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Results: 1 - 15 of 454
View Gérard Deltell Profile
CPC (QC)
View Gérard Deltell Profile
2020-07-08 12:32 [p.2539]
Mr. Speaker, I am very happy to be here with you today. It has been a while since we last saw one another. Many things have happened in Canada since then, but, unfortunately, they have been very bad things.
In just 15 days, under the current Prime Minister, Canada suffered a loss at the UN and saw its credit rating lowered, and the Ethics Commissioner began another investigation of the Prime Minister. The Liberal government has scored a hat trick in the mismanagement of public funds.
How can the Prime Minister accept such a disaster and explain it to Canadians ?
View Gérard Deltell Profile
CPC (QC)
View Gérard Deltell Profile
2020-07-08 12:34 [p.2539]
Mr. Speaker, this government is so proud of its pathetic hat trick that it struggled to find someone to respond. He did not answer the question, though, because all three of the Prime Minister's goals were on Canada's own net. In reality, this government scored three big failures in 15 days.
That is not all. The Prime Minister got one more hat trick: For the third time, he is under investigation by the Ethics Commissioner.
How can a government minister defend his Prime Minister?
View Gérard Deltell Profile
CPC (QC)
View Gérard Deltell Profile
2020-07-08 12:35 [p.2540]
Mr. Speaker, it is tragic that Canada suffered three failures in 15 days and that this government seems unable to find someone to answer basic questions about the Prime Minister's ethics, the credit-rating drop and the government's failure at the UN.
There is more. Today, we learned that Canada has the worst unemployment rate in the G7, at 13.7%. However, some businesses in my riding, such as Groupe PolyAlto, are looking for employees.
On the one hand, we have the worst record on unemployment, and on the other hand we have a labour crisis. Why? It is because the Liberals' policies are neither properly administered nor tailored to present needs.
Why is the government sticking to positions and policies that discourage people from going to work?
View Gérard Deltell Profile
CPC (QC)
View Gérard Deltell Profile
2020-07-08 12:36 [p.2540]
Mr. Speaker, we agreed that the government's first measures needed to be implemented, because we were in crisis mode. Now we are in recovery mode. However, the policies that were appropriate to respond to the crisis are not appropriate to manage the recovery.
What do the Liberals have to say to Groupe PolyAlto, a company in my riding that has 80 employees and room for many more but that is struggling to hire new staff because people are choosing the CERB over work?
View Gérard Deltell Profile
CPC (QC)
View Gérard Deltell Profile
2020-07-08 12:37 [p.2540]
Let me repeat, Mr. Speaker. The policies that were appropriate to respond to the crisis are not appropriate to manage the economic recovery. The Canada emergency response benefit and the Canada emergency student benefit are harming the Canadian economy and business owners who want to get the economy moving again.
Why is the government maintaining policies that are not adapted to today's reality?
View Bernard Généreux Profile
CPC (QC)
Madam Chair, I would like to inform you that I will be sharing my time with the member for Oshawa.
Can the President of the Treasury Board tell us how many public servants are currently working for the government?
View Bernard Généreux Profile
CPC (QC)
Madam Chair, I have a very simple question. Which cabinet member, including the Prime Minister, authorized an untendered contract, when we know that 285,000 public servants could very well have done the job? The government nevertheless gave it to an outside organization.
View Bernard Généreux Profile
CPC (QC)
View Bernard Généreux Profile
CPC (QC)
Madam Chair, it is fascinating to see the Bloc Québécois align closer to the Conservatives on economic issues. It is not a matter of who has proposed what in the past. This is about making suggestions to the government so that people can get back to work. I want to commend the members of the Bloc Québécois, who want to work on this with us to push Quebec's economy forward.
Everyone knows that we are definitely not through this pandemic yet. The $343 billion announced today does not include a potential recovery plan. I would like to ask my colleague his thoughts on that.
View Gérard Deltell Profile
CPC (QC)
View Gérard Deltell Profile
2020-07-08 15:57 [p.2571]
Madam Chair, I want to thank the member for his speech. He is always interesting, and even if we disagree on nearly 90% of each and every issue, this is what democracy is all about.
We have seen the government spend billions of dollars in the last month, and the results of that.
Let us take a look at the situation right now. Unfortunately, Canada is worse off than all the other G7 countries. It has the highest unemployment rate, and it is the only G7 country to have had its credit rating downgraded from AAA to AA. Moreover, it does not have an economic recovery plan.
What is the NDP leader's perspective on the current government's failures in those three areas?
View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2020-06-17 15:19 [p.2491]
Madam Chair, today we are in the House for a relatively short amount of time since we have only four hours to talk about the government's $87 billion in spending.
Before getting into the questions I have for the government, I thought I would crunch some numbers. We are going to spend four hours discussing $87 billion. That represents $362.5 million a minute or roughly $6 million a second. That is how much time we have to talk about the Prime Minister's announcements and all the questions on the minds of Canadians, businesses, organizations and all parliamentarians across the country. I am sure the Liberals across the way get asked the same questions by constituents. Unfortunately, they are unable to provide any answers.
Earlier today, during the sitting of the Special Committee on the COVID-19 Pandemic, I asked the Minister of Finance some questions on the economic update, or economic snapshot, as the Prime Minister calls it. Apparently the Canadian Parliament is incapable of doing as other countries or provinces have done and present a real economic update or a budget so that we can see where we stand after all of the announcements that have been made in the past three months.
In what little time we have every day to ask questions, we cannot even get basic information, such as the amount of the deficit or the debt, or the amount associated with a government announcement. I think that this shows a lack of respect for the parliamentarians here in this House and for Canadians who work hard to earn a living and support their families. Canadians pay taxes, which are used to provide services to the public and to those who are most vulnerable or in need.
Today I am relating the comments of the Parliamentary Budget Officer. The Conservatives are not making any of this up. For weeks now, we have been asking for an economic update. We are going to vote supply without knowing any of the details. Actually, we just learned that we will get all the facts in a few weeks, on July 8, so we have a bit of time today to ask some questions.
Even the Parliamentary Budget Officer has said that the Liberals' estimates are incomplete. The Prime Minister is talking about some really big numbers, in the billions of dollars, on the steps of his cottage instead of convening Parliament so we can debate the issues and legislation or ask questions. We are being left on our own to do our work as MPs in our ridings and help our constituents. The last three weeks have been extremely frustrating. We have received little information and we cannot meet with anyone in the halls of Parliament to get some help to do our work as MPs in our ridings. We do not have the opportunity to speak with the right people who might be able to get answers for our constituents and the businesses in need.
My first question is rather simple and I hope someone will be able to answer it. A month ago, following pressure from the Conservative Party, the Prime Minister stood on the steps of his cottage and announced that businesses that have just one employee or that pay themselves in dividends would finally have access to $40,000 in loans through the Canada emergency business account.
As much as we have gotten some answers during briefing calls, we still do not know when this information will be communicated to the financial institutions and credit unions so that businesses can receive that emergency assistance.
When will those $40,000 loans be available to businesses with just one employee or that pay themselves in dividends?
View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2020-06-17 15:25 [p.2492]
Madam Chair, unfortunately, my question was not answered.
Some businesses are trying to get the emergency loan. The Prime Minister announced it a month ago in front of his home. This information is still not available and is not found on any official site. There is not one financial institution that can provide answers to businesses that need this money today when provinces are fully reopening.
There is another question that I would like to ask the government. It is now mid-June. On April 22, there was a major announcement about helping students, and that if they wanted to volunteer to help the vulnerable dealing with COVID-19 they would receive up to $5,000 in grants. I checked the website again this morning. There is no information about this.
When will the information be available?
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2020-06-17 17:10 [p.2510]
Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my colleague from Aurora—Oak Ridges—Richmond Hill for her efforts.
This is a terrible day for Canada. The Prime Minister bet his reputation, and Canada's as well, on pulling out all the diplomatic stops to get a seat on the UN Security Council, but he lost. After spending millions of taxpayer dollars, after trying to convince dictators around the world to support Canada, and after setting aside the vital Canadian values of protecting rights and freedoms and protecting homosexual people, the Prime Minister has shown the world how little influence he had on the outcome of this vote.
Most unfortunately, the Prime Minister must take personal responsibility for this failure. I do not want Canadians to bear the blame for this failure, because Canadians are well regarded around the world. Canada is a good country that everyone can be proud of. Unfortunately, through his actions and his deeply flawed foreign policy, the Prime Minister created today's outcome, which was the result of all the years of embarrassment he has caused us on the international stage.
I can cite several examples. He managed to mix up Japan and China at a very important meeting. The Prime Minister embarrassed our allies at the signing of the Trans-Pacific Partnership. I remember the pictures vividly. The leaders of all of the TPP signatory countries were waiting for the Prime Minister of Canada to attend a crucial signing meeting. The Prime Minister of Canada never showed up. He failed miserably at representing Canada’s interests in China.
At the time, I was the agriculture critic, and I can say that it was utterly tragic to see how little energy Canada was putting into finding a solution. We were working very hard, we were creating committees, but the Prime Minister himself would never defend the Canadian farmers caught in this predicament. Should I take a moment to remind everyone of his disastrous trip to India?
It got the whole world talking. People everywhere were talking about our Prime Minister and his trip to India, but for all the wrong reasons. That was the beginning of the end for the Prime Minister of Canada’s brief flirtation with international diplomacy. When they saw how he acted in India, several countries decided to turn their backs on this Prime Minister, who is more concerned about his image than his own country’s interests and values.
Although he promoted Canada far and wide, saying that we would play a major role in the UN's efforts to protect people and countries in difficulty, Canada has already withdrawn from a peacekeeping mission in Mali that it had been asked to join. We do not know why.
With respect to our relations with the United States, need I remind the House of the concessions that were made, to the detriment of the dairy industry, and the government’s inability to find acceptable solutions for softwood lumber? The government was not able to include that. It set the issue aside, and we are still having problems today. It was unable to resolve that situation. During the negotiations, the government failed to reach a proper agreement that would protect Canadian aluminum workers. It is one failure after another. Canada lost the vote, but not because Canada is Canada. I certainly do not want Canadians to think that this failure is their fault. It is the fault of the Prime Minister himself. He is the one who channelled all his efforts, all his influence and Canadian taxpayer money and brushed aside Canadian values to speak with dictators in Qatar, Oman, Rwanda and Uganda during the pandemic, rather than defending Canadian values.
It is good to want a seat on the UN Security Council, but it is also good to stand up for Canadian values. We have seen what it costs when the government sets aside those values and everything we believe in and uses Canadian taxpayer money to promnote itself. Our allies turned their backs on Canada. That is what happened.
We want to be able to build a relationship of trust with other countries on the international stage. However, some countries hoping to negotiate on the international stage and trying to push the boundaries a little further try to do it with Canada first, because they know that Canada will not react. We saw this with China, with Italy in the case of durum wheat, and with India. This was the Prime Minister's failure, and we are extremely disappointed that today's loss is tarnishing Canada's international reputation.
Does the Minister of International Development regret jeopardizing Canada's reputation, abandoning Canadian values and making it so that, today, Canada is no longer seen as a country worth consulting? She pulled out all the stops to get a seat on the UN Security Council. Today we are seeing the result: Canada came in third.
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