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Results: 1 - 52 of 52
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you for joining us, Shane. In your two years as minister, you've certainly seen your share of emergencies, especially when it comes to floods. It's quite concerning that we're starting to see floods in communities where we really didn't have the same level of flooding before. I appreciate your comment about seeing the 200-year flood levels being reached. For example, Hay River was developed with what they called a “new town”. It was not supposed to flood, and this year it flooded.
I'm quite concerned. We have, as you stated, many communities without roads. We have many communities without police. We have a lot more ships in the northern part of the territory and we really don't have any navigational aids, so it's an accident waiting to happen. I'm not sure how we would handle it, because the coastal communities don't have a lot of larger boats.
The Canadian Rangers are a good support. I belong to the rangers. I was a master corporal with the rangers. I volunteered to work with the junior rangers, but I know that they don't have equipment. They don't have radios, so they can't talk to each other. They don't have air support. They don't really have a budget. The radios the police use are not the same as the ones the fire department or the health centre uses. The synchronization of equipment is not there.
It's really important when disasters strike. It's critical that all levels of government know their roles and responsibilities, and that they maintain good communications between all levels of government and with the residents.
My first question is whether you think that additional training opportunities and planning resources would help ensure that there's no confusion in these communities and have everybody on the same page, so to speak.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Just quickly, our communities in the north are quite young compared to the cities and towns in the south. Most of our communities have very little in terms of infrastructure. Some of it's fairly new. In the case of Fort Simpson and Jean Marie, for example, when the flood hit the power supply was in the areas that got flooded, the sewer and water systems. Mitigation is going to be needed when it comes to relocating critical infrastructure and building berms.
Do you have any suggestions for the government on supporting infrastructure in northern and indigenous communities that will help them mitigate the damage they may face from natural disasters?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you again, Mr. Chair.
I want to ask about search and rescue. I know that we've been talking a lot about floods and the situation around how we're dealing with the challenges there. Search and rescue in the Northwest Territories is also an issue that needs attention, especially in light of the fact that three years ago, I think, before COVID hit, we had 33 vessels come through the Beaufort Sea. That was from large cruise ships to people in kayaks.
At some point, we're going to have an accident. It's just a matter of time. We don't have any navigation aids. We don't have all the mapping that's required. People are going in there blind.
I want to ask you about the response for search and rescue. Almost everything is located in the south. It takes sometimes a couple of days to get a search plane, if the weather is bad, in Ontario. What do you suggest would be a solution to that? It's obvious that we should have something in the north.
I'll let you maybe speak to that a little bit more.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
We talked about many things under disasters. I have to give you a lot of credit, Shane, for all the upgrades and work you've done in the area of support, and the disaster assistance and information that is being put out there. The one thing that is not clear to me is the security of the community when everybody leaves. I don't think most communities are able to really deal with this when there's an evacuation. Lots of our small communities don't have the RCMP. Lots of times there's looting. There are people who stay behind and get into all kinds of mischief. The leaders are asking for the Canadian Rangers or the military to come in, but in most cases I believe the rangers are not allowed to do security.
What is the answer? What would you recommend the federal government put in place to help with that? It's not a really widespread problem, but it does exist.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Yes, Mr. Chairman, I do have a couple of questions.
Thank you, Marcus.
I have one more question for Mr. Thompson around information with respect to what's out there in terms of programs, in terms of support. Many of our communities can't access insurance for disasters. A lot of our communities don't have fire brigades, fire support and fire hydrants, so insurance companies are very reluctant to go into small indigenous communities. My office gets quite a few questions regarding how things work.
Does Minister Thompson feel that it would be in order for the federal government to work with different jurisdictions in terms of improving communications on how federal programs like disaster assistance work and how disaster mitigation works to let people know how to find their way through the process?
I understand that the GNWT is putting together some positions so that it can help, but there's a lot of concern. For example, in Hay River, I think we had 300 or 400 homes flooded, so there are lots of people with question marks.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
There's one more point I want to raise.
I wanted to ask this to Chief Martel. In my observation of the floods on the K'atl'odeeche reserve and in the town of Hay River, which are across the river from each other, I think the treatment of each was a little bit different.
I visited both communities after the flood. I was told on the reserve that they had a good team together, all local people, along with the chief as the lead, but there wasn't a lot of presence from anybody else. In fact, the police were all concerned about Hay River, but there was no one from the RCMP on the reserve. The chief just about got caught up in the flood. The ice closed in on the road behind her. Several vehicles got in really dangerous predicaments. If somebody hadn't had the sense to jump in a loader and knock some of these big ice pieces out of the way, there could have been a different ending to that situation.
What can you do or what have you been doing to try to ensure that the indigenous communities, the smaller communities, are treated in the same way as the larger regional centres, so that agencies such as the RCMP and your own emergency measures people are treating everybody fairly?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to the presenters today. It has been a very interesting discussion, for sure.
I'm glad to see Sara Brown joining us. She always brings forward a lot of energy and many good ideas.
I wanted to ask about the north's preparedness when it comes to emergency situations. In the last three years in the Northwest Territories we have experienced quite a few floods in the communities. Last year we had seven, and we have had several this year. There's always the threat of forest fires, and many of the calls I get are from community leaders and individuals who are asking for information on the process and who is responsible for what, even when it comes to looting in the community after the community is evacuated. Sometimes the communities will be asking for the rangers, but the rangers don't have that mandate.
I want to ask Sara if she thinks that additional training opportunities and additional resources would help ensure that there is no confusion in the emergency situations that we've experienced.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
I have another question for you, Sara. I want to know if you have any suggestions for the government on supporting infrastructure, especially in our smaller indigenous communities, that could help mitigate the damage they may face from natural disasters. We have a lot of communities that are under threat from flood. We have a lot of communities that now are being challenged by erosion, and we're still seeing communities that don't have berms or dikes.
In fact, they don't have the ability to relocate major pieces of infrastructure, some of them very important pieces of infrastructure like power plants and sewer lagoons and water treatment plants that are located in flood areas. When those go, then it's the whole community.... Whether the house is flooded or not, if you don't get water or power, you're out of luck.
That's something that seems to be lacking.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
For my last question, I want to ask you if you could expand a bit on your recommendation to make partnerships official policy. Could you explain what that really means?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Mr. Chair, I was hoping that I'd be able to ask Betty Villebrun some questions. I'm not sure if we're going to reconnect with her.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
I'll start with Grand Chief Kyikavichik.
Ken, thank you for presenting here today. I think you brought us a lot of information, a lot of real-life scenarios and many things that I've also experienced and heard about.
We heard from the federal minister, who talked about the areas that they want to focus on, but there's one area that concerns me, and I want you to let us know if this is an area that you've had to deal with. It's regarding escorts. More specifically, it's about people who are medevaced out. They're usually in critical condition and on a stretcher. They're taken from the health centre and sent south. They don't have an escort. They're there for emergency purposes.
When things turn around, when they're better or it's time for them to go home, because they never came with an escort, they can't have an escort to leave. The hospital brings them to the door and says, “Okay, sir,” or “Okay, madam, it's time for you to go.” A lot of times they're not dressed properly or they don't speak the English language well enough. There are a couple of horror stories that I've encountered over the last while.
Can you talk about that as an area that maybe we need to start really focusing on to make sure that escorts are provided? For me as an MP, the biggest issue on medical travel is the issue of escorts.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to everybody who presented here. As a Métis person, I was getting a little nervous when you started talking about Métis citizens dying earlier than the rest of Canadians.
Voices: Oh, oh!
Mr. Michael McLeod: In the Northwest Territories, we're in a little bit of a different situation, because we do have Métis Health, and it's a good program. It's oversubscribed, but every community also has compassionate travel.
We heard from the NWT Métis Nation here several meetings ago, when they talked about housing. Now, housing money has flowed to the national indigenous organizations. The NIOs have received money, but the NWT Métis Nation didn't get any of the housing money.
If the government decides to have money flow to the national indigenous organizations, which one of your organizations would get money? Could you give us just a short answer?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
To all three—
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Okay. It's for the Alberta guy, Lee.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I want to say thank you to the minister and her team for taking the time to talk to us today about this very interesting and very important issue of NIHB.
One of the main concerns about NIHB that I hear from my constituents and from indigenous governments in Northwest Territories is around escorts for medical travel. It seems very inconsistent. Some people qualify and some don't. Some jurisdictions allow for more medical escorts than others. It's not very clear. This point was echoed by Minister Green from GNWT on her presentation to committee at the last meeting.
My first question is this. Is the Government of Canada able to make the changes needed to make the process for getting an escort for medical travel easier and also clearer?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
I'm going to interrupt you. I was looking for an answer on how you're going to make it better. You pointed to some of the areas. I appreciate that.
I recently had a friend who had cancer and was very sick. He was sent to Edmonton by air ambulance from Yellowknife. The diagnosis was terminal cancer, and he was then told to travel back on commercial aircraft. He didn't have his shoes or a jacket, because he was medevaced there. We need to be more sensitive when it comes to dealing with people who are so sick that they are brought in on an air ambulance and can barely walk. It was really embarrassing to have to try to find a way to explain that or talk about that.
One of the key ways to improve the medical escorts element is to make the non-insured health benefit more culturally appropriate. In my riding, we have residents and elders in small communities who don't speak English, and a lot of them can't eat or refuse to eat hospital food or western food. They feel very uncomfortable just leaving their community to go to Yellowknife, for example, never mind going south to larger centres like Edmonton.
In what ways is the government able to make NIHB more culturally appropriate?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
Thank you to the presenters today.
My questions will go to Mr. Garry Bailey, the president of the Métis council of the Northwest Territories.
First of all, I want to say thank you, Garry, for agreeing to join us again. It's unfortunate that we couldn't get the sound system to work the last time. I'm happy that you're here to present the situation of the NWT Métis when it comes to receiving programs.
The government has made many historic announcements, when it comes to housing, to the national indigenous organizations, but it seems we never can make it work for the NWT Métis. Even the $500 million that went to the Métis National Council didn't flow to the Northwest Territories Métis. They were left out again.
I wanted to get Mr. Bailey to tell us how the Government of Canada can improve the design of their housing programs to ensure that Métis governments—like the NWT Métis, but there are also Métis in Alberta that are being left out—are able to access housing dollars when they're not represented by national indigenous organizations.
That's my first question.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
I'm going to ask two quick questions. It's important that everybody understands the situation for the NWT Métis. This committee is studying it, so the recommendations will come from here.
First of all, the Métis National Council does get housing money. Is the NWT Métis membership counted in the Métis National Council's numbers?
The second one I think you touched on. Could you talk about how important it would be to settle self-governments and also land claims through your new framework? How would that help address the housing needs for the NWT Métis?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to all of the witnesses today. These are very interesting presentations.
I want to quickly make a bit of a statement on the friendship centres, and then ask Chief Martel a question. I really appreciate the work that the friendship centres are doing. I personally think that every indigenous community in this country should have a friendship centre with an expanded mandate and a budget that supports it.
My question is for K'atl'odeeche First Nation's Chief Martel. First of all, thank you for joining us. It's good to see you here.
I think we've talked about housing many times and some of the challenges that you're facing. First of all, the K'atl'odeeche is a reserve, but it's not treated the same as a reserve in the south. K'atl'odeeche is also an indigenous community, but it's not treated the same as the indigenous communities in the north.
Now that you're here presenting in front of us, maybe you can take the opportunity to tell us what steps the Government of Canada could take to recognize the unique nature of reserves north of 60 such as yours, like KFN. How could they make sure that they have better access to federal housing programs?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Could you tell us why K'atl'odeeche, which is a reserve that was formed by the federal government, is not funded like the other reserves in the south are? Do you know why that is?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Could you tell us if you get any funding directly from the federal government at this point? Has the reserve, at any point since it was created, received any funding similar to what the reserves in the south get?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
I'm not sure if you would have a dollar figure, but I will ask you anyway. What would it take, what would an annual budget have to look like, to make sure the membership of your community is living in safe and secure homes? Would you have an estimate of what it would cost on an annual basis?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Chief.
Those are my questions, Mr. Chair.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Mr. Chairman, on a point of order, it's unfortunate that we can't move forward with Mr. Bailey's presentation. It points to the fact that we don't have any opportunities. There's no chance you're going to mail a headset to anybody in the Northwest Territories unless you're going to give us two to three weeks' advance notice. That really puts us at a disadvantage if it comes down to bringing people to make presentations. We have to find a better way. I'm wasting my time here if I can't bring my witnesses in to present on a very important matter. We have the second-highest core need in the country, and we can't get a person who is really deeply affected by it as a leader to present. There has to be a solution. It's not the first time, but it affects us more in the north than in any other part of this country.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Mr. Chair, it appears that one of the presenters cannot not hear the translation.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to the presenters today for a very interesting discussion.
I understand that the Metis Settlements General Council currently has a budget request for emergency interim funding.
I want to know what will happen to the Metis Settlements General Council and to the settlements if they don't receive any of the emergency interim funding?
Maybe we could get the Metis Settlements to describe the emergency and how serious this issue is.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
I have a quick question. This government has announced many different programs for indigenous people and indigenous governments. Why are some of the current funding programs that are out there now are not working for the settlements?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Mr. Chairman, I have a hearing issue. There's a significant difference between the volume on the interpreter versus the minister's volume. I'm playing with this button on and off, and every time it switches, it's just about blowing what hearing I do have left out of my ears.
Is there any way we could get that balanced, so that I don't have to be switching back and forth?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to both ministers for presenting today. There's a lot of interesting discussion happening.
I want to make, first, a comment to Minister Vandal about nutrition north.
In the Northwest Territories I think we have 10 communities on the nutrition north program. We don't want to be on that program, but in order for us to get off the nutrition north program we need a solution. The solution is in the government's hands, because in the Northwest Territories the federal government is still responsible for building new roads. So, if you took the opportunity and found the investment to build roads to these communities, we wouldn't need the growing subsidy.
When I got involved in the government many years ago the program was only about $20 million. We're well over $100 million a year now. That's a suggestion, and I keep reminding you of it.
Minister Miller, I belong to the Dehcho First Nations, and I started attending meetings when I was 17 years old. I was talking about recreation facilities and sports programs. The elders were talking about land claims. I'm now 62 years old, and we're still talking about land claims and self-government for the people of my tribal council. Things were not moving very fast, and in 2014 it got even worse because the Conservative government cut funding to band councils, to core funding, to tribal councils and they also cut the resources to the department.
Just before COVID hit I talked to a small community that's negotiating in the Northwest Territories—Colville Lake. We have 14 tables going on in the Northwest Territories. The chief said that in the Northwest Territories when negotiators come, they leave Ottawa Monday morning and fly all day to get to Yellowknife. After 12 hours they stay overnight in Yellowknife. The next day they catch the commercial flight to Norman Wells, and they stay there for another night. Wednesday morning they charter a plane into Colville Lake, get settled into their rooms, and we start negotiations on Wednesday afternoon. We do introductions and set the agenda. Thursday morning we start negotiating, and at noon we start packing up so that the negotiators can head back to Ottawa. They fly to Yellowknife Thursday night and Friday they head all the way back to Ottawa. A half of a day once a month, and it's not improving.
At this rate we're not going to settle any land claims. I've been here six and a half years and we haven't signed one land claim in the Northwest Territories. It's not the indigenous government's fault; it's the federal government's fault. They don't have the investment and resources to do a good job. There are negotiators with more files than they can handle.
Can you suggest a solution? Is there a strategy that you're working on to try to improve the ability for the federal government to take part in the negotiations to speed them up? At this rate—I'm 62 now—I'm not going to see an AIP in my lifetime in the part of the country that I live in.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Let's vote in one motion.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
First of all, I want to say how much I appreciate hearing our colleague MP Stubbs speak about the issue of homelessness. It strikes a chord with me as the member for the Northwest Territories where our situation is at a crisis level.
I really appreciate the minister of housing, Paulie Chinna, joining us. Paulie has done a lot of work as an advocate for the issue of housing.
We all know it's not going to be an easy solution. We all know there is no silver bullet that's going to fix it. We have 33 communities and every one of them is facing challenges. There is no one-size-fits-all.
Could the minister tell the committee what some of the barriers are that she sees for the northern communities and governments to access some of the programs and the funding dollars that are available? What can be done to make it easier to access these dollars? I hear quite a few indigenous governments and organizations speak of this challenge.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Could you tell us what the Government of Canada can do to help reduce the cost of building new homes in the Northwest Territories?
Do you think there are ways to build local capacity in the communities to make construction and repairs of units more affordable?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I'd like to welcome our presenters, Chief Daniels, Chris Googoo and, from the Northwest Territories, Darrell Beaulieu.
It's a real pleasure to hear the presentations, with lots of good information.
My question is for Darrell Beaulieu. I know personally that Denendeh developments has interests in a wide variety of sectors. Are there any particular sectors of the economy that, as an indigenous organization, you have found more difficult to get involved in? If so, what steps can the Government of Canada take to help organizations like yours diversify into some of these new fields?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you for that.
As you know, Darrell, I've been very interested in the work you've been doing with the NWT indigenous leaders economic coalition and now you have an opportunity to talk to the Government of Canada and talk to this committee.
How can the Government of Canada better support your vision for a better future for indigenous economic development in the Northwest Territories?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
I just want to ask about fairness.
Darrell, do you feel that the indigenous businesses in the north are treated the same as they are on reserve and in the south?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Mr. Chair, after reading the report and looking at the text.... There was a study to look at the housing shortages; I think it was put forward by the Bloc and Madame Gill. I would like to propose changes to the text and some different wording. The original text doesn't include Métis, and I was hoping we'd be able to include some of the work that's already been done.
I provided some of the wording already.
Can I bring forward the amendment that I'd like to see?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
The proposed new text would read, “1. Further to the motion of Tuesday, February 1, 2022, it was agreed”—
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
My wording would be:
1. Further to the motion of Tuesday, February 1, 2022, it was agreed that the following motion replace paragraph two in the First Report from the Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure: That, pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), the committee undertake a study on the effects of the housing shortage on Indigenous Peoples across Canada; that the committee invite the Minister of Indigenous Services, experts and government officials to examine this issue; that the committee hold a maximum of six meetings on this issue; that the study takes into consideration and builds on the evidence from the HUMA report entitled Indigenous Housing: The Direction Home (adopted on May 6, 2021), the PBO report on Urban, Rural and Northern Housing (February 11, 2021); that the committee report its findings and recommendations to the House; and that the committee request that the government table a comprehensive response to the report within a year. 2. That witness lists be made in a prioritized order and circulated between the parties.
Those are my recommendations, Mr. Chair.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to the two ministers for joining us. I really appreciated the presentation. It was very informative and interesting, for sure.
I've been involved in indigenous issues for most of my adult life, trying to deal with the situation in the community I live in and the communities across the north when it comes to quality of life. I was attending tribal council meetings when I was 17 years old. Some of the issues that we're talking about now are issues that I was talking about then.
A lot of effort has been made to bring back what was lost. We now have 14 tables in the Northwest Territories that are talking about land claims, land tenure, self-governance and compensation. It's all important stuff and we need to right some of the wrongs that were happening to us. We've also made a lot of progress on resource revenue sharing and on mandatory process participation. It's all important stuff.
However, we needed some changes to be made. I was really happy to see the new self-government fiscal policy come into play. It was done in a collaborative approach with indigenous people and it's a good document.
I wanted to ask the minister if she could tell me how that document—they call it the “green book”—covers economic development and how that's going to benefit the indigenous people.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
I have another question, this one for Mr. Vandal, regarding the abandoned mine program and how that creates opportunities for indigenous businesses and people and for skill development.
Minister Vandal, a large part of your ministry is the northern abandoned mine reclamation program, which I think has around $2.2 billion allocated in budget 2019 to clean up these sites.
That includes a number of mines. Giant Mine is one of them, and probably one of the more prominent ones. Last August, you signed some agreements with the Yellowknives Dene. There are others, such as the Silver Bear mine and Norman Wells oil fields that are going to undergo reclamation. There's going to be a lot of reclamation in the Northwest Territories.
Could you perhaps update us on what these types of agreements you've signed with the Yellowknives Dene will result in? How important are these types of projects to indigenous businesses and to northern economic success?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I'm hoping that the interpreters can hear me. I've made some adjustments to my microphone.
I want to say, first of all, welcome to all the presenters today. I really appreciate having Manny Jules, Harold Calla and former northerner Ernie Daniels, a colleague of mine from way back, appearing before us.
There are some very interesting points being made. I'm hoping, Mr. Chairman, that these three individuals will provide us with the documents, which some of them have referenced, for us to use as part of our review of this issue in committee.
I don't have to tell any of these three how important this issue is. Looking at the barriers and at the issue of economic reconciliation is very important for us if we are to move forward. It's a big part of reconciliation. In the Northwest Territories, we've been doing a lot of work on this issue because it has to be part of the plan of nation rebuilding and reconstituting nations, that is, the question of how we're going to govern ourselves and how we're going to finance ourselves. The financing scheme has to be very diverse because there's no one pot of money we can dip into.
We've been talking a lot about resource revenue sharing, and at our last Liberal convention, we passed a motion that 50% of resource revenues that are raised and that go to the federal government and the Northwest Territories would go to the indigenous governments, and we've been talking about taxation of our own membership once we sign and settle self-governance agreements and move forward on land tenure.
Another big piece is the review of indigenous procurement. Up to now, the procurement policies have just not been working. They're so old and outdated that they don't work for us, and they're cumbersome to use.
There are lots of things happening. I was very keen to see the document, the article, that Ernie Daniels put forward on replacing the diesel generators in the Northwest Territories. I think, Ernie, you talked about looking at one pot of money, and I think you referenced the money that's there for infrastructure for indigenous communities, but I'm curious to know if you're not looking at other funding sources or pots of money. There was a pot of money through the Arctic energy fund. I think there was $400 million in there.
Would a combination of different funding sources from the government allow you to move forward and do a pilot project? That's my first question, and then I'll follow up with a second question once you've referred to that.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Mr. Chair, could I interrupt for just one second? I'm hearing both voices at the same time. I'm hearing Serge and the interpreter, and I can't make out either.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Are you guys hearing it, or am I the only one hearing both?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
That means I have two votes, Chair, at committee.
I don't know why I'm on twice.
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