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Results: 106 - 120 of 304
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2020-02-21 13:58 [p.1396]
Mr. Speaker, I am not surprised the Liberal member is confused. That is quite common in this House.
The point I was trying to make is there are so many good things we could have been debating this week and the Liberals chose not to because they are so weak in dealing with an issue that is facing the country with the blockades. That is the point I was making.
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2020-02-21 13:59 [p.1396]
Mr. Speaker, I always look forward to members on this side providing advice and suggestions. Those are things that should be considered. I think we should consider what the member is proposing.
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2020-02-21 14:00 [p.1396]
Mr. Speaker, I can hear the frustration in the member's voice and see it on his face. Maybe the member has an idea of how Canadians feel today. Maybe he has a sense of how the farmers are feeling today, when they are looking at their bins that are full of grain, and they look at their bills and are asking what they are to do. They know that a month from now they will not be able to haul their grain because of road bans. They know it would take at least two and a half to three weeks for the grain to actually get moving again, if we were to stop blockades today.
If the member feels frustration, it is one-tenth of what those farmers are feeling right now.
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2020-02-21 14:01 [p.1396]
Mr. Speaker, there are so many examples.
There are examples of forestry workers who are going to be laid off because the sawmills have no more room to store that lumber.
Last week I was at Rio Tinto in Chicoutimi with the member for Chicoutimi—Le Fjord. They were talking about how they are trying to bring in trucks to keep that mill going. An aluminum mill does not just get turned on and off. It is not just a switch in the wall. It is a big deal.
The Liberals do not understand how big of a deal this is to Canadians. By doing what we are doing today, if that makes Liberals frustrated, maybe they will get a sense of how big of a deal it is. Do Liberals not understand that we are fighting for Canadians here this afternoon? That is what we are doing. If they do not understand that, then they really do not understand what their constituents' needs and wants are.
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Speaker, one of the many ways we can tell that the Prime Minister does not know what he is doing is when his message changes every single day. First, the Prime Minister elevated the protesters, talking about how they were defending their communities in the cold. Then he tried to make a link between radical anti-energy activists and reconciliation. Then he said that the protests were illegal, but it was not up to him to enforce the rule of law.
I have a simple question. Can the Prime Minister tell us on what day these illegal blockades will come down?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Speaker, these anti-free market, anti-energy activists have nothing to do with reconciliation, and it is completely unjust for up to 1,500 people to have to go without a paycheque because some people are breaking the law.
Helen Michelle of the Wet'suwet'en First Nation said, “A lot of the protestors are not even Wet'suwet'en people. Our people said go ahead” to Coastal GasLink.
Once again, can the Prime Minister tell this House on what day these illegal blockades will come down?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister is once again offering concessions to those who have more resolve than he does. Now the RCMP has been ordered to leave Wet'suwet'en territory, there are major questions about whether this project will actually go ahead.
The Prime Minister has already told these radical anti-energy protesters that he will not do anything to enforce the law. Those people are breaking the law and trying to hold up this important project.
Will he at least give a 100% guarantee that Coastal GasLink will be built, yes or no?
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
View Kevin Waugh Profile
2020-02-20 14:51 [p.1329]
Mr. Speaker, the ongoing rail blockades across this land are crippling our country and holding our economy hostage.
CN and VIA Rail have been forced to lay off hundreds of workers as a result of the Prime Minister's weakness. Canadian industry is warning of empty shelves, and production shutdowns will soon follow.
Can the Prime Minister tell this House exactly what these blockades are costing the Canadian economy each day they go on?
View Corey Tochor Profile
CPC (SK)
View Corey Tochor Profile
2020-02-20 15:00 [p.1331]
Mr. Speaker, Canada is facing a crisis, and the Prime Minister is too weak to act.
Yesterday the Prime Minister finally admitted that these blockades were illegal. The preamble to the Constitution Act, championed by Pierre Trudeau himself, states that Canada is founded upon principles that recognize the rule of law, yet when the Prime Minister is faced with a situation which he now admits is illegal, his reaction so far has been to do nothing.
When will this weak Prime Minister recognize the founding principle and start enforcing the rule of law?
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Speaker, Canadian farmers depend on rail service to get their goods to market. They are now planning for the spring and need to sell their crops and pay the cash advancements following a poor harvest season.
With dramatically reduced rail speeds and blockades happening across Canada, it is clear that the Liberals do not care about the importance of rail for farmers based on their lack of action.
How will the Prime Minister ensure that grain gets to market in the face of these blockades?
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2020-02-20 17:06 [p.1350]
Madam Speaker, I would like to remind the member that under the Chrétien government in the nineties, when the member for Malpeque was solicitor general and Ralph Goodale was in government, a group of farmers protested and took a sack of wheat across the border. I remember the member for Malpeque said the law is the law is the law.
Could the member compare today to then? Those farmers went to jail. Could he explain to me why there is no action at this point?
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2020-02-20 17:16 [p.1351]
Mr. Speaker, when do we say enough is enough? When do we say we have shut down enough ports, we have shut down enough jobs or we have shut down enough industries?
People cannot get contact lenses now in Ottawa. People in different parts of Canada cannot get baby formula. We cannot get grain to market. At what point does it become enough? When do we say we have to take action? The Premier of Quebec is ready to take action.
Could the member tell me when is the appropriate time?
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2020-02-20 17:34 [p.1354]
Mr. Speaker, I will be sharing my time with the hon. member for Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo. She is an amazing member of Parliament. I am so proud to share my time with her today.
Today is a sad day. It is sad that our country has gone to this level. It did not need to be this way. Canada is a trading nation. We are a nation that sells some $300 billion of goods around the world. Around the world, Canada is thought of as a friendly, polite and respectful nation. The rule of law is important in our nation. We tell other nations that the rule of law is what helps us to be who we are today.
We are talking about the barricades and what is going on in Canada, across western Canada, and the impact it is having on families right across the country. The inaction and the inability of the Liberal government to understand how serious things are is pretty disappointing. It shows how out of touch the Liberals are. The inability to react or know what to do shows us how weak the leadership of the Liberal government is.
Last week I was talking to a farmer friend of mine, Rick Lindsay, when this was happening. Rick had a couple of loads of wheat he wanted to get out. He has a cash advance just like every other farmer. He asked me what was going on. He said farmers have been fighting a hard harvest. They have a carbon tax. He wants to ship some grain, but he cannot get it shipped. He has contracts he wants to fulfill so he can get some cash flow and he has to start organizing and purchasing fertilizer for the spring, so he wants to know what is going on.
Let us look at the situation on the west coast with the Wet'suwet'en nation. The elected officials are in favour of this pipeline. The 20 bands along the route are in favour. How can three people, how can activists in Ontario, how can activists who have no skin in the game take a country down? That is what they want to do. They want to take this country down.
The member for Brandon—Souris talked about a group of farmers fighting for freedom. They were fighting for the freedom to sell the product they grow on their own. They did not want a Canadian wheat board. They protested, and that protest consisted of taking a sack of wheat across the border. They were arrested.
They were not being violent. They were not being smug to the RCMP. They were not being disrespectful. They were making a point. They were protesting. What did the Chrétien government do to those farmers?
People would be amazed to hear what that government did to those people. They were treated as if they were drug dealers. They were arrested and charged and thrown in jail. The minister at the time, who was from Malpeque, said the law is the law is the law. He said those farmers broke the law, so they had to go to jail. Minister Goodale at the time said he agreed that the law is the law is the law. He felt those farmers broke the law, so they have to go to jail.
It is easy to throw farmers in jail, because they are polite and respectful. They are not criminals and they are not anarchists. They are not trying to take down the country. Those farmers were fighting for something. They had skin in the game, something that was important to them. They were willing to cross that line to make a point. They were never going to put an RCMP officer's life at risk. They were never going to disrupt the country. They were never going to create a situation in which people would not be able to get contact lenses here in Ottawa or not get baby formula across the country or not get propane in eastern Canada. That was not their intent. They did not disrupt the whole Canadian economy. They wanted to make a point.
That is the difference between the type of protest we are seeing today versus a true protest. A true protest would be peaceful. A Gandhi-style protest would not include taking up arms. A Gandhi-style protest would not include protesters sitting on the ground and stating they are going to disrupt this country and take it to its knees. This protest going on is not a Gandhi-style protest. These people are anarchists. These people do not have skin in the game.
We need to ask ourselves what is going on and how it got to this point. When we do not enforce the rule of law, this is what happens. It is one of those things that just keeps growing and growing. If people get away with it once, with no slap on the wrist, they feel they can do it again.
We have a member from Vancouver who was arrested for protesting and received a slap on the wrist. There were no consequences. That makes people think they will do another one, since there were no consequences—
An. hon. member: The Green Party leader.
Mr. Randy Hoback: Yes, the Green Party leader.
People want to do another one, and another one, and another one after that, because there are no consequences. They think it is fun. Then they put it on a crowdfunding site in the U.S. and get paid to do it. We have seen that happen. This can be happening at this point in time.
What is the goal of these protesters? The Liberals have to look at that very seriously as a government, and ask if this is a real issue of reconciliation.
For some of them, for a small group, maybe it is. However, they are being abused by all of the other people who actually have no skin in the game. It is not their issue. They just want to stop development at all costs.
How do we deal with people like that? We enforce the rule of law. If we do not enforce the rule of law now, what prevents them from cranking it up later, and more and more going into the future?
I am very concerned that if we do not do things properly and fairly right now, if we do not deal with these issues in an appropriate fashion right now, it is going to lead to even more chaos as we get into the summer.
I will go back to the $300-billion worth of goods every year. If I am a company owner who is thinking about building a plant in Canada, and think that Canada is a pretty good place and Canadians are good people, but I see in an article that Canada has protests going on and it has shut down its rail lines, it tells me that if I build in Canada I may not be able to get propane for my plant.
That is what we are telling the world right now. As folks in Canada are trying to sell investment opportunities in Canada to corporations or other companies, business people are asking why they would do that, when there is no rule of law in Canada. It is gone. The Prime Minister is not enforcing the law, and he is very weak.
I was in a committee last night where we had a witness whose business has seven facilities across Canada building IPEX pipes for plumbing and electrical goods, to run the cable through it. At the end of the testimony, I asked him how things were going. He said that four out of the company's seven plants are now shutting down because they cannot get the raw goods to make the pipes. That is one facility.
I had wings with a friend last night. He was wearing his glasses and I asked him why he was wearing them. He said he could not get contact lenses. He could not find contacts in Ottawa, so he was wearing his glasses.
We are starting to see what is going to happen here unless the folks across the aisle start to deal with this in a serious manner. Our economy is shutting down and there is going to be a tremendous cost.
Even if we were to end the blockades today, it will take time to get things going. I hear about vandalism to rails out on the west coast. Before a train can cross a bridge, that bridge is now going to have to be fully inspected. The consequences of what these folks have done in just more than two weeks are pretty serious. They are going to last quite a while.
Another thing I want to highlight is that the grain sector has had its challenges in shipping its product around the global market. I can remember having debates with CN and CP about them not delivering on time. I remember times when there were 50-plus ships sitting in the port of Vancouver. We are at 40 now, and 10 in Prince Rupert. A purchaser of Canadian grain, from Japan let us say, who needs just-in-time delivery is going to get tired of us in Canada and is going to buy from the U.S.
That is what is happening here. That is the breakdown. There are implications for this country of more and more unemployment and families not being able to pay their bills. It is a domino effect. The dominoes have started to fall, and it is not a pretty ending. This could have been stopped. It could have been prevented.
When we go to communities and say we are going to do this and this for them, when we raise expectations this high and then do nothing or very little, what do we expect? That is what the government has done. The reality is now Canadians are going to pay for it, and that is very disappointing.
There is no reason Canadians should be paying for this. This should have been dealt with a long time ago. It should never have gotten to this point, and it is sad that it has.
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2020-02-20 17:44 [p.1356]
Mr. Speaker, I talked about this. This is not a Ghandi-style protest. This is totally different from what a protest should be, if those involved have what they are protesting at heart.
Do you have to use force? Maybe you do some days. I hate it. I do. I hate that we are going to have to possibly use force. That is because you did not do your job to begin with. You could have nipped it in the bud a year ago, maybe two years ago, but you let it go on and on, and it has gotten to a level where now you have to use force. That is not the RCMP's fault; that is your fault. How did you let it get this bad?
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2020-02-20 17:48 [p.1357]
Mr. Speaker, I share in her fear. It should never come to force. It should be able to be dealt with in a reasonable fashion. However, we are not creating the issue here, the Liberals are. The reality is that the RCMP have to do what the RCMP have to do, and hopefully not with force. Hopefully they can negotiate their way through it.
I was in Chicoutimi—Le Fjord with the member for Chicoutimi—Le Fjord talking to people at Rio Tinto. They were already bringing trucks in because they were concerned about getting their aluminum out and getting the bauxite in.
There was already an impact last week in that district on whether they could actually keep that facility running. The reality is that one does not just switch it off, then the next day receive some bauxite and clear some room and turn it back on.
It comes back to the fact that the Liberals could have headed this off a long time ago. If they had taken appropriate actions, dealt with things in an appropriate manner, managed expectations, been realistic and not lied to or misled people, we would not be here.
That is why we are here. The Liberals need to do some soul searching, and they have to understand they are the ones who created this problem. They need to fix it.
Results: 106 - 120 of 304 | Page: 8 of 21

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