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Results: 61 - 75 of 128
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
Yes, okay. Thank you.
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
We appreciate your having your voice heard here today at a parliamentary committee. I'm sure you're speaking on behalf of the many victims and their feelings throughout our country.
Mr. Rudin, I have a question for you.
You mentioned something we should all acknowledge. When you mentioned it, I thought it was something we really need to take note of. That is, Canada is multi-jurisdictional with federal, provincial and municipal components of either the responsibility or the impact when it comes to our justice system. As you know, in the federal government, we have carriage of the Criminal Code and the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act.
You mentioned the importance of resources on the ground if we're going to make changes. We've heard testimony from others saying that, whether it's parole, conditional sentencing or ensuring someone is meeting their conditions, resources are stretched thin. When we make a change here in Ottawa at the federal level, it has a downward pressure on other jurisdictions. Can you elaborate on that a bit? Maybe share some of your thoughts on what groundwork should be laid or resources put in place when we're making these types of decisions?
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
Thank you.
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
I have a point of order, Mr. Chair.
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
It's after 4. Some of us have things we have to get to, so what time were you planning to wrap up? I know we're scheduled to go until 4.
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
I'm going to have to step out, so can we wrap it up in six minutes, with turns of two, two, and two minutes?
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
I will address this to Chief Montour. You raised so many great points. Thank you for using the word “victims” in your testimony, because oftentimes we do not hear about victims, and I'm afraid they're the forgotten group when we're dealing with Bill C-5.
You mentioned the problem with drugs and overdoses. There's a misconception with this bill that it somehow deals with the simple possession of drugs when, in fact, it eliminates mandatory prison time for drug dealers. The mandatory sentence under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act that targets drug dealers who are charged with, for example, trafficking or possession for the purposes of trafficking, importing and exporting for the purposes of exporting, and production of a schedule 1 or 2 substance—that's heroin, cocaine, fentanyl, crystal meth.... Mandatory prison time would be eliminated for all of those things.
Chief, could you speak to what impact you think that would have on communities, on offenders and even on morale within the police, who are trying to help make our streets safer?
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
On the issue with regard to guns, you mentioned that this bill eliminates mandatory jail time for robbery with a firearm, extortion with a firearm and possession for purpose of weapons trafficking. You mentioned that there's been an increase over the last several years of these types of offences.
What type of message do you think eliminating mandatory jail time for those serious gun crimes will send?
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I appreciate all of you for being here today. You've all brought your perspective to this bill.
I want to ask a question of Mr. Russomanno.
It's no secret that we've raised some concerns about the legislation. You mentioned your involvement in the past when the previous government was bringing in some changes to conditional sentencing as well as mandatory minimum penalties. In spite of what the talking points are, which is that this bill is about getting rid of Harper-era mandatory minimums, I can tell you that one of the great ironies of this bill is that for the minimums being contemplated to be removed by this legislation, some go back to the seventies and they certainly go back to the nineties. Many of the mandatory minimum penalties, particularly some escalating ones around gun violence, that came in under a previous Conservative government, the government has chosen to leave in.
Do you feel that there is any place for mandatory minimum penalties in the Criminal Code at all? We know there's a mandatory minimum penalty for first-degree murder, for example. We know that some serious firearms offences have mandatory minimum penalties that are not touched by this legislation.
From that starting point, do you believe there's any role for mandatory minimum penalties?
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
Thank you.
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to both of the witnesses for appearing today on this important piece of legislation that could have a profound affect on our communities.
I'd like to ask my first question of Mr. Wall. Thank you for your testimony, sir.
The government would sometimes have people believe that these are non-serious offences somehow and, therefore, not deserving of jail time. Some of these offences have been on the books since the seventies. The minimum penalty, certainly through reforms to the Criminal Code, remained intact and many have been upheld in court cases.
I want to bring your attention to a few. We have robbery with a firearm, extortion with a firearm, weapons trafficking, using a firearm in the commission of an offence and possession for the purpose of weapons trafficking. These sound like serious offences to me that are at the root of some of the gun and gang problems that we have in this country. What message do you think it sends to the criminal element?
You mentioned the word “impunity”. I thank you also, sir, for mentioning a word we don't hear often enough, which is “victims”. Too often, victims have lost their voice on how they would react to this legislation. We've been hearing a bit from victims, but thank you for mentioning them.
What message do you think it sends to criminals to soften the offences for gun crimes?
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
Thank you.
There is some misconception that's been perpetrated that somehow this is dealing with minor drug offences. But when we look at the legislation, the mandatory minimums that are being eliminated from the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act are trafficking or possession for the purpose of trafficking, importing and exporting for the purpose of exporting and production of a schedule I or schedule II drug. That includes heroin, cocaine, fentanyl and crystal meth.
You've already commented on the guns crimes, but from the perspective of those who are trafficking, we have a crisis in Canada around drug use in both rural and urban areas. Canadians are dying and suffering. Crystal meth is a crisis. This bill would eliminate mandatory jail time not for those just in possession; there is no mandatory minimum for possession. What it does is it eliminates mandatory jail time for traffickers and producers and exporters and importers.
Can you comment on that?
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
Thank you.
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
Great. Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to all of our witnesses.
As we deal with what is a very important bill, I do know, from some of the background, some of the rationale behind the imposition of mandatory minimum penalties. Some of these penalties have been with us for a very long time, including many that are being repealed whose origins trace back to the 1970s. Please know that at times it's our job as parliamentarians to put into place laws that we feel provide balance for the justice system, balancing the seriousness of the offence with the protection of our communities and the input from victims and their families.
Ms. Samson from municipal affairs, you're a strategic adviser, a former mayor in the Montreal area and former head of public security in Montreal, so you certainly can speak with a lot of experience. I don't know if you saw a certain recent article, but your testimony made me think of it. Recently, we saw that people were using drones to try to bring handguns into Canada. That's what we're hearing from our expert testimony—namely, that a lot of the firearms that are being used criminally are in fact illegal firearms brought in from outside the country.
Unfortunately, in an effort to deal with gang and gun crime, we see the government, number one, cracking down on law-abiding citizens, and then, number two, providing softer sentences for firearms crime. Some of these are serious weapons offences: weapons trafficking, extortion with a firearm and robbery with a firearm. I fail to see, as one of the witnesses just mentioned, how someone could without intent commit robbery or extortion with a firearm or traffic a firearm.
Be that as it may, you have called on the Prime Minister to take action to curb gun violence, and you mentioned the lack of respect for life, the feeling of impunity among street gang members, who are favoured among other things by the laxity of the laws in Canada. You've already, as someone with a lot of experience, found that there is an impunity. What do you think the criminal element will make of our weakening the laws when it comes to gun crime?
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
Thank you. That is powerful testimony indeed.
As you know as a former mayor, it's not only the individual who is sometimes victimized, but communities are also put at risk. What do you think is the message to our communities, both urban and rural, if we pass Bill C-5 when so many of these communities are struggling with gun violence?
Results: 61 - 75 of 128 | Page: 5 of 9

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