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Results: 1 - 15 of 1767
View Chandra Arya Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Chandra Arya Profile
2021-04-15 13:59 [p.5671]
Madam Speaker, on behalf of all Canadians, I would like to thank India and Prime Minister Narendra Modi for providing two million AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine doses. A total of 500,000 doses are to be delivered, and the balance is expected in due course. This is what real friends do. During a crisis, they help each other.
India has also supplied vaccine doses for some needy countries for free or at a subsidized cost. This is practising an ancient Vedic saying of the sages. In Sanskrit it is Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam, which means that the world is one big single family.
India is also offering technology transfer for commercial production of vaccines in Canada. These actions reconfirm the respect and affection Canada and India have for each other.
View Dean Allison Profile
CPC (ON)
View Dean Allison Profile
2021-04-15 14:05 [p.5672]
Madam Speaker, Canadians are struggling to cope with the rise of COVID-19 cases, increasing lockdowns and the effects of a struggling economy. Businesses are closed, workers are losing their jobs or having their hours cut, the mental health crisis has deepened and Canadian families are worried about their children. This is all because the government did not secure enough vaccines and did not secure them in time.
We are far behind our neighbours to the south. Jake Tapper from CNN has brought this failure to the attention of our American cousins. The U.S. has already begun to vaccinate monkeys in U.S. zoos. I cannot make this stuff up. Meanwhile, here in Canada we have only vaccinated 2% of our population. The vaccination issue is such that the current government may go down in history as one of the biggest failures of any Canadian government during a crisis. Canadians and Canadian businesses are suffering because of it.
The data and tools to effectively manage this pandemic already exist. It is time for the government to begin using them.
View Candice Bergen Profile
CPC (MB)
View Candice Bergen Profile
2021-04-15 14:19 [p.5675]
Mr. Speaker, that was a really ridiculous thing for the Parliamentary Secretary to Deputy Prime Minister to say. The fact is that the Liberals have messed up so many things in their response to COVID, but they will not admit, they will not learn from it and they will not change it.
Today, we have learned that Moderna vaccines scheduled to arrive mid-April are being delayed yet again, which means provinces are forced to close vaccination clinics and people are not getting their shots. That means higher case counts and more lockdowns.
Responsibility for the third wave is the Prime Minister's. How many more Canadians will be infected with COVID because of the government's disastrous vaccine rollout?
View Patty Hajdu Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, every step of the way, we have been there for Canadians. We have been there for provinces and territories in delivering on the things that we know are saving lives.
This is a difficult time for the country. It is a difficult time for all Canadians. It is a difficult time for the health care workers, the lab workers, the front-line workers and the essential workers, who are all trying so hard to support each other and care for each other.
We will be there for Canadians, whether it is with personal protective equipment, testing equipment, human resources and, indeed, vaccines.
View Candice Bergen Profile
CPC (MB)
View Candice Bergen Profile
2021-04-15 14:20 [p.5675]
Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister's failed vaccine rollout and spin is actually making international headlines.
This morning's cover of the Daily Mail asked if our Prime Minister was jealous of Britain's vaccine delivery. It pointed out that Canada had four times as many new cases per day as the U.K. Prime Minister Johnson said that he did not have a response to our Prime Minister's comments, but that the British case data spoke for itself, because their vaccine rollout is months ahead of ours.
Could the Prime Minister admit that he is not only failing Canadians, but he is making an international fool of himself?
View Patty Hajdu Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, it is really important that all of us work together now to save lives. It is important that we see cohesion in our messaging. I surely hope that the member opposite is not working in any way to discourage Canadians from taking vaccination when it is their turn.
Let us be clear that every step of the way, we have given Canadians the information they need. We have supported Canadians with financial measures. We have been there for provinces and territories to deliver on their health care responsibilities.
Surely the member opposite would encourage the people in her riding to accept vaccination when it is their turn.
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
2021-04-15 14:27 [p.5676]
Mr. Speaker, it is clear the lack of vaccine supply has resulted in thousands of vaccination appointments being cancelled and a slower rollout of the vaccination program across the country. This is directly the responsibility of the federal government, and it has failed. It gives me no pleasure to say this, because Canadians want to get vaccinated, but they simply cannot because there are no doses available.
Will the Prime Minister admit that his government's failure to ensure we could produce the vaccines here in Canada is what led us to this mess?
View Anita Anand Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Anita Anand Profile
2021-04-15 14:28 [p.5676]
Mr. Speaker, I want to emphasize that all Canadians at this time need to pull together to get through this third wave.
For our part, the Government of Canada has already delivered 12.7 million doses to Canada. We have 8.9 million doses that have been administered in this country. We have accelerated 22 million doses from later quarters to earlier quarters. We are now third in the G20 in terms of the percentage of people with at least one dose.
We will continue to pull in millions of vaccinations. We will provide them to the provinces and territories and assist them in whatever way we can, including with the low dead-volume syringes that we have procured for the benefit of all Canadians.
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the shipment of 1.2 million doses from Moderna that was scheduled to arrive next week has been delayed until early May.
The Prime Minister said yesterday that there could be delays of a few days, but now we are talking about weeks. Quebec has gone back into lockdown, and Ontario has had to shut down vaccination clinics because of supply issues.
Will the Prime Minister admit that his procurement strategy has failed?
View Anita Anand Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Anita Anand Profile
2021-04-15 14:32 [p.5677]
Mr. Speaker, thank you for the question. We will continue to manage our supply chains for COVID-19 vaccines, while accelerating deliveries of approved vaccines.
Some 12.7 million doses have been delivered to Canada so far.
Also, millions of vaccines are on the way. We have accelerated 22 million doses from later to earlier quarters. We will continue to work together as a country to make sure that vaccines get out to the provinces and territories.
We are working day and night to get the job done.
View Rachel Bendayan Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Rachel Bendayan Profile
2021-04-15 17:53 [p.5708]
Mr. Speaker, I will be sharing my time with my hon. colleague from Parkdale—High Park.
Before I begin, I would like to acknowledge that the Parliament of Canada is on the unceded traditional territory of the Algonquin Anishinabe people.
In December 2020, our government introduced Bill C-15, an act respecting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Since then, I have received many letters, calls and emails from my constituents in Mile End, Outremont and Côte-des-Neiges. They asked me to pass the bill quickly, and they urge the House to do more to protect and promote the rights of indigenous peoples.
Most of the people who contacted me told me that they were not indigenous. They were proud to say that as Montrealers, Quebeckers and Canadians, the nation-to-nation relationship with indigenous peoples was important to them. It is an issue that speaks to the foundation of our Canadian identity, no matter our background.
We must correct past injustices as much as we can and continue to move forward on the path to reconciliation. Through Bill C-15, an act respecting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, we are taking another step along that path. As its name suggests, Bill C-15 seeks to protect and promote indigenous rights, including the rights to equality and non-discrimination, in order to establish stronger relations with indigenous peoples.
The bill provides the necessary legislative framework for Canada to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Through this bill, the Government of Canada will be required to collaborate with indigenous peoples on developing an action plan to achieve the objectives of UNDRIP. If passed, this bill will represent another major step forward in our shared journey toward reconciliation.
Passing Bill C-15, which would ensure consistency between Canadian laws and the principles of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, or UNDRIP, is an important step forward on the path to reconciliation. The bill requires the development of an action plan to implement the objectives of UNDRIP and requires the ongoing involvement of indigenous peoples at all stages, while mandating annual reports to Parliament.
Bill C-15 would enshrine the principles of UNDRIP, which include affirming the general application of international human rights laws to indigenous peoples; the right to participate in decision-making, with free, prior and informed consent; the right to culture, religious and linguistic identity; the protection of treaties and agreements with first nations; and of course the protection of the rights of indigenous women, including an obligation for governments to work with indigenous peoples to end violence against indigenous women.
Let us talk for a moment about what the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada chose to uphold.
The findings and evidence of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada forced us to confront the discriminatory and oppressive practices that continued unabated for nearly 150 years in Canada's residential schools. In addition to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada's calls to action 43 and 44, which call on the government to adopt and fully implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and develop an action plan to achieve its objectives, all of the calls to action cite the UNDRIP. Our commitment to upholding indigenous rights by acknowledging and redressing the damage caused by assimilation policies and practices is unwavering.
Passing Bill C-15 will not only address calls to action 43 and 44, but will also provide the Government of Canada with a framework for broader reconciliation.
I would also like to talk about what our government is doing right now to demonstrate our commitment to our first nations.
Throughout the pandemic, our government has shown its commitment to supporting indigenous communities in very real and tangible ways. Let us look for a moment at our vaccine rollout.
We know that remote indigenous communities are more at risk of getting COVID-19 and that health systems in those communities are more vulnerable to outbreaks. That is why we as a government prioritized indigenous communities in the procurement and delivery of vaccines for COVID-19.
To date, nearly 300,000 doses have been administered in first nations, Inuit and Métis communities, with over 50% of people having already received a COVID-19 vaccine. In the Northwest Territories, 55% of the entire population has received a first dose. In the Yukon, 59% of the population has received one dose, and already 43% has received both doses. This accelerated rollout has contributed to a dramatic drop in COVID-19 cases in our indigenous communities, with a decline of 80%. That is something we can all be proud of.
Let us also discuss for a moment where we are with respect to eliminating boil water advisories. Like many in the House, I am sincerely troubled by the fact that any boil water advisory still exists in any corner of our country, but real progress has been made and is sometimes overlooked.
When our government came into power, there were 105 boil water advisories in the country. We have eliminated 106 of them, and as of March 2021, 177 short-term drinking water advisories were also lifted. In fact, access to clean water has been restored to approximately 5,920 homes in first nations communities. I know and understand that much more work still needs to be done on this, but never before have we had a federal government in Canada that is more committed to getting that work done.
We have also made historic investments in education, housing, police services and shelters in indigenous communities.
The 2020 fall economic statement includes an additional investment of $781.5 million over five years starting this year as well as ongoing funding in the amount of $106.3 million to fight systemic discrimination against indigenous peoples and expand efforts to fight violence against indigenous women, girls and LGBTQ2 and two-spirit people.
These proposed investments include the following amounts: $724.1 million to launch a comprehensive violence prevention strategy to expand access to culturally relevant supports for indigenous women, children and LGBTQ2 and two-spirit people facing gender-based violence; $49.3 million to support the implementation of Gladue principles in the justice system in order to help reduce the overrepresentation of indigenous peoples in the criminal justice and correctional systems; and $8.1 million to develop administration of justice agreements with indigenous communities to strengthen community-based justice systems and support self-determination.
There is still a lot of work to do, but we are working even harder.
Bill C-15 is an action plan that will confirm that the declaration is a universal human rights instrument that applies to Canadian law and provides a framework for the Government of Canada's implementation of the declaration. It is an essential step toward reconciliation, and it is long overdue.
I therefore ask all members of the House to pass Bill C-15 as soon as possible.
View Rachel Bendayan Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Rachel Bendayan Profile
2021-04-15 18:05 [p.5710]
Madam Speaker, my colleague is absolutely right. What we have seen through many different statistics is that our indigenous communities are more vulnerable and do have real challenges when it comes to the health systems that are available, particularly in remote communities. That is exactly why this government prioritized indigenous communities in our vaccine rollout. That is why such a significant number of indigenous communities have been vaccinated. As I mentioned in my speech, over 50% of indigenous communities have been fully vaccinated. As I also said, that contributed to an 80% decline in COVID-19 cases in indigenous communities. Our strategy had real and concrete results, and I think we need to continue in that vein as we move forward and continue to support the health and safety of our indigenous communities.
View Erin O'Toole Profile
CPC (ON)
View Erin O'Toole Profile
2021-04-14 14:23 [p.5556]
Mr. Speaker, CNN, Forbes magazine and The Atlantic have all covered the government's disastrous vaccine rollout just in the last week. The severe third wave Canadians are experiencing right now is the direct result of the months it has taken for Canada to secure vaccines.
Is the Prime Minister satisfied that his vaccine rollout has now become an international embarrassment?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Justin Trudeau Profile
2021-04-14 14:24 [p.5557]
Mr. Speaker, as we make it through this third wave, we are going to have to continue to hold on even longer, even as vaccines are arriving in record numbers into Canada.
We have delivered 11.7 million vaccines to provinces and territories, and 20% of Canadians have received at least their first dose. We are now actually third in the G20 in terms of the percentage of Canadians who have received the vaccine.
This is promising, but we know there is much more to do. That is why we are working day and night to ensure the delivery of more doses even quicker.
View Erin O'Toole Profile
CPC (ON)
View Erin O'Toole Profile
2021-04-14 14:24 [p.5557]
Mr. Speaker, over 300,000 doses of the Moderna vaccine that were supposed to be delivered to Ontario last week have still not arrived. Maybe they still just have to hold on, as the Prime Minister told them.
Mass vaccination clinics are now closing as a result of his failure to deliver. Schools are closing across the country. How much worse is the third wave going to have to get before the Prime Minister realizes he has failed Canadians?
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