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Results: 1 - 15 of 9203
View Candice Bergen Profile
CPC (MB)
View Candice Bergen Profile
2020-02-21 11:16 [p.1378]
Mr. Speaker, the Coastal GasLink project has been given consent by the majority of the Wet'suwet'en people, but their voices are being ignored by the Liberals.
Rita George, one of their matriarchs, said, “The world thinks the matriarchs are behind all the protests going on and that's not true. None of the matriarchs were contacted.” She further said, “I want the world to know what's been happening to us. We are being bullied, it's so shameful, so hurtful. We are being humiliated.”
Why are the Liberals ignoring the majority of Wet'suwet'en people and instead empowering bullies and lawbreakers?
View Candice Bergen Profile
CPC (MB)
View Candice Bergen Profile
2020-02-21 11:18 [p.1379]
Mr. Speaker, thousands of Canadians are being laid off and their families do not know when they are going to see a paycheque again. Billions of dollars of essential goods cannot get to their destination and the economic impact is dire.
In fact, Atlantic Container Line says it will no longer ship goods to Halifax while these blockades continue. There are worries about propane shortages and higher food prices as a result of the Prime Minister's weak leadership.
How much worse does it have to get before the Prime Minister steps up and stops these illegal blockades?
View Candice Bergen Profile
CPC (MB)
View Candice Bergen Profile
2020-02-21 11:19 [p.1379]
Mr. Speaker, by empowering and emboldening lawbreakers and bullies, the government is setting the stage for more disruption and anarchy in this country.
Our economy is being shut down. Jobs are being lost and the voices of first nations people are being ignored. The best interests of Canadians are being ignored. The Liberal inaction on this is disgraceful.
When will the Liberal government stand up for law and order, stand up for first nations rights, stand up for jobs and end these illegal blockades?
View Marty Morantz Profile
CPC (MB)
Mr. Speaker, given that VIA Rail is a Crown corporation, subsidized to the tune of nearly $400 million annually by taxpayers, what has the cost been to VIA Rail due to the illegal blockades across the country and when will the Crown be initiating legal action for damages for the millions of dollars in lost revenue against the organizers of these illegal blockades?
View James Bezan Profile
CPC (MB)
Mr. Speaker, today we honour the lives and memories of the Heavenly Hundred.
For three months, thousands of Ukrainians occupied Kyiv's Independence Square and peacefully protested the corrupt regime of President Viktor Yanukovych.
I stood on the Maidan in Ukraine six years ago among the ash and bloodstains left from the brutal crackdown on these innocent Euromaidan protestors. Their bravery and sacrifice as they stood up against Yanukovych's thugs deserve our highest praise.
Ukraine and their friends around the world now carry forward the legacy of the Heavenly Hundred and all those who took part in the Revolution of Dignity as the battle for democracy and the territorial integrity of Ukraine continues even today.
Canada's Conservatives will always support the people of Ukraine in their pursuit of freedom, democracy and human rights.
[Member spoke in Ukrainian]
View Candice Bergen Profile
CPC (MB)
View Candice Bergen Profile
2020-02-20 15:17 [p.1334]
Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the opportunity to ask the Thursday question. I am interested to hear from the government House leader what we will be doing for the remainder of this week, as well as next week. I know there are a number of things the country is seized with, which includes something that the Deputy Prime Minister just mentioned, which is the new NAFTA.
I do not think the Deputy Prime Minister is fully aware of the fact that it was the government House leader, in an answer to a Conservative question on February 6, who said that he believed the new NAFTA should be split into a number of studies when it goes to committee. I feel it is important to point that out because, for some reason, the Deputy Prime Minister is trying to politicize this very important agreement that workers across the country and premiers are concerned about. Although the Conservative Party has been very clear when talking about some of the impacts of the new NAFTA, we are the party of free trade. It really is sad when the government House leader rises and says he thinks a bill should be split and then the Deputy Prime Minister says the Conservatives are stalling it. It is completely untrue and inaccurate and poisons the good relationship and good work that the government House leader and I and other House leaders have been doing.
As I ask the government House leader today to please let us know what business we will be looking at, I would like for him to keep that in mind so that our relationship and the work we do can continue to be done in good faith.
View Larry Maguire Profile
CPC (MB)
View Larry Maguire Profile
2020-02-20 16:53 [p.1348]
Madam Speaker, never have we seen so much economic damage done by so few people in such a short period of time. In the absence of leadership, our nation is paying a heavy price. The worker, the farmer, the small-business owner, the traveller, the voter and Canada's reputation on the world stage are the victims that lay in the wake of this calamity, the blockades holding our Canadian economy hostage. The politicians who refuse to denounce the illegal actions of those who seek to intimidate our nation have only further emboldened the protesters' resolve with their silence.
Canada's job and our economy are at risk. Grain cannot be moved, products cannot be shipped and passengers are left without a train. Those are the consequences when the rule of law is shelved and the democratic will of voters is ignored.
I stand in solidarity with every elected band council on the Coastal GasLink route, for it is the people they represent who are being silenced by those who cover their faces and partake in illegal activities. In a democracy it is the votes that count, not the decibels or hijinks of those who do not get their way.
We must ask ourselves if we are not setting a precedent by allowing the illegal actions to carry on. If people resort to illegal activities when they are opposed to a decision, are we not at risk of making decisions based out of fear? As elected officials, the only fear we should heed is that of a ballot box, not a handful of people who operate outside the bounds of the law.
In Parliament, the very place that has for generations been the heart of democracy, we have the shared responsibility to defend the democratic will of the Wet'suwet'en voters and elected band councils. No one in the House was elected to cherry-pick the laws of the nation that we expect to be enforced. If one wants to change the law, then table it, debate it and vote on it. That is how Canadian democracy works.
It was indigenous voters who voted freely to select their leaders, and they are now being shunted aside. There is not a member in the House who has questioned the validity of those elections and those who hold office. We must stand in solidarity and defend the democratic will of the Wet'suwet'en people. We can never waver, for if we turn our backs now we have only given credibility to those who are openly and willingly breaking the law.
In Canada, when we oppose the decisions of our elected leaders we have the democratic right to replace them. In those elections, the charter protects the right to protest and speak freely without repercussions. However, we do not have the right to partake in illegal activities.
The appalling behaviour of some, such as the barricading of the premier of British Columbia's home, is not acceptable. Using intimidation tactics and bullying fellow Canadians is not democratic. Preventing people from going to work is not, and should never be, acceptable in Canada. However noble they feel their cause is, it does not absolve them from the law.
As elected officials, we must continue to guarantee the very rights these protesters hold dear: the freedom of conscience, the freedom of thought, the freedom of expression, the freedom of peaceful assembly and the freedom of association. The pillars that protect these rights, all our rights, are built on the foundation that Canada is a nation of the rule of law. Unfortunately, it appears as though these protesters are only interested in respecting the rule of law when the courts side in their favour. This is not how a functioning democracy works. The rule of law must go both ways.
To those who are currently blocking roads, highways, ports and railways and infringing the rights of ordinary hard-working Canadians, I ask that they think for a moment of the suffering they have caused. People have been laid off, paycheques have stopped and orders have been cancelled. Families who work hard, play by the rules and pay their taxes are the ones feeling the brunt of these blockades. Farmers cannot fill grain orders and cannot get paid. Countries around the world are now looking at Canada as an unreliable supplier. The consequences of these illegal blockades will do irreparable harm. Canadians cannot be held in economic hostage or be used as a bargaining chip.
While our nation is far from perfect and election results may not go one's way, we must remain committed to the very principles that have protected our rights throughout the years. To those who try to justify the illegal blockades, no argument could persuade or convince me they are just. Not only is Coastal GasLink in possession of a valid environmental assessment certificate and permit from the BC Oil & Gas Commission, but the project is supported by every elected indigenous band along the pipeline's path.
It must also be said that most hereditary chiefs along the pipeline's path are also in support of this, and the vast majority of first nations community members themselves support this project because it would create jobs. It would create opportunities. It would improve the livelihoods of many. It would lead to investments in local communities. It would help, as my colleague just finished saying, reduce global greenhouse gas emissions.
While environmental organizations and indigenous groups opposed to resource development opportunities often turn to the courts to delay and prevent resource development, they must also respect the decisions of the courts. They must allow these economic opportunities to proceed. The democratic will of the Wet'suwet'en people cannot be ignored.
The process of approving this project was done accordingly. There is no legal argument that this project should not proceed. I encourage these protestors to continue to make their voices heard, but to do it in a way that does not impede upon innocent bystanders, who are being hurt through no fault of their own.
My message to those currently engaged in the blockades is to get politically involved, run for office and get elected, go out and knock on doors, organize petitions, protest and march as they see fit. However, they should not hold the Canadian economy hostage to advance their cause and should not purport to speak for people who have not given their blessing. Most of all, they should not hurt their fellow Canadians, who are being targeted through these blockades.
It must be said that opposing these illegal blockades does not contravene the reconciliation efforts throughout the country. It is the easily foreseeable consequence of ignoring a court order. More than ever, we need to better improve the economic and education opportunities of indigenous people in Canada. Those conversations must happen.
In this Parliament I expect solutions to be discussed and meaningful engagement with indigenous Canadians to occur. Improving the standard of living and the quality of life of indigenous Canadians must be a top priority. We know those conversations are not always going to be easy. People will agree or disagree, which is to be expected in a robust democracy.
We also know that in the weeks and months ahead, there will be other choices that elected leaders will have to make on resource projects. We cannot let our economy be brought to a halt every time a decision needs to be made or is made. We cannot set the precedent that it is acceptable to erect blockades in response to decisions that people disagree with.
Canadians sent us to Parliament to speak on their behalf and work together to implement solutions to the challenges we face. Those are the same reasons why the Wet'suwet'en voters went to the polls to elect their councils. It is irresponsible for us to turn our backs on these duly elected councils. A decision was made, and regardless of whether we support or oppose their wishes, we cannot condone the actions of people who are exploiting divisions within the Wet'suwet'en community to advance their own agendas.
This is a difficult and challenging issue. I implore those who are currently engaged in the illegal blockades to relent and allow the movement of people and goods. They can protest, make their voices heard and stay involved, but they should do so within the bounds of the law.
The country is watching and, more than ever, people are looking for leadership. Let us speak as one and pass the motion with unanimous support.
View Larry Maguire Profile
CPC (MB)
View Larry Maguire Profile
2020-02-20 17:03 [p.1350]
Madam Speaker, my colleague across the way asked if Conservatives think there are simple solutions. His government has made a very complex move by saying that we need dialogue. Of course we need dialogue; of course we need to have open conversations. I said that in my speech. We will have that, but people cannot break the law to get their points across. It does not matter what part of Canada one is represented in.
The government has abdicated its responsibilities with regard to the enforcement opportunities it has within the rule of law in this country. This situation has taken place in other jurisdictions, and previous governments, although not this one, have made changes to deal with these sorts of things in a more timely manner, before letting the whole country come under a blockade that brings the economy not to a halt but a standstill. It has certainly cost many jobs. We saw today that even VIA Rail has laid off over 1,000 people in the railroad system. It seems that the member for Winnipeg North does not acknowledge any of that.
View Larry Maguire Profile
CPC (MB)
View Larry Maguire Profile
2020-02-20 17:06 [p.1350]
Madam Speaker, removing the blockades would help the Wet'suwet'en people recognize that the jobs are for them as well. Their chiefs already recognize that.
View Larry Maguire Profile
CPC (MB)
View Larry Maguire Profile
2020-02-20 17:06 [p.1350]
Madam Speaker, having stood on the border with those farmers, I certainly know the issue very well. There is a very big contradiction between what my colleague from Prince Albert is talking about and the lack of action from the government over the last few weeks. The member has made a very good point, and it shows the contradiction in the government's actions.
View Candice Bergen Profile
CPC (MB)
View Candice Bergen Profile
2020-02-19 14:34 [p.1248]
Mr. Speaker, Canadians were hoping the Prime Minister would present a plan yesterday to bring down the illegal blockades that are costing jobs, causing Canadians real hardship and also making a mockery of our laws. Instead they received weak and ineffective words.
Even the premiers are unimpressed with the Prime Minister's pathetic response. In fact, Premier Scott Moe has initiated an emergency call with other premiers to address the crisis.
When will the Prime Minister step up, do his job and put an end to these dangerous and illegal barricades?
View Larry Maguire Profile
CPC (MB)
View Larry Maguire Profile
2020-02-19 15:29 [p.1257]
moved for leave to introduce Bill C-208, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (transfer of small business or family farm or fishing corporation) .
He said: Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise today to introduce my private member's bill, an act to amend the Income Tax Act regarding the transfer of small businesses or family farms or fishing corporations. This legislation would level the playing field for small businesses, family farms or fishing corporation owners when transferring their operation to a family member.
Currently, when a person sells his or her business to a family member, the difference between the sale price and the original purchase price is deemed to be a dividend. However, if this business is sold to a non-family member, it is considered a capital gain, which is taxed at a lower rate and allows the seller to use his or her lifetime capital gains exemption.
The bill would allow small businesses, family farms and fishing corporations the same tax rate when selling their operations to their family member as they would selling it to a third party.
I encourage all members to support this bill to promote sustainable small business succession, enhance opportunities for entrepreneurship and end the inequitable taxation of those transferring a small business, farm or fishing corporation to a family member.
View Candice Bergen Profile
CPC (MB)
View Candice Bergen Profile
2020-02-18 14:30 [p.1156]
Mr. Speaker, yesterday the transport minister issued a statement saying that “tampering with rail lines, railcars or signalling systems is illegal and extremely dangerous.” If rail lines are being tampered with, the consequences could be deadly. Canadians deserve to know what is happening and deserve to be protected.
If the minister is indeed aware of rail lines being tampered with, then why is he and his government doing absolutely nothing to stop this illegal activity and these illegal blockades?
View Candice Bergen Profile
CPC (MB)
View Candice Bergen Profile
2020-02-18 14:31 [p.1157]
Mr. Speaker, this is a serious situation. As the minister acknowledged, illegal activity is going on, so either the rule of law applies in Canada or it does not and we have anarchy.
I will ask the minister again. If he is aware illegal activity is going on, and tampering with rail lines is an illegal activity, why are the Liberals just giving Canadians words and word salad, as the Prime Minister is so good at delivering, instead of delivering real action to protect Canadians from these illegal blockades?
View James Bezan Profile
CPC (MB)
Mr. Speaker, when former prime minister Stephen Harper met with Vladimir Putin, he said, “get out of Ukraine.” Now that is real leadership. The Iranian community and the families of the victims of flight 752 deserve that kind of leadership. Instead they had the insulting spectacle of the Prime Minister glad-handing, back-slapping and of course bowing to the Iranian foreign minister and chief propagandist.
Will the Prime Minister apologize to the families and the Iranian community for this blatant disrespect? Will he say sorry for once again embarrassing Canada on the world stage?
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