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Results: 1 - 60 of 464
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you.
My next question is along the same lines.
In response to questions from the opposition—mine in particular—the Prime Minister told the House, a few times, that he used the so-called Liberalist database, the infamous list of Liberal Party members and donors, but only after the candidates had made it through the other steps in the selection process. As far as he is concerned, it's an acceptable practice.
Obviously, I won't try today to determine whether it was acceptable to do things that way or not. What I'm interested in is how much that part of the process costs.
Can you tell me what the cost of conducting Liberalist checks on candidates is?
View David Lametti Profile
Lib. (QC)
I can't answer that since it's not part of the process my department conducts. Neither the judicial advisory committees nor my team or I has access to the list. The process we follow is free from partisanship and political interests. The recommendations of the JACs are based on the candidate applications before them. Their job does not involve checking the list; nor does mine. I submit my recommendations to the Prime Minister's Office. I have said this publicly: so far, none of my recommendations has ever been blocked and I have never received any suggestions for appointees from the Prime Minister or his office.
I can't answer your question about cost, because what you are referring to is not part of our process.
View Michael Cooper Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to the witnesses.
I'll direct my first question to Ms. Krause.
Ms. Krause, you indicated that you sent a letter to WE seeking confirmation or clarification about whether they share their data with any political parties, including the Liberal Party. Have you received a response?
Vivian Krause
View Vivian Krause Profile
Vivian Krause
2020-07-22 12:34
The question I asked is whether they share data with corporate partners or political parties, or anyone who supports them, and I did not receive a response.
View Michael Cooper Profile
CPC (AB)
Is there any basis upon which you have to suspect that they may be sharing their data with political parties, such as the Liberal Party of Canada?
View Julie Dzerowicz Profile
Lib. (ON)
Ms. Senior, I'm sorry to cut you off. It's just that I have three more questions. Thank you so much, and thanks for getting that money out. Thank you for helping the organizations in my riding as well.
My next question is for Ms. Krause.
Ms. Krause, I want to make sure I have this right, so please confirm this. You indicated that WE had shared data to the Liberal Party in 2015 in order to help the Liberal Party target ridings to win. Did I get that right?
Vivian Krause
View Vivian Krause Profile
Vivian Krause
2020-07-22 13:10
I said that I wrote a letter last week to WE asking what they did with the data. I asked them if they give it to their corporate partners, if they give it to political parties, or if they give it to anyone working on political campaigns. I asked them what they do with the data.
View Julie Dzerowicz Profile
Lib. (ON)
Ms. Krause, you said that there is one source that had indicated to you that data was shared by WE to the Liberal Party in order to help them target ridings to win. Did you not say that?
View Julie Dzerowicz Profile
Lib. (ON)
Okay.
I do have some other questions. I just wanted to make sure I had that right. I was going to ask you whether or not you had any proof, because it's very difficult to leave those questions out there hanging.
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
Ms. Krause, corporate donations, whether in money or services in kind, were abolished in 2003. Have you checked with Elections Canada? If there were donations in kind or in money for a corporation, that is entirely illegal.
We ought to be very careful at this committee. I know you are immune from being charged for what you say at committee, but if you said something in public, you could be challenged by legal counsel.
Do you have any evidence that there were donations to the Liberal Party in kind or in service? You said it was part of the Liberal Party election machine. That's a very serious charge.
Vivian Krause
View Vivian Krause Profile
Vivian Krause
2020-07-22 13:22
Let's clarify.
There are many ways to be part of the election machine of any political party without making a cash donation. In fact, the way elections are run these days, it's the in-kind donations that are making the biggest impact, something as simple as a tweet from Barack Obama in the last election. Therefore, it's not just about cash.
Mr. Easter, if I may mention, I testified to your committee a year ago, on May 6. In that testimony I mentioned that I was concerned about how the political activity audits of charities had been handled. I mentioned that the CRA had audited 42 charities, and 41 out of 42 were not compliant. When Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was elected, he suspended those audits, rewrote the law, and the audits were finalized with a retroactively rewritten law.
In light of this WE Charity issue, we need to know who the audited charities were. Is WE one of them? Is WE Charity one of the charities that was under audit?
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
Ms. Krause, there is no question that we need to get to the bottom of this, but some of the speculation injures parties, injures reputations. At this committee hearing, I want us to stick as close to fact....
I don't care whether it's the Liberal Party, the NDP, the Conservative Party or the Bloc Québécois, speculation is not what we want to see. We want to get close to the facts.
I'll turn to Mr. Fragiskatos.
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
I want to get back to the fact that the party that formed the government, the Liberal Party, used the wage subsidy program for partisan purposes. I looked at section 2 of this program. I was surprised. I was wondering how the Liberal Party had had access to it.
Section 2 says that those who are entitled to it are companies or businesses—so clearly not the Liberal Party—, individuals or persons—so not the Liberal Party—, or charitable organizations.
Is the Liberal Party of Canada a charitable organization?
View Bill Morneau Profile
Lib. (ON)
We’ve decided to offer the wage subsidy to each business, across the country, in every sector of the economy, in order to protect its labour force so it can continue to operate. It’s a very important measure.
It will help our economy and will continue to protect employees all over the country.
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
He is not answering my question. The minister says that it’s for all businesses, but the Liberal Party of Canada is not a business.
My question was a bit mischievous, because I knew very well that it would not get an answer. The Liberal Party is against the wall. It can’t answer those questions, because it’s much too embarrassed to do so.
In my opinion, the Liberal Party is at the bottom of the list. The last point concerns a prescribed organization.
Is it as a prescribed organization that the Liberal Party was able to obtain its wage subsidy?
View Bill Morneau Profile
Lib. (ON)
I think that all MPs in the House understand that, in a time of crisis, it is necessary to protect employees. That’s our goal. We did reach it through the Canada Emergency Response Benefit as well as the wage subsidy.
We will maintain our approach, which helps all Canadians experiencing difficulties because of COVID-19.
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
The government’s situation is really embarrassing. We now know that it’s through the prescribed organization category that it managed to obtain the wage subsidy.
My question is simple. I don’t know whether it’ll get an answer.
Which minister had the bright idea of suggesting that the Liberal Party of Canada put its hand in the cookie jar? Whose wonderful idea was this?
Was it the Minister of Finance or the Minister of National Revenue?
View Bill Morneau Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Chair, as a government, we’ve decided that it was necessary to protect each business in the country that saw its revenue drop because of COVID-19. This way, they can protect their employees and their revenue. It’s very important. This means that after the crisis, people and businesses will be in a better situation.
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
We’re not making headway with the answers, but I think that we are with my questions.
A Liberal Party of Canada minister says that they’ll include this in the rules and that they’ll line their pockets. This looks like a conflict of interests.
Who’s guilty of having a conflict of interests in this government?
View Bill Morneau Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Chair, it was a lot simpler than that. We’ve decided that Canadians who needed help and who were experiencing difficulties would receive help from the government. This was our approach.
A business that experiences a drop in revenue can access the wage subsidy to retain its employees.
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
He keeps going. The Liberal Party of Canada is a business, and we’re hearing it from the finance minister. I thought he was a lot wiser.
During the pandemic, some people died. There were 5,298 deaths in Quebec and 8,254 in all of Canada. Some people were sick, others felt isolated, some businesses went bankrupt, and some people lost their job. Meanwhile, this party was lining its pockets.
Are you ashamed of your actions?
View Bill Morneau Profile
Lib. (ON)
We know that people and sectors are struggling all over the country. That is why we have decided to allow everyone experiencing difficulties to access our programs, such as the Canada Emergency Response Benefit and the wage subsidy.
This is our approach, and it’s a good approach to improve our situation.
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
They’ve improved it. They raised the wage subsidy from 10% to 75% of payroll for three months and now, they’re up to six months.
Which member of this government said that it was so good that he wanted more?
Who’s guilty of increasing again and again the amount of money they put in their pockets?
View Bill Morneau Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Chair, as I’ve already said, our government decided that it was necessary to protect Canadians from all parts of the country going through tough times because of COVID-19. It’s a good approach.
View Yves-François Blanchet Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
The government is trying to pass a bill that contains quite a few measures, some of which may be helpful. However, it doesn't contain a necessary measure, one that would prevent political parties from accessing wage subsidies and require them to repay subsidies they should have never been entitled to receive.
Does the Prime Minister think immorally funding the Liberal Party of Canada is more important than passing the bill he will be introducing tomorrow?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
We are introducing a bill that will make it possible to provide financial support to Canadians with disabilities. We are going to expand access to the wage subsidy and ease restrictions around the Canada emergency response benefit. These measures will help Canadians, and that is our focus.
We encourage the other parties to work with us to help Canadians.
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
Madam Chair, the Liberal Party of Canada has dipped into the wage subsidy, when it raked in $8 million last year and $3 million this year. Everyone knows that it isn't in trouble.
Let's start with the principle of communicating vessels. The wage subsidy money that the Liberal Party has taken will go into its election funds. My question is simple. Will this party tell the worker who lost his job during COVID-19 that the taxes he paid, even though he is not a Liberal, will go into the Liberal Party of Canada's election fund?
View Mona Fortier Profile
Lib. (ON)
From the beginning, our government has made Canadian workers and families a priority. The wage subsidy does just that. It is designed to help employers to protect the jobs Canadians depend on and to rehire workers who have been laid off. We will continue to provide this support to employers to ensure that jobs are protected until the end of August. We are continuing to ensure that workers are protected during this crisis.
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
This is similar to the principle of double-dipping. This party told us it was taking $210,000 a month in wage subsidies. That's $630,000 that it will put into its election fund. It's going to spend that money. Once it's been spent, the party will receive a 50% reimbursement from the Chief Electoral Officer. That's double-dipping.
Does this party know that during a pandemic, double-dipping doesn't follow the public health guidelines?
View Mona Fortier Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Chair, our message to Quebeckers and Canadians is clear: no matter who they work for, our government supports them.
The wage subsidy is intended to help workers throughout the economy to get through this crisis. To date, more than 2.5 million employees across the country are supported by the wage subsidy. This ensures that they can continue to count on a decent income during this unprecedented challenge. Our government is there for Canadians, and it will continue to be there for Canadians.
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
Madam Chair, I'm going to talk about another principle, the glutton principle. When you try to feed a glutton, you end up running out because a glutton always wants more. It's the same thing with the Liberal Party. They have raked in $210,000 a month, which is $630,000 in three months. The Liberals thought they could get more money by extending the wage subsidy.
Does that bother you?
View Mona Fortier Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Chair, last week, I had the opportunity to speak with a number of employers across the country to see how the wage subsidy was helping them to support their employees. They told us very clearly that we need to keep it in order to support employers and protect jobs across Canada.
We'll continue to do so. Already, more than 2.5 million employees across the country are supported by the wage subsidy. We won't discriminate between workers.
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
Madam Chair, the minister went to the Minister of National Revenue to find out how not to answer questions. She's very effective in her ineffectiveness.
We've seen the principle of communicating vessels, the principle of double-dipping and the principle of the glutton.
Under the “full stop” principle, will the Liberals pay back the money they've taken from taxpayers, when their party is one of the richest in Canada?
View Mona Fortier Profile
Lib. (ON)
Again, I think it's clear that the Canada emergency wage subsidy has been a support and a help for employers and, more importantly, for protecting jobs across the country. Over 2.5 million employees across Canada are protected by this wage subsidy.
We'll keep doing it.
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
It's a bit disconcerting.
I'll ask a simple question.
Does the Liberal Party still have principles?
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
Lib. (QC)
The Liberal Party of Canada is built on the principles, ideas and values of sharing, respect for others and economic development for the benefit of others. Those are the principles of the Liberal Party.
I can repeat them if my colleague asks me another question.
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Chair, we know that the Canada emergency wage subsidy program is funded by Quebec and Canadian taxpayers' money.
Since March 15, the Liberal Party of Canada has taken in about $1 million of taxpayers' money. A poll released yesterday tells us that 57% of Quebec taxpayers want the Liberals to pay back the money.
My question is simple: will they pay back the money?
View Mona Fortier Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Chair, the Canada emergency wage subsidy is designed to help employers protect the jobs that Canadians depend on and rehire workers who have already been laid off. The support is for employers in all sectors and of all sizes, including not-for-profit organizations, who have been hard hit by the COVID-19 pandemic.
To date, more than 2 million employees across the country have been supported by the subsidy and we will continue to support—
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Chair, the million dollars they collected, under the principle of communicating vessels, will end up in the election coffers and will be used to fund the partisanship of the Liberal Party. It is inevitable. That means that the money of taxpayers, be they Liberals or not, will end up funding the Liberal Party's election campaign. It makes no sense.
My question is very simple: will they pay the money back?
View Mona Fortier Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Chair, we do not discriminate between workers anywhere in the country.
We are going to support employers so that they can keep their employees. That is why we established the Canada emergency wage subsidy (CEWS). We will continue to encourage employers to support workers during this pandemic.
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Chair, according to the same poll, 51% of Liberal voters say that they must pay back the money.
Will the Liberal Party listen to its own supporters and pay back the money?
View Mona Fortier Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Chair, the support applies to all employers across the country. We support workers and we want them to be able to continue to work.
Our message to Canadians is clear: no matter who you work for, our government supports you. The wage subsidy is designed to help workers in all sectors of the economy get through this crisis.
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Chair, it is disrespectful not to listen to the voters who are saying that they have to pay back the money.
It is a real lack of respect to give us the answers they have been giving us since we started talking about this issue.
Out of respect, will they pay back the money?
View Mona Fortier Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Chair, we respect Canadians from coast to coast to coast. That is why we established the CEWS and we will continue to support workers during this crisis.
The CEWS is supporting more than 2 million employees across the country right now and it ensures that they can continue to—
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
We are talking about one of the two richest parties in Canada. The other one is finally going to back down on the wage subsidy. We hope so.
The Liberals have raised $8 million since the election on October 21. If everything they are telling us about protecting workers is true, let them answer the following question: how many workers would have been fired by the Liberal Party without this subsidy? If they mean it, let them tell us.
View Mona Fortier Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Chair, the CEWS supports the workers. We will continue to help employers access this important program. As I said earlier, our message to Canadians is clear: no matter who you work for, our government supports you.
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
This Liberal government has created a program that its party is using. That is fine, but for them to play a recorded message when they are asked about it is not fine.
We know that the Liberals have collected $1 million since March 15. We recently learned that they were going to extend the program by three months. If they do not want to pay back the money, that is unacceptable. Can they at least tell us that they will not dip into the program for the next three months?
View Mona Fortier Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Chair, I am going to repeat myself, but it is important to know that the purpose of the CEWS is to support workers across the country. Employers are currently using it and we encourage them to use this program. We are going to support Canadians right to the end.
View Yves-François Blanchet Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Chair, over the past 24 hours, we have discovered that sometimes the Prime Minister's silence speaks louder than his words. He may be tempted to remain silent once again, but that is not the object of the exercise.
I was wondering whether he has seen the Léger poll showing that 48% of Quebeckers do not think the Liberal Party should be eligible for the wage subsidy, compared to 27% who think it should. To be more specific, 40% of voters who identify as Liberals think that the Liberal Party should not be eligible for the wage subsidy.
Should he not consider, like our esteemed Conservative colleagues, giving up the wage subsidy for his party?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Chair, we put in place the wage subsidy to help businesses and organizations across the country to support the people who work for them. They are accountants, translators, office workers. They work and have families who depend on their paycheques.
During the COVID-19 crisis, we are here to support workers across the country.
View Yves-François Blanchet Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Chair, as the days go by, how many times can they repeat the same “non-answer” that says nothing? At a certain point, it gets a little tiresome.
Has the Prime Minister seen that 57% of Quebeckers think he should pay back the wage subsidy, whereas only 21% of Quebeckers think he should keep it? A majority of Liberal voters, 51% of them, think he should pay back the money. The phones must be ringing in Liberal MPs' offices. People must be saying that it does not look good.
Is the Prime Minister starting to think about the ethical issue?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Chair, this crisis is unprecedented. That is why we are investing to help workers across the country, whether they work for large companies, small companies, not-for-profit organizations or charities.
We are here to help workers who depend on a paycheque to support their families.
View Yves-François Blanchet Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Chair, it is increasingly clear that silence speaks louder than words.
How much money has the Liberal Party received through the wage subsidy?
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