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Results: 1 - 15 of 2611
View John Barlow Profile
CPC (AB)
View John Barlow Profile
2020-06-05 15:50
Perfect.
I'll start with number one, Mr. Chair:
That, given the committee’s letter to the Standing Committee on International Trade on Tuesday, February 25, 2020, regarding its study of Bill C-4, An Act to implement the Agreement between Canada, the United States of America and the United Mexican States (CUSMA), in which the committee outlined concerns about the impact on the Canadian dairy industry of implementing CUSMA before Saturday, August 1, 2020, and since it has been made public that the implementation date will now proceed on Wednesday, July 1, 2020, the Committee send for a copy of all briefing notes, memorandums, emails and documents related to the CUSMA’s implementation date and coming into force, to be provided before Wednesday, July 1, 2020, provided that the government does its assessment and vetting in gathering and releasing the documents as it would be done through the access to information process.
View Pat Finnigan Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Blois.
Seeing no hands raised, I would like to ask the clerk to get a recorded vote on Mr. Barlow's motion.
(Motion negatived: nays 6; yeas 5 [See Minutes of Proceedings])
The Chair: We will now go to your second motion, Mr. Barlow.
View Xavier Barsalou-Duval Profile
BQ (QC)
I have another question for you, Mr. Davies.
With the NAFTA, the government promised to establish an oversight system for imports of steel and aluminum to ensure that there is no dumping by countries producing steel very cheaply and selling it below cost.
We have recently seen that the government intends to postpone the establishment of that oversight system because of COVID-19.
Are you not afraid that countries that have not slowed their production, like China, may decide to flood our market?
Mitch Davies
View Mitch Davies Profile
Mitch Davies
2020-06-05 11:51
On the question of dumping, obviously, the production global oversupply, in particular of steel and other products, is a very sensitive and important topic for Canada. We've worked collaboratively on international fronts to encourage these practices to discontinue, obviously to protect our industry and the competitiveness of our industry.
I wouldn't have specific information on the specific measures, but I think that Canada Border Services Agency could perhaps be consulted in terms of the system of managing what importation is coming in. It's a very important priority, and I wouldn't say it's delayed in any way.
View Karen Vecchio Profile
CPC (ON)
We talked a bit about the TPP, but can we look at the U.S. agreement as well, the USMCA, and the impact it's going to have on Canadian producers? Have we seen a cap put on how many chickens are coming in, or has it reached that limit yet?
I know that when I spoke to turkey producers back at the end of April, they were saying that there have been more turkeys imported from the U.S. than in previous years. I'm wondering if we're seeing the same with chicken.
Benoît Fontaine
View Benoît Fontaine Profile
Benoît Fontaine
2020-06-02 16:32
Good question.
As I said earlier, because of the free trade agreement, there will be more American chicken on the shelves, since 62.9 million kilograms have been set aside for this financial partner in the form of tariff rate quotas. Again, a total of 129.6 million kilograms of foreign chicken will enter our country, which amounts to 10.8% of Canadian production. For the sector, this means the loss of 3,100 jobs and a $240 million drop in revenue. The turkey producers were right when they told you this.
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
Thank you both.
I do want to come back to either Mr. Fontaine or Mr. Laliberté on one of Karen's questions.
On the 129 million birds that will be coming from the United States, what percentage of the Canadian market will they take up or supply? What percentage of the Canadian market will the U.S. now have?
Benoît Fontaine
View Benoît Fontaine Profile
Benoît Fontaine
2020-06-02 16:35
First, we're talking about 129 million kilograms, not 129 million heads. We mustn't confuse heads with kilograms.
Second, 62.9 million kilograms have been set aside out of a total of 129 million kilograms. This is roughly 50%, and it amounts to 10.8% of the Canadian volume. For every kilogram of chicken that a person consumes, 100.8 grams come from elsewhere, and half of this certainly comes from the United States. This has created a major breach in supply management, which is very harmful to it. Supply management exists in the 10 Canadian provinces and is a solution for Canada's rural economy.
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
Are you saying it's 18% of the market in total they will have, just so I'm clear?
View Yves Perron Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Lampron. You referred to the last three agreements. That's why I find you very kind and polite.
Mr. Frigon, I want to hear about how the entry into force of CUSMA on July 1 will affect you and your industry. Apparently, you were told that the agreement would come into effect on August 1. Can you take about 20 seconds to respond?
Mathieu Frigon
View Mathieu Frigon Profile
Mathieu Frigon
2020-05-27 17:46
The impact will be very significant. In reality, the first year will last 30 days. There's a major difference between the first year and the second year in the agreement. In the second year, imports will triple and the export cap will be significantly reduced from 55,000 tonnes to 35,000 tonnes. We'll benefit from the first year for one month. These are substantial effects.
We were extremely disappointed to learn that the implementation would take place on July 1.
View Yves Perron Profile
BQ (QC)
You suffered a loss that wasn't anticipated, and this comes on top of everything else.
You referred earlier to the tariff rate quotas resulting from the agreement with Europe. Over half of these quotas have been allocated to non-dairy agents, distributors, not to mention any names.
Can you explain the negative impact of this situation? What could happen if the same mistake is made in the agreement with the United States?
Mathieu Frigon
View Mathieu Frigon Profile
Mathieu Frigon
2020-05-27 17:47
This was announced in 2017. Looking back, we saw that it created a great deal of instability in the market. Often, cheeses are imported specifically to compete with cheeses already produced in Canada, which leads to this instability.
Of course, our members will make the decision to import based on dairy market conditions. They're involved in it, so to speak. They're well aware of market conditions and stock levels. The stakeholders outside the dairy industry aren't naturally inclined to look at these parameters or factors such as production or stock levels. In the past few years, we've seen that allocating this to external stakeholders creates a great deal of instability in the market. Obviously, there has been the volume impact, but also an impact on the entire structure.
View Alistair MacGregor Profile
NDP (BC)
The point I'm making is that the sector is definitely feeling a pinch right now, but they've also felt pinches from other years. I just wanted to know if you've made any commitment to compensation to the sector for trade deals that your government negotiated with respect to CUSMA. Have you entered into any thoughts on that, yes or no?
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