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Results: 1 - 30 of 39
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
2020-03-12 15:09 [p.2024]
Mr. Speaker, I certainly agree with my hon. colleague that the backlog is totally unacceptable, but we have received an increase of 90% in first applications at Veterans Affairs and also the overall applications have doubled since 2015. We keep innovating our system by digitizing files and reducing paperwork. We continually, actually, say yes.
We have invested $10 billion in Veterans Affairs. We are going to make sure that veterans get the services they truly deserve.
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2020-03-11 18:18 [p.1967]
Madam Speaker, I have sat here and listened to the attack on other industries in this country, and it is just so wrong. I have heard this time and again from the Bloc Québécois. I am just not going to sit here and listen to it anymore. To attack the oil industry is absolutely wrong. I hope the member knows that with respect to equalization, over the last five years, $52 billion went to the Province of Quebec. Where did it come from? It came from higher wages in Alberta, oil in Newfoundland and Labrador, and fossil fuels in B.C. If those industries are healthy, we are all healthy.
I agree we need to do more for forestry, and we have done a lot for forestry over the years. There is the spruce budworm, the pine beetle and other things that need to be dealt with. We need to do that, but for heaven's sake, let us not try to make gains in one industry by attacking another in this House. We are all Canadians. We all need to be healthy with respect to the economy, and we need to do everything we can for all industries in this country so our economy can grow.
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
2020-03-10 14:58 [p.1889]
Mr. Speaker, I can assure my hon. colleague that we are working very hard on this backlog, and that we invested just under $700 million in the operating budget last year. What we are doing is digitizing the files. We are making sure that all veterans who should receive benefits, receive benefits.
Quite honestly, there is a 60% increase in total applications because our government has been more generous to the veterans, and a 90% increase in first applications. We have supported and will continue to support our veterans.
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
2020-03-10 14:59 [p.1889]
Mr. Speaker, as I indicated in the committee today, the money spent on mental health was not distributed properly. I directed the department to make sure that it was spent fairly, to make sure that a review take place and to make sure that it was spent just like it was over the last number of years.
On the backlog, when my hon. colleague's government was in place, it fired 1,000 employees and cut the budget. That is part of the reason why we are in difficulty.
View Robert Morrissey Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Robert Morrissey Profile
2020-03-10 18:08 [p.1916]
Mr. Speaker, I will be sharing my time with the member for Yukon.
I am pleased to rise in the House this afternoon to speak in support of Bill C-4. It is important to restate that Canada did not choose to renegotiate NAFTA. When confronted with the reality that our major trading partner was intent on replacing NAFTA, our government put in place a negotiating team that positioned Canada well as we began the process toward a modernized free trade agreement that, as my colleagues have stated in the House from time to time, has the overwhelming support of the House of Commons.
I have listened to much debate in the House and have heard various criticisms of parts of the renewed trade agreement, but members have not offered how they would have negotiated differently in those areas. While it is easy to pick apart points and say, “We would do it better”, Canada is a country of some 38 million people and our largest trading partner is a country of well over 300 million people. The official opposition would have Canadians believe that we could have simply gone to Washington and dictated to the U.S. every term we wanted in the agreement.
Mr. Kevin Lamoureux: Ridiculous.
Mr. Robert Morrissey: It is ridiculous. Trade agreements are negotiated between multilateral partners and countries. This particular one was between three countries, obviously: Mexico, Canada and the United States.
Canada, more than most, is dependent on trade. As a country of 38 million people, rich in natural resources, agriproducts and seafood, we depend on selling products worldwide in a competitive marketplace in order for Canada's economy to grow and succeed and to pay for the many programs that we as Canadians take for granted.
In these negotiations, I have to compliment the team that our government put in place to negotiate, at a critical time, a historic new agreement that will put in place, for Canadian businesses, Canadian farmers, Canadian fishers and Canadian workers, a secure framework as we move down the road and continue to grow and expand the economy.
Imagine for a moment standing here today in an environment with no agreement. Where would our industries be positioned? It is important to consider, in any particular trade agreement, which partner has more to lose and which partner has more to gain. For Canada, being a very small country compared to the U.S. in population and market size, it was extremely important that our negotiating team recognized that we had to have an agreement that served Canadians well and served Canada's economy well.
I have no problem going on the record to state that this agreement is a win for Canadians, a win established by a strong negotiating team that understood the dynamics and fundamentals of Canada's economy and ensured that the parts that had to be protected were protected.
I will not go into detail on the economic impact of this particular agreement, because it has been well debated in the House by earlier speakers. However, there is no question that Canada will be better positioned to move forward when the agreement is ratified than it would be if we had no trade agreement at all.
It is important to go back to how we arrived here. It was with a president intent on removing a trade agreement that had worked for a number of years, serving both countries well. That has been documented by speakers on both sides of the House. The agreement has served Canada and the U.S. well over the years.
It was extremely important that our government, being the smaller country population-wise in these trade agreements, secure an agreement that would be beneficial to all those sectors.
A couple of the last speakers basically portrayed the scenario that it was all wins for the U.S. and none for Canada. I believe that most fair-minded analysts would take a look at the agreement and say that Canada won on a lot of points, that Canada's team succeeded in a difficult environment and scored some big wins for us.
One of those wins that has been mentioned time and time again was that, from the outset, this government's line in the sand was always that supply management would remain in place. That was a major win in these trade negotiations, because at the start of this the U.S. administration was intent on seeing Canada's supply-managed system dismantled. That was a position that our government clearly would not waver on. There was room for negotiation, and at the end of the day we still have a sector that enjoys the benefits of operating in a supply market system.
My riding of Egmont is in the province of Prince Edward Island. Prince Edward Island is to Canada what Canada is to the U.S.. Prince Edward Island is a province with a small population, and we depend on trade for our agri products as well as seafood products. We very much depend on our national government to ensure that we have competitive trade agreements so that our goods move to market in a profitable manner and Prince Edward Island's industries remain protected that require it. Those industries that operate in a free market system do much better under this agreement, as was pointed out with the other agreements we signed with Europe and are now being negotiated with the Pacific Rim.
It is easy for opposition members to say that we should have done better in some areas, and we could have done better in some sectors, without offering what they would have exchanged to get to where their preferred position would have been. Yet, that is the role of the opposition. The opposition members can pick away at the government without offering up what they would do in our place. However, the government has a responsibility to ensure that at the end of the day Canadian entrepreneurs, farmers and fishers operate in a stable market environment with ensured protections. Some of the key areas that were protected are dispute settlement mechanisms, investor-state dispute resolution and the area of supply management.
As I indicated, Prince Edward Island is very small, and our dairy industry is very competitive. During this process, I met extensively with the dairy farmers in my riding. Let me read into the record a fact. Prince Edward Island has 1.7% of Canada's total dairy quota, and that quota has been growing at 3.5% annually, compared to the rest of Canada's at 2%, because the demand for domestic supply is moving. Over six years, that realized a 21% increase in market demand for Prince Edward Island's milk in a supply market system.
The industry is still growing and expanding. I recently had the honour of sitting down with some of the dairy farmers, the largest processors in my riding and the Minister of Agriculture and discussing what areas we had to continue to improve on to ensure that this industry remains competitive and small, medium-sized and large processors are competitive on an international market place.
I am pleased with this agreement. I certainly will be supporting it. I look forward to when this very important deal, which trumpets the accomplishments of this country, will be ratified in this House.
View Robert Morrissey Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Robert Morrissey Profile
2020-03-10 18:19 [p.1918]
Mr. Speaker, very simply, who was complimented in the final agreement? It was our lead negotiator, the then minister of foreign affairs. She was complimented by her trade counterpart from the U.S. and by the President of the United States. That answers the question of our position on how our trade people were treated in the U.S. Likewise, the end result of a successful agreement addresses that particular issue.
View Robert Morrissey Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Robert Morrissey Profile
2020-03-10 18:21 [p.1918]
Mr. Speaker, I am sure that if we checked the records of debates on this topic in the Mexican assembly and the U.S. Congress there would be opposing politicians criticizing their governments for not doing enough in their various jurisdictions. We had the same comments in the three countries that we positively did not go far enough in one area or the other. The fact is that this agreement did protect Canada's supply market system and did protect those farmers who participate in it.
View Robert Morrissey Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Robert Morrissey Profile
2020-03-10 18:23 [p.1918]
Mr. Speaker, let us cut right to the end of the discussion. The proof is in the final document. We have strong unanimity in this House for supporting this agreement, so obviously we arrived there in a transparent and open process.
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2020-03-09 12:45 [p.1783]
Madam Speaker, I have heard that member talk many times against the Trans Mountain pipeline and the $7.8 billion that the government is spending. The government is spending for many reasons. One is jobs, but it is really to create another export market for Canada's natural resource products.
I want to tell the member the economics behind this spending. There is a thing called the Alberta discount. The oil market discounts Canadian oil because we have no alternative but to sell to the United States. That amounts to 15% to 28% of the price per barrel of oil.
The pipeline would be safer and better for the environment, but if we could get rid of that Alberta discount, it would mean $587 billion per year to Canadians. We lose $1.8 billion a day in this country because of the Alberta discount, yet that member constantly talks against a pipeline that would allow us to get proper market prices for our oil. Come on.
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2020-02-28 12:12 [p.1750]
Madam Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the first report of the Standing Committee on Finance entitled “Canadian Ideas: Leveraging our Strengths”, the pre-budget consultations report prior to the 2020 budget, as ordered by the House.
I first want to thank members of all parties who presented witnesses and who worked strenuously to get this report prepared on time. The report contains some 92 recommendations, and it shows that a minority Parliament can work, with all parties working together.
I also want to thank those who presented submissions prior to the August 2019 deadline and also those who appeared as witnesses in February, presenting their ideas.
I also want to thank the clerk, David Gagnon, and the analysts with the Library of Parliament, who worked long hours and extra hours, Andrew Barton, Brett Capwell, Michaël Lambert-Racine and Sylvain Fleury, for all the work they did.
Finally, I have a point that is beyond the recommendations themselves. I would refer Canadians to appendix A, which includes the many proposals put forward by organizations and individuals across Canada, which is food for thought for future discussions.
View Sean Casey Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Sean Casey Profile
2020-02-27 14:06 [p.1682]
Mr. Speaker, the innovative communities fund focuses on investments that lead to long-term employment and economic capacity building in Atlantic Canadian communities.
There is an excellent example of that happening right now in the great riding of Charlottetown. Since 1981, our beloved Charlottetown farmers' market has been the city's go-to destination on a Saturday morning.
In politics, it is important to go out and meet people, and on Saturday mornings, there are lots of them at the market. All year long, over 65 vendors come to the market with the best local products, hospitality, cuisine, and arts and crafts Prince Edward Island has to offer. I think that says a lot.
The market is an essential driver for our economy, particularly for small business and agri-food entrepreneurs. This new investment will ensure that the market is able to not just survive, but to thrive as a place to buy local and meet neighbours.
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2020-02-26 15:21 [p.1613]
Mr. Speaker, also on a point of order, I want to remind you that in 2013, the Harper Conservatives completely gutted the farm safety net programs, and for Conservatives—
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2020-02-25 18:27 [p.1548]
Madam Speaker, I appreciate the member's remarks, but I am worried that this debate is going to fan the flames of rhetoric on both sides.
As a member of Parliament on this Teck Frontier issue, I supported this and approved the proposal. In terms of supporting it, I also realize that there are already 20 oil sands projects in the mill with approval. This one probably will not come into being unless things really change within the next 10 years. The problem we see on that side, and on this to a certain extent, is the way it is viewed out there in Alberta.
I have a lot of Alberta friends. I spend a lot of time there. A lot of people from the Maritimes worked in the oil industry and still do. In fact 25 flights out of Moncton a week used to go to Alberta and they are not now.
Trying to blame everything on the Prime Minister is not the answer. Does the member really think that the price of oil in the market had nothing to do with this decision? It requires $92 a barrel of oil for it to be successful. Oil is nowhere near there and looks like it is not going to get there.
Let us have some real facts on the table here. The Teck company made the decision themselves and the price of oil is—
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2020-02-25 18:30 [p.1549]
No. Give her more time.
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2020-02-25 20:42 [p.1569]
Madam Speaker, there are some points the member for Carleton made that I could actually agree with. Sometimes we do agree at the finance committee. However, what I absolutely do not agree with is his comment that the demonstrators and the leadership of the government, meaning the Prime Minister, along with the government, shut down the Teck mine. That is absolutely not true.
Did the member for Carleton not read the letter from Teck Resources? It said this was the market. The member talked about free enterprise, and that is what free enterprise is all about. If the market is not there, the business plan does not go ahead. It is that simple. Do not try to play politics on this issue, because this is bigger than politics.
I congratulate the leadership at Teck Resources, because they laid out the facts and said something to politicians in the House: Find a way to get together, to work the environment and the economy together, so we can prosper in this country. Let us stop playing politics with this issue that is dividing Canadians.
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2020-02-25 22:57 [p.1588]
Mr. Speaker, I listened quite closely to the member for St. Albert—Edmonton. To take the approach in this place of laying all the blame on the Prime Minister is just absolutely plain ridiculous. The CEO of Teck Frontier said clearly that the market was the major part of the reason it pulled out. I want to read from the letter of Teck Frontier's CEO, which stated:
Frontier, however, has surfaced a broader debate over climate change and Canada’s role in addressing it. It is our hope that withdrawing from the process will allow Canadians to shift to a larger and more positive discussion about the path forward.
We have not seen that positive discussion here tonight from the opposition at all.
There are real issues out there, and the member blames the Prime Minister. Let me tell the House something: The Prime Minister's response came long before this discussion by Teck Frontier. It came in the previous budgets we made and passed in this House, where we tried to bring the environment and the economy together. It came for an area that we get a lot of criticism on, with the Prime Minister supporting and purchasing the Trans Mountain pipeline so we can get product to a different market than the United States of America and perhaps get rid of the Alberta discount, which is costing this country $587 billion a year.
The Prime Minister has been responding. He has been trying to move forward—
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2020-02-20 10:04 [p.1287]
Mr. Speaker, this is my third day tabling reports. We have been busy at the Canada-United States Inter-Parliamentary Group.
Pursuant to Standing Order 34(1), I have the honour to present to the House, in both official languages, three reports of the Canada-United States IPG.
The first concerns the Pacific NorthWest Economic Region 29th annual summit held in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, July 21 to 25, 2019.
The second concerns the National Governors Association annual summer meeting, held in Salt Lake City, Utah, from July 24 to 26, 2019.
The third concerns the CAN/AM Border Trade Alliance conference, held in Washington, D.C., from October 6 to 8, 2019.
View Sean Casey Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Sean Casey Profile
2020-02-19 14:51 [p.1251]
Mr. Speaker, the veteran and family well-being fund is a crucial tool that our government has introduced that helps veterans, their families and veteran organizations across Canada. This program provides grants and contributions to organizations to conduct research and implement projects that support the well-being of veterans and their families, and it will have a lasting impact on the veteran community.
Can the Prime Minister tell us about recent projects our government has funded through this important program?
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2020-02-19 15:24 [p.1256]
Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34(1) I have the honour to present to the House, in both official languages, three reports of the Canada-United States Inter-Parliamentary Group.
The first report concerns the 72nd Annual Meeting of the Council of State Governments West, held in Big Sky, Montana, United States, from July 16 to 20, 2019.
The second report concerns the 74th Annual Meeting of the Midwestern Legislative Conference of Council of State Governments, held in Chicago, Illinois, from July 21 to 24, 2019.
The third report concerns the 59th Annual Meeting & Regional Policy Forum of the Council of State Governments, Eastern Regional Conference, held in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S., from July 28 to 31, 2019.
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2020-02-18 10:08 [p.1118]
Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34(1), I have the honour to present to the House, in both official languages, two reports of the Canada-United States Inter-Parliamentary Group.
The first concerns the Canadian/American Border Trade Alliance Conference, held in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, from May 6 to May 7, 2019. The second concerns the Western Governors' Association Annual Meeting, held in Vail, Colorado, U.S.A., from June 10 to June 12, 2019.
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2020-02-03 14:00 [p.819]
Madam Speaker, I rise today to recognize and celebrate the life of Ruth Brewer of Cavendish, who passed away peacefully in December at age 96.
Ruth's love for and dedication to her community was an inspiration to everyone who knew her. For many years, Ruth was a councillor at Cavendish Resort Municipality, and was a driving force in the growth and success of one of P.E.I.'s most famous destinations.
Well known for her work with children, she was a specialist in early childhood education, particularly with preschool children and those with special needs.
Ruth was a trailblazer and champion for nurse practitioners and rural health clinics in P.E.I., and was responsible for the establishment of the North Rustico Clinic. Ruth lived in the North Rustico lighthouse in the 1960s and 1970s, where she researched and wrote a book on the history of the harbour.
We salute Ruth. Her community and indeed all of Canada are a better place thanks to her life's work. May she rest in peace.
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
2020-02-03 14:44 [p.827]
Mr. Speaker, I know my hon. colleague cares.
The fact is that our benefits are demand-driven. This means that the money is always there for veterans. We are not leaving any money unspent. We are making sure that the money is always available.
In Veterans Affairs, our job is to improve our benefits and care for our veterans. I can assure my hon. colleague that is what we are doing, and that is what we will continue to do.
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
2020-02-03 14:45 [p.827]
Mr. Speaker, again, my hon. colleague truly cares, but in fact we have hired quite a number of case workers. In fact, the previous government had fired most of them. We now have over 500 case workers.
As I indicated, our programs would be demand-driven, and the money—
Some hon. members: Oh, oh!
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
2020-02-03 14:46 [p.827]
Mr. Speaker, as I indicated, we had a lot of work to do when we formed government. Along with that we invested $10 billion in veterans' benefits.
As I said before, we have and will continue to make sure that our veterans in this country are cared for.
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
2020-02-03 14:54 [p.829]
Mr. Speaker, I appreciate my hon. colleague's question, but I wish the member for Brantford—Brant had that feeling when the Conservative government was in power. In fact, when the Conservatives were in power, they fired 1,000 employees, which really cut and hurt the Department of Veterans Affairs.
Our government invested $10 billion in the Department of Veterans Affairs and also in benefits that are demand-driven. We always make sure that the funding is there for every veteran who is qualified to receive benefits.
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
2020-01-28 15:00 [p.587]
Mr. Speaker, as I said yesterday, I wish my hon. colleague, when he was in government, had not fired the thousand people that we needed so badly in Veterans Affairs, but we have picked up the problem and we are going to solve the problem—
Some hon. members: Oh, oh!
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
2020-01-28 15:00 [p.587]
Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker, and again I will tell my hon. colleague that yes, we understood the problem. That is why we invested $10 billion over six years in Veterans Affairs. That is why we are revamping the system. It is so that we will be able to deal with the backlog that exists in Veterans Affairs, which is not acceptable.
It is important to note too that current applications have about doubled, and we have hired 700 new people. We will solve the problem.
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2020-01-27 13:01 [p.443]
Madam Speaker, the member talked about the energy sector becoming a topic of discord. I listened closely to his remarks. I have a lot of friends in Alberta as I worked there for years and I still talk to them. The story I get from them is not what the Conservative opposition is saying, but that they are concerned about vacant office buildings in Calgary. Yes, there is a very strong concern in Alberta that I think is creating disunity and division in Canada. I hate to see that because, as I said, I have a lot of friends there.
One of the reasons for the discord is the misinformation the Conservative Party is propagandizing and that the member who just spoke is still doing by saying Liberals are opposed to pipelines. Why does the member not be honest in this place and with Canadians across the country? The Liberal government purchased a pipeline to get oil to market and Liberals are going to see it through. Let us have some honesty over there.
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
2020-01-27 14:52 [p.462]
Mr. Speaker, I appreciate my hon. colleague's concern, but I wish he would have had the same amount of concern when he and his government fired a thousand Veterans Affairs workers. That is what happened.
The fact is that the application process has practically doubled. About twice as many people have applied for veterans benefits. We have hired 700 people. I can assure my hon. colleague that this situation will be rectified by hiring people and taking care of veterans.
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
2019-12-13 11:44 [p.400]
Mr. Speaker, I can confirm for my hon. colleague that my department has not changed its policy regarding mental health services for family members. If support to family members is required as part of a veteran's treatment plan, they will receive that support. However, if a family member is incarcerated, we will not duplicate services with those of Correctional Service of Canada.
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