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Results: 1 - 26 of 26
2021-06-09 [p.1068]
Mrs. Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek), from the Standing Committee on Public Accounts, presented the 19th report of the committee, "Canada Child Benefit". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-432-152.
Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.
A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 29 and 36) was tabled.
2021-05-25 [p.966]
— by Mrs. Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue) — Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy Interim Report of the Canada Revenue Agency for 2020 to 2021, pursuant to the Federal Sustainable Development Act, S.C. 2008, c. 33, sbs. 11(3). — Sessional Paper No. 8560-432-1111-01. (Pursuant to Standing Order 32(5), permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development)
2021-05-10 [p.919]
Q-583 — Mr. Saroya (Markham—Unionville) — With regard to accounts locked by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) between March 13, 2021, and March 22, 2021, over concerns that usernames and passwords may have been hacked: (a) how many accounts were locked; (b) what was the average number of days impacted accounts were locked; (c) did the CRA notify each account holder in (a) that their account would be locked, and, if so, how were they contacted; (d) on what date did the CRA become aware that usernames and passwords may have been hacked; (e) how did the CRA become aware of the hacking; (f) is any recourse or compensation available to individuals whose information has been compromised as a result of their CRA information being hacked, and, if so, how do they access such recourse or compensation; and (g) have any specific measures been taken since March 13, 2021, to ensure the future safety of information shared online with the CRA, and, if so, what are the details of each measure, including the date of implementation? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-583.
2021-05-05 [p.898]
Q-558 — Mr. Mazier (Dauphin—Swan River—Neepawa) — With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), since January 2020, broken down by month: (a) how many phone calls did the CRA receive from the general public; (b) what was the average wait time for an individual who contacted the CRA by phone before first making a direct contact with an employee; (c) what was the average wait or hold time after first being directly connected with an employee; (d) what was the average duration of total call time, including the time waiting or on hold, for an individual who contacted the CRA by phone; and (e) how many documented server, website, portal or system errors occurred on the CRA website? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-558.
2021-04-28 [p.860]
— by Mrs. Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue) — Summary of the Corporate Business Plan for 2021-2022 with perspectives 2023-2024 of the Canada Revenue Agency, pursuant to the Canada Revenue Agency Act, S.C. 1999, c. 17, sbs. 49(2). — Sessional Paper No. 8562-432-839-02. (Pursuant to Standing Order 32(5), permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Finance)
2021-04-26 [p.828]
Q-517 — Mr. Epp (Chatham-Kent—Leamington) — With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), since January 1, 2019: (a) what was the call volume, broken down by month and by type of caller (personal, business, professional accountant, etc.); and (b) what was the (i) average, (ii) median length of time callers spent on hold or waiting to talk to the CRA, broken down by month and type of caller? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-517.
2021-04-26 [p.831]
Q-542 — Mr. Green (Hamilton Centre) — With regard to Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) high net worth compliance program, broken down by year, from November 2015 to date : (a) how many audits were completed; (b) what is the number of auditors; (c) how many new files were opened; (d) how many files were closed; (e) of the files in (d), what was the average time taken to process the file before it was closed; (f) of the files in (d), what was the risk level of non-compliance of each file; (g) how much was spent on contractors and subcontractors; (h) of the contractors and subcontractors in (g), what is the initial and final value of each contract; (i) among the contractors and subcontractors in (g), what is the description of each service contract; (j) how many reassessments were issued; (k) what is the total amount recovered; (l) how many taxpayer files were referred to the CRA's Criminal Investigations Program; (m) of the investigations in (l), how many were referred to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada; and (n) of the investigations in (m), how many resulted in convictions? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-542.
2021-04-12 [p.745]
Q-435 — Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie) — With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) advertising since November 4, 2015: (a) how much has CRA spent on advertising (i) on Facebook, (ii) on Xbox, Xbox 360 or Xbox One, (iii) on YouTube, (iv) in sponsored tweets on Twitter, (v) on Instagram; (b) for each advertisement, what was its (i) nature, (ii) purpose, (iii) target audience or demographic profile, (iv) cost; (c) what was the media authorization number of each advertisement; (d) what are the reference numbers of the documents, reports and memoranda concerning each advertisement or its after-the-fact evaluation; and (e) does the CRA compare the cost of advertising placement in traditional media with the media in (a), and, if so, what is the difference in cost for each of the advertisements in (b)? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-435.
2021-04-12 [p.745]
Q-436 — Mr. Viersen (Peace River—Westlock) — With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency hiring private firms to assist with the 2021 tax season: (a) what is the total value of all contracts signed; (b) what are the details of each contract, including the (i) vendor, (ii) amount, (iii) start and end date of the contract, (iv) description of goods or services provided; (c) what measures are in place to ensure that any information shared with these private firms is safeguarded and not subject to potential privacy breaches; and (d) for each contract in (b), did the government consider using existing government resources, including those in other departments or agencies, and, if so, why did the government decide to outsource instead of using government resources? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-436.
2021-03-25 [p.720]
— by Mr. Duclos (President of the Treasury Board) — Report of the Canada Revenue Agency for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020, pursuant to the Employment Equity Act, S.C. 1995, c. 44, sbs. 21(3). — Sessional Paper No. 8560-432-749-01. (Pursuant to Standing Order 32(5), permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities)
2021-02-25 [p.586]
— Canada Revenue Agency. — Sessional Paper No. 8520-432-11. (Pursuant to Standing Order 81(7), deemed referred to the Standing Committee on Finance)
2021-01-25 [p.447]
Q-296 — Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie) — With regard to investments in Canada Revenue Agency tax compliance measures to crack down on international tax evasion, since the 2016–17 fiscal year, broken down by fiscal year: (a) how many auditors specializing in foreign accounts have been hired; (b) how many audits have been conducted; (c) how many notices of assessment have been sent; (d) what was the amount recovered; (e) how many cases were referred to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada; and (f) how many criminal charges have been laid? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-296.
2021-01-25 [p.447]
Q-300 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — With regard to the temporary suspension of some programs and services of the Canada Revenue Agency, since the month of March 2020: (a) what is the name of each suspended program and service; and (b) for each program and service in (a), what is the (i) suspension date and resumption date, (ii) what are the reasons for the suspension? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-300.
2020-12-09 [p.393]
Q-181 — Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona) — With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), the Liechtenstein leaks and the Bahamas Leaks: (a) how many Canadian taxpayers were identified in the documents obtained, broken down by information leak and type of taxpayer, that is (i) an individual, (ii) a corporation, (iii) a partnership or trust; (b) how many audits did the CRA launch following the identification of taxpayers in (a), broken down by information leak; (c) of the audits in (b), how many were referred to the CRA’s Criminal Investigations Program, broken down by information leak; (d) how many of the investigations in (c) were referred to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, broken down by information leak; (e) how many of the investigations in (d) resulted in a conviction, broken down by information leak; and (f) what was the sentence imposed for each conviction in (e), broken down by information leak? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-181.
2020-12-09 [p.393]
Q-182 — Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona) — With regard to the Offshore Tax Informant Program, since fiscal year 2015-16: (a) how many calls have been received; (b) how many files have been opened based on information received from informants; (c) what is the total amount of the awards paid to informants; (d) what is the total amount recovered by the Canada Revenue Agency; (e) how many current investigations are the result of information received through the program; and (f) how much money is involved in the current investigations? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-182.
2020-12-09 [p.396]
Q-194 — Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford) — With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency, between fiscal years 2009-10 and 2018-19, broken down by fiscal year: a) how much was spent on training; and b) how much was spent on criminal investigations? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-194.
2020-11-16 [p.252]
Q-30 — Ms. McPherson (Edmonton Strathcona) — With regard to Canada Revenue Agency activities, agreements guaranteeing non-referral to the criminal investigation sector and cases referred to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, between 2011-12 and 2019-20, broken down by fiscal year: (a) how many audits resulting in reassessments were concluded; (b) of the agreements concluded in (a), what was the total amount recovered; (c) of the agreements concluded in (a), how many resulted in penalties for gross negligence; (d) of the agreements concluded in (c), what was the total amount of penalties; (e) of the agreements concluded in (a), how many related to bank accounts held outside Canada; and (f) how many audits resulting in assessments were referred to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-30.
2020-11-16 [p.252]
Q-32 — Mr. Lawrence (Northumberland—Peterborough South) — With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency’s approach to workspace-in-the-home expense deductions in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic’s stay-at-home guidelines: are individuals who had to use areas of their homes not normally used for work, such as dining or living rooms, as a temporary office during the pandemic entitled to the deductions, and, if so, how should individuals calculate which portions of their mortgage, rent, or other expenses are deductible? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-32.
2020-11-16 [p.262]
Q-66 — Mr. Bachrach (Skeena—Bulkley Valley) — With regard to the information collected by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) regarding electronic funds transfers of $10,000 and over and the statement by the Minister of National Revenue before the Standing Committee on Finance on May 19, 2016, indicating that using this information, the CRA will target up to four jurisdictions per year, without warning, broken down by fiscal year since 2016-17: (a) how many foreign jurisdictions were targeted; (b) what is the name of each foreign jurisdiction targeted; (c) how many audits were conducted by the CRA for each foreign jurisdiction targeted; (d) of the audits in (c), how many resulted in a notice of assessment; (e) of the audits in (c), how many were referred to the CRA's Criminal Investigations Program; (f) of the investigations in (e), how many were referred to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada; (g) how many prosecutions in (f) resulted in convictions; (h) what were the penalties imposed for each conviction in (g); and (i) what is the total amount recovered? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-66.
2020-11-16 [p.262]
Q-67 — Mr. Bachrach (Skeena—Bulkley Valley) — With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency's (CRA) activities under the General Anti-Avoidance Rule under section 245 of the Income Tax Act, and under section 274 of the Income Tax Act, broken down by section of the act: (a) how many audits have been completed, since the fiscal year 2011-12, broken down by fiscal year and by (i) individual, (ii) trust, (iii) corporation; (b) how many notices of assessment have been issued by the CRA since the fiscal year 2011-12, broken down by fiscal year and by (i) individual, (ii) trust, (iii) corporation; (c) what is the total amount recovered by the CRA to date; (d) how many legal proceedings are currently underway, broken down by (i) Tax Court of Canada, (ii) Federal Court of Appeal, (iii) Supreme Court of Canada; (e) how many times has the CRA lost in court, broken down by (i) name of taxpayer, (ii) Tax Court of Canada, (iii) Federal Court of Appeal, (iv) Supreme Court of Canada; (f) what was the total amount spent by the CRA, broken down by lawsuit; and (g) how many times has the CRA not exercised its right of appeal, broken down by lawsuit, and what is the justification for each case? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-67.
2020-11-16 [p.263]
Q-68 — Mr. Bachrach (Skeena—Bulkley Valley) — With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) interdepartmental committee that reviews files and makes recommendations on the application of the General Anti-Avoidance Rule (GAAR), broken down by fiscal year since 2010-11: (a) how many of the proposed GAAR assessments sent to the CRA’s headquarters for review were referred to the interdepartmental committee; and (b) of the assessments reviewed in (a) by the interdepartmental committee, for how many assessments did the interdepartmental committee (i) recommend the application of the GAAR, (ii) not recommend the application of the GAAR? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-68.
2020-10-20 [p.143]
— by Mrs. Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue) — Service Fees Report of the Canada Revenue Agency for 2019 to 2020, pursuant to the Service Fees Act, S.C. 2017, c. 20, s. 20. — Sessional Paper No. 8560-432-1153-01. (Pursuant to Standing Order 32(5), permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Finance)
2020-10-19 [p.124]
— by Mrs. Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue) — Reports of the Canada Revenue Agency for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020, pursuant to the Access to Information Act, R.S. 1985, c. A-1, sbs. 94(2) and to the Privacy Act, R.S. 1985, c. P-21, sbs. 72(2). — Sessional Paper No. 8561-432-646-01. (Pursuant to Standing Order 108(3)(h)(v), permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics)
2020-10-09 [p.103]
— by Mrs. Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue) — Summary of the Corporate Business Plan for 2020-2021 with perspectives 2022-2023 of the Canada Revenue Agency, pursuant to the Canada Revenue Agency Act, S.C. 1999, c. 17, sbs. 49(2). — Sessional Paper No. 8562-432-839-01. (Pursuant to Standing Order 32(5), permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Finance)
2020-09-23 [p.8]
— by Mrs. Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue) — Order respecting other time limits and periods relating to an act or regulation for which the Minister of National Revenue is responsible, pursuant to the Time Limits and Other Periods Act (COVID-19), S.C. 2020, c. 11, s. 11, ss. 11(1). — Sessional Paper No. 8560-432-1241-01. (Pursuant to Standing Order 32(5), permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Finance)
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