Committee
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 15 of 1177
View John Herron Profile
PC (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I have a couple of questions. Overall, with respect to the infrastructure programs, do you see the role of Infrastructure Canada as a facilitator and partner for provinces and municipalities to obtain objectives that fit the criteria of your program, as opposed to the other way around, where the federal government would have their eye on a project and seek partners?
View John Herron Profile
PC (NB)
Let's say a given municipality clearly defines what its objective is, a city-size project. When they make it very clear in their own house that this is a project they want to go forward with, what are the next steps they need to take in order to obtain those types of funds? Do they need to have the province cheek and jowl with them?
View John Herron Profile
PC (NB)
With SIF, when a municipality that's large in nature has its act together on where it wants to go, how do they “apply” for that type of funding? Where are the appropriate forms? How do they notify your department when it's seriously time for them to engage?
View John Herron Profile
PC (NB)
Thank you, sir.
Just very briefly before I begin, on Mr. Godfrey's comment, doing a report would probably be more comprehensive, but perhaps it would be even more expeditious to write a letter in advance to the minister flagging these potential loopholes and expecting him, when he shows up, to offer some solutions in that presentation. It's maybe a more informal way to do it, but probably it would be more expeditious.
I'm a little curious about how the inventory itself is collected with large final emitters. More importantly, once the inventory is developed, what process is in place in terms of how it's audited down the road?
View John Herron Profile
PC (NB)
A second question, and it was touched on before, is whether there was any best practices example of how we could address the types of loopholes the EU faced. If we can't do it from an entire EU perspective, the national governments within the EU have different challenges, and I always look very closely at Sweden: like us, they're a cold climate; like us, they have an export-driven, energy-intensive economy; and like us, they have a large land mass and a small population.
Are there examples in terms of how we may be able to...? How do the Swedes address these types of issues and loopholes? And because our economies even mirror each other so much, are they allowed to trade within different sectors as well?
View John Herron Profile
PC (NB)
I was curious about making a comparison with a specific country within the EU, even though they're all within that same basket itself, because the Swedish and Canadian economies mirror each other as closely as most, if not almost all.
When the Swedes were able to negotiate within the EU to take a much lower target than most European nations are taking, how did they get around the issue? If we have growth or higher production in resource-based energy-intensive industries, how do you help us in that regard?
View John Herron Profile
PC (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
View Elsie Wayne Profile
CPC (NB)
View Elsie Wayne Profile
2003-11-06 12:08
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
I want to welcome the honourable minister here. You'll note that I didn't wear one of my sweaters today. I just wore a scarf today.
But I will say this. I was in Newfoundland about a month and a half ago for some meetings. On the day I was checking out to leave for the airport, when I went to the desk, there were three gentlemen there who wanted to know if they could speak to me. One was an air force gentleman. The other two were army gentlemen.
The air force gentleman said, “Mrs. Wayne, we have to have parts to replace in our Hercules, and we don't have the money in our budget. We don't have the parts for our Hercules. We need some help.”
The other two men were in the army, and one man said, “I've been in the army for 25 years, Mrs. Wayne. My son's been in the army now for five years. When I had been in the army for five years, I wanted to stay for 25, but my son doesn't want that any more because of the quality of life we have.”
I tell you this, because I was really humbled by them waiting to speak to me on these issues. As you know, I've been one of the voices speaking on the replacement of the Sea Kings. I would like to know just exactly when we are going to have the replacement of the Sea Kings. Of course, as you know, I am not in favour of the cheapest; I'm in favour of the best, whatever is the best for a replacement. But I have to tell you this is for two reasons. One reason is the coastal surveillance on the west coast as well as over in Newfoundland. When we have foreign ships coming in dragging the bottom of the ocean, taking the eggs and the baby fish and so on from the bottom of the ocean—I'm talking about hundreds of thousands of them—we're killing the fishery. That is what has killed the fishery. We don't have the surveillance we should have.
But when these men told me they didn't have the money for the parts that require replacing in the Hercules, it almost brought tears to my eyes.
I want to congratulate you, because you have not played politics with the military, and you never have. I appreciate that, but I'm going to say this. We can say what we like about the States. Down there, as you know, in the Bush government, the military is a number one priority. It truly is. They don't have to fight for money. They don't have to push for money. Everybody agrees.
I still feel very strongly, Mr. Minister, that we in Canada have to make our military a number one priority. To me, it's before health, education, no matter what we look at. We have priorities, but the military men and women—and there are some here today—can't come up on the Hill and protest. They look to us and look to you.
All of us, we have to take the politics out of it. You don't play politics around this table, and most of our colleagues do not play politics with it. We're here to try to support you, and we will continue to do so. But I still feel very strongly that the military has to be a number one priority with our Government of Canada, no matter who is the government, and we have to make sure our voices are heard.
View Greg Thompson Profile
CPC (NB)
Excuse me, Mr. Chairman. On a point of order, I believe that because of our ranking in the House of Commons, the Progressive Conservative member will be next.
View Greg Thompson Profile
CPC (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Mr. Casey would normally be here, Mr. Sampson, and I'm filling in for Mr. Casey.
I'm intrigued by this idea of soft diplomacy or soft power being exercised by the Government of Canada in its commitment to getting you released. Complicit in all this is the sense that they never really felt you were innocent. In other words, there was a sort of reluctance on their part to move vigorously in your case, because there was an underlying feeling that you were in fact guilty, that they didn't really believe in your innocence.
Along with this, I want you to comment, Mr. Sampson, on the obvious connection between your case and the Maher Arar case, where information is obviously being shopped around and exchanged by the Government of Canada with Syrian officials and others, in terms of the questioning and interrogation of Maher Arar, in an attempt to get information on you. Is there any evidence that is happening?
I do want you to focus on that sense of the lack of commitment to you on the part of the Government of Canada, in terms of your innocence.
View André Bachand Profile
Ind. (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
Thank you very much for coming here. First of all, I wish my colleagues from the other provinces had been able to get the background material on the National Bank. While I don't wish to do any advertising on the bank's behalf, as Mr. Dubreuil mentioned, this institution is very much involved at the regional level. My region is one such example. As you said, the fact that this institution's operations are concentrated mainly in Quebec may not be something positive, but the fact remains that this concentration gives you nearly 40 per cent of the SME market.
I have a few quick questions for you. On the subject of small business start up, do you know what percentage of loans are awarded under various federal programs, what we commonly referred to in Quebec as the Small Business Loans Act, or in partnership with the CDIC, that is under federal development funding programs? What is the percentage of loans guaranteed under a federal or provincial program versus the percentage of loans that are not guaranteed?
View André Bachand Profile
Ind. (QC)
Thank you very much.
With respect to regional development, mention was made of small businesses. My colleague talked about tourism, a tertiary industry or sector that drives the economy. It's a fact that most financial institutions, whether provincially or federally regulated, are abandoning the tertiary sector, for example, the food and restaurant or other high risk sectors.
Having said that, in the regions, a number of businesses develop with the help of the tourism sector and with export assistance. I'm curious as to the kind of assistance you can lend to small businesses wishing to export their products, since this is one growing market in a state of considerable flux. Specifically, what areas do you focus on when considering export assistance for small businesses seeking help under certain export assistance programs? As bankers, what role do you play in this process?
View André Bachand Profile
Ind. (QC)
Our time is running short.
One of the major problems likely encountered everywhere in Canada—although I'm mostly familiar with the situation in Quebec—is the whole question of the second generation of small businesses. Unfortunately, as we're seeing more and more, businesses are not surviving. When they are taken over by the second generation, they are either sold or closed down. People don't know who to turn to for assistance. We hear a lot about SMEs. However, the longevity of the second generation will ensure the longevity of generations yet to come. The subject often comes up in the regions.
View André Bachand Profile
Ind. (QC)
Which one is that?
View Elsie Wayne Profile
CPC (NB)
View Elsie Wayne Profile
2003-11-04 12:28
Vice-Admiral, I had one of the members in uniform come to me, and they were worried about the Hercules.
Results: 1 - 15 of 1177 | Page: 1 of 79

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data