comme la première fois.
À ceux qui disent qu'on n’y peut rien en raison des champs de compétences, je me permets de citer Marcy Cohen, associée de recherche au Centre canadien de politiques alternatives. Selon elle, « l'établissement de normes claires en matière de soins de santé comme condition au financement fédéral ne constitue pas une ingérence dans les compétences provinciales — il s'agit plutôt de la seule façon de...
View Michelle Rempel Garner Profile
CPC (AB)
Madam Speaker, I know my colleague from Battlefords—Lloydminster is on the call, as she just debated, and I would like to thank her for her work on the issue of seniors. She has been tireless. I have been working with her, and she has met with dozens of affected groups from across the country. I know she brings a good perspective to this issue.
I would like to start my speech today by talking about what this issue is. In the last year, we have seen senior citizens under the government's duty of care die alone covered in their own feces. We have seen the military called in to deal with these situations. Nobody in Parliament, or any other level of government, gets to say that it is not our job to deal with this situation.
What happened in our long-term care facilities across this country during this last year of COVID should light the entire country on fire. If we truly believe that every Canadian deserves to live with dignity, then we need to be talking about this issue. We need to be proposing solutions, and we need to be moving forward. Anything less than that, I would say, is un-Canadian.
This is not an issue that just affects seniors. This cuts across every generation. This is for the seniors who are living in long-term care. This is for Canadians who might be approaching the age when they have to consider long-term care. It is also for people from my generation who are starting to have hard conversations with their parents about what they want to have happen, how they are going to age, and whether they will age in place.
It also affects the workers in these facilities. I am tired of seeing articles, which are absolutely true, on the PTSD workers in long-term care facilities have experienced dealing with the COVID pandemic. We all need to wake up and understand that we have to push forward with proposing solutions.
I am very pleased that the NDP has decided to use one of its precious supply days bringing this issue forward to the House of Commons for debate. We have spent a lot of time in this Parliament, and in the last Parliament, talking about dying with dignity, which is an important topic. However, we also need to be talking about living with dignity. We also need to be talking about the conditions seniors in Canada who require long-term care are currently living in, right now.
I want to start by looking at the motion itself. The first part of this motion requires Parliament to recognize three deadly facts for which there can be no debate. The first is that “during the first wave of the pandemic, 82% of COVID deaths in Canada happened in long-term care, which is the highest proportion in the OECD”.
The second fact is that “there have been over 12,000 long-term care resident and worker deaths in Canada since the beginning of the pandemic”, and the third is that “residents and workers in for-profit long-term care homes have a higher risk of infection and death than those in non-profit homes”. These are facts. We cannot deny them. The evidence is there. Parliament has to recognize that.
The first part to finding a solution is recognizing there is a problem. There were 12,000 deaths in long-term care homes during the first wave of the COVID pandemic. Let us quantify and think about that. That is greater than the population of some Canadian towns. I ask members to think about how many families were affected by that.
We also need to think about the workers who are affected by this. Many workers in these facilities are underpaid and undersupported, and many of them are new Canadians. Some are temporary foreign workers, and this is something a lot of people are willing to turn a blind eye to. I am glad the NDP put these figures in this motion. Parliament should be recognizing them and waking up to them.
The second part of the motion suggests that something must be done, so the NDP has proposed a solution. The fix this motion proposes is to move all privately owned long-term care facilities into public ownership. That is a spicy solution. At least there is a solution being proposed here.
My party strongly supports a well-funded, robust and publicly funded health care system in Canada, and it cannot be denied that there are significant issues with privately owned long-term care facilities. I want to talk about one example that the government has never rectified.
That is the approval of the sale of many long-term care facilities to Anbang. The purchase of long-term care homes by Anbang was approved by the Liberal government by the former industry minister, who scrutinized the investment review decision because it exceeded the $600-million threshold.
In an article published earlier last year, the union head of B.C. said, “It's pretty clear that this company is in crisis and unable to provide adequate care at a growing number of its sites.... It's a big problem, because the company's also the largest contracted provider of long-term-care beds in B.C.” There have been other articles during the pandemic about the high proportion of deaths in Anbang facilities.
We would think that the failure to uphold Canadian standards by the state-owned enterprise would have resulted in some sort of action by the federal government, and nothing has happened to date. It is highly problematic.
Therefore, will moving all long-term care facilities into public care fix all of these problems? There is a strong argument to be made that the process used to approve the Anbang sale was certainly deadly for many Canadian seniors. Moving to a fully public model would need a strong framework to evaluate what would change. For example, how would provincial governments absorb this responsibility and over what period of time? What would this mean for seniors and workers? What is the framework of that care guarantee?
As well, I think that for-profit care providers now need to show that clear evidence that making profit off of long-term care can be combined with a high certainty of standards of care. That needs to be presented, as more clarity is needed. I am glad we are having a discussion about how to move forward, and no proposed solution at this point should be outright dismissed. We should not be saying that this is not our job to look at.
On the issue of jurisdiction, which everyone is dancing around today, the reality is that the federal government has paid billions of dollars for health care and the federal government provides guidelines and best practices for all sorts of areas of care. The question becomes why the federal government has not moved in this regard. I am not saying that we need to take, as everbody is saying, an “Ottawa knows best” approach, but after overseeing the sale of Anbang and not doing anything about that, it is very convenient to just abdicate responsibility.
At least we are talking about a solution here today. Again, there is more work to be done before moving to one conclusion or another on what the fix is, but I am glad that we are having this discussion today.
With that, and because I am always for finding solutions, I move, seconded by the member for Battlefords—Lloydminster, that the motion be amended by replacing all of the words after “the House call upon the government to” with the following: “collaborate and partner with the provinces, territories, seniors' advocates and care-giving organizations to: (a) improve long-term care standards including taking a leadership role and promoting best practices while recognizing the diversity of needs and challenges across the country; (b) ensure that long-term care homes have adequate access to PPE, rapid tests and an effective vaccine rollout; (c) direct existing federal infrastructure and housing funding toward new construction and the renovation of long-term care facilities; (d) develop immediate and medium-term solutions to address the critical staffing needs in long-term care facilities; (e) increase mental health supports for front-line health care workers, residents and their families.”
Let us get to a solution today.
Madame la Présidente, je sais que ma collègue de Battlefords—Lloydminster est toujours prête à donner un coup de main, comme elle l'a indiqué. Je profite de l'occasion pour la remercier de son travail dans le dossier des aînés. Elle travaille sans relâche pour faire valoir leur cause. J'ai travaillé avec elle et je peux dire qu'elle a rencontré des dizaines de groupes de partout au pays qui sont affectés par la situation. La députée apporte un point de vue intéressant dans ce dossier.
D'entrée de jeu, j'aimerais parler de la nature de l'enjeu. Au cours de la dernière année, on a vu mourir seuls et couverts de leurs excréments des aînés dont le gouvernement avait la responsabilité. Les militaires ont été appelés en renfort pour aider à remédier à cette lamentable situation. Personne au Parlement, pas plus qu'à un autre niveau de gouvernement, ne peut se décharger de la responsabilité de cette catastrophe.
Ce qui s'est produit, partout au Canada, dans les établissements de soins de longue durée pendant cette dernière année de COVID devrait provoquer une levée de boucliers dans l'ensemble du pays. Si nous croyons vraiment que tous les Canadiens méritent de vivre dans la dignité, nous devons alors discuter de la question. Nous devons proposer des solutions et agir. Je soutiens que faire moins que cela irait à l'encontre des valeurs canadiennes.
Cet enjeu ne touche pas uniquement les aînés. En effet, il transcende les générations. Il concerne autant les personnes âgées qui habitent dans les établissements de soins de longue durée et les Canadiens qui approchent l'âge où ils auront besoin de ce genre de soins que les gens de ma génération qui entament avec leurs parents les discussions difficiles sur leurs volontés, sur la façon dont ils vieilliront et sur la possibilité qu'ils demeurent à la maison.
Cela touche également les travailleurs des établissements de soins de longue durée. J'en ai assez de lire des articles sur ces travailleurs qui sont en état de stress post-traumatique en raison de ce qu'ils ont vécu pendant la pandémie de COVID. Ces cas sont très réels et nous devons nous réveiller et comprendre qu'il faut proposer et mettre en place des solutions.
Je suis absolument ravie que le NPD ait décidé de consacrer l'un de ses jours désignés si précieux à débattre de cette question à la Chambre des communes. Nous avons passé beaucoup de temps au cours de la présente législature et de la législature précédente à parler de la question, très importante, de mourir dans la dignité. Toutefois, nous devons également aborder la question de vivre dans la dignité. Nous devons examiner sans tarder les conditions dans lesquelles vivent les aînés qui ont besoin de soins de longue durée au Canada.
Je tiens d'abord à examiner la motion. La première partie demande au Parlement de reconnaître trois faits incontestables. Primo, « lors de la première vague, 82 % des morts liées à la COVID au Canada sont survenues dans des établissements de soins de longue durée, la proportion la plus élevée de toute l’OCDE ».
Secundo, « plus de 12 000 résidants et travailleurs des établissements de soins de longue durée sont morts au Canada depuis le début de la pandémie. Tertio, « le risque d’infection et de décès des résidents et des travailleurs des établissements de soins de longue durée à but lucratif est plus élevé que dans les établissements sans but lucratif ». Ce sont des faits. Nous ne pouvons pas les nier. Les preuves sont là. Le Parlement doit les reconnaître.
La première étape pour trouver une solution est de reconnaître qu'il y a un problème. Lors de la première vague de la pandémie de COVID-19, 12 000 personnes sont mortes dans des établissements de soins de longue. Examinons ces chiffres et réfléchissons-y. C'est plus de gens que la population de certaines villes canadiennes. Je demande aux députés de réfléchir au nombre de familles qui ont été touchées par ces décès.
Nous devons aussi penser aux travailleurs touchés par la crise. Bon nombre de travailleurs de ces établissements sont sous-payés et manquent d'appui, et beaucoup d'entre eux sont de nouveaux Canadiens. Certains sont des travailleurs étrangers temporaires, et bien des gens sont prêts à fermer les yeux sur leur situation. Je suis heureuse que le NPD ait mis ces chiffres dans la motion. Le Parlement doit les reconnaître et en prendre conscience.
La deuxième partie de la motion suggère la prise de certaines mesures. Le NPD propose donc une solution. La motion demande notamment au gouvernement de transformer tous les établissements de soins de longue durée privés en organismes de propriété publique. C'est une solution audacieuse. Mais au moins, on propose une solution.
Mon parti est tout à fait en faveur d'un système de santé bien financé, solide et public au Canada. On ne peut nier qu'il y a de gros problèmes dans les établissements privés de soins de longue durée. J'aimerais parler d'une situation que le gouvernement n'a jamais rectifiée.
Il s'agit de l'approbation de la vente de nombreux établissements de soins de longue durée à Anbang. L'achat d'établissements de soins de longue durée par Anbang a été approuvé par l'ancien ministre de l'Industrie du gouvernement libéral, qui a examiné à la loupe la décision prise en matière d'investissements parce que le seuil de 600 millions de dollars était dépassé.
Dans un article publié au début de l'année dernière, le président du syndicat de la Colombie-Britannique a déclaré: « Il est assez clair que cette entreprise est en crise et incapable de fournir des soins adéquats dans un nombre grandissant de ses établissements [...] C'est un gros problème, car l'entreprise est aussi le plus grand fournisseur contractuel de lits de soins de longue durée en Colombie-Britannique. » D'autres articles ont été publiés pendant la pandémie sur le nombre élevé de décès dans les établissements d'Anbang.
On pourrait croire que le non-respect des normes par l'entreprise d'État étrangère aurait fait réagir le gouvernement fédéral d'une manière ou d'une autre, mais pourtant, non. Il n'y a eu, à ce jour, aucune réaction de la part du gouvernement. C'est très préoccupant.
Par conséquent, est-ce la panacée de confier tous les établissements de soins de longue durée au secteur public? Il y a tout lieu de croire que le processus qui a mené à l'approbation de la vente à Anbang s'est avéré catastrophique pour de nombreux Canadiens âgés. Avant de passer à un modèle public, il faudrait réfléchir à un plan détaillé pour évaluer les changements à faire. Par exemple, de quelle manière les gouvernements provinciaux en viendraient-ils à assumer cette responsabilité et combien de temps leur faudrait-il? Qu'est-ce que cela signifierait pour les personnes âgées et les employés? Quels critères devrait-on respecter pour s'assurer de la qualité des soins?
Je pense aussi que les fournisseurs de soins à but lucratif doivent maintenant prouver sans l'ombre d'un doute qu'il est possible de combiner la rentabilité des soins de longue durée avec une qualité élevée des soins. On doit nous montrer ça; une plus grande clarté s'impose. Je suis heureuse que nous discutions de la façon d'aller de l'avant et, à cette étape, aucune solution proposée ne devrait être rejetée d'emblée. C'est notre travail de nous pencher sur cette question; il serait faux de le nier.
En ce qui concerne la compétence — que tout le monde élude aujourd'hui —, en réalité, le gouvernement fédéral a investi des milliards de dollars dans le système de santé et fournit des lignes directrices et des pratiques exemplaires pour toutes sortes de domaines de soins. La question est de savoir pourquoi le gouvernement fédéral n'est pas intervenu à cet égard. Je ne prétends pas qu'il faille adopter une approche paternaliste, comme tout le monde le dit, mais il est très commode pour le gouvernement de se défausser de ses responsabilités après avoir assisté sans intervenir à la vente à la société Anbang.
Au moins, la Chambre parle aujourd'hui d'une solution. Comme on l'a dit, il reste du travail à faire avant de parvenir à une conclusion ou à une autre au sujet de la solution, mais je suis heureuse que nous discutions de la question aujourd'hui.
Sur ce, puisque je suis toujours en faveur de trouver des solutions, je propose, avec l'appui de la députée de Battlefords—Lloydminster, que la motion soit modifiée par substitution, aux mots suivant « la Chambre demande au gouvernement », de ce qui suit: « de travailler en collaboration et en partenariat avec les provinces, les territoires, les défenseurs des droits des aînés et les fournisseurs de soins pour: a) améliorer les normes en matière de soins de longue durée, notamment en jouant un rôle de chef de file et en favorisant des pratiques exemplaires, tout en reconnaissant la diversité des besoins et des défis à l'échelle du pays; b) veiller à ce que les établissements de soins de longue durée aient un accès adéquat à de l'équipement de protection individuelle, aux tests rapides et à une campagne de vaccination efficace; c) affecter les fonds fédéraux existants pour l'infrastructure et le logement à la construction et à la rénovation d'établissements de soins de longue durée; d) élaborer des solutions immédiates et à moyen terme pour répondre aux besoins criants en personnel dans les établissements de soins de longue durée; e) accroître les mesures de soutien en santé mentale pour les travailleurs de la santé de première ligne, les résidants et leur famille. »
Trouvons une solution aujourd'hui.
View Heather McPherson Profile
NDP (AB)
View Heather McPherson Profile
2021-03-22 16:13 [p.5063]
Madam Speaker, COVID-19 has been hard on everyone, but we know it has been hardest on one group of Canadians. More than anyone else, our seniors and those who care for them have borne the brunt of this deadly global health pandemic, and seniors and staff in for-profit long-term care have been impacted most of all.
I know everyone in this House has heard the devastating statistics. We know that over 80% of deaths in Canada occurred in long-term care homes. We know that 12,000 residents and workers have died in long-term care homes since the beginning of the pandemic. We know this is the worst record among comparable countries and double the OECD average. We know Ontario's for-profit nursing homes have 78% more COVID-19 deaths than non-profit homes. We know that if long-term care facilities are owned by a chain, they are far more likely to have serious outbreaks.
In my riding of Edmonton Strathcona, at one point in November, over 90% of the residents at South Terrace Continuing Care Centre, a for-profit centre, tested positive for COVID-19. Heartbreakingly, many of those residents have lost their lives.
These facts and figures are alarming. They are shocking, but much more importantly, each number represents seniors our government has failed. Each percentage represents a loss of life and grieving families left behind, unable to say goodbye, unable to share final days.
What happened and what continues to happen in Canada's long-term care homes is a national disgrace. The thousands of seniors we lost to COVID-19 did not have to die. They are dead because the government failed to protect them. How many more thousands of seniors must die before we finally fix our long-term care system, before we finally decide to actually care for our elders, before we put the care of our loved ones and the workers who care and support them first?
Each December I deliver poinsettias to the long-term care centres in my riding to bring a little festive cheer and holiday spirit to the community. I pop in to say hello, I share a cup of coffee with some of the residents, I chat about how they are doing and how I can help and I talk to the staff and thank them for their incredible work. It is one of my favourite things to do.
Obviously, this December it had to be different, but I still wanted to do what I could to brighten the day of the residents and staff in long-term care homes in Edmonton Strathcona and let them know that while I cannot visit like I used to, I am thinking of them and am fighting for them in the House of Commons. Knowing I could not enter the residence, I put on my PPE, wore my mask, called ahead to make sure I was following every safety protocol and dropped those poinsettias and holiday cards off outside the long-term care centres.
That was a very hard day. I saw family members who were standing in the bitter cold waving at their loved ones through windows to keep their fathers, mothers, grandmothers, uncles and aunts safe. I saw those same seniors isolated, lonely and terrified. I spoke to long-term care workers who broke down in tears because they were so tired and scared. They had been through so much and they felt let down by their government. They were scared; they were tired, absolutely, but they were also mad.
One caregiver, a young woman named Claire, a woman who had worked at a for-profit care centre, explained that before the pandemic she had worked at several different long-term care centres in Edmonton just to pay her bills. While she and her co-workers were doing everything they could to help residents stay safe and healthy, she felt like the government had let her and the seniors in her care down.
This young woman on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic, who literally risked her life to take care of our seniors, spoke of the deplorable conditions in long-term care before COVID-19. She told me of cost-saving measures that resulted in the deterioration of care over the years, the understaffing, the increased workload. She told me that the need to increase profit for corporations that owned these homes meant seniors and staff who cared for them were already in a precarious and dangerous situation before the pandemic.
Increasing privatization has moved the focus from caring for our seniors to creating profits for shareholders. I have said this many times in this House, but let me reiterate it: Care and profit are two oppositional forces.
The only way to profit from providing long-term care is to cut the care itself, to cut the number of people providing the care, to cut their wages, to cut the time spent providing care and to cut money from the design and maintenance of the homes themselves.
Long-term care was not working in this country before COVID-19. Experts had warned us. Seniors advocates had told the government over and over again that the level of care was deteriorating and that the profit model in many care centres resulted in massive profits for corporations and increasingly dangerous conditions for seniors and staff.
The fact that there were no national standards of care also meant that there was a huge discrepancy in the quality of care provided, and this was all before the worst global health pandemic of our time.
COVID-19 hit our long-term care centres like a tornado. Every flaw in our system—every unheeded warning about overworked staff, about under-resourced centres, about dangerous conditions—was exposed.
We heard from the Canadian Federation of Nurses Unions. They spoke of appalling conditions, overworked staff, rampant profiteering and a devastating loss of life. Further, they stated:
Canada’s long-term care is in crisis. Frontline health care workers have been sounding the alarm on conditions for years, but governments have failed to take responsibility and act....
The refusal to take responsibility for the crisis in long-term care has gone on for far too long and its true cost is measured in lives lost.
In my riding of Edmonton Strathcona, the vast majority of residents and staff at the South Terrace Long Term Care Home tested positive for COVID-19. Very many of those residents and staff got sick, and the loss of life was not just at South Terrace, but also at Carlingview Manor, Montfort long-term care home, Forest Heights Long Term Care Home, and McKenzie Towne Continuing Care Centre, just a few of the long-term care centres that had outbreaks and high levels of infection and death.
What do all of these long-term care centres have in common? All of these long-term care facilities are owned by one very large corporation, Revera. In fact, Revera owns more than 500 long-term care facilities worldwide. While it is not the only for-profit with large COVID outbreaks, it is unique because it is owned by the Canadian pension fund, and its board is appointed by cabinet.
It is because of this that I am joining my colleagues within the NDP to urge the government to immediately bring Revera under public ownership, and not just Revera. We have heard from specialists, we have heard from families, we have heard from workers, and we have heard from seniors themselves just how dangerous and deadly for-profit long-term care has been.
We need to work with provinces and territories to transition all for-profit care to non-profit care no later than 2030. We need more than just words and we need more than just a throne speech: We need long-term care that guarantees standards of care for our seniors regardless of where they live, regardless of how much money they have.
We need to ensure adequate funding for long-term care. The NDP would invest an additional $5 billion over the next four years in long-term care, with funding tied to respect for the principles of the Canada Health Act.
We need to ensure that workers who are caring for our seniors earn wages that reflect the value of their work and are honoured for the support they provide to our families and our seniors.
We need to begin. We need to finally begin to take profit out of long-term care, starting with Revera, by 2030.
Madame la Présidente, la pandémie a été difficile pour tout le monde, mais nous savons qu'un segment de la population canadienne en a particulièrement fait les frais. Plus que quiconque, ce sont les aînés et ceux qui en prennent soin qui ont été les plus durement touchés par cette crise sanitaire mondiale mortelle, surtout ceux qui habitent ou travaillent dans les établissements de soins de longue durée à but lucratif.
Je sais que tous les députés connaissent les statistiques alarmantes suivantes: plus de 80 % des décès enregistrés au Canada ont eu lieu dans les établissements de soins de longue durée, et 12 000 résidants et travailleurs de ces établissements sont décédés depuis le début de la pandémie. Nous savons qu'il s'agit là du pire bilan de tous les pays comparables et que cela représente le double de la moyenne des pays de l'OCDE. Nous savons également qu'en Ontario, il y a 78 % plus de décès liés à la COVID-19 dans les centres de soins à but lucratif que dans ceux sans but lucratif. En outre, les établissements de soins de longue durée qui font partie d'une chaîne sont davantage susceptibles de connaître des éclosions importantes.
Dans ma circonscription, Edmonton Strathcona, 90 % des résidants de l'établissement à but lucratif South Terrace Continuing Care Centre ont reçu un résultat positif à un test de dépistage de la COVID-19 en novembre. Cela me fend le cœur, mais bon nombre d'entre eux ont perdu la vie.
Ces faits et ces statistiques sont alarmants. Ils sont certes consternants, mais ce qui est plus important encore, ils représentent chacune des personnes âgées que le gouvernement a laissées tomber. Chaque pourcentage représente une vie perdue et une famille éplorée, qui n'a pu faire ses adieux et accompagner l'être cher dans ses derniers moments.
La situation qui s'est produite et avec laquelle nous devons encore composer dans les centres de soins de longue durée du pays est une honte nationale. Les milliers d'aînés disparus à cause de la COVID-19 n'auraient pas dû mourir. Ils sont morts parce que le gouvernement n'a pas su les protéger. Combien de milliers d'aînés verra-t-on encore mourir avant que l'on corrige enfin le système de soins de longue durée, qu'on décide enfin de prendre bien soin des aînés et que l'on considère comme une priorité les soins qui sont offerts à nos proches et les travailleurs responsables de ces soins?
Chaque mois de décembre, je livre des poinsettias dans les centres de soins de longue durée de ma circonscription afin d'apporter un peu de joie et de promouvoir l'esprit des Fêtes dans la collectivité. Je vais saluer les gens, je prends un café avec certains résidants, je discute avec eux pour savoir comment ils se portent et comment je peux les aider, et je parle avec les employés pour les remercier de leur excellent travail. Cela fait partie de mes activités préférées.
Évidemment, en décembre dernier, j'ai dû m'y prendre autrement, mais je tenais quand même à faire de mon mieux pour égayer la journée des résidants et du personnel des centres de soins de longue durée d'Edmonton Strathcona, et pour leur faire savoir que, même si je ne peux pas leur rendre visite comme avant, je pense à eux et je me bats pour eux à la Chambre des communes. Sachant que je ne pouvais pas entrer dans les établissements, j'ai mis mon équipement de protection individuelle et mon masque, j'ai téléphoné d'avance pour m'assurer de respecter tous les protocoles de sécurité et j'ai livré les poinsettias et les cartes de souhaits des Fêtes aux centres de soins de longue durée en les déposant à l'extérieur.
Ce fut une journée très éprouvante. J'ai vu des membres de plusieurs familles qui restaient dehors, par grand froid, et saluaient de la main leur père, leur mère, leur grand-mère, leur oncle ou leur tante, postés à la fenêtre, afin de les protéger. J'ai vu ces aînés seuls, isolés et terrifiés. J'ai parlé avec des fournisseurs de soins de longue durée qui se sont effondrés en larmes tellement ils étaient fatigués et effrayés. Ils avaient tellement souffert et ils se sentaient abandonnés par le gouvernement. Ils avaient peur; ils ressentaient évidemment de la fatigue, mais aussi de la colère.
Une jeune femme nommée Claire qui avait travaillé dans un centre de soins à but lucratif a expliqué que, avant la pandémie, elle avait travaillé dans plusieurs centres de soins de longue durée à Edmonton seulement pour pouvoir payer ses factures. Même si ses collègues et elle faisaient tout en leur pouvoir pour aider les résidants à demeurer en sécurité et en bonne santé, elle avait l'impression que le gouvernement les avait laissé tomber, elle et les aînés dont elle s'occupait.
Cette jeune femme aux premières lignes de la pandémie de COVID-19, qui a littéralement risqué sa vie pour prendre soin de nos aînés, a parlé des conditions déplorables dans les établissements de soins de longue durée avant la COVID-19. Elle m'a parlé des mesures d'économie ayant entraîné la détérioration des soins au fil des ans, du manque de personnel et de la charge de travail accrue. Elle m'a dit que la nécessité d'augmenter les profits des sociétés auxquelles appartiennent ces établissements avait déjà mis les aînés et le personnel dans une situation précaire et dangereuse avant même la pandémie.
À cause de l'accroissement de la privatisation, il est devenu plus important de générer des profits pour les actionnaires que de prendre soin de nos aînés. Je l'ai dit à maintes reprises dans cette enceinte, mais je vais le répéter: les soins et les profits sont deux forces qui s'opposent.
La seule façon de faire des profits lorsqu'on offre des soins de longue durée, c'est de procéder à des coupes dans les soins en tant que tels, de réduire le nombre de personnes qui donnent les soins, de réduire le salaire de ces dernières, de réduire le temps consacré aux soins et de limiter les coûts associés à la conception des installations et à leur entretien.
Les soins de longue durée au pays fonctionnaient déjà mal avant la COVID-19. Les experts nous avaient prévenus. Les défenseurs des aînés avaient répété à maintes reprises au gouvernement que le niveau de soins se détériorait et que le modèle à but lucratif dans de nombreux centres de soins avait permis à des sociétés d'engranger d'immenses profits et mené à un environnement de plus en plus dangereux pour les aînés et les travailleurs.
Comme il n'existe pas de normes nationales concernant les soins, il y a d'importants écarts dans la qualité des soins offerts et c'était le cas avant l'arrivée de la plus grave pandémie de notre époque.
La COVID-19 a frappé les centres de soins de longue durée comme une tornade. Tous les problèmes de notre système ont été révélés au grand jour: les avertissements concernant le personnel surmené, le manque de ressources des établissements et les conditions dangereuses que nous n'avions pas écoutés.
La Fédération canadienne des syndicats d'infirmières et infirmiers nous a parlé des conditions épouvantables, du personnel surmené, de la réalisation de bénéfices excessifs généralisée et des épouvantables pertes de vies. Elle a également ajouté ce qui suit:
Le secteur des soins de longue durée au Canada est en crise. Les travailleurs de la santé aux premières lignes sonnent l’alarme depuis des années, mais les gouvernements n’ont pas assumé leur responsabilité et n’ont rien fait.
Le refus d’assumer la responsabilité pour cette crise dans le secteur des soins de longue durée a assez duré, et le coût véritable se mesure en pertes de vies.
Dans ma circonscription, Edmonton Strathcona, la grande majorité des résidants et des employés du South Terrace Continuing Care Centre ont reçu un résultat positif à un test de dépistage de la COVID-19, et beaucoup d'entre eux sont tombés malades. Les décès ne sont pas survenus uniquement au centre South Terrace, mais aussi au Carlingview Manor, au Montfort Long-Term Care Home, au Forest Heights Long-Term Care Home, au Maples Personal Care Home de Winnipeg et au McKenzie Towne Continuing Care Centre de Calgary, pour ne citer que quelques-uns des centres de soins de longue durée qui ont connu des éclosions et des niveaux élevés d'infection et de décès.
Qu'est-ce que tous ces centres de soins de longue durée ont en commun? Ils appartiennent tous à une seule grande société: Revera. D'ailleurs, cette société possède plus de 500 centres de soins de longue durée partout dans le monde. Ce n'est pas le seul exploitant d’établissements de soins de longue durée à but lucratif qui a dû composer avec d'importantes éclosions de COVID-19, mais la situation de Revera est particulière dans la mesure où la société appartient à l'organisme responsable des régimes de pension du Canada, dont les membres du conseil d'administration sont nommés par le Cabinet.
C'est pour ces raisons que je me joins à mes collègues néo-démocrates pour exhorter le gouvernement à faire passer immédiatement Revera sous propriété publique, et pas seulement Revera. Nous avons entendu les témoignages de spécialistes, de familles, de travailleurs, ainsi que des témoignages d'aînés, qui nous ont tous dit à quel point le concept de soins de longue durée à but lucratif est dangereux et peut même se révéler mortel.
Nous devons travailler avec les provinces et les territoires afin de transformer tous les établissements de soins à but lucratif en établissements à but non lucratif d'ici 2030. Nous avons besoin de plus que de simples mots et qu'un simple discours du Trône; il faut se doter d'un système de soins de longue durée en mesure de garantir des normes de soins pour nos aînés, peu importe leur lieu de résidence ou leurs moyens financiers.
Nous devons veiller à ce que les soins de longue durée soient financés adéquatement. Le NPD investirait 5 milliards de dollars supplémentaires au cours des quatre prochaines années dans les soins de longue durée et lierait le financement au respect des principes de la Loi canadienne sur la santé.
Nous devons veiller à ce que les travailleurs qui prennent soin de nos aînés gagnent un salaire qui reflète la valeur de leur travail et soient honorés pour le soutien qu'ils apportent à nos familles et à nos aînés.
Nous devons entreprendre ce travail. Nous devons enfin nous employer à sortir l'idée de profit des soins de longue durée, à commencer par ceux qu'offrent Revera. Nous devons y arriver d'ici 2030.
View Sonia Sidhu Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Sonia Sidhu Profile
2021-03-22 16:44 [p.5067]
Madam Speaker, I want to thank the member for Winnipeg North for sharing his time with me. Today, I will be speaking on a very important issue following the motion brought forward by the hon. member from the NDP. I would like to thank my hon. colleague for moving it forward.
Let me start with a clear statement. I support national standards for long-term care, but I support standards that have been designed correctly and in consultation with the provinces and territories. The motion we are debating today is unfortunately not the correct course of action to take today to support our seniors in the long-term care system.
Canadian seniors have built this country. Many of them literally fought for it. They deserve our respect and care. As a society, it is important that we have open and serious conversations about the care we provide our senior citizens. There is no doubt that the impact of COVID-19 on long-term care facilities across the country has been devastating for Canadians. It has been especially difficult for those who have lost loved ones. As a country, we need to ensure that something like this never happens again. Our government is taking concrete steps in this regard, which I will speak about shortly.
Members of the House know that I have been a vocal advocate for improving long-term care and bringing the national standards in consultation with the provinces and territories. Last May, five of my Liberal colleagues from the GTA, other Liberal members and I sent a letter to the Government of Ontario calling on it to form an independent inquiry into the conditions of these homes and how COVID was able to spread through them so rapidly. From the start, we were sounding the alarm that something needed to be done. In the letter we demanded that the province work with the Government of Canada in creating national standards for long-term care, which I strongly support.
The report by the Canadian Armed Forces described truly horrible conditions at the homes they assisted in, including Grace Manor in my riding of Brampton South. The stories we have heard in the report were tragic. I have met with many families and advocates from across Ontario. This is why my colleagues and I have been working toward progress on LTC standards and our government has committed to work on this long-term solution. It is the responsibility of the provinces to regulate, protect and inspect long-term care homes in Ontario. The province promised an iron ring around them, but this never materialized. Our seniors deserve better.
As of Saturday, Ontario has seen the death count of 3,891 long-term care residents and 10 staff due to COVID-19, and 413 of these have been in Peel. Too many of these deaths were preventable. I truly support bringing in national standards for long-term care, but the motion before us today, I would argue that the first part of it seeking to bring Revera under public ownership is not the right solution to address this important problem.
With my time here today, I would like to explain why. It would be helpful to explain the federal government's role, or lack thereof, in this context. First, allow me to provide a bit of background. PSP Investments is mandated with investing net proceeds from the pension contribution of the public service, the Canadian Armed Forces and the RCMP pension plan in capital markets in the best interests of the contribution and beneficiaries under those respective acts. It reports to Parliament through the President of the Treasury Board, who is responsible for its legislation. The organization does include certain information about Revera in its annual report as well.
Under the Public Sector Pension Investment Board Act, the President of the Treasury Board is responsible for establishing and nominating a committee whose mandate is to establish a list of qualified candidates for proposed appointments as the director of the independent Board of Directors of PSP Investments. Based on the nominating committee's selection, the President of the Treasury Board makes a recommendation for appointment to the Governor in Council, and that is an important distinction.
The fact is that PSP Investments is not part of the federal public administration. It is not a government department or agency of the Crown. It does not receive parliamentary appropriations and it is not a part of the public administration of Canada.
PSP Investments is a non-agent Crown corporation that operates at arms' length from the Government of Canada. Part of the motion brought forward by my hon. colleague asks the government to interfere in the investment decision and strategy of this fund to make one long-term care group, namely Revera, public. It implies that the Government of Canada has authority to enact such a process, but the fact is that PSP Investments is intentionally structured to be at arms' length from the government. It is what ensures its independent and non-partisan role. PSP Investments must be, and is, responsible for its own investment decisions.
The President of the Treasury Board therefore does not have the authority to issue investment direction. Nor can he force PSP Investments to sell or transfer ownership of any of its assets. The organization's investment decisions are not influenced by political direction; regional, social or economic development considerations, or any non-investment objectives. In fact, such kind of interference would put PSP Investments at a competitive disadvantage and could impact its ability to achieve its legislative mandate.
The limitation also extends to Revera, which, as my hon. colleague well knows, is a private company that owns, operates and invests in the senior living sector. It is a wholly owned operating subsidiary of PSP Investments, which operates, develops and invests in senior housing facilities. Importantly, it is subject to the same rules as other businesses operating in the industry and its Canadian homes must be licensed or approved by applicable provincial or territorial government bodies. As such, its services are subject to provincial regulations on the quality of care and services. It is also self-funded, meaning that it has its own sources of financing and prepares independent audited financial statements. Since it is a wholly owned operating subsidy of PSP Investments registered under the Canada Business Corporation Act, it is not a part of the federal public administration.
Our government is taking concrete steps to help seniors in long-term care homes. In last September's Speech from the Throne, our government announced important measures aimed at doing just that and committed to working with the provinces and territories to set new national standards for long-term care, so we could ensure that seniors would be safe, respected and could live with dignity. We all want that. We are taking additional action to help seniors stay in their homes longer. We are pleased to work with Parliament on Criminal Code amendments to explicitly penalize those who neglect seniors under their care, putting them in danger.
In last fall's economic update, our government announced funding of up to $1 billion to establish a safe long-term care fund to help provinces and territories protect people in long-term care and support infection prevention and control. More recently, we are seeing progress with vaccinations. Thousands of seniors in long-term care facilities across the country have received their first doses of vaccines, and many have already received their second.
This is not a partisan issue. Our NDP colleagues know that the responsibility of delivering and regulating long-term care falls to the province and territories. A motion that does not recognize this fact does not bring us closer to the national standards. To be successful—
Madame la Présidente, je tiens à remercier le député de Winnipeg-Nord de partager son temps de parole avec moi. Aujourd'hui, je vais parler d'une question très importante découlant de la motion présentée par le député du NPD. J'aimerais le remercier de l'avoir présentée.
Commençons par une déclaration claire. Je suis en faveur de normes nationales pour les soins de longue durée, mais je suis en faveur de normes qui ont été conçues adéquatement et en consultation avec les provinces et les territoires. La motion dont nous débattons aujourd'hui ne propose malheureusement pas la bonne voie à suivre pour soutenir les personnes âgées dans les établissements de soins de longue durée.
Les Canadiens âgés ont bâti le pays. Beaucoup d'entre eux se sont littéralement battus pour en faire ce qu'il est aujourd'hui. Ils méritent notre respect et nos soins. En tant que société, il est important que nous ayons des conversations ouvertes et sérieuses sur les soins que nous offrons aux personnes âgées. Il ne fait aucun doute que les conséquences de la COVID-19 sur les établissements de soins de longue durée dans l'ensemble du pays ont été dévastatrices pour les Canadiens. La situation a été particulièrement difficile pour ceux qui ont perdu des êtres chers. En tant que pays, nous devons veiller à ce qu'une telle situation ne se reproduise jamais. Le gouvernement prend des mesures concrètes à cet égard et je vais en parler dans quelques instants.
Les députés savent que je suis une ardente défenseure de l'amélioration des soins de longue durée et de la mise en place de normes nationales, en consultation avec les provinces et les territoires. En mai dernier, cinq de mes collègues libéraux de la région du Grand Toronto, d'autres députés libéraux et moi-même avons envoyé une lettre au gouvernement de l'Ontario pour lui demander de mener une enquête indépendante sur les conditions de vie dans ces foyers et sur la raison pour laquelle la COVID a pu s'y propager si rapidement. Dès le départ, nous avons tiré la sonnette d'alarme pour dire qu'il fallait faire quelque chose. Dans cette lettre, nous exigions que la province collabore avec le gouvernement du Canada pour créer des normes nationales en matière de soins de longue durée, idée que j'appuie sans réserve.
Le rapport des Forces armées canadiennes décrit des conditions de vie vraiment atroces dans les établissements où elles ont été déployées pour apporter leur aide, notamment à Grace Manor dans ma circonscription de Brampton-Sud. Les histoires tirées du rapport qu'on nous a raconté étaient déchirantes. J'ai rencontré un grand nombre de familles et de défenseurs de la cause partout en Ontario. C'est pourquoi mes collègues et moi oeuvrons pour l'instauration de normes en matière de soins de longue durée, et le gouvernement s'est engagé à travailler à cette solution à long terme. Il incombe aux provinces de réglementer, de protéger et d'inspecter les établissements de soins de longue durée en Ontario. La province a promis de les entourer d'un « anneau de fer », de les protéger, mais cela ne s'est jamais concrétisé. Nos aînés méritent mieux.
Samedi, l'Ontario recensait le décès de 3 891 résidents et de 10 employés des établissements de soins de longue durée des suites de la COVID-19 depuis le début de la pandémie. De ce total, 413 décès sont survenus dans la région de Peel. Il est très malheureux qu'un grand nombre de ces décès auraient pu être évités. Je suis entièrement d'accord avec l'idée d'établir des normes nationales pour les soins de longue durée. Par contre, en ce qui concerne la motion présentée aujourd'hui, je considère que la première partie, où il est fait mention de transformer immédiatement Revera en organisme de propriété publique, n'est pas la solution adéquate pour régler ce sérieux problème.
J'aimerais expliquer mon point de vue durant le temps qui m'est accordé aujourd'hui. Il serait bon d'expliquer le rôle du gouvernement, ou l'absence de ce dernier, à l'égard de cet enjeu. Premièrement, je vais donner un peu de contexte. L'Office d'investissement des régimes de pensions du secteur public a le mandat d'investir le produit net des cotisations aux régimes de pension de la fonction publique, des Forces armées canadiennes et de la GRC dans les marchés financiers, et ce, dans l'intérêt des cotisants et des bénéficiaires en vertu des lois pertinentes. L'organisme relève du Parlement par l'intermédiaire du président du Conseil du Trésor, qui est responsable de la réglementation. Par ailleurs, le rapport annuel de l'organisme contient de l'information sur l'entreprise Revera.
En vertu de la Loi sur l'Office d'investissement des régimes de pensions du secteur public, le président du Conseil du Trésor est responsable de créer un comité dont les membres auront le mandat de dresser une liste de candidats qualifiés pour diriger le conseil d'administration indépendant de l'Office d'investissement des régimes de pensions du secteur public. Après avoir consulté les candidatures proposées par le comité de sélection, le président du Conseil du Trésor formule une recommandation au gouverneur en conseil. Il est très important de bien comprendre la différence.
En fait, l'Office d'investissement des régimes de pensions du secteur public ne fait pas partie de l'administration de la fonction publique fédérale. Ce n'est ni un ministère du gouvernement ni une société de la Couronne. Il ne dispose d'aucun crédit parlementaire et il ne fait pas partie de l'administration publique du Canada.
Investissements PSP est une société d'État non mandataire qui agit indépendamment du gouvernement du Canada. La motion présentée par mon collègue vise notamment à demander au gouvernement de s'ingérer dans les décisions et les stratégies d'investissement de cet organisme pour transformer un groupe d'établissements de soins de longue durée, c'est-à-dire Revera, en organisme public. Cela laisse entendre que le gouvernement du Canada a le pouvoir de lancer ce genre de processus. Or, en réalité, la société Investissements PSP est intentionnellement structurée de manière à fonctionner indépendamment du gouvernement. C'est ce qui lui garantit de pouvoir agir de façon indépendante et non partisane. Investissements PSP est et doit être responsable de ses propres décisions en matière d'investissement.
Le président du Conseil du Trésor n'a donc pas le pouvoir d'émettre des directives en matière d'investissement. Il ne peut pas non plus forcer Investissements PSP à vendre ses actifs ou à en transférer la propriété. Les décisions d'investissement de l'organisme ne font l'objet d'aucune directive politique et ne sont pas prises selon des objectifs de développement régional, social ou économique ou des objectifs qui n'ont pas trait aux investissements. D'ailleurs, ce genre d'ingérence placerait Investissements PSP dans une position désavantageuse sur le plan concurrentiel et pourrait avoir une incidence sur sa capacité de remplir son mandat législatif.
Cette limite s'applique également à Revera, qui, comme mon collègue le sait bien, est une société privée qui possède et exploite des établissements de soins aux aînés et qui investit dans ce secteur. C'est une filiale en propriété exclusive d'Investissements PSP qui exploite et développe des établissements de soins aux aînés et qui investit dans ce secteur. Il est à noter que l'organisme est assujetti aux mêmes règles que les autres entreprises de ce secteur, et que ses établissements doivent avoir un permis ou une approbation des organismes provinciaux ou territoriaux responsables. Par conséquent, ses services sont assujettis à la réglementation provinciale sur la qualité des soins et des services. Il est aussi autofinancé, ce qui veut dire qu'il dispose de ses propres sources de financement et qu'il produit des états financiers vérifiés de façon indépendante. Étant donné qu'il s'agit d'une filiale en propriété exclusive d'Investissements PSP enregistrée au titre de la Loi canadienne sur les sociétés par actions, elle ne fait pas partie de l'administration publique fédérale.
Le gouvernement pose des gestes concrets pour aider les personnes âgées dans les foyers de soins de longue durée. Dans le discours du Trône de septembre dernier, il a annoncé d'importantes mesures en ce sens et s'est engagé à travailler avec les provinces et les territoires en vue d'établir de nouvelles normes nationales en la matière, pour que les aînés vivent en sûreté, dans le respect et la dignité. C'est ce que nous voulons tous. Nous prenons d'autres mesures pour aider les personnes âgées à demeurer plus longtemps chez elles. Nous sommes heureux de travailler avec le Parlement en vue de modifier le Code criminel afin de pénaliser explicitement les personnes qui négligent et mettent en danger les aînés dont ils prennent soin.
Dans l'énoncé économique de l'automne dernier, le gouvernement a annoncé un financement pouvant atteindre 1 milliard de dollars consacré à la création d'un fonds de soins de longue durée sûrs visant à aider les provinces et les territoires à protéger les personnes dans les établissements de soins de longue durée et à soutenir la prévention et le contrôle des infections. Plus récemment, nous avons constaté des progrès en matière de vaccination. Des milliers d'aînés résidant dans des foyers de soins de longue durée un peu partout au pays ont reçu leur première dose de vaccin et beaucoup ont déjà reçu leur deuxième.
Cette question n'est pas partisane. Les députés du NPD savent qu'il revient aux provinces et aux territoires d'offrir et de réglementer les soins de longue durée. Une motion qui ne reconnaît pas cet état de fait ne nous rapproche pas de l'objectif des normes nationales. Pour réussir...
View Francesco Sorbara Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, this is a very important issue for my riding of Vaughan—Woodbridge and for me. Much like many of my colleagues across this beautiful country, many of the individuals in my riding who reside in long-term care facilities were impacted.
I first want to thank the Canadian Armed Forces members who assisted at Woodbridge Vista: one of the long-term care facilities in my riding where, unfortunately, many residents passed away. I want to thank the Canadian Armed Forces for going in and assisting the staff there and getting things under control. I also want to thank William Osler Health System. It managed the Woodbridge Vista facility for a period of time. The same thing happened at Villa Gambin: the CAF did not go in there, but assistance was required.
We want our seniors to be taken care of. These seniors literally built this country. They are in their 80s and 90s. They toiled away building the beautiful cities and towns we live in and made Canada what it is. We owe it to them to do the right thing. We owe it to them to take care of them.
We know in Ontario, approximately 70% of the seniors in long-term care facilities suffer from dementia, Alzheimer's or a related condition. We know that they are there. They need to be safe, they need to be healthy and they need to be protected. We need to ensure that.
What went on in the early stages of the pandemic was horrifying for Canadians across the country in terms of the death toll, how people passed away and how people could not see loved ones. These are our seniors we are talking about. They are some of our most vulnerable citizens. We know we need to do better, and I wish to thank the Canadian Armed Forces again, the Canadian Red Cross and the individuals who have gone in and assisted.
Our government has stepped up to the plate by working with the provinces. That is very important. Whether it is with the government of Quebec, Ontario or whichever province, we have been there to assist with things such as the safe restart agreement and $740 million to purchase PPE. We have been there to work with the provinces and we will continue to do that.
I am very respectful of this. We have a fiscal federation in Canada. There are certain responsibilities the federal government has and responsibilities the provinces have. Those responsibilities include the delivery of services. With the Canada health transfer, we have transferred literally billions of dollars to the provinces. We did that, but at the same time, the provinces are still the majority funders of health care, specifically in the province of Ontario. We need to recognize that.
I believe in national standards. We need to bring them in, but we must do so in a way that co-operates with each province. We can only do that as such. That is the way our system is built. That is the way we have built such a great country and we will continue to do so. We have seen that co-operation.
I know the Province of Ontario is committed to investing over $2 billion per year into long-term care facilities, hiring 27,000 PSWs over the next four years and committing to a gold level standard of four hours of care for each person residing in a long-term care facility. We need to make sure that is implemented.
I appreciate the NDP's motion today and the member who brought it forward. I wish to speak to the fact that we have a system in place in this country. Yes, there are for-profit operators of long-term care, there are municipal operators of long-term care and there are provincial operators. Each model has its shortcomings and each model has its strengths.
We have seen many long-term care facilities managed for-profit. On average, they have not performed as well as others. That is a fact. However, some of them performed decently. I know the NDP would like to nationalize everything. They would like to nationalize all parts of the economy. Sometimes, it sounds like the NDP cannot even support a trade agreement with the United Kingdom, or CETA or the USMCA. Even when people like Jerry Dias step forward and say we need to support these trade deals, the NDP members still cannot bring themselves to support them.
I would like to go back to comments related to this motion and what is in the motion, specifically with regard to PSP Investments. As well-intentioned as this motion is, I would argue that the first part of it, which seeks to bring Revera under public ownership, is not the right solution to this important issue.
With my time here today, I think it will be helpful to explain the government's role, or lack thereof, in this context. First, allow me to provide a bit of background. We, as Canadians, believe in having a secure and dignified retirement for all Canadians. That is why we enhanced the CPP in our first term in government. That is why we have committed to increasing OAS by 10%.
However, we also have a number of pension funds in this country and one of them is PSP Investments. PSP Investments is mandated to manage the pension contributions of the public service, including the Canadian Armed Forces and Royal Canadian Mounted Police. It is mandated to manage these pension plans and capital markets in the best interests of the contributors and beneficiaries of those respective plans. PSP reports to Parliament through the President of the Treasury Board, who is responsible for its legislation. The organization includes certain information about Revera in its annual reports.
Under the Public Sector Pension Investment Board Act, the President of the Treasury Board is responsible for establishing a nominating committee. Its mandate is to establish a list of qualified candidates for the proposed appointment of director of the independent board of PSP Investments. Based on the nominating committee's selection, the President of the Treasury Board makes a recommendation for appointment to the Governor in Council. It is an important distinction. The fact is that PSP Investments is not part of the federal public administration. It is not a government department or agency of the Crown. It does not receive parliamentary appropriations. It is not part of the public administration of Canada.
PSP Investments is a non-agent Crown corporation that operates at arm's length from the Government of Canada. That is a very important point to make to my colleagues who wish to nationalize everything, like those in the NDP. PSP Investments needs to operate and needs to invest its dollars for the benefit of its members. Who are these members? They are union members. They are public sector employees, whether RCMP members, Canadian Armed Forces members or others. The list goes on. They can pull the reports off the website and see that there are literally hundreds of thousands of current beneficiaries and also what are called persons making contributions, or contributories.
Part of the motion brought forth by my hon. colleague asks the government to interfere in the investment decisions and strategy of this fund in order to make one long-term care group, namely Revera, public. It implies that the Government of Canada has the authority to enact such a process. However, the fact is that PSP Investments is intentionally structured to be at arm's length from the government, and thankfully so. That is the right way it should be. This ensures its independent and non-partisan role. PSP Investments must be, and is, responsible for its own investment decisions.
The President of the Treasury Board therefore does not have the authority to issue investment direction, nor can he force PSP Investments to sell or transfer ownership of any of its assets. The organization's investment decisions are not influenced by political direction; regional, social or economic development considerations; or any non-investment objectives. In fact, such kinds of interference would put PSP Investments at a competitive disadvantage, which could impact its ability to achieve its legislated mandate.
This limitation also extends to Revera Inc., which as my Liberal colleague well knows, is a private company that owns properties in, operates in and invests in the senior living sector. It is a wholly owned operating subsidiary of PSP Investments that operates, develops and invests in senior housing facilities. Through its portfolio partnership, Revera owns and operates more than 500 properties across Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom. Importantly, it is subject to the same rules as other businesses operating in the industry. Its Canadian residences must be licensed or approved by applicable provincial and territorial government bodies. As such, its services are subject to provincial regulations on the quality of care and services.
That in no way means that I am not in favour of national standards. I am in favour of national standards. Our seniors need to live in a secure, safe environment. The last few years of their lives need to be dignified. We all know that and we all want that as parliamentarians. I do not think there is any disagreement there.
Revera is also self-funded, meaning that it has its own source of financing and prepares independently audited financial statements. Since it is a wholly owned operating subsidiary of PSP Investments, registered under the Canada Business Corporations Act, it is not part of the federal public administration.
Our government has committed, as we saw in the September Speech from the Throne, to ensuring that our seniors are taken care of. We want to make sure that people entering retirement have a safe, secure and dignified retirement. We want to make sure seniors who need to be transferred to a long-term care facility are healthy, safe, secure and protected.
It is great to see that the vaccines are out. It is great to see that in the province of Ontario specifically, to my knowledge, the number of deaths in long-term care facilities has actually diminished to near zero and in some days has registered zero.
Monsieur le Président, il s'agit d'une question très importante pour ma circonscription, Vaughan—Woodbridge, et pour moi. Comme c'est le cas de beaucoup de mes collèges partout au Canada, dans ma circonscription, beaucoup de résidants des établissements de soins de longue durée ont été touchés.
Je tiens à remercier les membres des Forces armées canadiennes qui ont aidé à Woodbridge Vista, un des établissements de soins de longue durée de ma circonscription où, malheureusement, beaucoup de résidants sont morts. Je tiens à remercier les Forces armées canadiennes de s'y être présentées pour aider le personnel et d'avoir pris la situation en main. Je veux aussi remercier le centre de santé William Osler, qui a géré l'établissement Woodbridge Vista pendant un certain temps. La même chose s'est produite à Villa Gambin: les Forces armées canadiennes ne s'y sont pas présentées, mais une aide s'imposait.
Nous voulons que les aînés soient pris en charge. Les aînés ont littéralement bâti le pays. Ils sont âgés de 80 ou de 90 ans. Ils ont travaillé dur pour bâtir les magnifiques villes et villages que nous habitons et pour faire du Canada ce qu'il est. Nous leur devons de faire ce qui s'impose. Nous leur devons de prendre soin d'eux.
Nous savons que, en Ontario, environ 70 % des aînés dans les établissements de soins de longue durée sont atteints de démence, de la maladie d'Alzheimer ou d'un problème de santé connexe. Nous savons qu'ils sont dans ces établissements. Ils ont besoin d'être en sécurité et en santé et ils ont besoin de protection. Nous devons y veiller.
Ce qui s'est passé au début de la pandémie a été horrible pour les Canadiens de partout au pays: le nombre de morts, la façon dont les gens mouraient et l'interdiction de visiter ses proches. Il est question des aînés, certains des citoyens les plus vulnérables. Nous savons que nous devons faire mieux, et je tiens à remercier de nouveau les Forces armées canadiennes, la Croix-Rouge canadienne et les personnes qui sont allées dans les établissements pour aider les gens.
Le gouvernement a assumé ses responsabilités en travaillant avec les provinces. C'est très important. Que ce soit en collaboration avec le gouvernement du Québec, de l'Ontario ou de toute autre province, nous avons été là pour apporter de l'aide comme l'Accord sur la relance sécuritaire et le versement de 740 millions de dollars pour l'achat d'équipement de protection individuelle. Nous avons répondu à l'appel en collaborant avec les provinces et nous continuerons de procéder ainsi.
Je suis très respectueux de cette réalité. Le Canada est une fédération au chapitre de la fiscalité. Le gouvernement fédéral a certaines responsabilités et les provinces en ont d'autres. Ces responsabilités comprennent la prestation de services. Grâce au Transfert canadien en matière de santé, nous avons transféré des milliards de dollars aux provinces. Nous l'avons fait, mais il n'en reste pas moins que les soins de santé sont toujours principalement financés par les provinces, surtout en Ontario. Nous devons le reconnaître.
Je crois aux normes nationales. Nous devons en instaurer, mais nous devons le faire en collaboration avec chaque province. C'est tout ce que nous pouvons faire. C'est ainsi que le système est conçu. C'est ainsi que nous avons bâti un si grand pays et que nous continuerons à le faire. Nous avons été témoins de cette collaboration.
Je sais que la province de l'Ontario a promis d'investir plus de 2 milliards de dollars par année dans les établissements de soins de longue durée, ce qui comprend l'embauche de 27 000 préposés aux bénéficiaires au cours des quatre prochaines années et la mise en place d'une norme élevée qui prévoit quatre heures de soins pour chaque personne résidant dans un établissement de soins de longue durée. Nous devons nous assurer que cela se réalisera.
Je reconnais la valeur de la motion néo-démocrate d'aujourd'hui ainsi que les mérites du député qui l'a présentée. Je souhaite cependant souligner le fait que nous avons un système en place au Canada. Certes, des établissements de soins de longue durée sont exploités par le secteur privé, alors que d'autres le sont par une municipalité ou encore par une province. Chaque modèle a ses forces et ses faiblesses.
Nous avons constaté qu'un grand nombre d'établissements de soins de longue durée sont à but lucratif. En moyenne, ils s'en sont moins bien tirés que d'autres. C'est un fait. Cependant, certains de ces établissements ont eu des résultats satisfaisants. Je sais que le NPD aimerait tout nationaliser. Il veut nationaliser tous les secteurs de l'économie. Parfois, il donne l'impression qu'il ne peut même pas appuyer un accord commercial comme celui conclu avec le Royaume-Uni, ou encore l'Accord économique et commercial global ou l'Accord Canada—États-Unis—Mexique. Même quand des gens comme Jerry Dias disent publiquement qu'il nous faut appuyer ces accords, les députés néo-démocrates ne peuvent toujours pas s'y résoudre.
Revenons aux observations sur la motion et sur ce qu'elle prévoit, plus précisément en ce qui concerne Investissements PSP. Même si la motion est fondée sur de bonnes intentions, je suis d'avis que la première partie, qui cherche à transformer Revera en organisme de propriété publique, n'est pas la solution appropriée à cette importante question.
Pendant le temps de parole dont je dispose aujourd'hui, je pense qu'il sera utile d'expliquer le rôle du gouvernement à cet égard ou plutôt le fait qu'il n'en joue aucun. D'abord, je vais fournir un peu de contexte. En tant que Canadiens, nous croyons que tous nos concitoyens méritent une retraite sûre et digne. C'est pourquoi nous avons bonifié le Régime de pensions du Canada pendant notre premier mandat. C'est aussi pourquoi nous nous sommes engagés à augmenter de 10 % la Sécurité de la vieillesse.
Cela dit, nous avons aussi un certain nombre de fonds de pension au Canada, et Investissements PSP est l'un d'entre eux. Investissements PSP a pour mandat de gérer les cotisations de retraite de la fonction publique, y compris celles des Forces armées canadiennes et de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada. Il doit gérer ces fonds de pension et ces marchés de capitaux dans l'intérêt des cotisants et des bénéficiaires. Investissements PSP relève du Parlement par l'entremise du président du Conseil du Trésor, qui est responsable de la loi qui l'encadre. L'organisme inclut de l'information sur Revera dans ses rapports annuels.
En vertu de la Loi sur l'Office d'investissement des régimes de pensions du secteur public, le président du Conseil du Trésor est chargé d'établir un comité de sélection. Le mandat du comité est de dresser une liste de candidats qualifiés pour la nomination au poste de directeur de l'Office d'investissement des régimes de pensions du secteur public. Le président du Conseil du Trésor fait ensuite une recommandation de nomination au gouverneur en conseil en fonction de la décision du comité de sélection. Il s'agit d'une distinction importante. Le fait est que l'Office ne fait pas partie de l'administration publique fédérale. Ce n'est ni un ministère ni un mandataire de l'État. Il ne reçoit pas de crédits parlementaires. Il ne fait pas partie de l'administration publique du Canada.
L'Office d'investissement des régimes de pensions du secteur public est une société d'État non mandataire, indépendante du gouvernement du Canada. Il s'agit d'un point très important à faire valoir à mes collègues, notamment ceux du NPD, qui souhaitent tout nationaliser. L'Office doit investir son argent dans l'intérêt de ses membres et prendre des décisions qui favorisent ces derniers. Qui sont ces membres? Ce sont des membres de syndicats; des employés du secteur public, qu'ils soient membres de la GRC, des Forces armées canadiennes, et cetera. La liste est longue. Les députés peuvent consulter les rapports sur leur site Web et constater qu'il y a littéralement des centaines de milliers de bénéficiaires actuels, ainsi que des personnes qui versent des cotisations, ou des cotisants, comme on dit.
La motion présentée par mon collègue vise notamment à demander au gouvernement de s'ingérer dans les décisions et les stratégies d'investissement de cet organisme pour transformer un groupe d'établissements de soins de longue durée, c'est-à-dire Revera, en organisme public. Cela laisse entendre que le gouvernement du Canada a le pouvoir de lancer ce genre de processus. Or, en réalité, l'Office d'investissement des régimes de pensions du secteur public est intentionnellement — et heureusement — structuré de manière à fonctionner indépendamment du gouvernement. C'est la bonne façon de procéder. C'est ce qui lui garantit de pouvoir agir de façon indépendante et non partisane. L'Office est et doit être responsable de ses propres décisions en matière d'investissement.
Le président du Conseil du Trésor n'a donc pas le pouvoir d'émettre des directives en matière d'investissement. Il ne peut pas non plus forcer l'Office d'investissement des régimes de pensions du secteur public à vendre ses actifs ou à en transférer la propriété. Les décisions d'investissement de l'organisme ne font l'objet d'aucune directive politique et ne sont pas prises selon des objectifs de développement régional, social ou économique ou des objectifs qui n'ont pas trait aux investissements. D'ailleurs, ce genre d'ingérence placerait l'Office dans une position désavantageuse sur le plan concurrentiel et pourrait avoir une incidence sur sa capacité de remplir son mandat législatif.
Cette limite vaut également pour Revera Inc., qui, comme le sait pertinemment mon collègue libéral, est une société privée investissant dans le secteur des résidences pour personnes âgées et détenant et exploitant des propriétés dans ce secteur. Cette société est une filiale active en propriété exclusive de l'Office d'investissement des régimes de pensions du secteur public qui exploite et aménage des résidences pour personnes âgées et investit dans de tels établissements. Par l'entremise de son portefeuille de partenariats, Revera est le propriétaire-exploitant de plus 500 propriétés au Canada, aux États-Unis et au Royaume-Uni. Fait important, la société est assujettie aux mêmes règles que les autres entreprises en activité dans l'industrie. Ses résidences canadiennes doivent obtenir un permis d'exploitation ou l'approbation de l'autorité gouvernementale provinciale ou territoriale compétente et sont, par conséquent, assujetties aux règlements provinciaux régissant la qualité des soins et des services.
Cela ne signifie nullement que je m'oppose à des normes nationales. Au contraire, j'y suis tout à fait favorable. Nos aînés doivent vivre dans un milieu salubre et sûr. Ils doivent pouvoir vivre les dernières années de leur vie dans la dignité. À titre de parlementaires, nous le savons tous et le souhaitons tous. Je pense que cela fait l'unanimité.
Revera est également autofinancée, ce qui signifie que la société possède sa propre source de financement et prépare des états financiers qui font l'objet d'un audit indépendant. Puisqu'il s'agit d'une filiale active en propriété exclusive de l'Office d'investissement des régimes de pensions du secteur public enregistrée sous la Loi canadienne sur les sociétés par actions, elle ne fait pas partie de l'administration publique fédérale.
Tel que l'indique le discours du Trône prononcé en septembre, le gouvernement est résolu à faire en sorte que l'on s'occupe de nos aînés. Nous voulons nous assurer que les retraités vivent leur retraite dans la dignité, en milieu sûr et en jouissant d'une sécurité financière. Nous voulons nous assurer que les aînés qui doivent être transférés dans un établissement de soins de longue durée sont en santé, en sécurité et protégés, et que leurs besoins sont satisfaits.
Il est merveilleux que la vaccination ait commencé. Il est rassurant de constater, du moins à ma connaissance, que le nombre de décès dans les établissements de soins de longue durée a diminué, notamment en Ontario, où le bilan quotidien est très faible, voire, certains jours, totalement nul.
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
2021-03-10 14:31 [p.4820]
Mr. Speaker, we are coming up on the first anniversary of COVID-19. It has been a very difficult year for so many people, but what is so heartbreaking about this pandemic is how seniors bore the brunt of it, particularly seniors in long-term care. We have learned that seniors in for-profit long-term care experienced the worst conditions and were most likely to lose their lives.
The New Democrats have long said there is no place for profit in the care of our seniors. Will the Prime Minister commit to removing profit from long-term care?
Monsieur le Président, nous approchons du premier anniversaire de la COVID-19. L'année a été très difficile pour beaucoup de gens, mais ce qui est vraiment désolant dans cette pandémie, c'est que ce sont les personnes âgées qui en ont été les principales victimes, en particulier les personnes âgées en établissements de soins de longue durée. Nous avons découvert que ce sont les personnes âgées résidant dans les établissements de soins de longue durée à but lucratif qui vivaient dans les pires conditions et qui étaient le plus à risque de mourir.
Les néo-démocrates disent depuis longtemps qu'il n'y a pas de place pour la recherche du profit lorsqu'il s'agit de soigner les personnes âgées. Le premier ministre s'engage-t-il à intervenir pour que la recherche du profit ne soit plus un objectif des établissements de soins de santé de longue durée?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Justin Trudeau Profile
2021-03-10 14:32 [p.4820]
Mr. Speaker, we have committed to working with the provinces and territories to ensure that seniors are protected right across the country in long-term care. We know there is a need to improve long-term care standards across the country. We look forward to working with the provinces and territories to share best practices.
In the case of seniors, we have stepped up as a government with more than $3.8 billion in tax-free payments to seniors, along with enhanced community support. We are committed to increasing old age security by 10% for seniors aged 75 and up. That builds on our work of increasing the GIS, increasing the Canada pension plan for future retirees and supporting seniors every step of the way.
Monsieur le Président, nous nous sommes engagés à travailler avec les provinces et les territoires pour que les personnes âgées recevant des soins de longue durée soient protégées partout au pays. Nous sommes bien conscients de la nécessité d'améliorer les normes à ce chapitre. Nous sommes impatients de travailler avec les provinces et les territoires pour mettre en commun des pratiques exemplaires.
Nous avons, en tant que gouvernement, versé aux aînés des paiements non imposables de plus de 3,8 milliards de dollars et nous avons augmenté le soutien communautaire. Nous nous sommes engagés à augmenter la pension de la Sécurité de la vieillesse de 10 % pour les personnes âgées de 75 ans et plus. Cette mesure s'ajoute à l'augmentation du Supplément de revenu garanti et du Régime de pensions du Canada pour les futurs retraités et à l'aide que nous apportons sans relâche aux anciens.
View Alexandre Boulerice Profile
NDP (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for his speech. I, too, am angry about the Liberal government's inability to help the airline and aerospace industries, which provide a lot of jobs.
I want to come back to what my colleague said about our inability to produce vaccines in Canada. Because of previous Liberal and Conservative governments, Canada has lost its ability to manufacture vaccines. Over the past year, we have seen how important this is because we have become dependent on other countries and on the goodwill of private companies that do not hesitate to move their operations elsewhere if they fail to make a profit.
What does my colleague think about the NDP's proposal to have a national public vaccine production capacity, perhaps even under the authority of a Crown corporation, so that, when the next pandemic hits, Canada will no longer have to depend on foreign countries or private companies?
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mon collègue de son discours. Je partage tout à fait sa colère quant à l'incapacité du gouvernement libéral d'aider les secteurs aérien et aéronautique, où il y a beaucoup d'emplois.
Je veux revenir sur ce que mon collègue a dit au sujet de notre incapacité à produire des vaccins au Canada. À cause des précédents gouvernements libéraux et conservateurs, le Canada a perdu sa capacité de fabriquer des vaccins. Durant la dernière année, nous avons constaté à quel point c'était important, puisque nous sommes devenus dépendants des autres pays, mais aussi du bon vouloir de compagnies privées qui n'hésitent pas à déménager leurs pénates ailleurs si elles ne dégagent pas de profits.
Que pense mon collègue de la proposition du NPD d'avoir une capacité nationale publique de production de vaccins, peut-être même sous l'égide d'une société d'État, pour que, lors de la prochaine pandémie, le Canada soit capable de ne plus dépendre de pays étrangers ou de compagnies privées?
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2021-03-09 13:50 [p.4745]
Mr. Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague for his question.
The Liberal government's management of vaccine procurement has been pathetic. It staked Canadians' fate and health on a deal with a company that provided no assurances that it would deliver on its promises to our people.
It rejected proposals from Canadian companies that were willing to do whatever it took to produce vaccines here. When it comes time to take stock of this pandemic, the vaccine procurement strategy will be the biggest thorn in the Liberal government's side. The reality is that the government completely missed the boat and is 100% to blame for the vaccination delays prolonging the crisis.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mon collègue de sa question.
La gestion de l'approvisionnement en vaccins par le gouvernement libéral a été pathétique. On a confié le sort et la santé des Canadiens et des Canadiennes à une entente avec une compagnie dont on n’avait aucune assurance qu'elle allait tenir ses promesses pour notre population.
On a rejeté les propositions d'entreprises canadiennes qui étaient prêtes à tout mettre en œuvre pour produire des vaccins ici. Quand on va faire le bilan de cette pandémie, la stratégie d'approvisionnement en vaccins va s'avérer la plus grosse épine dans le pied du gouvernement libéral. En effet, il a complètement raté le bateau, et les retards dans la vaccination, qui font que la crise perdure, lui sont attribuables à 100 %.
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
Mr. Speaker, the throne speech said that one of the greatest tragedies of this pandemic is the lives lost in long-term care homes, lives like the brother of my constituent, Louise.
Last May, he died alone in a facility owned by Revera. Before his death, his meals were served in styrofoam containers and he was denied contact with Revera caregivers. This terrible treatment of a dying man cost $5,000 a month, and if that were not outrageous enough, Revera demanded rent for the two months after his death.
Revera is part of a Crown corporation. When will the Liberals take the profit out of long-term care?
Monsieur le Président, on pouvait lire dans le discours du Trône que les nombreux décès survenus dans les établissements de soins de longue durée figuraient parmi les pires tragédies de la pandémie. C'est notamment ce qui est arrivé au frère de Louise, qui habite dans ma circonscription.
Cet homme est mort seul en mai dernier dans un établissement appartenant à Revera. Dans les jours qui ont précédé sa mort, ses repas lui étaient servis dans des contenants de styromousse et il a été coupé de tout contact avec les soignants de Revera. Pour être traité de la sorte, il lui en coûtait 5 000 $ par mois et, comble du comble, Revera a exigé deux mois de loyer après son décès.
Revera fait partie d'une société de la Couronne. Quand les libéraux évacueront-ils la recherche de profits des soins de longue durée?
View Darren Fisher Profile
Lib. (NS)
Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for the very important question. It is so important that we protect those living and working in long-term care. We provided $740 million to provinces and territories to bring in measures to control and prevent infections, including in long-term care. On November 30, we announced an additional $1 billion in the fall economic statement to create the safe long-term care fund.
We are working closely, and will continue to work closely, with the provinces and territories to protect those in care by providing guidance to prevent and address outbreaks, and work with them to set new national standards.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie le député, car il s'agit d'une question très importante. Nous devons absolument protéger les personnes qui habitent et qui travaillent dans un centre d'hébergement de longue durée. Nous avons fourni 740 millions de dollars aux provinces et aux territoires pour qu'ils préviennent et endiguent les infections, notamment dans ce genre d'établissements. Le 30 novembre, l'énoncé économique de l'automne annonçait qu'un milliard de dollars supplémentaires serait consacré à la création du Fonds pour la sécurité des soins de longue durée.
Nous continuerons de tout faire, en étroite collaboration avec les provinces et les territoires, pour protéger les personnes qui habitent dans ces établissements. Nous publierions notamment des lignes directrices afin de prévenir et de maîtriser les éclosions et nous fixerons ensemble de nouvelles normes nationales.
View Heather McPherson Profile
NDP (AB)
View Heather McPherson Profile
2021-02-25 12:47 [p.4537]
Mr. Speaker, I was very happy that the member talked about the importance of recommitting to and reinvesting in a universally accessible publicly delivered health care system. He spoke of how that would help seniors in real, tangible ways. I was also happy he brought up long-term care. I would like my colleague to comment on that.
We know that the vast majority of deaths in long-term care as a result of COVID-19 happened in for-profit long-term care centres. Can the member explain why he believes the federal government is refusing to do the right thing and remove profit from long-term care to protect seniors?
Monsieur le Président, j'ai été très heureuse d'entendre le député parler de la nécessité de réitérer l'engagement à créer un système de santé public et universel et de financer une telle initiative. Il a parlé des avantages très réels et concrets d'une initiative de la sorte pour les aînés. Je suis également heureuse qu'il ait soulevé la question des foyers de soins de longue durée. J'aimerais que le député nous en dise un peu plus à ce sujet.
Nous savons que la très grande majorité des décès liés à la COVID-19 dans les foyers de soins de longue durée sont survenus dans des établissements à but lucratif. Le député pourrait-il nous dire pourquoi, selon lui, le gouvernement fédéral refuse de faire ce qui s'impose et de faire disparaître la recherche du profit dans les établissements de soins de longue durée afin de mieux protéger les aînés?
View Alexandre Boulerice Profile
NDP (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague from Edmonton Strathcona for her excellent comments concerning the need for a universal public pharmacare program that would make such a difference for our seniors, especially when it comes to the accessibility and cost of medications. Everyone would benefit. Unfortunately, yesterday, three parties joined forces against the NDP's proposal, which would have met such pressing needs.
I believe that the private sector has no place in long-term care facilities. As we saw yesterday, the Liberals often bow down to large private companies. Yesterday, it was big pharma, and we get the impression that they do not really want to bow down to large private companies when it comes to senior care.
We should not distinguish between credit cards and health insurance cards. Health insurance cards should give us access to quality care, and I think that we should all work together and figure out a way of avoiding such situations in the future.
The Herron long-term care residence on Montreal's West Island, a private institution, was utterly devastated. People were treated with contempt, ill treated, malnourished; some were dehydrated, left to lie on the floor and in their beds for days on end. It is disgraceful and unacceptable in our society, and we, at every level of government, must do everything we can to work together to make sure that it does not happen again. The private sector has no place in health care.
Monsieur le Président, je veux remercier ma collègue d'Edmonton Strathcona de ses excellents commentaires à l'égard de la nécessité d'une assurance médicaments publique et universelle qui aiderait tellement nos aînés, notamment pour ce qui est de l'accessibilité et du coût des médicaments. Cela aiderait tout le monde. Malheureusement, hier, nous avons vu trois partis se lier contre la proposition du NPD, alors qu'elle répond à des besoins criants.
En ce qui a trait au privé, il n'a pas sa place dans les CHSLD. Nous l'avons vu hier, les libéraux cèdent souvent devant les grandes compagnies privées. Hier, il s'agissait des grandes pharmaceutiques, et nous avons l'impression qu'ils ne veulent pas vraiment céder face aux grandes compagnies privées en ce qui concerne les soins de nos aînés.
Nous ne devrions pas faire la distinction entre la carte de crédit et la carte d'assurance maladie. C'est la carte d'assurance maladie qui doit nous donner l'accès à des soins de qualité et je pense que nous devons tous travailler ensemble et nous demander comment faire pour éviter que de telles situations se reproduisent à l'avenir.
Le CHSDL Herron dans l'Ouest de l'Île de Montréal, un établissement privé, a vécu une hécatombe. Les gens ont été vraiment méprisés, mal traités, mal nourris, parfois déshydratés, laissés sur le plancher et laissés dans leur lit pendant des journées entières. C'est indigne et inacceptable de la part de notre société et nous, tous les paliers du gouvernement, devons tout faire pour travailler ensemble et nous assurer que cela ne se reproduira plus. Le privé n'a pas sa place en santé.
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
2021-01-26 14:31 [p.3542]
Mr. Speaker, over 200 doctors are calling for urgent action in Ontario to address the crisis in long-term care exposed by COVID-19. They are calling for massive reforms, but in particular they are also calling for removing profit from long-term care.
Revera is one of the largest for-profit providers of long-term care. It is owned by a federal agency. Will the Prime Minister take the first step in removing profit from long-term care by removing profit from Revera by making it public, and saving lives?
Monsieur le Président, plus de 200 médecins demandent qu'on agisse rapidement en Ontario pour s'attaquer à la crise qui sévit dans les établissements de soins de longue durée et que la COVID‑19 a mise en lumière. Ils demandent qu'on réforme le système en profondeur, et surtout qu'on élimine la notion de profits dans les établissements de soins de longue durée.
L'entreprise Revera compte parmi les principaux fournisseurs de soins de longue durée à but lucratif. Cette entreprise appartient à un organisme fédéral. Le premier ministre fera‑t‑il les premiers pas pour faire disparaître la recherche du profit dans les établissements de soins de longue durée en nationalisant Revera afin de sauver des vies?
View Chrystia Freeland Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, let me start by saying that I share the member opposite's concern and his anguish over people in long-term care facilities, and I think this is a concern shared by all Canadians. This is something we need to urgently address, and our government is doing just that, working in close collaboration with our provincial and territorial partners.
Let me also say that I think it is entirely appropriate for us as a country to examine very carefully the standards in long-term care, to set national standards and to examine what kind of care protects our seniors best.
Monsieur le Président, je veux commencer par dire que je partage la préoccupation du député d'en face, de même que son inquiétude à propos des résidants des établissements de soins de longue durée, et je crois que c'est une question qui préoccupe tous les Canadiens. C'est un dossier dont il faut s'occuper de toute urgence, et c'est exactement ce que fait le gouvernement, en étroite collaboration avec ses partenaires provinciaux et territoriaux.
J'ajouterais qu'il est tout à fait approprié, selon moi, que les dirigeants de notre pays examinent très attentivement les normes relatives aux soins de longue durée, afin d'établir des normes nationales et de déterminer le type de soins qui permet le mieux de protéger les aînés.
View Scott Duvall Profile
NDP (ON)
View Scott Duvall Profile
2020-12-07 11:52 [p.3007]
Madam Speaker, it is a great pleasure to rise to speak to Bill C-231. I am so glad to see the bill has been brought forward, as it addresses the very important issue of how money in federally sponsored plans will be invested in the interest of all Canadians. I would like to acknowledge my colleague from Cowichan—Malahat—Langford and his staff for all their hard work in bringing the bill to the House.
The bill takes the investment approach of the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board, which is responsible for managing the funds that will be used to pay CPP beneficiaries well into the future. The management of this fund is critically important to the future well-being of Canadian workers and retirees, but the no-holds-barred investment mandate of the fund managers requires some real common-sense tweaking.
I first became aware of the potential problems with the board's management mandate in 2016 when a colleague of mine, a member from Victoria, sent me an email detailing severe human rights abuses at a mining site in Eritrea that was owned by a Canadian mining company. The email further detailed that the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board was a significant shareholder in the Canadian mining company and was at least indirectly tied to the abuse occurring at the Bisha mining site in Eritrea. My staff and I were shocked as we unearthed more information about the abuses. Military personnel were being employed to basically keep the mine workers in a state of slave labour, and this included arbitrary arrests and detentions and even killing workers who were not producing desired results. I seriously wondered how this was possible. How could the fund that Canadians pay into to secure their retirement be used to support such obvious and tragic human rights abuses?
As my staff and I continued to study the question, the answer started to become clear. The mandate of the Canadian Pension Plan Investment Board, with a huge fund of over $400 billion, 1,500 full-time employees and offices on three continents, was to make as much money as it possibly could through its investments, with very little holding it back. This is its mandate, as defined by the CPPIB Act:
(c) to invest its assets with a view to achieving a maximum rate of return, without undue risk of loss, having regard to the factors that may affect the funding of the Canada Pension Plan and the ability of the Canada Pension Plan to meet its financial obligations on any given business day.
As members can see, the only limitation, to put it in plain English, is this: Do not lose any money.
We thought there must be some certainty, with all these restrictions, on how this board could invest the monies of hard-working Canadians. We continued through the act and researched the board's internal documentation, but we could find no restrictions at all. What we did find were guidelines, committees and policies, none of which were binding and none of which seemed to have much of an effect on the enormous number of investment decisions made by the board. More and more, the board's investment oversight seemed to be a function of its PR department rather than anything related to the operational and investment departments.
Shortly after receiving the email from my colleague, I attended a meeting at the parliamentary finance committee at which the representatives of the CPPIB, including its president, were scheduled to appear. I decided to take some of my own concerns and questions directly to them. I asked them if they were aware the mining company they had invested in to the tune of one and a half million shares was engaged in supplying labour to the Bisha mine under conditions that have been described as slave labour. I also asked if they could describe the measures and procedures they have in place to ensure that they avoid investing in companies linked to human rights violations.
I think the CPPIB representatives were caught off guard and unprepared for such a line of questioning. The answers I received were what we would expect from a company president or a company lawyer when they really do not have a good answer: empty and hollow allusions to guidelines and good intentions. However, I did get a promise that someone from the board would follow up and give me a more detailed answer in the days following the committee meeting.
What I ended up getting was a letter from their chief PR person. In this letter, he spouted some vague commitment to being good corporate citizens, but also said this:
Nevsun Resources represents one of approximately 2,500 public companies we are invested in around the world. As at March 31, 2016, CPP Investment Board held 1,519,000 shares in Nevsun Resources totalling a market value of $6 million. We sold much of our position since our last reporting period and our current exposure to the company totals less than $1 million....
I was a bit dumbfounded by this response. The letter seemed to be saying that, because it invested in so many companies worldwide, it could not possibly know what was going on with them. This hardly seems to be a reasonable approach. I was even more shocked by the dubious logic. It is like saying now we are only 20% responsible for investing in a company that is killing its workers, which does not add up and it defies any kind of common sense. I do not think it is something most Canadians would believe.
This is a very important bill. Right now, the CPPIB, which again is responsible for the fund that hard-working Canadians contribute to every year, is investing in companies involved in weapons manufacturing, private for-profit American prisons that detain immigrants and children, companies that are guilty of serious human rights violations and companies responsible for contributing to the global climate crisis.
Is it unreasonable to expect that an organization dedicated to investing public funds should do so with some types of ethical restrictions? I do not think so, and I think many Canadians would agree. What we want and what this bill seeks to do is to have the Canadian Pension Plan Investment Board take a proactive approach of due diligence in its investment policies, leveraging our more than $400-billion pension fund by investing only in companies with ethical business practices and divesting from those that create weapons of war, contribute to climate change and other environmental problems or oppress people around the world through unethical labour practices and human rights violations.
It makes no sense to me, and I think to most Canadians, that the government should not be able to do something about questionable investments made by funds that are governed by acts of Parliament. The situation with Revera long-term care homes is a good case in point. Revera is a for-profit company, wholly owned by the Public Sector Pension Investment Board, an entity created by the federal government to manage pension funds from public sector workers. Revera has been roundly criticized for the mismanagement of its homes, especially during the pandemic.
During the first wave of COVID-19, its homes had the most number of deaths in the industry, and during the second wave, it is again seeing significant outbreaks in its homes across the country. CBC has just announced that Revera had another 100 outbreaks of COVID-19 this morning, including 50 of its workers. There is a course of complaints from its workers about understaffing, a lack of PPE, and overtime and pandemic bonuses are not even being paid.
The problems at Revera are the same that we have found throughout the for-profit, long-term care sector right across the country. It is a model that does not work for guaranteeing the safety of our loved ones. As with some other problematic investments of the CPPIB, it is a problem that the government can do something about.
As Canadians who pay into the fund, which is managed by the CPPIB, we are, by extension, all shareholders in the companies that benefit from the fund's investments. A lot of influence can be had by divesting from companies that conduct themselves in a way that we view as objectionable or unethical. By amending section 35 of the CPPIB Act, which is what this bill seeks to achieve, we can require the board to take a proactive approach to ethical investment, and I am sure that is what Canadians want.
Today, I have heard that a lot of people here believe in the bill in principle, and I encourage us all to work together. Let us move the bill forward and get it passed. I encourage all my colleagues to support the bill today.
Madame la Présidente, je suis ravi de m'exprimer sur le projet de loi C-231. Je suis très heureux que ce dernier ait été présenté, car il aborde comment les fonds dans les régimes parrainés par le gouvernement fédéral seront investis dans l'intérêt de tous les Canadiens, un enjeu crucial. Je tiens à souligner le travail exceptionnel accompli par mon collègue de Cowichan—Malahat—Langford et son personnel afin de présenter ce projet de loi à la Chambre.
Le projet de loi porte sur l'approche privilégiée par l'Office d'investissement du régime de pensions du Canada, qui est chargé d'investir les fonds qui seront versés aux prestataires du Régime de pensions du Canada pendant de nombreuses années. Il est très important que ces fonds soient bien gérés, car le bien-être futur des travailleurs et des retraités canadiens en dépend. Par contre, l'approche en matière d'investissement des gestionnaires de fonds selon laquelle tous les coups sont permis doit être sérieusement repensée pour tenir compte du gros bon sens.
Je me suis rendu compte pour la première fois qu'un problème se posait avec le mandat de gestion de l'Office d'investissement du régime de pensions du Canada en 2016, quand un de mes collègues, un député de Victoria, m'a envoyé un courriel faisant état des graves violations des droits de la personne qui se produisaient sur un site d'exploitation minière en Érythrée, appartenant à une société minière canadienne. Dans le courriel, on précisait également que l'Office d'investissement du régime de pensions du Canada était un actionnaire majoritaire de cette société minière et que, par conséquent, il était à tout le moins indirectement associé aux violations commises à la mine Bisha, en Érythrée. Mon personnel et moi étions tous scandalisés lorsque nous en avons appris davantage au sujet des violations. Des militaires avaient été embauchés pour veiller à ce que les travailleurs soient essentiellement maintenus dans un état d'esclavage: les travailleurs étaient entre autres arrêtés et détenus pour des motifs arbitraires, et certains étaient même tués s'ils ne produisaient pas les résultats voulus. Je me suis sincèrement demandé comment tout cela était possible. Comment se pouvait-il que le fonds auquel les Canadiens cotisaient pour assurer leur retraite soit utilisé pour financer des violations des droits de la personne aussi évidentes et tragiques?
La réponse à cette question est devenue évidente à mesure que nous avons continué d'examiner la situation. Le mandat de l'Office d'investissement du régime de pensions du Canada, qui dispose d'un énorme fonds de plus de 400 milliards de dollars, de 1 500 employés à temps plein et de bureaux sur trois continents, est d'optimiser le rendement des investissements, peu importe ce que cela implique. La mission de l'Office, telle que définie par la Loi sur l’Office d’investissement du régime de pensions du Canada, est la suivante:
c) de placer son actif en vue d’un rendement maximal tout en évitant des risques de perte indus et compte tenu des facteurs pouvant avoir un effet sur le financement du Régime de pensions du Canada ainsi que sur son aptitude à s’acquitter, chaque jour ouvrable, de ses obligations financières.
Comme les députés peuvent le constater, la seule contrainte, c'est, en bon français, de ne pas perdre d'argent.
Nous croyions qu'il devait certainement exister des restrictions entourant la manière dont l'Office investit l'argent durement gagné par les travailleurs canadiens. Nous avons continué à étudier le texte de loi et les documents internes de l'Office, mais nous n'avons trouvé aucune contrainte à cet égard. Il y a des lignes directrices, des comités et des politiques, mais rien de tout cela n'est contraignant et rien ne semble avoir une incidence quelconque sur les innombrables décisions d'investissements prises par l'Office. Il nous est apparu progressivement que la surveillance exercée sur les investissements de l'Office est une fonction de son service de relations publiques et n'a rien à voir avec son secteur des activités et des investissements.
Peu après avoir reçu ce courriel de mon collègue, j'ai assisté à une réunion du comité parlementaire des finances à laquelle les représentants de l'Office, dont son président, devaient comparaître. J'en ai profité pour leur faire part de certaines de mes préoccupations et leur poser directement certaines questions. Je leur ai demandé s'ils savaient que la société minière dans laquelle ils avaient investi à hauteur d'un million et demi d'actions employait des ouvriers à la mine de Bisha dans des conditions de travail considérées comme constituant de l'esclavage. Je leur ai aussi demandé s'ils pouvaient décrire les mesures et les procédures qu'ils avaient mises en place pour éviter d'investir dans des entreprises liées à des violations des droits de la personne.
Je pense que mes questions ont pris les représentants de l'Office au dépourvu. J'ai reçu les réponses auxquelles on peut s'attendre de la part du président ou de l'avocat d'une entreprise quand ils n'ont pas vraiment de réponse qui tienne la route: de vagues et insipides allusions à des lignes directrices et à de bonnes intentions. J'ai quand même reçu la promesse qu'un membre du conseil d'administration assurerait un suivi et me donnerait une réponse plus détaillée dans les jours suivant la réunion du comité.
J'ai fini par recevoir une lettre de leur responsable des relations publiques. Dans cette lettre, il s'engageait vaguement à ce que leur société se comporte comme une bonne entreprise citoyenne, mais déclarait aussi ceci:
Nevsun Resources est l'une des quelque 2 500 sociétés ouvertes dans lesquelles nous investissons partout dans le monde. En date du 31 mars 2016, l'Office d'investissement du régime de pensions du Canada détenait 1 519 000 actions de Nevsun Resources, pour une valeur marchande de 6 millions de dollars. Depuis notre dernière période de déclaration, nous avons vendu la plupart de nos actions et notre part actuelle dans la société représente moins de 1 million de dollars [...]
Cette réponse m'a quelque peu renversé. Dans la lettre, l'Office semblait sous-entendre que, étant donné qu'il investissait dans tellement d'entreprises dans le monde, il lui était absolument impossible de savoir ce qu'elles faisaient toutes. Cette approche ne semble vraiment pas raisonnable. J'ai été encore plus choqué par la logique douteuse dont il faisait preuve. C'est comme s'il se félicitait parce qu'il ne finançait maintenant qu'à hauteur de 20 % une société qui tue ses travailleurs, ce qui est aberrant et défie le bon sens. À mon avis, la plupart des Canadiens ne partageraient pas cette façon de voir les choses.
Il s'agit d'un projet de loi très important. Actuellement, l'Office d'investissement du régime de pensions du Canada, qui, je le répète, est responsable du fonds auquel des travailleurs canadiens cotisent chaque année, investit dans des entreprises qui fabriquent des armes, des prisons étatsuniennes privées à but lucratif où l'on détient des immigrants et des enfants, des entreprises coupables de graves violations des droits de la personne et des entreprises qui contribuent à la crise climatique mondiale.
Est-il déraisonnable de s'attendre à ce qu'un organisme responsable d'investir des fonds publics s'acquitte de son rôle tout en respectant certaines limites fixées par l'éthique? Je ne le pense pas, et je suis d'avis que de nombreux Canadiens seraient d'accord avec moi. Ce que nous voulons et ce que ce projet de loi cherche vise, c'est faire en sorte que l'Office d'investissement du régime de pensions du Canada adopte une approche proactive de diligence raisonnable dans ses politiques d'investissement, en se servant de notre fonds de pension de plus de 400 milliards de dollars pour investir uniquement dans des entreprises qui ont des pratiques commerciales éthiques et en cessant de financer les entreprises qui fabriquent des armes de guerre, qui contribuent aux changements climatiques et à d'autres problèmes environnementaux, ou encore qui oppriment des personnes où que ce soit dans le monde au moyen de pratiques de travail non éthiques et de violations des droits de la personne.
Je ne comprends pas, et j'imagine que la plupart des Canadiens ne comprennent pas non plus, pourquoi le gouvernement ne serait pas en mesure d'intervenir en cas de placements douteux faits par des fonds régis par des lois du Parlement. La situation avec les établissements de soins de longue durée Revera en est un bon exemple. Revera est une société à but lucratif, appartenant entièrement à l'Office d'investissement des régimes de pensions du secteur public, une entité créée par le gouvernement fédéral pour gérer les fonds de pension des travailleurs du secteur public. Revera a été critiquée sans ambages pour sa mauvaise gestion de ses établissements de soins, surtout pendant la pandémie.
Durant la première vague de COVID-19, c'est dans les foyers Revera qu'il y a eu le plus grand nombre de décès dans le secteur des établissements de soins de longue durée. Maintenant, durant la deuxième vague, il y a encore une fois des éclosions importantes dans les foyers Revera dans l'ensemble du pays. CBC vient d'annoncer qu'on a dépisté 100 nouveaux cas de COVID-19 dans les foyers Revera ce matin, dont 50 chez les employés. Les employés se plaignent d'un manque de personnel et d'une pénurie d'équipement de protection individuelle. De plus, il ne sont pas payer pour leurs heures supplémentaires et ils ne reçoivent aucune prime pour leur travail en temps de pandémie.
Les problèmes qui ont été relevés aux foyers Revera sont les mêmes qui se posent dans l'ensemble du secteur des établissements de soins de longue durée à but lucratif du Canada. Il s'agit d'un modèle qui ne permet tout simplement pas de garantir la sécurité de nos êtres chers. Le gouvernement peut faire quelque chose pour remédier à cette situation, comme c'est le cas pour d'autres placements problématiques réalisés par l'Office d'investissement des régimes de pensions du secteur public.
En tant que Canadiens cotisant au fonds, qui est géré par l’Office d’investissement du régime de pensions du Canada, nous sommes, par extension, tous des actionnaires dans les entreprises qui bénéficient des placements du fonds. Nous pouvons exercer une influence considérable en nous dessaisissant de nos investissements dans des entreprises qui se comportent de façon répréhensible ou contraire à l'éthique. En modifiant l'article 35 de la Loi sur l’Office d’investissement du régime de pensions du Canada, ce que le projet de loi vise à faire, nous pouvons obliger l'Office à adopter une approche proactive pour favoriser des placements éthiques. Je suis certain que c'est ce que désirent les Canadiens.
Aujourd'hui, j'ai entendu beaucoup de députés dire qu'ils croient au principe du projet de loi. Je nous encourage donc tous à unir nos efforts pour faire adopter le projet de loi. J'encourage tous mes collègues à appuyer le projet de loi aujourd'hui.
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
View Don Davies Profile
2020-12-03 11:58 [p.2895]
Madam Speaker, yesterday, the leader of the NDP called for the creation of a Crown corporation that would produce vaccines and essential medications in Canada. Of course, all Canadians were greatly disappointed to see the Prime Minister acknowledge in November that we do not have the capacity to produce vaccines in this country. That leads us to be vulnerable. Other countries produce vaccines and drugs, accelerating access to vaccines for their citizens, as opposed to Canadians.
Does my hon. colleague agree that Canada should cure this defect and ensure that we have the domestic capacity to produce life-saving vaccines and essential medication here in Canada for Canadians?
Madame la Présidente, hier, le chef du NPD a réclamé la création d'une société d'État qui serait chargée de produire les médicaments et les vaccins essentiels dont le pays a besoin. Je ne crois pas avoir besoin de préciser à quel point les Canadiens ont été déçus d'entendre le premier ministre dire en novembre que le Canada n'a pas les moyens de produire ses propres vaccins, ce qui le rend vulnérable. Les pays qui produisent des vaccins et des médicaments sur leur territoire pressent le pas afin que ces vaccins soient offerts le plus rapidement possible, mais d'abord à leurs citoyens, pas aux Canadiens.
Mon collègue estime-t-il lui aussi que le Canada devrait remédier à la situation et faire le nécessaire pour qu'il puisse produire lui-même les vaccins et les médicaments essentiels dont il a besoin pour sauver la vie de ses citoyens, les Canadiens?
View Yves-François Blanchet Profile
BQ (QC)
Madam Speaker, I have nothing against the idea of ensuring that Canada and Quebec are able to manufacture vaccines right here.
The facilities exist, and the government has invested in other facilities that will increase our vaccine manufacturing capacity.
Is a Crown corporation the way to do it?
I am not a fan of big centralizing bodies. However, the pharmaceutical industry has evolved a lot in recent decades. Canada's pharmaceutical industry is hurting because it has fallen behind and now relies on the innovation of independent laboratories and academic institutions. Pharmaceutical companies then purchase the rights and manufacture them.
This is something that the government should be investing in, not taking charge itself.
Madame la Présidente, je n'ai rien contre l'objectif de s'assurer que, sur le territoire canadien et québécois, on est capable de produire des vaccins.
Il existe déjà des installations, et le gouvernement a investi dans d'autres installations qui vont augmenter la capacité de production de vaccins.
Est-ce que c'est une société de la Couronne?
D'une part, je me méfie un peu des grandes organisations centralisatrices. D'autre part, l'industrie pharmaceutique a énormément évolué dans les dernières décennies. Cela a fait mal au Canada sur le plan de son industrie pharmaceutique, car celle-ci se fie maintenant à l'innovation qui est créée par des laboratoires indépendants et des établissements universitaires. Les pharmaceutiques achètent ensuite les droits et procèdent à la fabrication.
Cette dynamique demande une stimulation de la part de l'État, non pas une substitution de l'État.
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
2020-12-03 12:02 [p.2896]
Madam Speaker, I will be splitting my time with the hon. member for Vancouver Kingsway.
I want to begin by talking about the situation that we find ourselves in right now.
These are obviously difficult times. Many people are worried, and we understand why. The Liberal government has totally failed in its responsibility to create a plan for this pandemic. Generally speaking, the fear we are seeing is related to the fact that successive Liberal and Conservative governments have always forced families to bear the burden by cutting the services they needed. That is the history of those two parties.
The other problem is that the Liberal and Conservative parties are too close to big business. In this case, it is clear that the Liberal government is too close to the pharmaceutical companies. The Prime Minister and the Liberals gave $1 billion in contracts to big pharmaceutical companies and did not ensure that the vaccines needed to protect people against COVID-19 could be produced here in Canada. Canadians are having to wait even longer to get the vaccine because of the Liberals. As a result, more people are going to become ill and potentially die from COVID-19.
In the United States and the United Kingdom, vaccines will be available this week. However, in Canada, the only thing we know for sure is that we are receiving six million doses in March, which is enough for three million people. The problem is, that is not even enough to vaccinate everyone over 70. There are 4.5 million seniors in Canada over the age of 70, not to mention high-risk individuals such as health professionals, essential workers and indigenous peoples. The government must ensure that we have the capacity to make our own vaccines and essential medications for Canadians.
This pandemic has shown that we must not rely on production from other countries during emergencies. As a result of the Liberal government's lack of preparation, Canadians will have to wait even longer to get a COVID-19 vaccine.
Past Conservative governments privatized labs and vaccine manufacturers, effectively preventing Canadians from having access to a vaccine and essential medications. Despite being in power for decades, Liberal governments have not restored this capacity to produce vaccines and medications here in Canada.
The fact is that the Liberal government has completely failed to lay out a plan. It does not have a plan to address the major question of the pandemic, which is about rolling out the vaccine. The Liberals are going to talk about the fact that they have the best access to vaccines and have some of the best plans, but they have not published their plan.
Australia, a country very similar to Canada in resources and size, has the entire plan for its vaccine rollout on its website. The Liberals might say that they do not know which vaccine will be successful. Australia factored that in. It has included all potential scenarios. If one vaccine is successful, it has a plan; if another is successful, it has a plan. It talks about who will get it and when they will get it. That is what a government should do.
The Liberal government has completely failed to lay out a clear plan. There is no question about that. What is even worse is that the most we know about the plan the Liberal government is proposing is that the first round of vaccines, coming possibly in March, will only be enough to cover three million Canadians.
We know, based on Canada's census, there are over four and a half million Canadian seniors over the age of 70. There is certainly not enough medication to cover all of the vulnerable seniors, let alone all of the front-line workers and the indigenous communities at high risk. What is the plan? This is a simple request that the government has failed to answer.
It has failed to roll out a clear plan of when everyone will be vaccinated and who will be vaccinated. People want to know the answers to these questions. This will give hope to Canadians who are worried, who are wondering what is going to happen and what the future looks like. The fact that the government could not lay out a clear plan with clear details is a failure in leadership.
Another problem that we saw at the beginning of this pandemic was that we could not produce some of the most important essential equipment that we needed. It came to light that the protective equipment we needed to provide to our front-line workers was in short supply. We relied on a supply chain that was broken, and Canadians were not able to access protective equipment.
People were outraged that the 10th largest economy in the world did not have the ability to produce masks, gowns and sanitizers. I am very proud of the fact that Canadian companies mobilized and were able to turn that around and start producing these locally, but it is a clear failure in policy if a country is not able to produce the medical equipment it needs.
What has become even more troubling is that we do not have the capacity, as the 10th largest economy in the world, to produce our own medications or vaccines. Here is where we have to be very clear about who is to blame. There is absolutely no question that Conservative governments in the past privatized our public companies, the companies owned by us that produced vaccines in Canada. Their policies effectively eliminated all the production capacity to make vaccines in Canada. That is their responsibility. By the same token, the Liberals were in power for decades and failed to restore our capacity to manufacture and produce vaccines and medications.
Let me give a really clear example, one that should startle people. One of the prides of Canada is the fact that Connaught, owned by Canadians, was where insulin was made. The medical breakthrough on insulin was made in Canada and we owned it. We created it and owned the ability to produce it, and we produced it at an affordable rate. As an example, which is not a public or private example but strictly Canada versus the U.S., one vial of insulin, the homologue version, costs $32 in Canada and $300 in the U.S.: 10 times the cost. People from the States come to Canada to get medications because they are so much more affordable here. We not only discovered but made insulin in Canada, and the Conservatives privatized Connaught.
Connaught was also the key player in many vaccines that were discovered. In fact, the reason why Connaught was developed in the first place, and I am sure the irony will not be lost on members, is because a diphtheria outbreak meant that people needed a vaccine. Canada found that it was far too expensive to buy: private companies were charging too much, so it was decided to make it here in Canada. History has a habit of repeating itself. We are now faced with a pandemic, and we do not have the capacity to make the vaccine in our own country. We need to make it in our own country.
We need to be able to restore our capacity to make this here at home. We need to be able to make vaccines in Canada, so New Democrats are proposing the creation of a public Crown corporation: a company owned by us. Just as we own electricity and roads in many jurisdictions, we should own the ability to make vaccines and medications in our country. It is a question of sovereignty and the ability to protect our citizens. We are the 10th largest economy in the world and should absolutely be able to make critical, vital medications and vaccines in our own country. That is our proposition. To undo the wrongs of the Conservatives and the Liberals, we need to move forward and restore our ability to manufacture medications here in our own country.
Madame la Présidente, je partagerai mon temps de parole avec le député de Vancouver-Kingsway.
Je tiens à parler d’abord de la situation dans laquelle nous nous trouvons.
Nous vivons des temps difficile, c'est évident. Beaucoup de gens sont inquiets, et on peut le comprendre. En effet, le gouvernement libéral n'a absolument pas assumé sa responsabilité de mettre sur pied un plan relatif à cette pandémie. En général, la peur qui existe est liée au fait que les gouvernements libéraux et conservateurs qui se sont succédé ont toujours fait payer la facture aux familles, en coupant dans les services dont elles avaient besoin. C'était l'histoire de ces deux partis.
L'autre problème, c'est que les partis libéraux et conservateurs sont trop liés avec les grandes entreprises. Dans ce cas, il est clair que le gouvernement libéral est trop lié avec les entreprises pharmaceutiques. Le premier ministre et les libéraux ont donné 1 milliard de dollars de contrats à de grandes compagnies pharmaceutiques et ne se sont pas assurés que les vaccins nécessaires pour protéger les gens contre la COVID-19 peuvent être produits ici, au Canada. À cause des libéraux, les gens doivent attendre encore plus longtemps pour obtenir un vaccin. On laisse ainsi plus de gens tomber malades et potentiellement mourir de la COVID-19.
Aux États-Unis et au Royaume-Uni, des vaccins seront disponibles dès cette semaine. Pourtant, au Canada, la seule information confirmée que nous avons, c'est que nous recevrons 6 millions de doses en mars, ce qui est suffisant pour seulement 3 millions de personnes. Le problème, c'est que ce n'est même pas suffisant pour vacciner les gens de plus de 70 ans. Au Canada, 4,5 millions de Canadiens et de Canadiennes sont âgés de plus de 70 ans, sans parler des personnes à risque, comme les professionnels de la santé, les travailleurs et les travailleuses essentiels et les Autochtones. Le gouvernement doit s'assurer que le Canada a la capacité de fabriquer ici même des vaccins et des médicaments essentiels pour la population canadienne.
Cette pandémie a montré que les gens ne doivent pas dépendre de la production d'autres pays lors des situations d'urgence. À cause du manque de préparation du gouvernement libéral, les Canadiennes et les Canadiens seront obligés d'attendre encore plus longtemps pour obtenir un vaccin contre la COVID-19.
Par le passé, les gouvernements conservateurs ont privatisé les laboratoires et les fabricants de vaccin, empêchant ainsi la population canadienne d'avoir accès à un vaccin et à des médicaments essentiels. Malgré des décennies de pouvoir, les gouvernements libéraux n'ont pas restauré cette capacité à produire les vaccins et les médicaments ici, au Canada.
Le fait est que le gouvernement fédéral n’a absolument pas réussi à présenter un plan. Il n’a pas de plan pour s’attaquer à l’enjeu majeur de la pandémie, à savoir le déploiement de vaccins. Les libéraux vont dire qu’ils ont le meilleur accès aux vaccins et que leur plan figure parmi les meilleurs, mais ils ne l’ont pas publié.
L’Australie, un pays qui ressemble beaucoup au Canada par ses ressources et sa taille, a publié sur son site Web l’ensemble de son plan de déploiement des vaccins. Les libéraux pourraient dire qu’ils ne savent pas quel vaccin sera efficace. L’Australie en a tenu compte. Elle a prévu tous les scénarios possibles. Si un vaccin est efficace, elle a un plan; si un autre est efficace, elle a un plan qui précise qui va l’obtenir et à quel moment. C’est ce qu’un gouvernement devrait faire.
Le gouvernement libéral a complètement échoué à présenter un plan clair. Cela ne fait aucun doute. Pire encore, tout ce que nous savons du plan du gouvernement libéral, c’est que la première ronde de vaccins, qui pourrait venir en mars, ne suffira qu’à couvrir trois millions de Canadiens.
Le recensement nous apprend que le Canada compte plus de quatre millions et demi de personnes âgées de plus de 70 ans. Il n’y a certainement pas assez de doses pour couvrir toutes les personnes âgées vulnérables, sans compter les travailleurs de première ligne et les collectivités autochtones à haut risque. Quel est le plan? Il s’agit d’une question simple à laquelle le gouvernement n’a pas répondu.
Il a échoué à présenter un plan clair indiquant quand tout le monde sera vacciné et qui sera vacciné. Les gens veulent connaître les réponses à ces questions. Ces réponses donneront de l’espoir aux Canadiens qui sont inquiets, qui se demandent ce qui va se passer et à quoi ressemblera l’avenir. Le fait que le gouvernement n’ait pas réussi à présenter un plan clair comportant des détails précis est un échec en matière de leadership.
Un autre problème que nous avons observé au début de cette pandémie tient au fait que nous ne pouvions pas produire une partie de l’équipement essentiel le plus important dont nous avions besoin. Nous avons appris que l’équipement de protection que nous devions fournir à nos travailleurs de première ligne était en nombre insuffisant. Nous comptions sur une chaîne d’approvisionnement qui était rompue, et les Canadiens n’avaient pas accès à l’équipement de protection.
Les gens étaient scandalisés d’apprendre que la 10e économie mondiale n’avait pas la capacité de produire des masques, des blouses et des produits désinfectants. Je suis très fier que des entreprises canadiennes se soient mobilisées et aient pu renverser la vapeur et commencer à produire ces produits localement, mais il s’agit d’un échec évident de politique si un pays n’est pas capable de produire l’équipement médical dont il a besoin.
Ce qui est devenu encore plus troublant, c’est que nous n’avons pas la capacité, en tant que 10e économie mondiale, de produire nos propres médicaments ou vaccins. C’est ici que nous devons être très clairs en ce qui concerne les personnes à blâmer. Il ne fait absolument aucun doute que les gouvernements conservateurs du passé ont privatisé nos entreprises publiques, les entreprises qui nous appartenaient et qui produisaient des vaccins au Canada. Les politiques des conservateurs ont concrètement éliminé toute la capacité de production de vaccins au Canada. Ils en sont responsables. De même, les libéraux ont été au pouvoir pendant des dizaines d’années et ils n’ont pas réussi à rétablir notre capacité de fabrication et de production de vaccins et de médicaments.
Je me permets de citer un exemple très clair, un exemple qui devrait faire sursauter les gens. L’une des fiertés du Canada est le fait que Connaught, une entreprise appartenant à des Canadiens, était un fabricant d’insuline. La percée médicale relative à l’insuline a été faite au Canada; c'est nous qui l'avons découverte. Nous l’avons créée et nous possédions la capacité de la produire, ce que nous faisions à un prix abordable. Par exemple, et ce n’est pas un exemple opposant le secteur public au secteur privé, mais simplement le Canada par rapport aux États-Unis, un flacon d’insuline, la version homologue, coûte 32 $ au Canada et 300 $ aux États-Unis, soit 10 fois plus. Des Américains viennent au Canada pour acheter des médicaments parce qu’ils sont beaucoup plus abordables ici. Non seulement nous avons découvert l’insuline, mais nous la fabriquions au Canada, et les conservateurs ont privatisé Connaught.
Connaught a aussi joué un rôle clé dans la découverte de nombreux vaccins. En réalité, la raison première de la création de Connaught, et je suis sûr que les députés ne manqueront pas de voir l’ironie, c’est qu’une épidémie de diphtérie a fait que les gens avaient besoin d’un vaccin. Le Canada a constaté qu’il était beaucoup trop cher à l’achat: des entreprises privées exigeaient un prix beaucoup trop élevé. Il a donc été décidé de le produire ici au Canada. L’histoire a tendance à se répéter. Nous sommes maintenant confrontés à une pandémie et nous n’avons pas la capacité de produire le vaccin dans notre propre pays. Nous devons le produire dans notre pays.
Nous devons être en mesure de rétablir notre capacité à le produire ici, chez nous. Nous devons être en mesure de produire des vaccins au Canada. C’est pourquoi les néo-démocrates proposent la création d'une société d’État, une société qui nous appartiendrait. Tout comme l’électricité et les routes nous appartiennent dans bien des provinces et des territoires, nous devrions posséder la capacité de produire des vaccins et des médicaments dans notre pays. Il en va de notre souveraineté et de notre capacité à protéger nos citoyens. Nous sommes la 10e économie dans le monde et nous devrions sans équivoque pouvoir produire des médicaments et des vaccins essentiels et vitaux dans notre propre pays. C’est ce que nous proposons. Pour réparer les torts causés par les conservateurs et les libéraux, nous devons aller de l’avant et rétablir notre capacité à produire des médicaments ici, dans notre propre pays.
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
View Don Davies Profile
2020-12-03 12:15 [p.2898]
Madam Speaker, I want to thank my hon. colleague for his leadership in addressing what is, I think, a profound failure in public policy by successive Conservative and Liberal governments.
As he pointed out, it was the Conservative government in 1986, the Mulroney government, that privatized Connaught Labs, which had performed a valuable public health service to this country by producing essential vaccines and insulin for millions of Canadians. Of course, the Liberals have had 18 years in government since then, 16 of those in majority, to reverse that policy. Instead, both governments presided over the slide in Canada's pharmaceutical production capacity.
Can he tell us in the House what the impact would be on Canadians' public health if a Crown corporation had a drug manufacturer, going forward?
Madame la Présidente, je remercie mon collègue du leadership dont il a fait preuve en dénonçant ce qui, à mon avis, est un échec lamentable en matière de politique publique de la part des gouvernements conservateurs et libéraux qui se sont succédé.
Comme mon collègue l'a souligné, c'est le gouvernement conservateur dirigé par M. Mulroney qui, en 1986, a privatisé les laboratoires Connaught, qui avaient jusque là rendu un précieux service au Canada en matière de santé publique en fabriquant des vaccins et de l'insuline, produits essentiels à des millions de Canadiens. Par ailleurs, étant donné que les libéraux ont été 18 ans au pouvoir depuis lors et qu'ils ont dirigé un gouvernement majoritaire pendant 16 ans, ils auraient pu modifier cette politique. Au lieu de cela, deux gouvernements libéraux ont présidé à la baisse graduelle de la capacité de production pharmaceutique du Canada.
Le député peut-il dire à la Chambre quelle serait l'incidence sur la santé publique des Canadiens si, à l'avenir, une société d'État possédait un fabricant de médicaments?
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
2020-12-03 12:16 [p.2898]
Madam Speaker, I want to first thank the member for Vancouver Kingsway for the idea itself. We were having a discussion about what we could move forward on, and the member is a big part of why we are making this announcement.
This would be vital. Members can imagine the outrage that Canadians felt when we could not produce basic masks, gowns and protective equipment. Canadians feel that same outrage right now. They think about the fact that a country as wealthy and as advanced as Canada cannot make vaccines and medication for its own population and the fact that, since we do not have capacity, we are going to have to wait until other countries produce for us to receive.
The ability to make it here in Canada, and to have our own company where we can make medication and vaccines in Canada, would be life-changing. It would open up the door for us to have national universal pharmacare that is fully public. It would make it easier. It would make sure that millions of Canadians who are struggling with the cost of medication would not have to worry, and right now in this pandemic, it would have meant that we would have gotten through this more easily.
Madame la Présidente, je tiens d'abord à remercier le député de Vancouver Kingsway d'en avoir eu l'idée. Nous discutions des mesures que nous pourrions présenter, et c'est en grande partie grâce au député que nous faisons cette annonce.
Ce sera d'une importance cruciale. Les députés peuvent imaginer l'indignation ressentie par les Canadiens lorsqu'ils ont su que nous ne pouvons pas produire des masques, des chemises d'hôpital et de l'équipement de protection de base. Les Canadiens sont tout aussi outrés en ce moment. Ils songent au fait qu'un pays aussi riche et avancé que le Canada ne peut pas fabriquer des vaccins et des médicaments pour sa propre population et que cette incapacité nous obligera à attendre que d'autres pays produisent ce dont nous avons besoin.
Cela changerait complètement la donne si le Canada avait la capacité de fabriquer ses propres médicaments et ses propres vaccins et si une entreprise canadienne pouvait s'en charger. Cela ouvrirait la voie à la création d'un régime national d'assurance-médicaments universel qui soit entièrement public. Cela faciliterait les choses. On pourrait ainsi s'assurer que les millions de Canadians qui peinent à se payer des médicaments n'aient plus à s'inquiéter. À l'heure actuelle, en pleine pandémie, cela nous aurait permis de nous en sortir plus facilement.
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
View Don Davies Profile
2020-12-03 12:18 [p.2898]
Madam Speaker, it is a privilege to speak to the important motion introduced today by my colleague from Calgary Nose Hill. I think I speak for all of us in the House when I say 2020 has been an incredibly challenging year, not only, of course profoundly, from a health point of view but also from an economic point of view. It is a fair comment to say 2020 has been unprecedented, really one year in a century, when it comes to the intersection of a public health crisis with a massive economic shock.
On a personal level, there has been incredible suffering and sacrifice by Canadians in every community in our country. Over 12,000 families have lost loved ones. There has been incredible isolation, with family members being separated and kept apart: children from their aged parents, sometimes spouses from partners and sometimes grandparents from grandchildren. Seniors have been left alone, isolated, sometimes in long-term care centres separated from their closest family members, and some have died alone without the comfort of family members around them.
We have had incredible job losses, income challenges and displacement, and the economic devastation many businesses have felt across this country is something that will be felt for years to come.
However, there is hope. The global search for an effective vaccine is showing great promise. Along with a potential treatment, this is really the only way we will restore Canada to some semblance of normalcy. Hopefully that is a new normalcy that is better than the one it will replace.
Canadians across this country are awaiting access to a vaccine with excitement, anticipation and great optimism, but of course a vaccine has to be safe, effective and delivered as broadly and as swiftly as possible. To do this, not only parliamentarians but Canadians need transparency and information. In fact, the public is entitled to it. The public needs it. Besides it being a right for Canadians to have the most current, accurate information possible from their federal government, it is also critically important to allay fear and suspicion and to build trust and confidence.
The NDP has worked throughout the COVID pandemic to be a positive, constructive and evidence-based voice in Parliament and in our communities. We have one goal, and that is to help Canadians stay healthy and supported in the best way possible. Economically, the NDP has been responsible for at least a dozen improvements to support Canadians, ranging from increasing the CERB to $2,000 a month, to extending support to part-time and seasonal workers, and increasing the wage subsidy for small businesses to 75%. There are many other ways we worked hard and productively with the government to improve those supports.
Regarding the health side of the equation and vaccines, what do we know right now about the government's response? First, we know the Liberal government has refused to make a single vaccine contract public. In fact, it voted against a motion in the House to disclose even redacted contracts.
Second, after promising Canadians in August that we would be able to manufacture vaccines in Canada, the Prime Minister admitted in November that we have no such capacity. Worse, he had to acknowledge that this meant Canadians would get vaccines later than citizens would in countries that are producing vaccines.
Third, the Liberal government failed to negotiate in a single contract, of any of the seven contracts it signed with potential vaccine manufacturers, the right to produce a vaccine in Canada.
Fourth, as of this day, December 3, we have no detailed vaccination plan that reveals how vaccinations will be administered, by whom, or who will have priority.
Fifth, the government failed to receive promising vaccines on Canadian soil pending Health Canada approval, as Canadian law specifically allows and as is being done in other countries, like our neighbours to the south.
Sixth, the best information that we have is that Canada has secured, at most, six million doses of vaccines by April, which is enough to vaccinate only three million Canadians or about 8% of the population of our country. As the leader of our party has pointed out, we have over four million Canadians over the age of 70, so that is not even enough to vaccinate every senior over the age of 70, who are obviously in a vulnerable position.
Seventh, to this day, we do not know when vaccines are expected to arrive, how they will be distributed, which province will get them and in what amounts.
Eighth, we have no real date for herd immunity. We have a vague assurance by our Prime Minister that he hopes to immunize 50% of the population by September, but we have absolutely no evidence or data to suggest why that date has been chosen.
I know that vaccine science is complex. I acknowledge that there are things that are not yet known. We agree that some plans must await Health Canada approval. However, let us compare how the current government performs, compared with other countries, to see what is actually possible.
In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention established a vaccine readiness date of November 15 with a 24-hour rollout. It released a 75-page playbook detailing everything, including vaccine provider recruitment, vaccine storage and priority groups. The U.S. has received Pfizer vaccine to pre-position it, pending FDA approval. I will pause there. FDA has not approved the Pfizer vaccine, just like Health Canada has not approved the Pfizer vaccine. That did not stop the United States from receiving the Pfizer vaccine and having it stored, so that if and when it is approved it can roll it out immediately. Canada has not done that.
The U.S. aims to vaccinate every American who wants it by June 1, 2021. In fact, its plan is to vaccinate 20 million Americans in December and 30 million Americans every single month, meaning the U.S. will have vaccinated 110 million people, or one-third of their population, by the time we have done 8%. Finally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the U.S. signed agreements with major pharmacy chains like CVS and Walgreens to assist with vaccinations in long-term care centres.
I will turn to the U.K. It has already designated 1,250 local health clinics as vaccine sites, with targets for the number of vaccinations each week. The U.K.'s NHS has already started taking vaccine appointments, starting with long-term care residents, those over 80 and health and social workers. The U.K. government approved AstraZeneca, and the U.K. is receiving 800,000 doses of vaccine this week.
In Germany, the health minister has asked states to have vaccination centres ready by mid-December and had a national vaccination strategy ready by early November. In Australia, the government has a 12-page vaccination plan released and there are 30 million AstraZeneca doses being manufactured in that country. Brazil, India, Japan, Indonesia, China, Russia, Australia, Belgium and many other countries are producing vaccines in their countries. In Canada, our Prime Minister says we cannot.
What do we need? We need action and transparency. We need a detailed strategy and timeline for vaccinations. This does not need to be delayed until Health Canada's approval. It can and must be decided and released now.
Canadians deserve to know when the first doses will arrive, who will get vaccinated first, how vaccinations will be delivered and when they will be available to every Canadian. We would like the government to release at least basic details of our vaccine contracts. After all, Canadians paid for them.
Finally, we want to establish a public drug and vaccine manufacturer, a Crown corporation, to fix Canada's unacceptable vulnerability, so that never again will Canada have to wait for China or the United States to deliver essential medical equipment, supplies, medicine or vaccines to Canada.
We support this motion. Let us get transparent information to Canadians, so that they can know what is going to happen and we can get started with the process of vaccinations as soon as possible.
Madame la Présidente, c’est un privilège de pouvoir prendre la parole au sujet de la motion importante présentée aujourd’hui par la députée de Calgary Nose Hill. Je pense que tous les députés seront d'accord avec moi pour dire que 2020 est une année très éprouvante, non seulement sur le plan sanitaire, évidemment, mais aussi sur le plan économique. Il est juste de dire que 2020 est sans précédent depuis un siècle par cette crise de santé publique s'accompagne d’un énorme choc économique.
Sur le plan personnel, les Canadiens connaissent d’incroyables souffrances et font d’immenses sacrifices, dans toutes les collectivités de notre pays. Plus de 12 000 familles sont endeuillées. Beaucoup de Canadiens sont isolés, séparés des membres de leur famille, les enfants de leurs parents âgés, parfois les conjoints de leur partenaire et parfois aussi les grands-parents des petits-enfants. Les personnes âgées sont seules, isolées, parfois dans des centres de soins de longue durée, séparées de leurs proches, et certaines meurent sans le réconfort de la présence de membres de la famille.
Nous avons perdu un nombre incroyable d’emplois, nous avons des problèmes de revenu et de suppression de postes, et il y a les ravages économiques que beaucoup d’entreprises ressentent dans tout le pays et qui seront ressentis pendant longtemps encore.
Cependant, il y a de l’espoir. La recherche mondiale d’un vaccin efficace se révèle très prometteuse. En plus de constituer un traitement potentiel, les vaccins sont au fond la seule manière de ramener le Canada à un semblant de vie normale. Espérons que cette nouvelle normale sera meilleure que celle qu’elle remplacera.
Dans tout le pays, les Canadiens attendent avec impatience et optimisme d’avoir accès à un vaccin, mais il est évident qu’un vaccin doit être sûr, efficace et administré au plus grand nombre, le plus rapidement possible. Pour cela, non seulement les parlementaires, mais les Canadiens ont besoin de transparence et d’information. En fait, le public y a droit. Il en a besoin. En plus du fait que les Canadiens ont le droit d'attendre du gouvernement fédéral qu'il leur fournisse l’information la plus à jour et la plus précise, il est essentiel aussi d’apaiser les craintes et la suspicion et de renforcer la confiance.
Depuis le début de la pandémie de COVID-19, le NPD s'efforce d'être une voix optimiste et constructive qui s'appuie sur des données objectives, au Parlement et dans la société en général. Nous avons un but, qui est d’aider les Canadiens à rester en bonne santé à vivre. Sur le plan économique, le NPD est à l’origine d’au moins une dizaine de bonifications de l’aide apportée aux Canadiens, qu'il s'agisse de faire passer la PCU à 2 000 $ par mois, d'étendre l’aide aux travailleurs saisonniers et aux travailleurs à temps partiel ou de porter la subvention salariale à 75 % pour les petites entreprises. Nous avons collaboré de nombreuses autres façons productives avec le gouvernement pour améliorer ces mesures d'aide.
En ce qui concerne le volet sanitaire et les vaccins, que savons-nous pour l’instant de ce que fait le gouvernement? Premièrement, nous savons que le gouvernement libéral a refusé de rendre public le moindre contrat d’achat de vaccins. En fait, il s’est prononcé contre une motion à la Chambre qui demandait la communication de contrats, même caviardés.
Deuxièmement, après avoir promis aux Canadiens en août que nous pourrions fabriquer des vaccins au Canada, le premier ministre a reconnu en novembre que nous n’en avions pas la capacité. Pire, il a dû reconnaître que cela voulait dire que les Canadiens recevraient les vaccins plus tard que les citoyens des pays qui en produisent.
Troisièmement, le gouvernement libéral n’a négocié dans aucun des sept contrats qu’il a signés avec des fabricants potentiels le droit de produire un vaccin au Canada.
Quatrièmement, aujourd’hui, 3 décembre, nous n’avons aucun plan de vaccination détaillé qui révèle comment le vaccin sera administré, par qui, ou qui sera prioritaire.
Cinquièmement, le gouvernement n’a pas reçu sur le sol canadien de vaccins prometteurs en attente de l’approbation de Santé Canada, comme la loi canadienne l’autorise expressément et comme le font d’autres pays, comme nos voisins américains.
Sixièmement, selon les meilleures informations que nous ayons, le Canada a obtenu, au plus, six millions de doses de vaccin d’ici avril, ce qui ne permet de vacciner que trois millions de Canadiens, ou 8 % de la population de notre pays. Comme le chef de notre parti l’a fait remarquer, plus de quatre millions de Canadiens ont plus de 70 ans. Ce n’est donc même pas assez pour vacciner toutes les personnes âgées de plus de 70 ans, qui sont manifestement les plus vulnérables.
Septièmement, à ce jour, nous ne savons pas quand les vaccins devraient arriver, comment ils seront distribués, quelle province en obtiendra et en quelles quantités.
Huitièmement, nous n’avons aucune date réelle en ce qui concerne l’immunité collective. Le premier ministre a vaguement assuré qu’il espère immuniser la moitié de la population d’ici septembre, mais nous n’avons absolument aucune donnée factuelle ou autre qui justifie le choix de cette date.
Je sais que la vaccinologie est une science complexe. Je reconnais qu’il reste des inconnues. Nous sommes d’accord que certains plans doivent attendre l’approbation de Santé Canada. Cependant, comparons ce que fait le gouvernement à ce qui se fait dans d’autres pays pour voir ce qu’il est, en fait, possible de faire.
Aux États-Unis, les Centers for Disease Control and Prevention se sont donnés jusqu’au 15 novembre pour être prêts à vacciner, avec un déploiement en 24 heures. Ils ont publié un manuel de 75 pages où tout est détaillé, y compris le recrutement des fournisseurs de vaccins, la conservation des vaccins et les groupes prioritaires. Les États-Unis ont reçu le vaccin de Pfizer pour le prépositionner, en attendant l’approbation de la FDA. Je vais ouvrir une parenthèse. Tout comme Santé Canada, la FDA n’a pas approuvé le vaccin de Pfizer. Cela n’a pas empêché les États-Unis de recevoir ce vaccin et de l’entreposer de sorte que s’il est approuvé, il pourra être aussitôt distribué. Ce n’est pas ce que le Canada a fait.
Les États-Unis comptent vacciner tous les Américains qui le souhaitent d’ici le 1er juin 2021. En fait, ils entendent vacciner 20 millions d’Américains en décembre, puis 30 autres millions par mois, ce qui veut dire qu’ils auront vacciné 110 millions de personnes, soit le tiers de leur population, quand nous aurons vacciné 8 % de la nôtre. Enfin, les Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ont signé des accords avec de grandes chaînes de pharmacies, comme CVS et Walgreens, qui aideront à la vaccination dans les établissements de soins de longue durée.
Parlons maintenant du Royaume-Uni. Il a déjà désigné 1 250 cliniques comme lieux de vaccination, en plus d'avoir établi des objectifs quant au nombre de vaccins administrés chaque semaine. Le service de santé national du Royaume-Uni a déjà commencé à fixer des rendez-vous, en commençant par les résidants des établissements de soins de longue durée, les personnes âgées de plus de 80 ans et les travailleurs sociaux et de la santé. Le gouvernement du Royaume-Uni a homologué le vaccin d'AstraZeneca, et il en recevra 800 000 doses cette semaine.
En Allemagne, le ministre de la Santé a demandé aux États de faire en sorte que les centres de vaccination soient prêts à la mi-décembre et il a établi une stratégie de vaccination nationale au début novembre. En Australie, le gouvernement a publié un plan de vaccination de 12 pages, et 30 millions de doses du vaccin d'AstraZeneca sont fabriquées dans ce pays. Le Brésil, l'Inde, le Japon, l'Indonésie, la Chine, la Russie, l'Australie, la Belgique et beaucoup d'autres pays produisent des vaccins sur leur territoire. Au Canada, le premier ministre affirme que nous ne le pouvons pas.
De quoi avons-nous besoin? Nous avons besoin de mesures concrètes et de transparence. Nous avons besoin d'une stratégie détaillée de vaccination et d'un échéancier précis. Il n'est pas nécessaire d'attendre les décisions en matière d'homologation de Santé Canada. Un tel plan peut et doit être établi et publié maintenant.
Les Canadiens méritent de savoir quand les premières doses arriveront, quels groupes seront vaccinés en premier, comment les vaccins seront distribués et quand tous leurs concitoyens y auront accès. Nous aimerions que le gouvernement révèle à tout le moins les grandes lignes des contrats relatifs aux vaccins. Après tout, ce sont les Canadiens qui paient.
Enfin, nous voulons établir un fabricant public de médicaments et de vaccins, une société d'État, pour remédier à cette vulnérabilité inacceptable du Canada. Ainsi, le Canada n'aurait plus jamais besoin d'attendre que la Chine ou les États-Unis lui envoient des biens essentiels comme de l'équipement médical, des fournitures, des médicaments ou des vaccins.
Nous appuyons cette motion. Obtenons de l'information transparente pour les Canadiens afin qu'ils puissent savoir ce qui se passera et que nous puissions lancer le processus de vaccination le plus tôt possible.
View Heather McPherson Profile
NDP (AB)
View Heather McPherson Profile
2020-12-03 13:57 [p.2913]
Madam Speaker, like the member, I am very concerned about the care our seniors are receiving across the country, and certainly would welcome national standards that ensured that all seniors across the country receive the care that we know they deserve. One of the things that I think would provide the hope that she so desperately would like our seniors to have is knowing that, going into another pandemic, we would not be in this situation.
Would the member opposite agree that the federal government should establish a Crown corporation to manufacture vaccines and medicines for Canadians for future pandemics that we know are coming?
Madame la Présidente, tout comme la députée, je suis grandement préoccupée par les soins que reçoivent les aînés un peu partout au pays. J'accueillerais certainement d'un oeil favorable des normes nationales qui assureraient à tous les aînés du pays l'accès aux soins qu'ils méritent. Selon moi, ce qui donnerait de l'espoir aux aînés, ce que la députée souhaite désespérément, c'est de savoir que la situation ne se répéterait pas s'il y avait une autre pandémie.
La députée d'en face ne convient-elle pas que le gouvernement fédéral devrait établir une société de la Couronne responsable de la fabrication de vaccins et de médicaments destinés aux Canadiens en cas de pandémies futures, lesquelles surviendront assurément?
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
CPC (SK)
Madam Speaker, at this moment in time, what we need is transparency and accountability. We need the Liberal government to be transparent. We should not have had a prorogation for six weeks. We lost six valuable weeks knowing that we were going into a second wave.
We need the Liberals to come forward. When they are asked for help by the provinces, they need to step up. At a minimum, they need to listen to what they are saying and give the information to the premiers that they are asking for.
Madame la Présidente, en ce moment, nous avons besoin de transparence et de reddition de comptes. Le gouvernement libéral doit se montrer transparent. La prorogation de six semaines n'aurait pas dû avoir lieu. Nous avons perdu six semaines précieuses alors qu'une deuxième vague s'annonçait.
Il faut que les libéraux prennent leurs responsabilités. Lorsque les provinces leur demandent de l'aide, ils doivent intervenir. À tout le moins, ils doivent écouter ce qu'elles ont à dire et donner aux premiers ministres provinciaux les renseignements qu'ils réclament.
View Jenny Kwan Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jenny Kwan Profile
2020-12-03 16:56 [p.2934]
Madam Speaker, the Liberal government has rightly pointed out that the Conservatives seriously eroded Canada's pharmaceutical capacity. Perhaps most starkly is when the Mulroney Conservative government privatized Connaught Labs, a publicly owned laboratory that helped produce vaccines and low-cost prescriptions for Canadians. That was in 1986. Since then, the Liberals have made no move to create a public drug manufacturer despite many years of being in government.
Does the member acknowledge that this is a huge problem and, in fact, if we have our own manufacturing capacity that is publicly owned by Canadians, then we would be able to produce the vaccines locally and ensure we get the supply first?
Madame la Présidente, le gouvernement libéral a fait remarquer à juste titre que les conservateurs avaient gravement sapé la capacité de production pharmaceutique du Canada. Je citerai notamment la décision prise par le gouvernement conservateur de M. Mulroney de privatiser les laboratoires Connaught, qui fabriquaient des vaccins et des médicaments à faible coût pour les Canadiens. C’était en 1986. Depuis, malgré de nombreuses années au pouvoir, les libéraux n’ont rien fait pour mettre sur pied un système public de fabrication de médicaments au Canada.
La députée reconnaît-elle que c’est un gros problème et qu’en fait, si nous avions un système public de fabrication de médicaments au Canada, nous serions capables de produire des vaccins localement et d’être servis en premier?
View Salma Zahid Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Salma Zahid Profile
2020-12-03 16:57 [p.2934]
Madam Speaker, I know it is very important that Canadians have the vaccine when it is ready. I know that countries producing the vaccine might have it first, but Canada is ready for the vaccines as soon as they are available.
The Globe and Mail's André Picard is one of the most respected journalists covering health care in Canada. He said, “[The Leader of the Opposition]'s hindsight is 20/20. His demands that the federal government produce a precise timetable for vaccine distribution are equally fantastical.”
The government has secured access to more vaccines per capita than any other country in the world. We are ready. We have experts like Major General Dany Fortin to lead the national logistics effort. I have faith in the experts and in Canadians. Canadians will have the vaccine as soon as we have one that is safe for Canadians.
Madame la Présidente, je sais qu’il est très important que les Canadiens aient accès aux vaccins dès qu’ils seront prêts. Je sais que les pays qui les produisent peuvent être servis en premier, mais le Canada est prêt à les recevoir dès qu’ils seront disponibles.
André Picard, du Globe and Mail, est l’un des journalistes les plus respectés dans le domaine médical. Voici ce qu’il a dit: « Après coup, [le chef de l’opposition] ne risque pas de se tromper, et quand il demande que le gouvernement fédéral lui donne un calendrier précis pour la distribution des vaccins, c’est totalement irréaliste. »
Le gouvernement a réservé un plus grand nombre de vaccins par habitant que n’importe quel autre pays au monde. Nous sommes prêts. Nous avons des spécialistes comme le major général Dany Fortin pour piloter le programme logistique national. Nous avons confiance dans nos spécialistes et dans les Canadiens. Ces derniers auront accès à un vaccin dès que nous en aurons un qui est sûr.
View Paul Manly Profile
GP (BC)
View Paul Manly Profile
2020-12-03 16:58 [p.2935]
Madam Speaker, I would like to follow up on the last question.
For 70 years, Canada was a world leader in vaccine production through Connaught Labs, through a public model of vaccine development and production. Knowing what we know now, do you think it is a good idea to go back to this public ownership model, which would do the research and manufacturing, and not just leaving it up to big pharmaceutical companies? Should we have a public lab in Canada again?
Madame la Présidente, j’aimerais poursuivre la même idée.
Pendant 70 ans, le Canada a été un chef de file mondial en matière de production de vaccins grâce aux laboratoires Connaught, qui s’inscrivaient dans un modèle public de mise au point et de production de vaccins. Sachant ce que nous savons aujourd’hui, pensez-vous que ce soit une bonne idée d’en revenir au modèle public pour faire de la recherche et de la fabrication, au lieu de s’en remettre complètement aux grandes sociétés pharmaceutiques? Autrement dit, devrions-nous recréer un laboratoire public au Canada?
View Salma Zahid Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Salma Zahid Profile
2020-12-03 16:59 [p.2935]
Madam Speaker, I know Canadians need assurance that the vaccine will be there when there is a safe one available. Canada is in line. Canada has one of the best portfolios in the world for vaccine candidates. We have agreements with seven leading candidates. I am sure Canadians will have the vaccine as soon as we have it available.
Madame la Présidente, je sais que les Canadiens ont besoin d’avoir l’assurance qu’ils auront accès à un vaccin sûr dès que celui-ci sera disponible. Le Canada est en bonne position. Il a acquis l’un des meilleurs éventails de candidats vaccins au monde. Nous avons conclu des ententes avec sept grands laboratoires. Je suis sûre que les Canadiens auront accès à un vaccin dès qu’il sera disponible.
View Jenny Kwan Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jenny Kwan Profile
2020-12-03 17:26 [p.2939]
Madam Speaker, early on in the pandemic, in phase one, it was obvious that we ran into problems because we were not able to produce personal protective equipment. It was a glaring issue with respect to Canada's lack of capacity. Now we are into the vaccine stage, and it has once again shown up as a major issue that we are not able to produce our own vaccines.
In fact, it was the Conservative government that privatized Connaught Labs, which caused this problem and which has exacerbated this problem. Of course, the Liberals did not fix it in all the years that they have been in government.
Given what we have learned today, would the member support the NDP's call to have a public Crown corporation that would make vaccines and critical drugs for Canadians?
Madame la Présidente, au début de la pandémie, à la première vague, notre incapacité à produire de l'équipement de protection individuelle a évidemment causé des problèmes. C'était une lacune flagrante de la capacité de production au Canada. Nous sommes maintenant à l'étape des vaccins, et la question de la capacité est encore une fois un grave problème parce que nous ne pouvons pas produire nos propres vaccins.
En fait, c'est un gouvernement conservateur qui a privatisé les laboratoires Connaught, ce qui est à la source du problème et qui l'a exacerbé. Bien sûr, les libéraux n'ont pas corrigé la situation pendant toutes les années où ils étaient au pouvoir.
Compte tenu de ce que nous avons appris aujourd'hui, le député appuierait-il la demande du NPD voulant qu'on établisse une société d'État qui produirait des vaccins et des médicaments essentiels pour les Canadiens?
View Eric Melillo Profile
CPC (ON)
View Eric Melillo Profile
2020-12-03 17:26 [p.2939]
Madam Speaker, I am somewhat disheartened when I hear from other members in this House who like to spend time criticizing past governments. It really does not matter whether they were Conservative or Liberal. I know that when I talk to constituents in my riding, they do not really care what past governments have done. What they care about right now is what the current government is doing, what current MPs are doing and how we are fighting for them.
That is where my focus is, and I think I speak for everyone in my party when I say that is where our focus is, moving forward. That is why we are bringing forward this important motion, to ensure that the government brings forward a plan, is transparent about that plan, and is moving forward to help combat this virus to keep Canadians safe, get Canadians back to work and keep our economy going.
Madame la Présidente, je suis plutôt découragé que des députés consacrent du temps à critiquer d'anciens gouvernements à la Chambre, peu importe s'ils étaient libéraux ou conservateurs. Lorsque je parle aux gens de ma circonscription, ils accordent bien peu d'importance aux anciens gouvernements. Ce qui est important à leurs yeux, c'est ce que le gouvernement actuel fait, ce que les députés actuels font et la façon avec laquelle nous luttons pour défendre leurs intérêts.
C'est ce sur quoi je me concentre. Je pense que je parle au nom de tous les députés de mon parti lorsque je dis que notre priorité est d'aller de l'avant. C'est pour cette raison que nous présentons cette motion importante. Nous voulons veiller à ce que le gouvernement présente un plan, en toute transparence, pour contribuer à la lutte contre ce virus afin d'assurer la sécurité des Canadiens, leur permettre de retourner au travail et faire tourner l'économie.
View Paul Manly Profile
GP (BC)
View Paul Manly Profile
2020-12-03 17:28 [p.2939]
Madam Speaker, I know the hon. member said he does not want to talk about the past, but he has just talked about the past 10 months. We cannot learn from history unless we realize what our history is.
Coming back to the question from the hon. member for Vancouver East, does the member regret the privatization of Connaught Labs? We had a lab for 70 years that produced vaccines for people around the world at a very low price. It would be doing very well for us right now, if it had not been privatized by the Conservative government. Does the hon. member think that we should be going back to that kind of a model?
Madame la Présidente, je sais que le député a dit ne pas vouloir parler du passé, mais il vient de parler des 10 derniers mois. Nous ne pouvons pas tirer des leçons de l'histoire si nous ne connaissons pas notre histoire.
Pour revenir à la question de la députée de Vancouver-Est, le député regrette-t-il la décision de privatiser les laboratoires Connaught? Pendant 70 ans, ils ont fabriqué des vaccins pour des gens partout dans le monde à très faible coût. Ils nous seraient d'une grande aide en ce moment, si le gouvernement conservateur ne les avait pas privatisés. Le député croit-il que nous devrions revenir à ce genre de modèle?
View Eric Melillo Profile
CPC (ON)
View Eric Melillo Profile
2020-12-03 17:29 [p.2939]
Madam Speaker, I have been an MP for only one year, but I definitely do not regret any of the decisions I have made in this House, or any of the great work our opposition has done to hold the government to account. We are going to continue to do so, and I hope that all members of the opposition and government members will join us in bringing more accountability and transparency by voting in favour of this motion.
Madame la Présidente, je suis député depuis un an seulement, mais je ne regrette absolument aucune des décisions que j'ai prises à la Chambre et je suis fier de l'excellent travail accompli par l'opposition pour exiger des comptes de la part du gouvernement. Nous continuerons d'obliger le gouvernement à rendre des comptes et nous espérons que tous les députés de l'opposition et du gouvernement nous aideront à accroître la reddition de comptes et la transparence en votant en faveur de cette motion.
View Jenny Kwan Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jenny Kwan Profile
2020-12-03 17:58 [p.2943]
Madam Speaker, the member just went off on some weird tangent, but I will focus our conversation on the debate.
The reality is that Canada used to have a world-class, publicly owned entity that produced vaccines and prescription drugs, Connaught Labs. It was privatized by the Mulroney government. We can now do something about the future, which is Canada going back to having a publicly owned Crown corporation to produce vaccines and prescription drugs for Canadians.
Is that something the member would support? Is that something to look at in the future to prepare Canadians should there, God forbid, be another pandemic?
Madame la Présidente, le député vient de faire une drôle de digression, mais je vais me concentrer sur le sujet de notre débat.
En réalité, le Canada avait auparavant une entité publique de calibre mondial qui produisait des vaccins et des médicaments sur ordonnance. Il s'agissait des laboratoires Connaught, que le gouvernement Mulroney a privatisés. Nous pouvons prendre maintenant des mesures pour l'avenir en créant une nouvelle société d'État pour fabriquer des vaccins et des médicaments sur ordonnance pour les Canadiens.
Le député est-il favorable à cette idée? Est-ce une idée à examiner pour préparer les Canadiens à l'éventualité, Dieu nous en préserve, d'une autre pandémie?
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2020-12-03 17:59 [p.2943]
Madam Speaker, the member raised a good point. One of the things we have seen with the pandemic are the areas we can improve upon with respect to our industries. We have seen that with PPE or hand sanitizers, as I cited. Canada used to do quite well with with respect to the local production of vaccines. Over the last number of months, the government has been looking at a wide variety of options on how we could increase the potential for vaccinations being produced in Canada. That will be an ongoing discussion in the months ahead.
Madame la Présidente, la députée soulève un bon point. La pandémie nous aura au moins permis de déterminer ce qui doit être amélioré dans les différents secteurs d'activité. Nous en avons eu un exemple, comme je le disais, avec le désinfectant pour les mains et l'équipement de protection individuelle. Le Canada a déjà fait bonne figure au chapitre de la fabrication de vaccins. Depuis quelques mois, le gouvernement étudie de nombreuses options afin d'accroître le potentiel de production de vaccins ici, au Canada. La discussion se poursuivra dans les mois à venir.
View Heather McPherson Profile
NDP (AB)
View Heather McPherson Profile
2020-11-26 22:55 [p.2603]
Madam Chair, in the first wave of the pandemic, we were the worst country in the OECD when it came to deaths in long-term care homes. Tragically, we are still seeing big deadly outbreaks in long-term care homes across the country. In Edmonton, all but four residents of the South Terrace Continuing Care Centre have tested positive for COVID-19.
This is an unbelievable tragedy. We know that these for-profit centres kill. Will the government do what needs to be done to make sure that long-term care in this country puts patients ahead of profits?
Madame la présidente, pendant la première vague de la pandémie, le Canada a eu le pire bilan de l'OCDE en ce qui concerne les décès dans les établissements de soins de longue durée. Tragiquement, il y a encore d'importantes éclosions meurtrières dans ces établissements partout au pays. Dans le South Terrace Continuing Care Centre d'Edmonton, il n'y a que quatre des résidants qui n'ont pas eu un résultat positif à un test de dépistage de la COVID-19.
C'est une terrible tragédie. Nous savons que les établissements à but lucratif font mourir des gens. Le gouvernement va-t-il faire le nécessaire pour veiller à ce que les établissements de soins de longue durée au Canada fassent passer les patients avant les profits?
View Patty Hajdu Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Chair, I share the deep sadness of the member opposite about the loss of life in long-term care homes, where they have a duty and obligation to protect the health and safety of the people there. They are paid to do so.
That is why we have worked so closely with the provinces and territories, including providing additional monies, $740 million, to strengthen infection prevention control in long-term care homes.
The development of national long-term care standards is included in the Speech from the Throne. We are going to do more together. Canadians are depending on it.
Madame la présidente, je partage la profonde tristesse de la députée d'en face concernant les pertes de vie dans les foyers de soins de longue durée, qui ont le devoir et l'obligation de protéger la santé et la sécurité de leurs résidents. Après tout, ils sont payés pour le faire.
C'est pourquoi nous avons collaboré étroitement avec les provinces et les territoires, notamment en fournissant des fonds supplémentaires, soit 740 millions de dollars, pour renforcer le contrôle de la prévention des infections au sein des foyers de soins de longue durée.
L'élaboration de nouvelles normes nationales en matière de soins de longue durée figure dans le discours du Trône. Nous allons faire davantage ensemble. Les Canadiens en dépendent.
View Matthew Green Profile
NDP (ON)
View Matthew Green Profile
2020-11-19 15:07 [p.2138]
Mr. Speaker, today, thousands of shoes have been placed on Parliament Hill representing those who died of COVID-19 in long-term care homes across Canada.
For-profit, long-term care homes run by Revera Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Public Sector Pension Investment Board, are among the worst in the country for COVID deaths. The Public Service Alliance has called on PSP to end its investments in these appalling facilities.
The government can end the suffering that our seniors and people with disabilities are facing in homes owned by Revera Inc. now. Will the Prime Minister commit to ending the for-profit nature of long-term care homes in Canada?
Monsieur le Président, des milliers de chaussures ont été placées sur la Colline du Parlement aujourd'hui pour représenter les personnes mortes de la COVID-19 dans les centres de soins de longue durée du Canada.
Les centres de soins de longue durée à but lucratif gérés par Revera Inc., filiale en propriété exclusive de l'Office d'investissement des régimes de pensions du secteur public, figurent parmi ceux qui affichent le plus de décès liés à la COVID au pays. L'Alliance de la Fonction publique exhorte l'office d'investissement à cesser d'investir dans ces établissements épouvantables.
Le gouvernement peut mettre fin dès maintenant à la souffrance que vivent les aînés et les personnes handicapées résidant dans des centres appartenant à Revera Inc. Le premier ministre s'engagera-t-il à mettre un terme à la présence de centres de soins de longue durée à but lucratif au Canada?
View Patty Hajdu Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I think I can speak for all of us to say that we must do better to protect the lives of people who are living in long-term care and communal living settings. It is very important that we work together with provinces and territories to do so, which is why the safe restart agreement included $740 million to provinces and territories to strengthen their processes to protect against infection from COVID-19.
We will do more. The Speech from the Throne committed to national standards on long-term care, and that is exactly what we intend to do with provinces and territories.
Monsieur le Président, je crois parler en notre nom à tous quand j'affirme qu'il faut faire mieux pour protéger la vie des personnes qui vivent dans des centres d'hébergement et de soins de longue durée. Il est essentiel, pour ce faire, de collaborer avec les provinces et les territoires. C'est pourquoi l'Accord sur la relance sécuritaire prévoyait 740 millions de dollars pour aider les provinces et les territoires à améliorer les processus de lutte contre les infections par la COVID-19.
Nous en ferons encore davantage. Dans le discours du Trône, le gouvernement s'est engagé à établir des normes nationales pour les soins de longue durée. C'est exactement ce que nous comptons faire, en collaboration avec les provinces et les territoires.
View Leah Gazan Profile
NDP (MB)
View Leah Gazan Profile
2020-11-17 14:43 [p.2003]
Mr. Speaker, in Manitoba the provincial and federal governments have had eight months to fix health and safety issues occurring in federally owned long-term care homes. They failed. We now have outbreaks of COVID-19 at Maples and Parkview Place long-term care homes. Workers and residents are getting sick and losing their lives.
The federal government owns Revera facilities, and it is time it stopped playing jurisdictional games and honour its responsibility to keep residents and workers safe and alive. When will the Liberals own their part of the crisis and make sure workers and loved ones can survive the pandemic?
Monsieur le Président, au Manitoba, les gouvernements provincial et fédéral ont eu huit mois pour régler les problèmes de santé et de sécurité qui se posent dans les établissements de soins de longue durée appartenant au gouvernement fédéral. Ils ont échoué. À l'heure actuelle, des flambées de COVID-19 se sont déclarées dans les établissements de soins de longue durée Maples et Parkview Place. Des travailleurs et des résidants tombent malades et certains meurent.
Le gouvernement fédéral est propriétaire des établissements de soins Revera, et il est temps qu'il cesse les chicanes de compétences et qu'il assume sa responsabilité de garantir la sécurité et la santé des résidants et des travailleurs. Quand les libéraux assumeront-ils leur part de responsabilité dans la crise et veilleront-ils à ce que les travailleurs et leurs proches puissent survivre à la pandémie?
View Patty Hajdu Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I think every member in the House is concerned with the growth of cases and indeed the tragic deaths that are occurring across the country as a result of COVID-19. Our hearts are with all of the families that have lost a loved one. In this difficult time we all have to continue to pull together.
We need a team Canada approach and that is exactly what we have been providing, whether it is $19 billion to provinces and territories, millions of rapid tests for provinces and territories, or additional supports, such as over 250 Canadian Red Cross people deployed into long-term care homes, including in Manitoba, we will continue to be there for all Canadians no matter which province they are in.
Monsieur le Président, je pense que tous les députés sont préoccupés par l'augmentation du nombre de cas et, en fait, par les décès tragiques causés par la COVID-19 partout au Canada. Nous sommes de tout cœur avec les familles qui ont perdu un être cher. En ces temps difficiles, nous devons tous continuer à nous serrer les coudes.
Dans ce contexte, l'approche Équipe Canada s'impose et c'est exactement celle que nous avons adoptée. Nous avons notamment versé aux provinces et aux territoires 19 milliards de dollars et leur avons fourni des millions de tests rapides. Des mesures de soutien supplémentaires ont également été mises en œuvre, comme le déploiement de 250 employés de la Croix-Rouge canadienne dans les foyers de soins de longue durée, entre autres au Manitoba. Le gouvernement continuera d'être là pour tous les Canadiens, indépendamment de la province dans laquelle ils se trouvent.
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2020-11-17 15:32 [p.2011]
Madam Speaker, it is a pleasure to rise today for the motion brought forward in the House by my colleague, the member for Wellington—Halton Hills. This is an important motion on Canada's foreign relations and national security and I am glad to have the opportunity to speak to it.
In our increasingly digital and interconnected world, security concerns are growing, gaps are becoming more evident and governments are attempting to tackle them. As technology evolves, so do the new challenges of how to ensure it is secure and accessible for the individuals using it. This includes our mobile networks and Internet connections. An issue that goes hand in hand with this is national security.
Governments across the world are thinking more and more about the implications and interconnectedness of national security, infrastructure and trade. Taking national security seriously also means protecting Canada's national interests and our Canadian values from foreign interference. Unfortunately, the Liberal government has been slow to react, allowing foreign actors to go unchecked in our system.
The motion, if passed, would require the government to make a decision on Huawei's involvement in Canada's 5G network within 30 days, fitting within the government's commitment to announce a policy and framework on China this fall, and develop a robust plan to counter China's foreign influence in Canada.
After years of talk, uncertainty for Canadian businesses and citizens, and our allies moving on this without us, the Liberal government still has not put together any plan or made a decision. We are not talking about the Chinese people, but about the People's Republic of China. The risk of allowing Huawei into our 5G networks is well documented, and the case is clear for why the government must ban it from our system.
Huawei's involvement in our telecommunications network poses a threat to national security, as, under Chinese law, Huawei must support, assist and co-operate with Chinese intelligence activities. Experts have stated that if the Chinese communist regime were to ask for it, Huawei would have to hand over the data that it collects.
When we talk about Huawei, we are talking about infrastructure that will be the backbone for other technology, as it is also well documented that Chinese regime enterprises are investing in critical infrastructure and asset projects all over the world. Allowing Huawei into our 5G network could mean allowing China's communist regime the ability to access Canadians' private and personal data, including potentially sensitive data that the Chinese regime could use for its benefit, for intelligence-gathering or to intimidate Canadians of Chinese origin within our own borders, which, as per reports, is occurring now.
Make no mistake. This data could be given, through Huawei, to a regime with a history of human rights abuses. It has jailed democratic and activist dissidents in Hong Kong and has persecuted and mistreated religious minorities, such as the Uighur Muslims and Tibetan Buddhists, including putting them into forced labour camps.
We cannot have weak leadership and a naive approach when it comes to dealing with a regime committing these atrocities. We need consistency, a plan and action.
The former public safety minister, Ralph Goodale, was in charge of a 5G review in 2018-19, and decisions kept being pushed off. In May 2019, he said the government would make a decision before the federal election, and then in July 2019, said it would do so after the election. That was a year and a half ago, and now it has been over a year since the election.
The request in this motion is therefore very reasonable. The Liberals cannot say they have not taken action because no one else has or that they have not had the time to review and consult.
Canada is now the only member of the Five Eyes international intelligence organization not to either ban or restrict the use of Huawei 5G equipment. Australia, New Zealand, the United States and the United Kingdom, all like-minded allies of Canada, are our counterparts in the Five Eyes alliance. They have moved on this and Canada has not made a decision. We have heard no plan and we are delayed behind our allies.
We see a trend here where the Liberal government is lagging behind our allies on security decisions and trade negotiations.
In the United States, moving to ban Huawei from its 5G networks was a bipartisan effort, with members from both sides of the aisle coming together.
Last summer, the United Kingdom implemented a full ban on mobile carriers purchasing Huawei's 5G technology. The country's National Cyber Security Centre, a government organization tasked with preventing computer security threats, did a review of the system and agreed with this ban as well as recommending that full-fibre Internet operators transition away from purchasing any new equipment from Huawei.
It is time for the current Liberal government to act. At a time of much uncertainty, this is something the government has full control over and would finally give our citizens and business owners certainty. The motion simply asks for the government to take into account the review that it did two years ago, as well as all of the information at committees and with our allies, and include this in the government's announced China policy framework, which it is working on. The motion also calls upon the government to develop a robust plan, as Australia has done, to combat China's growing foreign operations here in Canada and its increasing intimidation of Canadians living in Canada and to table it within 30 days of the adoption of the motion.
The Australian model on this has shown to be a flag bearer of how Canada could also look to respond. According to Reuters, Australia came up with its own plan after its analysis showed that China's Communist regime was posing a threat to Australia's democracy and national sovereignty. The protection of democracy and national sovereignty is fundamental and, day by day, it is showing more and more that Canada must have its own plan in this regard. Another measure Australia announced was introducing a national security test for foreign investments.
Last summer, the committee I was formerly on, the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, undertook a study of the Investment Canada Act, including hearing from stakeholders and policy experts on how state-owned enterprises, including those from China, have been able to get into Canada for the purpose of expanding international influence.
Speaking at the committee as a witness, Dr. Charles Burton, senior fellow at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute's centre for advancing Canada’s interests abroad, as an individual, testified. Having extensive experience in the Canada-China relations sphere, he called Canada's relationship with China one of economic coercion. He went into detail at the committee, explaining the intertwined relationship between Huawei and its executives, the People's Republic of China and the Chinese Communist Party. In his assessment, Huawei and indeed all enterprises from China meet the Canadian definition of state-owned enterprises for the purpose of the Investment Canada Act. Many academics have called on Canada to work to limit and counter China's attempts in this realm, going so far as to say that those in China's Communist regime believe that our government lacks the conviction to push back.
Another academic, Dr. Duanjie Chen at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute, wrote about concerns regarding the Chinese Communist state strategy to dominate through the acquisition of large companies in other countries. According to Dr. Chen, “[State-owned enterprises] form an integral part of China’s national strategy for global expansion”. Canada's plan to combat China's growing foreign operations, intimidation and influence must include looking at these state-owned enterprises and their involvement in investment in our country.
Another concern some have raised is that foreign state-owned enterprises acquiring Canadian companies can get access to sensitive Canadian intellectual property and reduce the competitiveness of Canadian companies. Mr. Tim Hahlweg, assistant director of requirements at the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, also spoke at the industry committee. Mr. Hahlweg stated:
As discussed in our recent public report, state-sponsored economic espionage activities in Canada continue to increase in breadth, depth and potential economic impact. In order to fulfill their national economic, intelligence and military interests, some foreign states engage in espionage activities. Foreign espionage has significant economic ramifications for Canada, including lost jobs, intellectual property, and corporate and tax revenues, as well as competitive advantages.
Mr. Jim Balsillie, chair of the Council of Canadian Innovators, also spoke at the industry committee regarding the Investment Canada Act. Mr. Balsillie described how the act must change to ensure it remains fit for purpose. He stated, “What I see is our policy-makers inviting foreign companies to take our sovereignty and prosperity away.”
It is not just economic intimidation. The federal government must look at the abuses conducted by this regime abroad and also at the influence and scare tactics that we have seen and heard of right on our own soil.
I would like to wrap up today by reiterating my support for this important motion, which will signify to the rest of the world, including our like-minded allies, that Canada is serious about standing up for our national interests and values, as well as having a strong and principled foreign policy backed by action.
Madame la Présidente, je suis heureuse de prendre la parole aujourd’hui à propos de la motion présentée à la Chambre par mon collègue, le député de Wellington—Halton Hills. Il s’agit d’une motion importante sur les relations étrangères et la sécurité nationale du Canada et je suis heureuse de pouvoir en parler.
Dans notre monde de plus en plus numérique et interconnecté, les préoccupations relatives à la sécurité se multiplient, les lacunes deviennent plus évidentes et les gouvernements tentent de les combler. À mesure que la technologie évolue, l