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Results: 1 - 15 of 611
View Paul Manly Profile
GP (BC)
View Paul Manly Profile
2021-04-16 12:23 [p.5753]
Madam Speaker, it is an honour to table petition e-3108, which has over 3,000 signatures and was initiated by constituents in Nanaimo—Ladysmith.
The petitioners note that natural, time-tested immune system essentials and holistic health practices do not receive enough attention for their role in preventative health care. They request that the Government of Canada educate and empower Canadians on holistic health approaches to optimize and maintain their natural immunity and well-being. They ask to cover practices for health sustainability and wellness care under the Canada Health Act, including chiropractic care, massage therapy, acupuncture and naturopathic medicines. They ask the government to support, promote and enhance Canadians' access to holistic health services and natural health products.
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2021-04-16 12:24 [p.5753]
Madam Speaker, it is an honour to rise virtually in the House today to present a petition from a number of constituents. It is a petition that originated some time ago. It is slightly dated, but so many petitioners have asked for it to be submit it.
I do submit a petition calling for the government to take note of the fact, which is not dated and remains the case, that there is no established method for cleaning up a spill that involves bitumen diluted with diluent, that the Trans Mountain pipeline represents a threat to coastal communities and a threat to climate.
The petitioners call on the Government of Canada to reject the idea of buying and building the Trans Mountain pipeline at a cost of what was estimated at that time, but has risen to be over $10 billion.
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2021-04-16 12:32 [p.5755]
Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague.
I am very disappointed in this bill. Other countries, such as England and New Zealand, have much stronger legislation. They passed bills with hard-hitting measures that will truly tackle the perils of climate change.
Bill C-12 is the weakest bill in the world.
What does my Bloc Québécois colleague think about the fact that the Minister of the Environment did not compare existing laws elsewhere in the world to come up with measures that work?
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2021-04-16 12:40 [p.5756]
Mr. Speaker, my question is simple and clear.
What is being proposed in Bill C-12 will result in Canada having the weakest law in the world with respect to the government's responsibility to tackle the great threat of the climate emergency.
Other countries have laws. For example, England passed a very strict law in 2008, which resulted in greenhouse gas reductions. Every year, England meets its targets while Canada fails to do so.
In my colleagues's opinion, why did the minister not study the stricter legislation of other countries?
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2021-04-16 12:54 [p.5758]
Madam Speaker, the member mentioned two people I also love who left us too soon: Bruce Hill and Jim Fulton. In reference to him thinking about his own children and being interested in climate as a teenager, I held my daughter, not yet one year old, while I watched the signing of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Rio in 1992. Since that time, humanity has emitted more greenhouse gases than in the entire period between the beginning of the industrial revolution and when we committed to start reducing greenhouse gases to avoid the emergency we are now in.
My concern is that Bill C-12, as drafted, is actually dangerous because it deludes us into thinking that a 2050 target of net-zero will keep us from blowing past what we committed to do in Paris, which was to hold the global average temperature to as far below 2°C as possible and preferably to 1.5°C. There is a carbon budget.
Will the hon. member—
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2021-04-16 13:22 [p.5762]
Madam Speaker, maybe procedures have changed, but with questions and comments when an hon. member raises their hand, am I not entitled to ask a question?
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2021-04-16 13:23 [p.5763]
Madam Speaker, to my hon. colleague, it is entirely the point that when one understands a carbon budget and when one understands the threat of maintaining or expanding oil and gas activity over even the next decade or more, the chances of losing human civilization to runaway global warming are very severe, and we should be planning for the protection of workers and an orderly transition away from fossil fuels. In fact, that is what is required and being planned around the world.
I would ask my hon. Conservative colleague how the Conservative Party can claim to have a climate plan but think expanding oil and gas well into the future is some sort of right based on regional representation.
View Jenica Atwin Profile
GP (NB)
View Jenica Atwin Profile
2021-04-15 10:08 [p.5643]
moved for leave to introduce Bill C-285, an act to amend the Pest Control Products Act (glyphosate).
She said: Mr. Speaker, I thank my seconder and colleague, the member for Nanaimo—Ladysmith, who is always a strong proponent of protecting our environment.
Today I fulfill a promise I made to my constituents when I ran in 2019. It is an honour to present this bill with the important purpose of imposing a nationwide ban on the use of glyphosate, from our forests to our fields. The widespread use of glyphosate over New Brunswick forests and across Canada is a menace to human health and plant and wildlife biodiversity. There is a growing global consensus that glyphosate, deemed a probable carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, has no place in our society.
Rather than allowing toxic chemicals to be sprayed in Canada until they are proven harmful, we should be exercising greater precaution and banning products until they can be deemed safe. Canadians have the right to breathe clean air, drink safe water and harvest healthy food from the land.
I want to thank the leadership of the tens of thousands of New Brunswickers who have bravely fought for years for this ban to be implemented in the hope of ensuring safer communities for generations to come.
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2021-04-15 10:18 [p.5645]
Mr. Speaker, I am honoured to present a petition on behalf of constituents here in Saanich—Gulf Islands, the WSANEC indigenous territories, which we acknowledge with gratitude.
The WSANEC nation, which when anglicized is pronounced “Saanich”, has a very critical ecosystem called the Saanich Inlet. As the name suggests, it is an inlet from the Salish Sea with very little flushing capacity. The petitioners are very concerned that sewage becomes a problem in the Saanich Inlet, primarily from recreational vessels and some other sources. The petitioners seek the designation of the Saanich Inlet as a zero-waste discharge area.
Another example that friends on the east coast will know where this applies is the Bras d’Or Lake, which likewise is an inlet from the sea and is protected by a zero-discharge area.
The petitioners humbly request that the government take action and designate the Saanich Inlet as also a zero-waste discharge area.
View Jenica Atwin Profile
GP (NB)
View Jenica Atwin Profile
2021-04-15 10:40 [p.5648]
Mr. Speaker, there is so much to say here and so much to clarify. The arguments are extremely nuanced. The implications of this bill are profound. There are voices that must still be empowered through this process. This is for all of Canada. Canadians deserve a fulsome debate. MPs deserve the opportunity to contribute to that fulsome debate.
Would the minister agree that even good, progressive legislation has to go through the parliamentary process? We need to have these conversations out in the open. There are many voices, on either side of the bill, who should have their day in the House of Commons. Would the minister agree?
View Jenica Atwin Profile
GP (NB)
View Jenica Atwin Profile
2021-04-15 12:34 [p.5658]
Madam Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague so much for her incredible, impactful words today. She has articulated so many of the things that need to be said more often in this House.
I have struggled with this bill. I have high hopes, but I also have those same concerns and that same mistrust. I am thinking of court cases, child welfare, residential school survivors, the boil water advisories, the lack of action on missing and murdered indigenous women and girls, the snail's pace of implementing the TRC recommendations, the poverty, the state of housing.
I wonder, will this bill truly address the situation? For communities on the ground, day-to-day band operations, what will this mean in practice? That is the question I am having trouble articulating. Is it symbolism over substance, or can I believe in Canada this time around?
View Jenica Atwin Profile
GP (NB)
View Jenica Atwin Profile
2021-04-15 12:57 [p.5662]
Madam Speaker, resource development and extraction have offered some opportunities for first nation communities: training, jobs, accommodation agreements and perhaps economic prosperity in certain cases. The trouble with highlighting only the positive is that it lacks integrity; it comes off as disingenuous. We know many of the ways that resource development and extraction have actually used and abused indigenous territories and peoples.
Could the member comment on some of the ways that missing and murdered indigenous women are impacted by, say, man camps that accompany this development?
View Jenica Atwin Profile
GP (NB)
View Jenica Atwin Profile
2021-04-15 13:13 [p.5664]
Madam Speaker, we have heard about how quickly we need to pass this piece of legislation, and I understand that perfection in a perfect world is not necessarily what we can aim for.
Significant amendments must be made to this bill. I would like to hear the member's comments on that, specifically about the lack of true intent around including the word “racism.” It is not there. We see instead “systemic discrimination”, and a measure to address injustices. Why does a hesitancy to address racism exist? Could the member comment on that?
View Jenica Atwin Profile
GP (NB)
View Jenica Atwin Profile
2021-04-15 13:28 [p.5666]
Madam Speaker, I want to ask quickly about some of the words we use. Language is so important, and “reconciliation” has been said time and time again in the House. I have heard from many people who feel that this word is actually losing some of its meaning. In fact, if we think of reconciliation, it means to reconcile, to improve what was perhaps once a good relationship, which we know was not the case.
Could the member speak about reparations and what we could actually be doing in Canada to ensure that we repair a broken relationship?
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2021-04-15 15:09 [p.5684]
Mr. Speaker, Canada's climate record just continues to get worse. The most recently released data shows that our greenhouse gas emissions were rising at the beginning of COVID. Today's report from Environmental Defence demonstrates, once again, that fossil fuel subsidies are also going up, while a report from the Breach tells us that the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers secured its own special committee with cabinet.
Next week, when the Prime Minister stands up in President Biden's climate summit, we will at long last announce a target that is meaningful and holds to 1.5°C?
Results: 1 - 15 of 611 | Page: 1 of 41

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