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Results: 1 - 30 of 5838
View Leah Gazan Profile
NDP (MB)
I move that section 515 of the act be amended by adding the following after subsection (4.2):
(4.21) If the Attorney General requests that an accused who is charged with an offence against their intimate partner wear an electronic monitoring device, the Attorney General must take all reasonable measures to ensure that
(a) a device is available that makes the monitoring possible, regardless of the geographic area in which the accused has been directed to remain; and
(b) if the accused were to approach any place where any victim, witness or other person identified in an order made under subsection (2) might reasonably be found, emergency services would be available to provide any necessary assistance to that person.
View Leah Gazan Profile
NDP (MB)
Sure. In the committee meetings on this bill, one of the criticisms that was raised was access to this specific resource, meaning the electronic monitoring device. There were issues with when a person would be able to have an electronic device and if there were the appropriate supports in place to ensure that the individual were safe.
Those are the purposes of the amendment.
View Leah Gazan Profile
NDP (MB)
Thank you, Chair.
I just so appreciate this committee. I really do love this committee. It's so weird, because you would think this wasn't politics.
Just going back to some of the feedback, this actually is directly related to the feedback about accessibility. I take Pam's points about the second one. It has to be within the confines of the law. I appreciate that, with the intent, however, to reflect the deep concerns that were raised by some of the witness testimony.
In proposed subsection (4.21)—and again I'm not a lawyer—it says, “all reasonable measures”. It says “a device is available that makes the monitoring possible, regardless of the geographic area in which the accused has been directed to remain”. So I think it's all reasonable, knowing that there are issues with cell service. But with regard to “all reasonable”, I could be wrong, but I think covers that disparity in access.
View Leah Gazan Profile
NDP (MB)
I actually have a question. We're talking about policing being a provincial jurisdiction, but that's not actually true on reserve or in certain areas where it's within the RCMP's jurisdiction. Does that fall outside of provincial jurisdiction, or would that be within provincial jurisdictions? For example, if the RCMP are policing on reserve, is that provincial or federal jurisdiction? I'm just wondering.
View Leah Gazan Profile
NDP (MB)
Yes, particularly related to the policing piece—not the courts piece but the policing piece. Whose jurisdiction is that? Do you know what I mean?
View Leah Gazan Profile
NDP (MB)
Right—that piece I understand. It's the policing piece that I don't.
View Leah Gazan Profile
NDP (MB)
That's tribal police.
View Leah Gazan Profile
NDP (MB)
I'd like to thank everybody for their feedback relating to the proposed amendment. I'm certainly not attached to it.
I'll go back to what Pam recommended at the beginning, in terms of not necessarily excluding it as an opportunity to discuss some of the gaps, particularly around cell service and accessibility. It's to ensure that the testimony that was provided is very well reflected in the bill or, even if it doesn't make it into the bill, that the discussions around the bill are reflected.
View Leah Gazan Profile
NDP (MB)
Thank you, Chair.
I do support the amendment and in light of that, I like to withdraw my amendment to the next one because it's reflected in the motion.
View Leah Gazan Profile
NDP (MB)
Thank you, Chair. I do support moving a motion today for a couple of reasons.
One is out of respect for Jennifer Kagan, who put forward an amendment that fell outside.... I think we owe that to the sacrifice that she and her family made. I think that's critical.
The other thing is—and I'm saying this because I want it on record—that lots of these programs that come about, including e-bracelets, don't impact a population that's been identified with the highest rates of violence, indigenous women and girls, many of whom will not benefit from this program. I just want to be on the record saying that.
I think having that in a motion and making sure that the motion gets out today is really critical, and in honour of the crisis of murdered and missing indigenous women and girls as well.
Thank you.
View Leah Gazan Profile
NDP (MB)
Thank you so much, Madam Chair.
I just want to start out by saying that I don't think it's my position to assume the intent of anybody in the room. You have done a very outstanding job as chair. I'm really honoured to be part of a committee where we actually get things done.
That aside, as the status of women committee, with that wording, amendments could happen. It's important that we stand up for the rights of women that are stipulated in the charter without qualification. We're the only ones doing it in the House of Commons. There are very few of us who are standing up for the rights of women, including a right that's been affirmed through the Supreme Court and is part of our Canadian charter: to be able to have a safe and accessible abortion.
I certainly was in support of the motion without thought, as it's my obligation as a member of Parliament. It's without question. I just want to share that I am surprised. I don't really see this, as well, as a partisan issue. I support the motion to adjourn for now, so we can continue getting the bill through. I do think this is a critical discussion to have in committee. I don't think this is a discussion that we can sidestep. I think it's something critical. However, we need to do it. We need to discuss this as a committee.
I have a final thought: The most difficult changes come from difficult discussions. I think, because our committee has done such a good job—even in accepting my study, which is a very difficult study for people to go through—I have faith in the committee members that we can get through some of these discussions, which may be difficult for some. I just want to leave it there.
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you, and thanks to the witnesses for being here.
I'm going to stay with Mr. Robinson to let him finish up on that theme, because, as he said, it was a complicated thing. From some of the reports that CAUT has done, the actual percentage of university budgets that relates to salaries has dropped steadily over the years. I'm imagining that's because they're spending more on other things, whether it's research or infrastructure.
Could you comment on that? You were just beginning to touch on that, getting back to concentrating on the education aspects that are so important.
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you.
I want to move to Dr. Myers. I'll stay on the same theme.
Dr. Myers, you were talking about it not being an entirely salary-driven process for attracting talent. Part of it is that brilliance attracts brilliance. I think that is something close to what you said.
I also want to make sure of something, because we were having trouble seeing the slides at this end of the room. When you were talking about Dr. Kendrick Smith, I thought I saw a picture of CHIME there.
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
That is a facility in my riding, so I was happy to see that. I'm happy to see researchers in other parts of the country using that facility. Hopefully, we'll maybe see it as part of this committee work.
Just to get back to that, you said you had 25 faculty and 22 who are part time. Are those 25 faculty all at Waterloo? Do you have full-time faculty associated with a number of institutions?
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
I'm trying to get a handle on how that all.... You said it was an independent non-profit organization. Where does your core funding for the Perimeter Institute come from if it doesn't come from the regular government research funding sources?
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
Okay. Thanks very much. I just wanted to get that straight in my mind.
I'm going to move back to Mr. Robinson, if I have a minute or so.
Again, when I worked at the University of British Columbia, I saw the beginning of that erosion of full-time research faculty. They were teaching undergraduate courses like Biology 101, Chemistry 100 and that sort of thing. Now pretty much all of those first-year courses—or a lot of them—are taught by contract teachers who are fully qualified academically to do research but, as you said, are not.
I'm wondering, Mr. Robinson, if you could comment on the effect that has on the inspiration for young scientists who are going into first- or second-year university who I think would really benefit by being taught by researchers who are doing exciting stuff.
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you.
I'll turn to Ms. Watts-Rynard. You were rushed at the end of your initial presentation. You had the three recommendations. I didn't really catch all of the third recommendation, so maybe you could expand on that for 45 seconds. I'd appreciate it.
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you.
I'm going to stick with this line. I must say that I was just flabbergasted when I found out a few months ago that the values of these grants and scholarships that support our graduate students—and not just our graduate students, but our best graduate students, the ones who actually qualify for these grants and scholarships—hadn't changed since 2003. I think I was meeting with CASA or perhaps another group.
How does this happen? It's not just that the cost of living has gone up since then; tuition has skyrocketed since then. Now we have students trying to live on $17,000 or $20,000 a year, well below the poverty line and well below minimum wage. I was a grad student, and it was a full-time job.
I don't know.... I guess I'll ask you, Dr. Goosney. Why has it not come to the attention of anyone at the tri-council that these students are suffering? As to whether it's hard on their mental health, I know it's hard on them just to get enough money for groceries. Now they have to work part time or go into debt. Why did this happen? How can we fix it as soon as possible?
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you, and I hope we fix it by 2023, not by 2030.
I want to turn to Mr. Fotang to talk about something. I don't know if anyone has actually mentioned this.
This study is about attracting the best and brightest. I'm just wondering, Mr. Fotang, if you perhaps can comment on attracting international students and comment on the difficulties they face, whether it's funding or even the immigration limitations in getting here. I don't think we've heard anything about that in this study yet.
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
You mentioned co-op types of options. International students can't access those. Many academic programs have a co-op aspect to them, so international students, because of their visa requirements, can't access all of those, can they?
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
Okay. Thank you.
I see the yellow card, so I'll cede my time. Thanks.
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
I would like to stay with Mr. Fotang and ask him very quickly what his thoughts are on tuition fees, loans and interest forgiveness on loans. What does he think are the most important benefits to undergrads?
Mr. McKinnon took most of my questions, but I would like to stick with that. Regarding student loans and tuition fees, what can we do to help?
View Matthew Green Profile
NDP (ON)
I'm happy to pick up where my good friend René left off.
Mr. Dion, do you believe that mandatory training—annual, semi-annual training—for MPs would help improve clarity around the code of conduct?
View Matthew Green Profile
NDP (ON)
It sure does.
Mr. Dion, you mentioned that the code of conduct, as it is, is functional.
Given that we're here with estimates, I'm wondering, in your contemplation of your budget, when you're doing policy background and briefings with your staff, are you looking around the world to see who has the most robust programs, looking for ways to continually improve upon the code and the adherence to the code?
View Matthew Green Profile
NDP (ON)
What I'm trying to bring to this committee is a higher standard of transparency and accountability.
I'll share with you my opinion, Mr. Dion. While it might be true that there is functional adherence to this, when we get caught around substantive scandals of Parliament, there seems to be a pattern of the code, in the conduct and the consequences being quite different from what the general public's expectation is in terms of the standard to which we operate with professionalism in the House. I think that leads to the level of cynicism and this idea around having political impunity around a lot of issues.
When you're looking around the world for comparative examples of policy improvements, which countries would you point to that would have the most robust, transparent, highest gold standards of codes of conduct, and what do some of those consequences look like?
View Matthew Green Profile
NDP (ON)
There's always the story about the Icelandic people who put people in jail when their government collapsed. There seemed to be some real consequences.
Given these examples and the recommendations you provided and the budget that's before us in terms of the estimates, if you had a magic wand or a blank cheque and the ability to have global leading standards in ethics, in adherence to ethics and to the code of conduct, in lobbying, and so on and so forth, what recommendations would you make to this committee to contemplate in terms of strengthening our legislation here?
View Matthew Green Profile
NDP (ON)
Let me ask you this. I'm an MP. I'm in the House of Commons, I'm in the ethics committee and I'm asking you for a specificity. What recommendations would you provide to create the gold standard of a code of conduct to ensure that the gap between the perception of a conflict of interest and the actual legislation is bridged in such a way that the general public doesn't continue to have this viewpoint that we have impunity as a class?
View Matthew Green Profile
NDP (ON)
Would you consider perhaps providing it in writing?
View Matthew Green Profile
NDP (ON)
Thank you.
Those are my questions.
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