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View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
I call the meeting to order.
Welcome back, everyone. Welcome to meeting number 47 of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2) and the motion adopted in committee on April 12, 2021, the committee has commenced consideration of the study of fair compensation in the field of educational publishing in Canada.
Today's meeting is taking place in a hybrid format. Most of us will be in our own respective virtual rooms, or in the case of Madame Bessette, a virtual environment with a beautiful backdrop. Hopefully you'll get to see that later.
As you know, of course, when you're viewing us from the webcast, the person speaking is the only one you will see on the screen.
Now we get to the crux of the matter. The way this format is going to work is that instead of an hour with each of the witnesses, we're going to have all witnesses. We have six witness groups with us today. We'll carry on. If we need a health break, we'll do that halfway through; nevertheless, we will continue to move on.
I introduce our first witness only because he is not yet with us. He is having a few technical issues. We'll get to him towards the end when he's able to log back on. That would be Bryan Perro, who's a writer, and he's appearing as an individual.
We now go to the organizations. From Access Copyright, we have Roanie Levy, who is the president and chief executive officer; from the Association of Canadian Publishers, Glenn Rollans, who is past president; from the Canadian Society of Children's Authors, Illustrators and Performers, Sylvia McNicoll, author; from the Writers' Union of Canada, John Degen, who is the executive director; and from Universities Canada, Philip Landon, who is the chief operating officer of that organization.
To our witnesses, we've all had our sound checks and are ready to go. We'll have five minutes of your opening statements, and following that, we'll go to each of the caucuses represented here on our committee.
That said, Ms. Levy, I'm going to start with you. You have up to five minutes to begin.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you very much.
Now we go to Glenn Rollans from the Association of Canadian Publishers.
Mr. Rollans, you have up to five minutes.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Mr. Rollans.
We're now going to move on to the Canadian Society of Children's Authors, Illustrators and Performers. Here is Sylvia McNicoll.
Ms. McNicoll, go ahead, please.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Ms. McNicoll.
Now we go to the Writers' Union and John Degen, who is the executive director.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Mr. Degen.
We go now to Universities Canada. Philip Landon is the chief operating officer.
You have up to five minutes, sir. Go ahead.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Mr. Landon.
Now we go to Mr. Perro, who is our final guest.
Mr. Perro—I hope I've pronounced that correctly—it's nice to see you back online. We're going to do a sound check with you to make sure we can hear you. Just one word—
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
That is much better.
Go ahead, Mr. Perro. You have up to five minutes.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Mr. Perro.
I think wishing you happy birthday is in order.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Oh, was it? Well, happy belated birthday.
Okay, everyone, thank you very much. That ends our testimony from our witnesses' opening statements.
Now we go into questions, and I have a couple of tips for everyone.
We're now on an expanded list of witnesses, as you know. We have all six of them here. Colleagues, it would help us greatly if you could identify who you want to ask your question to, as opposed to saying that you have a question and anybody can answer. That tends to chew up a lot of time and creates a bit of confusion, since we have six witnesses here. You could help me out.
As for our witnesses, now when I give colleagues time of five or six minutes, the time is their own. If you wish to get in on a conversation, you could wave your hand if you wish, or do something of that nature to try to get the attention of the person asking the question. I would ask my colleagues to be aware of that.
We are now going to the Conservatives and Mr. Rayes. Mr. Rayes, you have six minutes.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Merci.
I provided a little bit of flexibility for our witnesses, but I can't provide too much, as much as I would love to. It's very interesting, though. Thank you.
We will now go to Ms. Ien for six minutes, please.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
I apologize. I should have mentioned at the beginning that if you hear me say "Thank you", I give you the flexibility to finish your sentence. It doesn't mean you have to end right away. I think I unintentionally did that to Mr. Perro as well, so I apologize.
If you hear me say "Thank you", just sum up your thought very quickly. We have to get on to the next questioner.
Speaking of which, go ahead.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you.
Mr. Champoux, you may go ahead. You have six minutes.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you.
We'll now go to Ms. McPherson for six minutes, please.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
I'm sorry, folks. I have to stop it right there. We have to go to our second round.
I noticed, Ms. McNicoll, that you had your hand up earlier, but perhaps we could deal with it in the next round of questioning. I want to point out that you did have your hand up, albeit virtually, but it was there.
Nevertheless, in the second round we now will go to Mr. Waugh for five minutes, please.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Ms. Levy.
We'll now go to Mr. Louis for five minutes please.
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