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Results: 46 - 60 of 1333
View Richard Bragdon Profile
CPC (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Donnelly.
I see that my colleague Mr. Fast is on the call, so I'm going to yield the rest of my time to Mr. Fast.
View John Williamson Profile
CPC (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Dr. Sangay, I want to thank you very, very much for being here today. I have to say that you have a very impressive resumé, with your work in Asia as well as your studies in the United States and elsewhere, and of course your election as well.
I want to go back to something you mentioned earlier about China's growing role in the United Nations. You touched on its infiltration of certain very key spots. One, of course, is its ability now to oversee some of the reporters and the investigating on the human rights file. How do you think this will impact Tibet and the hearing that Tibet has received both at the United Nations and in publications around the world?
View John Williamson Profile
CPC (NB)
Yes. We see that elite capture here. I know there's pressure afoot to have government officials who have worked on the China file to have a cooling-off period so they cannot immediately go to work for the Chinese regime once they leave government service, whether they are politicians or public servants.
I think I have about a minute left here. Could you talk to me a little bit about what life is like on the ground in Tibet in terms of Tibetans getting news and transmitting that news? I know there's a problem all over China, where the state controls news outlets, but your people are folks who are looking for information and to get the word out. Do they get that information in Tibet? Can they share it, or does the state really close things off there as well?
View John Williamson Profile
CPC (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
Ambassador Mulroney, we actually met 20 years ago in your office in Taipei. I was covering the Taiwanese election there. I think that place remains the truest expression of Chinese democracy, and it's on display every number of years for the world to see that democracy is alive and well in Taiwan.
I'm curious. You've had a long career in mainland China and Taiwan, and you're familiar with the area. Have your views evolved in terms of Taiwan? Looking back 20 years, and before that, how have your views concerning mainland China and Beijing changed over the years, or perhaps they have not?
View John Williamson Profile
CPC (NB)
I appreciate that and agree with that.
You mentioned in your opening remarks that there would be an economic cost to a divergence from mainland China. I think that's true. Could you talk as well about the costs to Canada in terms of our values, and even economic costs, of continuing on the path we're on, where we're afraid to speak out and the prospect of more trade is more alluring to our business elites?
View John Williamson Profile
CPC (NB)
You would agree, then, that a sheepish policy towards Beijing has only served to embolden them and to cause us economic difficulties, economic harm. China thinks that because we are sheep dressed up in sheep clothing, we will not do anything, and they feel they have the freedom to push us around.
Mr. David Mulroney: Yes. It's always—
View Pat Finnigan Profile
Lib. (NB)
I will call this meeting to order.
I apologize. Everybody's sound is great and I forgot to bring my headset with me today. If you can't hear the translation, please let me know. I'll try to speak right into the laptop, loud and slow.
Welcome to meeting number 22 of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food. Pursuant to the motion adopted by the House of Commons on Tuesday, May 26, the committee is meeting to consider a request received by the clerk and submitted by four members of the committee. This request was made to discuss support measures for Canadian poultry and egg farmers.
I have just a few notes here. When you intervene, please make sure that your language channel is set to the language that you intend to speak, not the floor. This is very important. It will reduce the number of times we need to stop because the interpretation is inaudible for our participants, and it will maximize the time we spend exchanging with each other.
Also, before speaking, please wait until I recognize you by name. When you are ready to speak, you can click on the microphone icon to activate your mike.
Make sure that your microphone is off when you are not talking.
We are now ready to begin.
Members have all received the letter and had a chance to look at the meeting request. Perhaps at this stage I will open the floor.
I don't know, Mr. Barlow, if you want to talk about the motion or actually move the motion so that we can discuss it. I'll let you explain your request.
View Pat Finnigan Profile
Lib. (NB)
That works fine. Go ahead, Mr. Barlow.
View Pat Finnigan Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you very much, Mr. Barlow.
We'll open the floor.
I just want to remind members that if they wish to speak, they can use the “raise hand” function at the bottom right-hand side so it is easier to keep track.
I see Mr. Hoback has his hand raised. Would you like to speak to this, Mr. Hoback?
View Pat Finnigan Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you very much, Mr. Hoback.
Next is Mr. Drouin.
View Pat Finnigan Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Barlow.
Again, we can look at that. Another thing we could do, if the committee wanted, would be to have a long meeting of four hours, or maybe two three-hour meetings. There are different ways we can do this to maybe save one meeting. I'm just throwing that out there.
Mr. Perron, you have the floor.
View Pat Finnigan Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Perron.
Could I ask everybody to make sure they're on mute when they're not speaking? We're hearing some background noise.
Mr. Lehoux, you have the floor.
View Pat Finnigan Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Lehoux.
Mr. Barlow, you have the floor.
View Pat Finnigan Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Barlow.
Yes, I can certainly work with the clerk on that. Everybody would have to send their lists of witnesses. It's not going to be a very long list, but we need some witnesses for the clerk to work with. I imagine we could set a date as a deadline to have that list submitted. Today is Wednesday. What about tomorrow or Friday? Do you think we could get that list before the end of the day tomorrow or Friday?
View Pat Finnigan Profile
Lib. (NB)
Okay.
Mr. Perron, had you—
Results: 46 - 60 of 1333 | Page: 4 of 89

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