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Results: 541 - 600 of 117604
View Xavier Barsalou-Duval Profile
BQ (QC)
I just want to confirm what you're telling me, Mr. Vinette. There have been 80 versions of the app as a result of changes in government policies or bugs that have been detected.
Is that correct?
Denis Vinette
View Denis Vinette Profile
Denis Vinette
2022-08-19 15:22
That's correct.
View Xavier Barsalou-Duval Profile
BQ (QC)
So you can't give us any figures or data. I think it would be useful for us to have them. Then we could determine, for example, whether there were 1,000 bugs at the start and 5 bugs in August.
Can you estimate that? Do you have any data on it?
Denis Vinette
View Denis Vinette Profile
Denis Vinette
2022-08-19 15:22
I don't have any data with me. According to the most recent numbers reported in the media, one bug affected roughly 10,000 persons who used an Apple phone from June 28 to July 20.
It took six days to correct that problem. The individuals concerned received emails directing them to quarantine. We identified those cases and forwarded the information to our friends at the Public Health Agency of Canada, or PHAC, which contacted the people affected. So that situation has since been corrected.
View Xavier Barsalou-Duval Profile
BQ (QC)
People also tell us they're told they face $5,000 fines if they fail to comply with the directive. Earlier we saw that a directive has been introduced under which that fine would not necessarily be imposed for a first offence.
Do you have any information on the number and amounts of fines that have been assessed?
Denis Vinette
View Denis Vinette Profile
Denis Vinette
2022-08-19 15:23
I'm going to ask my colleague Ms. Lutfallah to discuss fines.
However, I can tell you that we're collecting implementation information that should have been forwarded through ArriveCAN. People aren't required to quarantine for 14 days for failing to submit their information via the ArriveCAN app. According to the data we have, 80% to 90% of people who have been informed that they are required to use the app will do so on their next trip.
Jennifer Lutfallah
View Jennifer Lutfallah Profile
Jennifer Lutfallah
2022-08-19 15:24
In terms of non-compliance with ArriveCAN and the potential monetary penalties that could be imposed on individuals, I want to point our that our officers at the airports as well as land borders try to bring people into compliance rather than writing a ticket as a first measure. We're playing a much more facilitative role. A ticket is not the first option that is exercised by our officers to bring compliance with the ArriveCAN app.
Since the inception or since ArriveCAN was made mandatory for both land and air—I think it was in 2020 for air and 2021 for land—there have been only 190 tickets with respect to ArriveCAN non-compliance. In those cases—and they're very limited cases when you consider the overall number of travellers coming into our country—those individuals are repeat offenders or simply will not comply with giving us a paper submission, which we offer when they are referred over to PHAC, or they just don't want to comply with the public health measures.
I want to underscore that the number of tickets that have been issued for ArriveCAN non-compliance is extremely low, because our officers play a very facilitative role. Generally, they are very successful in bringing people back into compliance with the law.
View Xavier Barsalou-Duval Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you.
My next question is for Mr. Vinette, but it could also be directed to another witness.
When quarantines were made mandatory during the pandemic, there were many questions and much indignation about the way follow‑up was done, and even whether follow‑up was in fact being conducted because some people observed that it was not.
I'd like to know whether quarantine verification is still in effect. If so, how is it being done?
Denis Vinette
View Denis Vinette Profile
Denis Vinette
2022-08-19 15:26
That's a question for my colleague Ms. Lutfallah.
Jennifer Lutfallah
View Jennifer Lutfallah Profile
Jennifer Lutfallah
2022-08-19 15:26
There's a multipronged approach that's being used for quarantine follow-up. Quarantine is generally applied for individuals who are unvaccinated or deemed unvaccinated because they were unable to provide us vaccine credentials.
We at the Public Health Agency have an escalation protocol, if you want to call it that, where we will start with phone calls. There will be reminders sent through ArriveCAN to remind individuals of their quarantine as well as their testing obligations. We also have callers who will contact these individuals directly to make sure they maintain their compliance with their quarantine requirements. These callers will also call individuals who test positive to ensure that they meet the isolation requirements—
View Peter Schiefke Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you very much, Ms. Lutfallah. Unfortunately, I'm going to have to cut you off there.
Thank you very much, Mr. Barsalou‑Duval.
Next we have Mr. Bachrach.
Mr. Bachrach, the floor is yours. You have six minutes.
View Taylor Bachrach Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I'd like to begin my questioning with the officials who are here from CATSA. At past meetings, I've asked about the summer attendance incentive program, which is a program that CATSA's contractors have put in place using public money to offer a financial incentive to screening officers and other CATSA employees who don't take their booked summer holidays and don't take any sick time over the summer months.
In my past questioning, the response from CATSA has been that this was put in place to address absenteeism. I wonder if the officials from CATSA could define absenteeism for me.
Mike Saunders
View Mike Saunders Profile
Mike Saunders
2022-08-19 15:28
Thank you very much for the question.
I'll make one clarification. The incentive program was not offered to CATSA employees; it was offered to the screening contractors, to the screening officers across the country.
View Taylor Bachrach Profile
NDP (BC)
Sure, that's fair enough, but these employees wear CATSA badges on their shoulders, so you'll forgive me if we conflate the two. These are employees working for CATSA contractors, and this program uses public money through CATSA in order to provide the incentive to address absenteeism.
How do you define absenteeism?
Mike Saunders
View Mike Saunders Profile
Mike Saunders
2022-08-19 15:28
Absenteeism is.... Actually, I think I would defer to my colleague Neil Parry to define absenteeism as per this program. I believe he's responded to you, not on that particular element of this program but on other elements of it.
Neil Parry
View Neil Parry Profile
Neil Parry
2022-08-19 15:29
Thank you, Mr. Chair. I'd be happy to respond to that.
There are different types of absenteeism, and I'll make a clarification, as I did at my last appearance, of what the incentive is intended to achieve. We want to incent screening officers to come into work for their scheduled shift when they are not sick and when they are not on vacation.
There are different types of absenteeism, as you point out. There's absenteeism when you're sick, and we trust our screening officers to act professionally, as they've done throughout the pandemic, and not come to work when they're sick. They demonstrated for over two years during the pandemic that they would stay home and be responsible.
When they have planned vacation, we encourage them to take it because, as you've talked about for almost two hours now, it is an extremely busy environment, and they have done a noble job under these circumstances, under these pressures.
However, there is the occurrence from time to time at different locations where, for a scheduled shift, there is something called book-offs. We're trying to reduce that by offering our contractors the opportunity to bill us for their programs. Those programs allow that, if you are sick for a couple of days, you are not disqualified from the incentive program. For the further weeks throughout the summer, you can earn up to $200 per cycle for coming in for your scheduled shift.
View Taylor Bachrach Profile
NDP (BC)
Mr. Parry, what you've just said contradicts the documents that we've seen from CATSA contractors, which very clearly indicate that, if workers take sick time, they are disqualified from receiving the bonus for the week in which they took that time.
Are you aware of this?
Neil Parry
View Neil Parry Profile
Neil Parry
2022-08-19 15:31
I am aware of this, and that doesn't contradict what I just said. What I said was, if they are sick or away that week, they qualify for the other weeks in which they show up for their scheduled shift, so they continue to be eligible. They are not disqualified from the program.
I am aware of the documents. I've seen all of the memos issued by our contractors. Some of them have been amended since. I believe the copy that you had at our last meeting.... There are further clarifications within those when those memos talk about what's eligible.
This is a program that was rolled out quickly. We worked with our contractors. There were a number of questions that they received from their union representatives. We went back with them to clarify that we don't want to see people disqualified. We want to ensure that they can take their vacation and, if they are sick, we want them to stay well, but we also want them to continue to be eligible for those weeks and to show up for their shift when they're not sick or on vacation.
View Taylor Bachrach Profile
NDP (BC)
To be clear, Mr. Parry, if I am working for a CATSA contractor and I wake up with a sore throat and stay home to protect my co-workers and the travelling public, do I still qualify for the $200-a-week bonus for that week in which I stayed home sick for one day?
Neil Parry
View Neil Parry Profile
Neil Parry
2022-08-19 15:32
For that week you do not, but you qualify for your paid sick leave. Your normal benefits and compensation apply, but the incentive program, which is 12 separate increments, is available for whichever increments those officers can avail themselves of.
View Taylor Bachrach Profile
NDP (BC)
Mr. Parry, can you not see how this puts workers in a very difficult situation? Essentially, you wake up with a sore throat and you're making that decision about whether to go into work and there's $200 on the line. Is this not an incentive to go to work sick?
Neil Parry
View Neil Parry Profile
Neil Parry
2022-08-19 15:32
We don't see it as an incentive to go to work sick, because screening officers, without this incentive, are entitled to all of their base compensation, which includes their hourly wage, their health and dental benefits, paid sick leave, paid holidays. This is supernumerary to that compensation, so they're not out-of-pocket in any capacity.
The incentive program is an additional bonus structure that they can avail themselves of when it's the best opportunity for them.
View Taylor Bachrach Profile
NDP (BC)
I think you know where I'm going with this. They would get $200 if they went in sick with a sore throat. They lose the $200 bonus if they stay home.
Have the unions conveyed concern about this program directly to CATSA?
Neil Parry
View Neil Parry Profile
Neil Parry
2022-08-19 15:33
I'd have to verify that. Generally, the unions convey their concerns directly to their employers.
View Taylor Bachrach Profile
NDP (BC)
Am I clear to understand, then, that CATSA has no issues with the way this program is currently being rolled out?
Neil Parry
View Neil Parry Profile
Neil Parry
2022-08-19 15:33
I would say that the program is showing that it is working, that it is effective, and that our absenteeism throughout the country has been down over the summer.
View Peter Schiefke Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you very much, Mr. Parry.
Thank you very much, Mr. Bachrach.
Next we have Ms. Lantsman.
Ms. Lantsman, the floor is yours. You have five minutes.
View Melissa Lantsman Profile
CPC (ON)
Thanks very much.
Thanks for coming.
I'm going to go back to ArriveCAN. Given the experience and the major criticism by almost every stakeholder across the industry, from travel to tourism to those concerned with privacy, I'd like to know if the department has spoken to anyone outside of itself who supports it. Can you name anyone you've consulted with regarding ArriveCAN?
Michael Keenan
View Michael Keenan Profile
Michael Keenan
2022-08-19 15:34
Mr. Chair, I don't know which department the honourable member is referring to, but I could offer one comment on this, and perhaps my colleagues at CBSA would like to comment.
It's an important point of context that ArriveCAN operates at the land border and the air border. Here we're talking about air congestion. One of the very challenging situations we had in air congestion was getting people fast enough through the customs hall at Pearson. As the minister has indicated, earlier in this ramp-up of travel we saw some significant incidents of planes being held at the gate and the metering of passengers into the customs hall.
We have an airport operations recovery group with the airports and airlines—all the partners, including Transport, CBSA, PHAC, CATSA—and a lot of work was done to try to work through how to fix that. A number of changes were made that have proven to be very successful because the number of holds for international arrivals has dropped 90%. It was like 300 per week in May, when we were at about 65,000 people arriving a day. It's now down to like 40 a week, even though we have 90,000 people arriving per day.
A number of changes were made in the management of the customs hall. Colleagues in CBSA—
View Melissa Lantsman Profile
CPC (ON)
Sorry, I had a question. I'm going to pipe in here because I have only a couple of minutes.
I'm going to ask it in a different way.
Everybody here on this call has implied that the app is only necessary due to the mandates. If the government removes the mandates one day, if it decides to do that, would the department's view be that there is no need for ArriveCAN?
Michael Keenan
View Michael Keenan Profile
Michael Keenan
2022-08-19 15:36
To answer the first question, in that work, we worked with all of the partners and managed to get the ArriveCAN completion rate up much higher for international arriving passengers. That was the work with the entire industry. There was a lot of engagement with the industry on this. They worked with us. That was one of the key success factors in declogging the customs hall. There has been extensive discussion with our operating partners on ArriveCAN. The fact that a lot fewer people are arriving at the customs hall with it incomplete has been a key success factor in getting people through.
On your second question, I think I would.... It's difficult to speculate on the second question simply because, given the policy the government has today in terms of the information that is being required from passengers to ensure safe international travel, the completion of ArriveCAN is a major force in the gains in efficiency in the airport we're seeing now.
View Melissa Lantsman Profile
CPC (ON)
I'm going to go back to where you said there was a 99% compliance rate with ArriveCAN; that's what we heard, or 99%-plus compliance with ArriveCAN. I'm going to turn your attention to somebody named Mark Webber. He's the president of the Customs and Immigration Union representing border agents. He says it's that high because of the assistance in filling out ArriveCAN. He says the number is more like 70%.
So which number is true? In terms of looking at that 99%, are you being misled on the compliance rate? There's a very big difference between those who come ready with it done and CBSA agents being taken away from their work to help people do it, because that's what we're hearing.
Michael Keenan
View Michael Keenan Profile
Michael Keenan
2022-08-19 15:38
I would say one thing on this—and then quickly turn it over to Mr. Vinette—and agree on the premise of your question. In fact, a lot of work was done in the context of international arrivals in air to get passengers to complete ArriveCAN before they went to the customs hall. If they went into the customs hall without ArriveCAN done, it clogged up an extremely busy part of Pearson airport. Getting that rate of completion up before they go in the hall is one of the key reasons that we've been able to make such progress in the flow of international arrivals at Pearson.
In terms of the statistics, I would turn it over to my colleague at CBSA to comment further.
View Peter Schiefke Profile
Lib. (QC)
Unfortunately, we don't have time.
I'm sorry, Mr. Vinette.
We will now go to Mr. McDonald.
Mr. McDonald, you have five minutes. The floor is yours.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2022-08-19 15:39
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I want to say a big thank you to my colleague, the MP for Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, for asking me to fill in for him at this committee meeting today.
We've heard a lot today about one topic in particular, and that's the airline passenger bill of rights. That was pushed by a good friend of mine, a man by the name of Woodrow French, who lives not too far from my home. We live in the same town. He was at it for years. Finally a government listened, and that government was the Liberal government. I think it was Minister Garneau at the time.
To the officials, does the airline passenger bill of rights do what it was intended to do when it comes to protecting airline passengers? Should it be tweaked if it's not doing its intended end-of-the-day product, protection for anyone using our airlines, whether domestically or commercially?
Michael Keenan
View Michael Keenan Profile
Michael Keenan
2022-08-19 15:40
Mr. Chair, I think the answer to the question is that, as the member indicated, the airline passenger protection, the airline passenger rights regime that Minister Garneau brought in several years ago, came in just before the pandemic. It has made a significant difference in terms of how passengers are treated, but it also is the first time we've had a comprehensive set of passenger rights in Canada.
In the context of COVID, we've discovered that it actually does need changes. In fact, one area where it needed an adjustment is that the system hadn't contemplated a massive disruption of air travel on the scale of what we saw with COVID in March 2020. That's the reason the Minister of Transport brought forth regulations to strengthen the requirements for refunds in situations where there is major disruption and an airline is incapable of completing a journey. That enhancement in passenger rights is actually coming into force on September 8.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2022-08-19 15:41
Thank you for that.
Next, we hear a lot about mandates, whether it's vaccination mandates or masking mandates or anything else, from the Conservative side, who never, ever supported the introduction of any mandates whatsoever, whether it be masking or vaccination or travel restrictions. Do you believe that the mandates were necessary programs to bring in when COVID first struck our area here in Canada and any of the provinces? Do you think that because of the mandates we've managed to save thousands and thousands of lives? There are people still dying from COVID, but of course, as we know, when it first came to our country and exploded in many provinces, many people did die from the disease—probably people who shouldn't have died or wouldn't have died, only for COVID, which was the main contributor to it.
Do you think we should still pay attention to the public health officials who are recommending that we do this or we do that, or that it's time to drop this or drop that—in essence, I guess, at the end of the day, protecting Canadians' lives, whether they're coming from abroad, or travelling from province to province, or using any entity for travel, whether it be ferries, trains or planes?
Michael Keenan
View Michael Keenan Profile
Michael Keenan
2022-08-19 15:43
In terms of the overall impact of mandates on the protection of the population, I would have to defer to colleagues with PHAC on that. Before I do that, I would simply say that, at Transport Canada, we have been working with our partners to put in place extensive restrictions on travel as well as rules for safe travel when travel returns, everything from closing the border, shutting down flights and shutting down cruise ships to restarting all of these industries but ensuring that it's done with the right measures to protect travellers, whether it is distancing, mask mandates or vaccine mandates. Those have evolved significantly over the last two and a half years. We put in place dozens and dozens of orders and adjusted them dozens of times based on public health conditions and the latest public health science and research.
It is our assessment that they have made a significant difference by enabling people, Canadians and foreigners, to travel and do so safely despite the threat of COVID.
In terms of the broader question about the impact of mandates on protecting the population, I would have to turn to a colleague from the Public Health Agency of Canada.
Jennifer Lutfallah
View Jennifer Lutfallah Profile
Jennifer Lutfallah
2022-08-19 15:44
With respect to the measures that have been put in place as a result of COVID-19, we've undertaken a multipronged or multi-layered approach. With respect to a mandate based on vaccination, obviously a vaccination mandate would mitigate the importation of COVID-19 as well as decrease the potential for infection and severity.
View Peter Schiefke Profile
Lib. (QC)
You have 10 seconds, please, Ms. Lutfallah.
Jennifer Lutfallah
View Jennifer Lutfallah Profile
Jennifer Lutfallah
2022-08-19 15:45
Along with the vaccine mandate, Canada has taken that multi-layered approach and implemented a number of other mechanisms to reduce the risk to Canadians' health and to increase their health security. That included testing as well as quarantine, isolation and masking. When you take all those measures together, as Dr. Tam has said on previous occasions, it has gone far in protecting the health of our population.
View Peter Schiefke Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you very much.
Thank you, Mr. McDonald.
Mr. Barsalou‑Duval, you have the floor for two and a half minutes.
View Xavier Barsalou-Duval Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
My question is for Ms. Lutfallah, because she was unable to finish answering the question I asked her earlier about quarantine verification.
From what I understood, notifications can be sent through the ArriveCAN app, and there may be telephone verifications.
Are physical verifications also made to determine whether people are complying with quarantines?
Jennifer Lutfallah
View Jennifer Lutfallah Profile
Jennifer Lutfallah
2022-08-19 15:46
We do on-site verification as well, based on the risk that the individual may pose with respect to non-compliance. In very limited circumstances, after we have the on-site verification, which is usually done by a security company, we will refer some of those more egregious cases to police of jurisdiction.
View Xavier Barsalou-Duval Profile
BQ (QC)
Do you have an approximate idea of numbers? For example, how many physical verifications were conducted this summer?
What percentage of individuals in quarantine have been physically verified?
Jennifer Lutfallah
View Jennifer Lutfallah Profile
Jennifer Lutfallah
2022-08-19 15:47
I will have to get that number for you. I don't have it readily accessible.
View Xavier Barsalou-Duval Profile
BQ (QC)
All right.
We would be grateful if you could provide that information later.
Mr. Keenan, there's a lot of talk about ArriveCAN and bugs. People wonder whether the app works and whether it's effective in reducing waiting times. We're still gathering data and evidence on that. We also hear that the ArriveCAN app may be retained for the long term.
I'd like to know the government's intentions in that regard. Will the ArriveCAN app become permanent? Will it be terminated or not?
View Peter Schiefke Profile
Lib. (QC)
I would ask you to answer in 15 seconds, Mr. Keenan.
Michael Keenan
View Michael Keenan Profile
Michael Keenan
2022-08-19 15:48
It's hard for me, as a public official, to say what the government's policy decisions will be.
View Peter Schiefke Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you very much.
Next we have Mr. Bachrach.
Mr. Bachrach, the floor is yours. You have two and a half minutes.
View Taylor Bachrach Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I have a question for Mr. Keenan regarding the air passenger protection regulations.
You mentioned the new amendments to the regulations that are coming into effect on September 8. Last week, on August 10, Transport Canada issued a statement stating that “amendments to the Air Passenger Protection Regulations will come into force to ensure passengers are compensated for flight delays, cancellations, and other incidents that may be out of an air carrier's control.” We looked into those amendments, and the amendments don't do that at all. The amendments essentially refund passengers their airfare if they're not able to complete their trip within a certain amount of time.
Can you speak to why Transport Canada put out such a misleading press release and is not clear about what these amendments actually achieve?
Michael Keenan
View Michael Keenan Profile
Michael Keenan
2022-08-19 15:49
Mr. Chair, the member points out an important improvement in the air passenger protection regulations that actually has, as its antecedent, the complete shutdown of air travel back in March 2020. What happened there is that the passenger rights system had a set of obligations for carriers in terms of the treatment of passengers, whether or not a delay is within their control. However, the regulations didn't envisage the kind of catastrophic shutdown we saw in March 2020, so they didn't speak to what you would do if the air carrier can't actually complete the journey in a reasonable time. That generated the issue of vouchers versus refunds.
This change ensures that if the passengers want, they can get compensation in the form of a full cash reimbursement of the ticket if it's a situation where it's impossible for the airline to complete the journey within a reasonable time.
Short of this amendment, the airlines still have obligations, even in situations under the current rules as they exist today, before September 8, for rebooking passengers and duty of accommodation and care, even if the cause of the delay is outside of their control. This bolsters the rights of passengers and gives them the ability to declare, no, they just want a refund and they just want their money back.
View Peter Schiefke Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you very much, Mr. Bachrach, and thank you, Mr. Keenan.
Next we have Mr. Baldinelli for five minutes.
The floor is yours.
View Tony Baldinelli Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you, Chair.
My questions are going to be for Mr. Vinette.
Thank you for being here. It's good to see you again.
Mr. Vinette, one of the main issues plaguing our airports is not only ArriveCAN, but we're also hearing about a severe shortage in staffing with regard to CBSA officers, not only at our airports but also at our land border points of entry. What does CBSA need to do to achieve its full staffing complement in Canada? How many officers are we short?
Denis Vinette
View Denis Vinette Profile
Denis Vinette
2022-08-19 15:52
The CBSA plans every year for its seasonal fluctuations in traffic in the various modes—land, airports and through the cruise ship season—and aligns its resources and moves them accordingly.
In support of the air transportation sector, we hire student border services officers every year, and they come on strength after their school year ends in April. They help us and we retain some of them through the balance of the year so they're ready to be on site the following year. They supplement our workforce.
In terms of the overall workforce, like other sectors, we have had individuals who, as a result of COVID and other measures, have been unable to attend the workplace, and we've respected that and we've worked with them. They've continued to contribute to our border services by supporting the front line through other venues and other programs to ensure that we could sustain the capacity.
We continue to advance the staffing, and I'm pleased to report that we've actually doubled our recruitment target for the next two years in order to offset the loss of some officers as a result of the COVID restrictions that may have affected them and their ability to return to the workplace.
View Tony Baldinelli Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you for that.
I was just checking the CBSA employment page earlier, before coming over, and there was a COVID notice. It said, “Due to the impacts of COVID-19, we are experiencing unforeseen delays with some aspects of the selection process.” Speaking with several stakeholder groups.... They had heard that the CBSA training session was closed during COVID. Possibly that's why there are the shortages and the backlog of officers needed.
I'm wondering if you can confirm that. Was that training centre in fact closed for a period of time? Did that add to the backlog? Why are we still “experiencing unforeseen delays with some aspects of the selection process”?
Denis Vinette
View Denis Vinette Profile
Denis Vinette
2022-08-19 15:54
The CBSA did shutter its national college for recruitment in Rigaud, Quebec for two cycles, I believe. I would have to confirm that.
When it was safe to do so, we reopened. We actually had individuals report to the college. They would quarantine for the 14 days before classes. Visitors were kept from entering the location to ensure that we could keep the college as sterile as possible. We are now back in full operation. As I stated, we will be doubling our recruitment in order to deploy—
View Tony Baldinelli Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you.
In terms of that cohort—you mentioned two cohorts—how many officers would that have been in total?
Denis Vinette
View Denis Vinette Profile
Denis Vinette
2022-08-19 15:54
In a given year, we target about 275 to 300 new recruits. Therefore, it could have been upwards of 600. We are now back in full cycle, and we will complement our resources by doubling those cohorts for the next two years.
View Tony Baldinelli Profile
CPC (ON)
Was CBSA unable to operate? Colleges and universities, even the Ontario Police College, were operating in a virtual manner. Why was the training centre not able to do the same?
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