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View Jeremy Patzer Profile
CPC (SK)
I have a simple clarification question, then.
Did the original text of the bill say “eight years”, but then the Senate amended it? They went from two years to one year, and that brought it from eight years to seven years. Is that the dynamic there, I wonder?
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
I will be short. Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I want to thank Mr. Ripley and the staff. It's been a difficult time. I think this bill is even more of an issue, because—let's face it—it has been three decades since it's been looked at.
As a member of Parliament, I am so proud of our youth in this country. It was a week ago today that all the papers in this country flagged proposed section 4.1. Within the last seven days I have never seen the outburst that I have seen from our youth in our country. I am so proud of those who use social media. A lot of them, as we know, are the younger generation.
As politicians we sometimes forget that we are going to leave the broadcasting bill eventually in their hands. They are going to be the ones who own this. I am so proud of all the young people in this country who have phoned, emailed and written—some of them here even in Saskatoon—to the minister about their concerns on this bill.
It wasn't until last Thursday that it hit the fan. Yes, we've had our experts and Ms. Dabrusin, you had yours. We've talked about Dr. Geist. The experts, though, are the citizens—especially the young ones in this country. For the first time that I can remember in decades, they have stood up and said that's enough. They want free expression. They want to have social media and use it the way they've been using it today. They do not want big government looking over their shoulder.
I was concerned when I asked the question to the current chair of the CRTC, Ian Scott, and he replied back that he needed to go to Treasury Board. Now we're giving them more powers and I know he said at our committee that he can't do anything until he gets a lot more money from the Treasury Board.
I know we are going over time here, but I just wanted to make the point that I am so proud of our youth in this country. Sometimes, as politicians, we forget who we serve. They reminded us in the last 10 days that they are out there, they are watching us and they don't like what they see in this bill. That is evident with the feedback that the current government and all opposition members have received on this bill.
Remember, we have one mouth and two ears. The ears are ringing because the youth in this country have signalled to us, as politicians, that they don't like this bill. They do not like what is going on. We have an obligation to the youth of this country, because they are going to be leading it very shortly.
Thanks, Mr. Chair.
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Chair, and thank you, MP Vaughan, for working cordially with us.
I would like to move a motion that the committee prioritize the seniors study, as amended, and unanimously agreed to on Tuesday, February 2, 2021, as the next study to be undertaken by this committee.
At our last meeting, I did go at length into why I believe this is an important and timely study for us to do. Seniors built this country, and we definitely have the opportunity right now to look at how COVID has affected them, and where we could do a better job after the fact, and even where we could do better the next time something like this happens.
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
CPC (SK)
Chair, if there is agreement for this to be the next study, I would ask if we could start the study next Thursday, just to give time for witnesses to be contacted and give them enough of a heads-up.
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Chair.
Thank you, MP Vaughan.
My opinion would be that, at some point on the duration of the study.... I think MP Vaughan did bring up a good point that, if the minister and officials can come even near the beginning, that also gives a bit of a buffer for the clerk when it comes to witnesses and that whole microphone kerfuffle that we seem to get to enjoy quite often.
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I want to thank both Chief Rempel and Chief Blake for being with us today. Your testimony and knowledge and experience are very helpful as we pursue some answers to this question about policing as an essential service.
The mandate letters for the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness and the Minister of Indigenous Services both refer to co-developing a legislative framework to recognize first nations policing as an essential service. In our last panel—I'm not sure if you were both observing the first hour panel—we had officials from four different federal departments on the panel. If I recall, I believe it was Ms. Blaney who asked the question about defining essential services. I'm not sure we actually got an answer to that question from the department officials. We have this mandate that talks about policing as an essential service. I'm not sure anybody is telling us or defining for us what that is in the jurisdictional quagmire we seem to find in the federal departments.
I'm going to start with Chief Blake, and then, Chief Rempel, ask if you'd be prepared to answer the same question.
Would you, in your terms, take a moment and define for me, in your experience at the level of work that you both do, what defining police service as an essential service would mean as a difference in the communities you serve?
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you.
Chief Rempel, do you want to add your comment to that question? Then I will have one more for you, hopefully, if the chair gives me time.
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you. I appreciate that from both of you.
I'm going to follow up again with just another question along that same line. The federal government talks about this co-development process. I'm just curious whether you, Chief Blake, in your role with the association, and Chief Rempel, in your role as the chief of a first nation, know of people within your organizations—colleagues or peers—who have been involved or been asked to be involved in the co-development of this process?
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Chief Rempel, I want to be a bit more specific with you. I'm curious if you're aware of any chiefs at the local level who have been asked to be involved with this process.
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
I suspect that in conversation with your peers, I might hear that same answer from any of them. Would that be fair, in your opinion?
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you.
Mr. Chair, I think I'm pretty close. I'll cede the rest of my time.
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you very much, Chair.
Thank you, all of you, for what you're doing and for your service, as well as the commemoration that you're involved in. It's clearly a passion for all of you, and it means a great deal to me as well.
Hello, Sammy. It's good to see you again.
I am one of the civilians on this team who has found veterans very gracious in the way that they embrace teaching me a great deal about their lives and what they've experienced. Sammy has certainly done that in regard to his service and the role that he plays.
I just want to mention, Sammy, what you indicated. I have it on page 3 of the document you shared. You referred us, as members of this committee, to two documents that the Library of Parliament could provide for us to learn more about our responsibilities and issues around the Afghan war—sorry, the Afghan...not a war. I would like to ask if either our clerk or our analyst would provide that to all of us. It sounds like that's something we could definitely gain from. If that's possible, I would appreciate it.
If you would, Sammy, please explain more about section 32 of the National Defence Act and why you as a veteran feel that this legislation is important to veterans and to commemoration.
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you for that.
As a veteran, what are your thoughts on how Canada should engage the public on commemoration? I hear a little bit of your angst around that dynamic based on your perceptions in regard to those who have served since the Korean War, and the dynamics there.
What would you like to say to us in that regard?
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Can I ask you about the Afghan memorial? It's in a 10-year plan, and of course, has been taking a very long time to come to fruition. I hear from veterans from that time that this is very important, that they have a place to go to meet each other.
Is that the type of thing you're referring to?
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you again, Mr. Chair.
This is just so good. Thank you so much.
I just want to mention, with regard to the Battle of the Atlantic commemoration, that as a brand new member of Parliament back in the first spring that I attended that, it blew me away. The action out on the lawn was late happening. It was raining. It was cold. It took me hours to get over that. Those veterans refused umbrellas—refused. I just looked at them, and I kept saying, “If they can do this, I can do this.” The pictures of them out on the Atlantic covered in ice and what they went through. I don't know how we can explain that further to young Canadians. I regret that we haven't had the opportunity to do that again as members of Parliament.
With regard to what Sammy has said as well, we, as members of Parliament, need to understand what our armed forces go through. I know, to a certain point.... I believe Sammy told me once, “No, you do not want to know; you shouldn't know.” Of course, there are things that are beyond what we can handle, but to just have that level of appreciation....
Sammy, again, you talked about the issues around the Gulf War and then with Afghanistan. Canadians think that they're all wars. If you don't know any different, of course it's a war. When you find out that it isn't a war, you ask why we make these differences. Rwanda.... What I've learned about that circumstance, it is a peacekeeping dynamic.
Our soldiers face horrific things no matter what circumstances they end up in. Why are you so passionate about that recognition of the difference in terms?
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