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Results: 1 - 30 of 89
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Chair, the Prime Minister so badly wanted to win a seat on the United Nations Security Council, he made it a campaign promise in 2015, spent the last five years selling out Canadian principles, cozying up to dictators and despots, and even sent Canadian soldiers into harm's way to curry favour at the UN.
Last night must have been a devastating blow to the Prime Minister. Was it worth it?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Except, Mr. Chair, that's not what he did. He remained silent when standing beside leaders of countries with terrible human rights records because he was afraid of offending them and losing their votes. That is his legacy in chasing this vanity project.
The Prime Minister shook the hand of the Iranian foreign minister and even vowed just a month after that country's military shot down a plane with dozens of Canadians on it. Again, was it worth it?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Chair, the Prime Minister has sent billions of dollars of taxpayers' money to countries with economies more advanced than Canada's or led by dictators with terrible human rights records. That is his legacy. He's also turned his back on our friends and our allies, voting in favour of one-sided anti-Israel resolutions at the United Nations in order to curry favour from countries that do not acknowledge Israel's right to exist. Again, was it worth it?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Chair, this House voted to list the IRGC, the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, as a terrorist entity. The Prime Minister refused to take action and do that. He's also refused to impose any Magnitsky act sanctions on human rights abusers around the world, all in an attempt to curry favour with those dictators and despots at the United Nations, selling out Canada's values in pursuit of a seat.
Now he has come back empty-handed, having come in last. Again, was it worth it?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
That's not what he did, Mr. Chair. You see, when he was in the same room as dictators and despots and leaders of countries with terrible records, he was silent. In fact, he stood right beside the president of Senegal when that president defended Senegal's laws making homosexuality a crime. The Prime Minister said nothing. He was silent. He's even using Canadian tax dollars to invest in oil and gas projects in other countries in order to win favour as well.
Again, when we look at this government's record, when we look at his personal record on the world stage, we see that our relationship with India has been damaged by his actions. We have a worse trade deal than he inherited. He has angered, with his erratic behaviour, our partners in the Pacific area, and at the end of it, he came home empty-handed. Was it worth it?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
Mr. Chair, the Prime Minister seems more prepared to put on the charm to win a seat on the UN Security Council than to deal with the pandemic here at home.
Instead of coming to Parliament and correcting errors in his programs for the benefit of Canadians, the Prime Minister has too often stayed home, calling the leaders of other countries.
Why is the Prime Minister spending so much time pursuing his personal ambitions and failing Canadians, when we're in the worst crisis in a century?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Chair, the Prime Minister claims he has been making these phone calls to talk about a coordinated response to COVID-19, and on June 11 the Prime Minister had a call with the Sultan of Oman. Will the Prime Minister today condemn Oman's repeated arrests of anti-government protesters?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
But you won't condemn that human rights abuse.
I'll give you another chance. On May 6, the Prime Minister had a phone call with the Emir of Qatar. Will he condemn Qatar's use of slave labour to build a soccer stadium?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
When it comes to a personal vanity projects, he won't condemn human rights abuses. He just calls them “disagreements”.
Well, on June 11, the Prime Minister spoke with the President of Rwanda. Will the Prime Minister condemn the murder, frequent arrest, torture and imprisonment of opposition politicians and investigative journalists, yes or no?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
That was a yes-or-no question. The Prime Minister can't bring himself to criticize dictators and despots around the world who abuse human rights, and we know that he likes to fund UNRWA to curry favour with nations that are ideologically opposed to Israel's right to exist.
Not only has UNRWA helped the terrorist organization Hamas and provided educational materials that attack Jews, but just last year its leaders were found to have been involved with “sexual misconduct, nepotism, retaliation, discrimination and other abuses of authority, for personal gain, to suppress legitimate dissent, and to otherwise achieve their personal objectives”.
Why is the Prime Minister funding UNRWA?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Chair, the Prime Minister's record on foreign affairs has been a complete disaster. He surrendered to Donald Trump, offering up concession after concession. He went to China to get a free trade deal, and all he came home with was a nickname from the Communist Party that is so offensive the Speaker has ruled I can't repeat it in this chamber. His erratic behaviour during the Trans-Pacific Partnership talks angered our allies in Australia and Japan. Of course, who can forget his disastrous trip to India?
Mr. Chair, which one of the Prime Minister's foreign policy blunders is he most embarrassed by?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Chair, for months Conservatives have been pointing out flaws in Liberal government programs that are preventing Canadians from getting the help they need. The Prime Minister has refused to make these very technical changes to get more help to Canadians who need it. For example, on the wage subsidy, more than two-thirds of the money allocated for that program has lapsed because businesses don't qualify.
I have a simple question. Will the Prime Minister change the program to allow companies who have made acquisitions to access the wage subsidy to keep more people working?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Actually, Mr. Chair, it was the Liberals who said no to the motion to allow this Parliament to sit to debate that motion, and even in that legislation they refused to allow businesses who have made acquisitions to access the program.
Now, when we look at the rent relief program, it is so difficult to apply for it that many landlords are refusing to bother, leaving even more small businesses to fall through the cracks. In fact, of the $3 billion allocated to the rent relief program, only $39 million has been paid out. That's less than 2%.
Now, the Prime Minister is still using talking points from April. It's now June and he has refused to fix these programs and has successfully talked out the calendar on the days that the House of Commons could meet to discuss these programs. When will he make these changes to get more help to Canadians who need it?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Chair, Canadians cannot wait. He has run down the clock on parliamentary sittings and he still refuses to make these changes to get more help to Canadians.
Today, we learned that Telus has installed Huawei technology in downtown Ottawa. There are over 80 sites across the national capital region with Huawei technology installed. Some of these sites are very near sensitive government institutions, like government departments, the National Research Council, RCMP headquarters and the Bank of Canada. How long has the Prime Minister known that Huawei technology has been installed in the Ottawa area?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Chair, the Prime Minister is bragging about accountability and transparency. Will he table an economic update before the House rises?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
That's a long way of saying no, Mr. Chair.
Mr. Chair, the Prime Minister has pursued a policy of appeasement in pursuit of a personal vanity product at the UN. In the process, he's cozied up to dictators and human rights violators. He's abandoned Israel and committed funding to UNRWA, an organization whose schools have been used as storage facilities for Hamas rockets against Israeli civilians, and whose facilities have served as breeding grounds for racism and anti-Semitism. He has apologized for the Iranian regime when it shot down a plane full of Canadian citizens, and he refuses to list the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps as a terrorist entity.
What's the point of having a seat at the table if you have to sell out Canadian principles to get there?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
I appreciate the honourable leader of the Green Party, Elizabeth May, for that reminder. When I was Speaker I always appreciated her help and advice about how to improve decorum in here. I just want to say to the member, and to all members, that the reason that I cannot control myself is that the Prime Minister used the word “embarrassment” in answering a foreign affairs question, and it just made me think of the India trip.
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Chair, today, the Prime Minister is shamefully misleading Canadians, trying to shirk responsibility for his failures in providing help for people with disabilities. He is letting people with disabilities down. He is the one who waited months before bringing proposals forward to help people with disabilities. Then yesterday, when Conservatives proposed a motion to have Parliament meet to debate this legislation, it was Liberals who said no. Can the Deputy Prime Minister explain why Liberals refused to allow the House to debate this bill yesterday?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Chair, the mistake yesterday was the Liberals shamefully saying no to allowing Parliament to deal with that legislation and then, disgustingly, today trying to play petty politics on the backs of people with disabilities. That's shameful, and Canadians won't forget it.
Mr. Chair, yesterday The Globe and Mail revealed that the Minister of Foreign Affairs had two mortgages on two properties worth over $1 million with the Bank of China, which is owned by the Chinese government.
Does the Prime Minister believe that it's appropriate for his Minister of Foreign Affairs to be personally indebted to the Chinese Communist Party?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Chair, she must have been talking about herself and her own party during her response. Conservatives stand ready. The second she wants to recall Parliament, we will be here to get the help that Canadians expect.
The question was about another Liberal minister getting into trouble because of a fancy European property. This time, it's the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Monsieur Champagne, who owns two posh apartments in London and owes an arm of the Chinese government over a million dollars.
Does the Deputy Prime Minister think it's appropriate to have a minister of the Crown owing an arm of the Chinese government over a million dollars?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
I have just a simple question for the Deputy Prime Minister. Have Mr. Champagne's mortgages come up for renewal since he has been a member of Parliament?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
It's a relevant point, because if he was a sitting member of Parliament when the mortgage came up for renewal and he decided to renew with the bank that is run by the Communist Party of China, the negotiations or dealings around that would be very relevant.
Will the Minister of Foreign Affairs disclose what interest rate he is being charged for the two mortgages on his two London flats?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Chair, the Prime Minister is doing everything to avoid being accountable to Canadians. He is refusing to table a budget, refusing to provide an economic update and refusing to let the House of Commons do its work.
Will he at least provide the Auditor General with the additional funding she needs to look into government expenditures?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Chair, the Prime Minister wants parliamentarians to vote on aspects of the government's spending. We want the Auditor General to be able to examine that government spending.
Under the government, the Auditor General has had to do more with less, and her ability to conduct audits is being affected. The Auditor General has indicated that she will be able to do half as many audits, despite an almost doubling in the size of government spending.
I have a simple question. Will the Prime Minister give the Auditor General the money she needs to do her job, yes or no?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
The Prime Minister is again engaged in revisionist history. He well knows that it was the Auditor General's office that volunteered to make administrative efficiencies, which did not affect its ability to do the job. In fact, as the interim auditor general, John Wiersema, said, “We would not have proposed [this] if we didn’t think it was the right thing to do and that we’d be able to carry out our role for Parliament.” Only the government's refusal to grant that extra funding is hampering the Auditor General's ability to give Canadians the answers they deserve, and we wonder why.
This is the government that cannot explain where 20,000 infrastructure projects went and where five billion dollars' worth of supposed infrastructure investments have gone. They can't identify that. Then there is, of course, the $35-billion Infrastructure Bank, which has completed precisely zero projects.
Are these the reasons the Prime Minister is so intent on withholding funds from the Auditor General?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Chair, it's no surprise that the Prime Minister likes to reach back into history from before the 2015 election to justify his position. The 2015 election was the only time he got more votes than the Conservative Party did, so I understand why he likes to live in the past.
In May, the interim auditor general said, “Ten years ago, we were completing about 27 performance audits every year. With our current resources, we expect to be able to deliver 14 performance audits each year.” That's half the number of audits, despite a massive explosion in government spending.
The Auditor General's office has requested more funds to be able to do the job that Canadians expect to be done. Will the Prime Minister give those additional funds to the Auditor General's office, yes or no?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Madam Chair, last week we learned that Liberal member of Parliament Marwan Tabbara had been arrested on April 9 of this year on a series of charges, including two counts of assault, and we know that one of the victims is a woman.
The Prime Minister said he learned Friday about the charges. Can he tell the House when he first learned about the arrest of Mr. Tabbara, not the charges but the arrest of Mr. Tabbara?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
On Friday, the Prime Minister took part in a gathering of nearly 7,000 people. He wore a mask, because he could not maintain his physical distance from everyone else. Today, we are here, in the House, keeping a good distance from one another and not wearing masks. Parliament can work that way.
Will the Prime Minister recall Parliament immediately so that it can do its job?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Except, Madam Chair, this is not actually a parliamentary meeting of the House of Commons. This is a committee. This is not the normal workings of Parliament. We know that the Prime Minister wants to abridge and sideline the role of parliamentary accountability. He met with thousands of people outside on Parliament Hill just a few days ago. Why can we not meet with a fraction of that number inside Parliament Hill to do the work on Canadians' behalf?
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Again, Madam Chair, the Prime Minister knows that this is not the normal functioning of Parliament.
In fact, in a little over a week, Parliament will debate what's called the estimates, over 80 billion dollars' worth of new government spending. Because of the Prime Minister's rules that he's imposed on this chamber, members of Parliament will only have four hours to debate over 80 billion dollars' worth of new spending. Imagine the CEO of a major corporation telling its board of directors that they are only going to let the auditors in for four hours and they are going to rubber-stamp everything else. That CEO would be fired.
Again, if the Prime Minister can meet outside this chamber with thousands of people, why can members of Parliament not gather inside to do the work that Canadians elected us to do?
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