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Results: 1 - 15 of 441
View Tom Kmiec Profile
CPC (AB)
View Tom Kmiec Profile
2020-02-19 14:09 [p.1244]
Mr. Speaker, I rise to pay respect to one of Canada's leading public intellectuals.
He is Edmonton-born and Fairview-raised, with an academic career spanning McGill, Harvard and finally the University of Toronto. He is a clinician by profession and, with over two million copies sold of his self-help book, one of Canada's best-selling authors.
He is comfortable quoting Jung, Nietzsche and Solzhenitsyn, and his Bible lectures have struck a nerve with a secular generation detached from its roots. It is said a nation's treasure is its scholars. Jordan B. Peterson is one of Canada's treasures.
Rule 10 is to “be precise in your speech”, so let me be judicious. During his talks, he used his words carefully, imparting wisdom for an introspective life.
His battle with depression reminds us that being sick does not mean one is weak. He went to rehab to treat his addiction to antianxiety medication after his wife Tammy's terminal cancer diagnosis. He spoke frankly of his autoimmune illness and the life changes he had to make. His most recent health setbacks are a reminder of our mortality, regardless of fame or fortune.
I invite all members to join me in wishing Dr. Jordan B. Peterson a speedy recovery.
View Kelly McCauley Profile
CPC (AB)
View Kelly McCauley Profile
2020-02-19 14:15 [p.1245]
Mr. Speaker, I rise to honour Joan Carr, Edmonton Catholic School superintendent, who we lost to cancer this month.
Pioneering early learning programs, improving indigenous learning and helping new Canadians enter the school system were all part of Joan's 14 years as the head of Edmonton Catholic schools.
In 2017, Joan was recognized as Canada's top school superintendent. An elegant and attentive person, Joan never lost the heart of a teacher despite her exacting responsibilities as superintendent of more than 44,000 students. She modelled servant leadership to an extraordinary degree, empowering all those who worked for her to realize their talents, and focused always on supporting parents in their role as the primary educators of their children.
Joan was gifted with the support of her husband, Kevin Carr, himself a legend in educational leadership. She was the loving face of Jesus the teacher for all those she served. Well done, good and faithful servant. May she enter the glory of God.
View John Barlow Profile
CPC (AB)
View John Barlow Profile
2020-02-19 14:38 [p.1249]
Mr. Speaker, the illegal rail blockades are yet another blockade and another barrier for Canadian grain farmers, and the situation is a crisis. There are 19 ships off Prince Rupert and another 50 ships off the port of Vancouver, many of them waiting to be loaded with grain. Every week that the rails are blockaded with illegal blockades costs Canadian farmers $50 million. We are more than four weeks in, and Canadian farmers already hit with the Liberal carbon tax are seeing their bills mounting.
When will the Prime Minister safely remove these illegal blockades and get our commodities moving again?
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Minister of Public Safety conceded that under the RCMP Act, he does in fact have the authority to provide direction to the RCMP.
Will the Prime Minister finally show some real leadership and instruct his public safety minister to direct the RCMP to enforce the law and safely end these illegal blockades?
View Michelle Rempel Garner Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Speaker, today the Prime Minister talked about force, but the force that is required today is a strength of conviction from him to be a leader and put an end to this crisis, not the weak embarrassment that we have seen on display for the last two weeks. He must understand that enforcing the rule of law is his duty and that it is an inherent act of peace.
How long is he going to let this continue for? A week? A month? A year? Forever?
View Heather McPherson Profile
NDP (AB)
View Heather McPherson Profile
2020-02-19 15:09 [p.1255]
Mr. Speaker, while the Liberals are failing to de-escalate the growing crisis across this country, they are creating another one for working people in my province. In Alberta alone, 19,000 people have lost their jobs in the last month.
Jason Kenney's policies and cuts are hurting Albertans, but so is the current government in its refusal to deliver on its promises.
Some hon. members: Oh, oh!
View Heather McPherson Profile
NDP (AB)
View Heather McPherson Profile
2020-02-19 15:10 [p.1255]
Mr. Speaker, Jason Kenney's policies and cuts are hurting Albertans, but so is the government's refusal to deliver on its promises. The Liberals are failing on reconciliation. They are failing on the environment. They are failing on diversifying the economy and supporting Alberta workers.
View Len Webber Profile
CPC (AB)
View Len Webber Profile
2020-02-19 15:33 [p.1258]
moved for leave to introduce Bill C-210, An Act to amend the Canada Revenue Agency Act (organ and tissue donors).
He said: Mr. Speaker, I rise today to reintroduce my private member's bill that I had originally introduced in the previous parliamentary session.
Last year, the bill passed unanimously through all stages in the House in just 25 sitting days. Unfortunately, it died on the Order Paper at second reading in the Senate when the election was called. I am here, once again, to introduce this bill.
There are approximately 4,600 Canadians currently awaiting a life-saving organ transplant. While 90% of Canadians approve of organ and tissue donation, only about 20% of Canadians actually have registered consent with their provincial or territorial registries. This is an absolutely unacceptable number, and this is where we can help as parliamentarians.
My bill would assist Canadian provinces and territories in growing and maintaining their organ and tissue donor registries. The bill is simple. It would ask Canadians on their annual income tax return if they consent to having their provincial or territorial government be informed of their desire to be added to their organ and tissue donor registry. It is that simple: a question of consent on the income tax form.
Currently, the Canada Revenue Agency prohibits the use of the income tax form for any purpose other than the administration of taxes. In order to allow for a question regarding organ and tissue donation on the tax form, a legal exemption must be created.
This was done once before on the tax form so that Elections Canada could ask Canadians for updated contact information. Again, what I am proposing is that a simple question of organ and tissue donation be placed on the tax form alongside of the Elections Canada question.
I want to thank the hon. member for Calgary Shepard for seconding my bill, and also the 20 members of Parliament from all the parties in the House who have officially seconded my bill in a remarkable display of parliamentary co-operation.
I ask all members of the House to pick up the torch and consider passing this bill again with the same amount of enthusiasm, so that we can help save the lives of hundreds of Canadians.
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to present four petitions in the House today.
The first petition deals with proposed legislation that was discussed in the last Parliament, and we now have a similar bill proposed to the Senate in this Parliament. In the last Parliament, it was Bill S-240. In this Parliament, it is Bill S-204, and it seeks to combat the scourge of forced organ harvesting and trafficking by making it a criminal offence for a Canadian to go abroad to receive an organ without consent.
It would also create mechanisms by which someone could be deemed inadmissible to Canada because of their involvement in organ harvesting and trafficking.
The petitioners are in support of this concept and of the bill.
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Speaker, the second petition highlights the particular challenges faced by the Sikh and Hindu minorities in Afghanistan. It is a long-standing call to action by members of those communities here in Canada for the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship to use the powers granted to him to create a special program to help persecuted minorities in Afghanistan to be privately sponsored by the communities to come to Canada.
The petition further urges the Minister of Foreign Affairs to raise the persecution faced by these communities with her Afghan counterpart and to strongly advocate for more to be done to protect them.
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Speaker, the third petition highlights specifically the persecution of Falun Gong practitioners in China. The petitioners call for more to be done by this Parliament and by the government to combat this gross violation of fundamental human rights.
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Speaker, the fourth petition highlights challenges faced by the Pakistani Christian community as a result of the blasphemy laws and other conditions in Pakistan, and the abuse of those laws as well to target minorities. In particular, the petitioners highlight Pakistani Christian asylum seekers in Thailand and their challenges as the result of detention, crackdowns, inhumane conditions, etc.
The petitioners urge the Government of Canada to take up this matter urgently with the Government of Thailand and call for the protection and humane treatment for Pakistani asylum seekers, and that they be able to apply for refugee status with the UNHCR and for resettlement without fear of being arrested, detained or deported.
View Tom Kmiec Profile
CPC (AB)
View Tom Kmiec Profile
2020-02-19 15:45 [p.1260]
Madam Speaker, I am tabling two petitions.
The first is from my constituents regarding Ukrainian International Airlines flight 752. They remind the House that 176 people, including 57 Canadians, were killed in this atrocity. They blame this horrible atrocity on the Iranian regime alone. They remind the House that the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps is responsible for terrorist attacks all across the Middle East. They remind the Government of Canada that it has an obligation to ensure that Iran is held accountable and the families of the victims receive the justice they deserve.
The petitioners are asking for the government to immediately implement the Conservative motion passed by Parliament in 2018 to list Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps as a terrorist organization, that fair compensation be paid to the families and that the Iranian government and the Canadian government ensure the repatriation of the remains.
View Tom Kmiec Profile
CPC (AB)
View Tom Kmiec Profile
2020-02-19 15:45 [p.1260]
Madam Speaker, the second petition is also from petitioners in my riding.
The petitioners are drawing the attention of the House to the fact that on May 30, 2019, Alberta Premier Jason Kenney kept his campaign promise and gave Albertans the largest tax break in Alberta history by repealing the punishing NDP carbon tax. Therefore, they are asking the Government of Canada to scrap the leftover federal carbon tax that has been imposed on Albertans as of January 1, 2020.
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
CPC (AB)
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
2020-02-19 15:46 [p.1260]
Mr. Speaker, I rise on a question of privilege regarding a deliberately misleading statement presented to the House by the Minister of Natural Resources.
I asked the minister, on December 5, 2019, if his department had granted any contracts to the Pembina Institute since January 1, 2017. This request was made through written Question No. 50.
The minister's answer was:
Natural Resources Canada, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, the Canada Energy Regulator, and the Northern Pipeline Agency have not granted any contracts to the Pembina Institute since January 1, 2017.
If you look on line, Mr. Speaker, at the government's proactive disclosure report available through the open government portal, it lists eight contracts, all awarded by the Department of Natural Resources, and all awarded to the Pembina Institute since January 1, 2017.
I am sure you are aware, Mr. Speaker, of the ruling of Speaker Jerome on December 6, 1978. Speaker Jerome found a prima facie question of privilege after the member for Northumberland—Durham was assured by the solicitor general that as a matter of policy, the RCMP did not intercept the private mail of anyone.
In testimony before the McDonald commission, the former commissioner of the RCMP stated that they did indeed intercept mail on a very restricted basis and that the practice was not one which had been concealed from ministers. The member claimed that this statement clearly conflicted with the information he had received from the then solicitor general some years earlier.
The response by the Minister of Natural Resources to my written question claimed that no contracts had been granted to the Pembina Institute since January 1, 2017. That same minister then provided conflicting information online, as I stated earlier.
Another example of a prima facie case involving conflicting information provided by a minister can be found at pages 8581-2 of the Debates of February 1, 2002. The Speaker was concerned that despite the fact that the minister of national defence stated that he had no intention of misleading the House, contradictory statements were made by the minister and the records were left with two different versions of events.
On March 9, 2011, the Speaker considered a matter where it was alleged that the minister of international cooperation made misleading statements in committee and the House. The Speaker noted that a standing committee had made material available that could be measured against other material, including statements in the House, and answers to oral and written questions. He said that the statements made by the minister had, at the very least, caused confusion. He then decided to allow the member to propose his motion to the House referring to recent precedent and mindful of a ruling by Speaker Jerome to the effect that in case of doubt on a question, the Speaker should leave it to the House to decide.
I point out that this is not a simple matter of the government just deciding not to give an answer to a written question, but a matter of a minister deciding to deliberately deny an answer by providing the wrong answer to the House while at the same time exposing this deception by providing the real answer elsewhere.
On December 16, 1980, at page 5797 of Hansard, the Speaker ruled:
While it is correct to say that the government is not required by our rules to answer written or oral questions, it would be bold to suggest that no circumstances could ever exist for a prima facie question of privilege to be made where there was a deliberate attempt to deny answers to an hon. member....
Before I conclude my remarks, I want to touch on the question of privilege raised by the member for Timmins—James Bay yesterday, because it is relevant to my question of privilege. The member argued that the information he received from the Minister of Justice regarding the legal costs of fighting indigenous children at the Human Rights Tribunal was misleading and that the minister should be held in contempt of the House.
The member brought to the attention of the Speaker other information provided by the minister to another source that was significantly different from the answer he received through his written question.
The member also asked the Speaker to apply the test used by Speakers laid out on page 85 of House of Commons Procedure and Practice, which clearly states:
...when it is alleged that a Member is in contempt for deliberately misleading the House: one, it must be proven that the statement was misleading; two, it must be established that the Member making the statement knew at the time that the statement was incorrect; and three, that in making the statement, the Member intended to mislead the House....
I want to go on record as supporting the hon. member's question of privilege and let him know that I share his frustration with a government that consistently displays a dismissive attitude toward Parliament and its members, a course that ought to be corrected in the early days of this Parliament. One way to do that is to allow this matter to be considered by the members of the House.
I ask you, Mr. Speaker, to measure the content of the answer given by the Minister of Natural Resources to my written question against the information the same minister provided in his proactive report. If this gives you any doubt or causes you confusion, then I urge you to leave it to the House to decide, as Speakers Milliken, Jerome and many others have done in the past under these circumstances.
When you are ready to allow this matter to be put to the House, Mr. Speaker, I will be prepared to move the appropriate motion.
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