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Results: 1 - 60 of 18815
View Mark Holland Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mark Holland Profile
2019-12-10 19:19 [p.253]
Mr. Speaker, if you seek it, you will find unanimous consent to apply the results of the previous vote, held before the committee of the whole, to this vote, with Liberal members voting yes.
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2019-12-10 19:19 [p.253]
Mr. Speaker, we agree to apply the vote and the Conservative members will be voting no.
View Claude DeBellefeuille Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois agrees to apply the vote and will be voting yes.
View Rachel Blaney Profile
NDP (BC)
View Bardish Chagger Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Bardish Chagger Profile
2019-06-19 21:56 [p.29445]
Mr. Speaker, there have been discussions among the parties, and I think if you seek it, you will find unanimous consent for the following motion.
I move:
That, notwithstanding any Standing or Special Order or usual practice of the House:
(a) the motion respecting the Senate Amendments to Bill C-91, An Act respecting Indigenous Languages, be deemed adopted;
(b) the motion respecting the Senate Amendments to Bill C-92, An Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families, be deemed adopted;
(c) Bill C-98, An Act to amend the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act and the Canada Border Services Agency Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts, be deemed to have been concurred in at the report stage, and deemed read a third time and passed;
(d) Bill C-101, An Act to amend the Customs Tariff and the Canadian International Trade Tribunal Act, be deemed to have been concurred in at the report stage, and deemed read a third time and passed on division; and
(e) when the House adjourns on Thursday, June 20, 2019, it shall stand adjourned until Monday, September 16, 2019, provided that, for the purposes of any Standing Order, it shall be deemed to have been adjourned pursuant to Standing Order 28 and be deemed to have sat on Friday, June 21, 2019.
View Bruce Stanton Profile
CPC (ON)
View Mark Holland Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mark Holland Profile
2019-06-18 18:29 [p.29338]
Mr. Speaker, I believe if you seek it, you will find unanimous consent to apply the result of the previous vote to this vote, with Liberal members voting in favour.
View Erin Weir Profile
CCF (SK)
View Erin Weir Profile
2019-06-18 18:30 [p.29338]
Mr. Speaker, the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation agrees to apply and will be voting in favour.
View Bardish Chagger Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Bardish Chagger Profile
2019-06-11 20:52 [p.28962]
moved:
That in relation to Bill C-88, An Act to amend the Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act and the Canada Petroleum Resources Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts, not more than five further hours shall be allotted to the consideration of the report stage and five hours shall be allotted to the consideration at third reading stage of the said bill; and
That, at the expiry of the five hours provided for the consideration at third reading stage of the said Bill, any proceedings before the House shall be interrupted, if required for the purpose of this order, and in turn every question necessary for the disposal of the stage of the bill then under consideration shall be put forthwith and successively without further debate or amendment.
View Brian Masse Profile
NDP (ON)
View Brian Masse Profile
2019-06-11 20:53 [p.28962]
Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. I would ask you to review the tape and find that there are at least one or two Liberal members who are flying paper airplanes in the chamber here tonight. We have seen a number of different things take place. I have never seen that before in all my years here. I would ask you to review the tapes perhaps, as members come forward. I know that several Liberal members were involved in passing the plane around. There has been a lot of discussion about decorum and so forth in the House. I have seen a number of different things over the years.
Some hon. members: Oh, oh!
Mr. Brian Masse: I know that some members want to continue to heckle me down right now, but that is okay. Actually turning it to this type of a measure and throwing projectiles like that reaches another level.
I do not mind continuing to raise this issue, because perhaps that Liberal member or several Liberal members will actually come forward and talk about the fact that they participated in this type of activity.
This is not a ballpark. This is the House of Commons, and we would expect members' behaviour to at least have that type of substance to it.
View Geoff Regan Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Geoff Regan Profile
2019-06-11 20:54 [p.28962]
I thank the member for Windsor West for his point. I will review the recordings to see if there is any indication of that. I would urge members not to be engaged in that sort of activity in the House or any other activity, including heckling, that is disrespectful in here. That applies to everybody. The member is correct. We ought to be concerned here about decorum.
Order. If members want to have conversations, they should have them outside.
Pursuant to Standing Order 67.1, there will now be a 30-minute question period. I invite hon. members who wish to ask questions to rise in their places so the Chair has some idea of the number of members who wish to participate in this question period.
The hon. member for Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo.
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Mr. Speaker, this is an expression that I think should apply here: that the government's lack of planning and good House management does not constitute an emergency on our part.
This particular government was aware. It introduced Bill C-88 months ago. The Liberals have rarely brought it up for debate, and now they want to shut it down in the last couple of days of Parliament. It is a piece of legislation that deserves an opportunity for appropriate debate.
Again, they have had it on the Order Paper for over 18 months, and finally they bring it up in the last week. I would like the minister to explain what happened to the last year and a half when we could have been debating this legislation.
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
2019-06-11 20:57 [p.28962]
Madam Speaker, as with all legislation that responds to the kinds of negotiations that happen between indigenous governments, provincial and federal governments, this consultation needed to take place. We are now responding to what both Premier McLeod and Grand Chief George Mackenzie have stated in their joint letter.
We hope that Bill C-88 will proceed expeditiously through the legislative process and will receive royal assent in this Parliament. The negative implications of the status quo are significant.
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
Madam Speaker, I would like to echo the comments and sentiments of the member for Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo that after this bill was brought in, it did not even come to second reading until last Christmas. This is a bill that the Liberals knew they had to produce before the election in 2015. This was before the courts in the Northwest Territories. There was an injunction that was holding up litigation until this place produced this legislation.
Yes, there had to be consultation. However, it is my understanding that the consultation was completed in the middle of 2017, and yet here we are two years later and the government is saying that we have to hurry up. Well, hurry up and wait. We have been waiting for this legislation for two years, and now the government is saying that there is no more time left.
I agree with the Premier of the Northwest Territories that the bill has to be passed expeditiously, but we have not had a good answer from the government as to what caused these delays. I could speculate on other things, but I think it is a bit rich for the Liberals to say that we have to pass this right now and we have to have time allocation. They have had four years to do this, and I think that has to be noted.
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
2019-06-11 21:00 [p.28963]
Madam Speaker, this bill is a priority for the government and is essential to restoring the legal certainty in resource development in the NWT.
We have had two days of debate on the bill at second reading. The INAN committee heard from a number of panels of witnesses, and we are currently on our second day of debate at third reading. I believe that when this negotiation has taken place with the partners, this is sufficient debate and we need to get on with it and get it passed.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2019-06-11 21:01 [p.28963]
Madam Speaker, in the previous government, Bill C-15 was created in 2014 with complete disregard for the land claims agreements. The Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act was created through the negotiations of land claims, and it certainly destroyed the trust factor with indigenous people in the Northwest Territories.
I want to ask the member if she would talk a little about how Bill C-88 would re-establish trust with indigenous people in the Northwest Territories, protect their constitutionally protected land claims and self-government agreements and restore legal certainty.
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
2019-06-11 21:01 [p.28963]
Madam Speaker, I thank the hon. member for his ongoing leadership in all aspects of the Northwest Territories, and for his advocacy for the indigenous people and the indigenous governments in the Northwest Territories.
I would answer his question by quoting David V. Wright, legal counsel to the Gwich'in Tribal Council, at the INAN committee:
[T]he consultation process on Bill C-88 has actually helped restore some of the trust between Canada and the GTC. That trust would be eroded by any further delay, or at worst, failure to pass this bill in a timely manner.
View Arnold Viersen Profile
CPC (AB)
View Arnold Viersen Profile
2019-06-11 21:02 [p.28963]
Madam Speaker, the consultation on this bill was a joke. The Liberals phoned the Premier of the Northwest Territories 20 minutes before they made the announcement on the moratorium in northern Canada.
The Liberals are holding the Government of the Northwest Territories hostage with this bill, in the fact that they have put in one piece that the Northwest Territories wants and one piece that the Northwest Territories does not want.
Will the minister admit that she is just holding the territories hostage?
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
2019-06-11 21:03 [p.28963]
Madam Speaker, I think it would be good if the member actually remembered what Premier McLeod said at committee:
We don't see Bill C-88 as a partisan bill. It ensures that land claim agreements are fully implemented by maintaining the regional boards, and it also has modern amendments with multi-party support.... The Government of the Northwest Territories supports swift passage of Bill C-88. The implications of not proceeding with the bill within the lifetime of this government and retaining the status quo are significant.
View Peter Julian Profile
NDP (BC)
View Peter Julian Profile
2019-06-11 21:03 [p.28963]
Madam Speaker, I am very saddened. Sunny ways are definitely dead. Democracy is dying.
Tonight, we just had an extreme closure motion that even Stephen Harper never brought in. It was an extreme closure motion that did not allow for the right to reply of one opposition member in the entire House. There was a 20-minute closure speech. That was for a bill that has raised real concerns around civil liberties and the fact that we are talking about metadata of innocent Canadians being kept without proper scrutiny.
What we had from the Liberals was a few hours of debate a year ago, and then tonight, closure. It is absolutely unacceptable. Now, with Bill C-88, we are seeing the same thing of bulldozing. Even Stephen Harper did not go this far. Liberals promised, back in 2015, to bring a new tone to the House, to actually work with opposition members, and they have chosen to do the opposite. Why are Liberals bulldozing through legislation that requires proper scrutiny and proper discussion?
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
2019-06-11 21:05 [p.28963]
Madam Speaker, I am very happy to answer the member's question.
I will just take some of the words out of Premier McLeod and Grand Chief Mackenzie's joint letter: “expeditiously through the legislative process”; Premier McLeod, “swift passage”; Chief Alfonz, “failure to resolve this matter co-operatively”; David Wright, “restoring trust”; and Grand Chief Gladys Norwegian, “will help to restore balance to the way the MVRMA operates and will ensure that the voice of indigenous board members will be heard.”
The indigenous partners, governments, and the Government of the Northwest Territories want this bill, and I do not think that parliamentarians in this room need to be seen to be obstructing that.
View Pat Kelly Profile
CPC (AB)
View Pat Kelly Profile
2019-06-11 21:06 [p.28963]
Madam Speaker, for this minister to say that members of Parliament who wish to debate legislation are obstructing the process demonstrates quite unbelievable arrogance on her part.
Since the minister did not answer the question from the member for Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo or the member for South Okanagan—West Kootenay, I am going to ask the question again.
This has been on the books for 18 months. Why, in the twilight of this Parliament, is the government invoking closure on a bill and claiming it is because the bill needs to be expeditiously passed? What have you been doing for the rest of this Parliament?
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
I want to remind the member that he is to address the question directly to the Chair. I can tell him that I have been very busy during this Parliament.
The hon. minister.
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
2019-06-11 21:06 [p.28963]
Madam Speaker, I too have been very busy during this Parliament, as have all the members in the House. The legislation that this Parliament has been able to bring forth just shows how we have been able to work through this. I believe that the bills that are the result of agreements among partners should hold a very special place in this House in that they are the work of partners coming together.
That means that members have the right to comment on it. However, what we are finding with this bill is that there is huge consensus as to how necessary it is to undo the chaos that the previous government put in place. There were injunctions and legal uncertainty, because the Conservatives did not consult and there was no consensus. We got stuck with a really bad bill that the people of Northwest Territories have had to live with, and now we are fixing it.
View Mike Bossio Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Speaker, the opposition members claim that the current regulatory system is complex, costly, unpredictable and time-consuming, and that the merging of the boards is essential for dealing with these issues. However, my understanding is that the merging of these boards landed the whole process in court. It has thrown development in the Northwest Territories into real legal uncertainty. Can you expand on why it is so important to repeal the provisions merging these boards?
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
The hon. member knows that he has to address the question to the Chair. I am not going to expand on it. I will let the minister do it, though.
The hon. minister.
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
2019-06-11 21:08 [p.28964]
Madam Speaker, there are comments coming from the other side that are very unparliamentary.
The regulatory framework in the north is an example of how local decision-making allows good projects to go forward, stops bad projects and sends mediocre projects back to the drawing board. This is exemplary. When those boards were fused, it no longer had the ability to really respond to the local realities.
Grand Chief Gladys Norwegian said that “the proposed amendments [what we are fixing from the previous government] will help to restore balance to the way the MVRMA operates and will ensure that the voice of indigenous board members will be heard.”
This is extraordinarily important. That fusion had never been consulted on. The Conservatives dropped it into the bill at the last moment. It is unacceptable, and that is not the way that we are working in our partnership with indigenous people in this country anymore.
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
I want to remind members that even though they may not like what they hear or be in agreement with what they hear, they need to ensure that they respect the rules of the House. Therefore, I would hope that the parliamentary language issue will not be a problem during the debate.
Questions and comments, the hon. member for North Okanagan—Shuswap.
View Mel Arnold Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mel Arnold Profile
2019-06-11 21:10 [p.28964]
Madam Speaker, I have to stand today and say that never has a government spent so much and achieved so little. That is why we end up with this logjam of legislation that the Liberals have not been able to get through in the three and a half years that they have been stumbling along on this.
Talking about consultation, the minister says that the Liberals have done adequate consultation on this. I have to reflect back to the consultation that the government supposedly did on Bill C-68, which we are also debating today, with the Fisheries Act. The Liberals spent over a million dollars providing first nations with the ability to provide briefs to the committee on the review of the Fisheries Act. Those briefs were never provided to the committee for its study on the act.
How can the minister stand there and say that the Liberals have done adequate consultation, when that is an example of how they have not done so?
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
2019-06-11 21:11 [p.28964]
Madam Speaker, I have said a couple of times here already that when bills and legislation are the result of complete engagement between the partners, indigenous peoples and governments, the territorial government and ourselves, they are agreements that are exciting for us in Parliament to support. They came to the table, came forward with this agreement and there was consensus to do that. This is an exciting chapter as to how we can go forward.
The reason we got into this mess is because the previous government did not consult. It threw this fusion of the boards into legislation at the last possible moment, which resulted in an injunction, legal uncertainty, all of the things that created chaos for resource development in the Northwest Territories. That is what we are fixing today and that is why we need it passed.
View Sheri Benson Profile
NDP (SK)
View Sheri Benson Profile
2019-06-11 21:12 [p.28964]
Madam Speaker, what we are discussing tonight is the fact that we do not have an opportunity to hear what the minister has to say, have a good debate and talk about a process that perhaps was very good and was built on consensus. This possibly is very good legislation. However, this is the House. This is Parliament. As parliamentarians, we have a right to review the bill and the government still has a right to bring it forward and talk about it. I may very well find the bill and the consultations good, but what we are talking about right now is closure on that debate. You are denying my right to review that legislation. That is the piece that is offensive to me.
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
I want to remind the member for Saskatoon West that she is to address the questions to the Chair and not the individual members.
The hon. minister.
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
2019-06-11 21:13 [p.28964]
Madam Speaker, it gives me an opportunity to explain that legislation like the YESAA bill for the Yukon or the Anishinabek education agreement are bills that come together because of the real work done by indigenous people who come forward with their best possible plan. Those are very special bills.
The member knows that two days of debate at second reading, going to the INAN or other committees and a second day of debate at third reading is sufficient for these kinds of bills that come together because of agreements with our partners. They need to be passed in order to restore the legal certainty and the vibrant economy in the Northwest Territories.
View Todd Doherty Profile
CPC (BC)
View Todd Doherty Profile
2019-06-11 21:14 [p.28965]
Madam Speaker, I have the utmost respect for our hon. colleague across the way. However, I have said from the very beginning that there is no plan. If one fails to plan, one plans to fail.
The Liberals have failed first nations with respect to the suicide epidemic that has ravished our first nations in rural communities from coast to coast to coast. They have failed our first nations regarding boil water advisories. They stand here all the time, with their hand on their hearts and the minister wraps herself in an indigenous-flavoured scarf and they say this is their most important priority. I take offence to that.
I have been open and transparent with the House. My wife and children are first nations. The minister has failed our first nations. Time and again, first nations chiefs have come to us, saying the government has not consulted them on many different issues. I have reached out to the minister and she has failed to act.
Does she not feel this is another piece of legislation where the government will go down a path to fail not only Canadians, but first nations communities from coast to coast to coast?
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
Before I go to a point of order, I want to remind the member that he may want to correct something. They are not our first nations; they are the indigenous peoples of Canada.
View Todd Doherty Profile
CPC (BC)
View Todd Doherty Profile
2019-06-11 21:16 [p.28965]
Madam Speaker, as I said, my family is first nations people. My family is first nations.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2019-06-11 21:16 [p.28965]
Madam Speaker, I rise on a point of order. I take offence to the fact that the member feels that I, as an indigenous person, belong to him. I also take offence to the comment that because the minister is wearing an indigenous scarf, it is offensive. That is totally wrong and unacceptable. I would ask the member to retract those statements.
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
View Todd Doherty Profile
CPC (BC)
View Todd Doherty Profile
2019-06-11 21:17 [p.28965]
Madam Speaker, I deeply appreciate and respect my hon. colleague, but as someone who has first nations in his family and has hung on the hope that the minister would follow through on some of the promises—
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
The hon. member is getting into debate. He either wants to apologize or he does not.
View Todd Doherty Profile
CPC (BC)
View Todd Doherty Profile
2019-06-11 21:17 [p.28965]
Madam Speaker, if you will permit me, I believe I have the opportunity to respond to this. I will apologize and retract what I said, but it is shameful that the minister stands—
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
We do not need additional information. The hon. member either apologizes for what he said or—
An hon. member: He did.
The Assistant Deputy Speaker (Mrs. Carol Hughes): We will accept that.
The hon. minister.
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