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Results: 1 - 15 of 293
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
Mr. Chair, I have a point of order. I have no trouble hearing the minister at all.
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
That's interesting.
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
And I hear her.
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
I can hear her when I take my interpretation to background and take it off a language channel. I think the problem is that when you go on English or French, you can't hear her. If you go to pure background, you can. I've heard everyone so far, and I'm sure you've heard enough from me.
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
Thank you so much.
I would speak in French but I had to put myself on the English channel, and I know that messes everyone up. I want to thank my colleague from the Bloc Québécois for this opportunity.
I want to start with you, Mr. Snyder, because of the focus you've brought to habitat. Specifically, I think a lot of Canadians would be shocked to know that the forest fires that have burned through B.C. have not resulted in replanting efforts at all. I'm particularly concerned about that. I know with the steep banks along tributaries into the Thompson and the Fraser, and we see it on the Bonaparte, every time it rains you get debris from the forest fires from a few years ago. I don't know how salmon could live through all that.
I just want to ask if you see any hope of a significant effort from any level of government to replant those slopes with trees that are appropriate to that ecosystem to help restore salmon.
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
Thank you.
I want to turn to our former colleague Fin Donnelly.
I love your words around a resilient watershed ecosystem where we focus on the habitat, and I think the question around forests is just the same thing
I don't think I'll get more than one more question in before we go back to Madame Gill.
We had another witness speak about the lower Fraser and the number of flood management dikes put in over many years. If we were to focus on watershed management in the way you describe for resiliency, what role would addressing those man-made structures have in restoring a healthy ecosystem for salmon, in your view?
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
Thank you.
Alexandra Morton, I have a 2010 sockeye print above my desk. I didn't ask you any questions, but thank you for your work.
I really need to turn it back over to my colleague from the Bloc Québécois.
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
Thank you, Chair, and thank you, panel.
Thank you very much. I'll try to be very succinct.
For the witnesses, this is something new we have. It's called “lowering the boom”, because we tend to forget to unmute ourselves.
I want to go to Fin Donnelly on this quick question. I very much agree with you, Fin, about unity. If there is any issue that should be non-partisan, it's saving our wild salmon. It's so much a part of our life in British Columbia.
In a hierarchy of things.... You just said that you think we could come to a consensus. I know this may be an awkward question, so rather than asking you where you don't think we have consensus, can you identify what you think the top and most important bold steps are that should attract 100% support from all the MPs around this virtual table?
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
Fin, forgive me, but I want to try to sneak in one more quick thing.
We know that our Liberal colleagues have made a commitment to planting millions of trees. It hasn't been operationalized yet. Do you have any hints on how we could make sure we get federal-provincial co-operation to actually plant the kind of ecologically appropriate trees to stabilize slopes?
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I want to thank both witnesses. Charity Intelligence, I've gone through your website. I think you do good work, and it's impressive that you do it on such a small budget and with so few people.
I want to ask a policy question, if I may. I imagine that you've been very interested in the Senate report, which was referenced by the Kielburgers in their testimony. The Senate report on catalyzing action, or something like that—the road map for charities in Canada—came out from a Senate subcommittee last summer. The Kielburgers mentioned that they regretted that hadn't been acted upon, because it would have given more scope to charities to use social enterprise and have that understood by policy-makers as an appropriate way to assist the good work that charities do. I wonder if you have any commentary at all on the Senate report and the nature of policy around charities in Canada.
I'll ask you, Kate.
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
Thank you.
This is my second question. I don't know if I'll have more than two.
Have you ever seen a charitable entity with the structure of a board of directors, staff and a separate category called “founders”, who are also, apparently, receiving funds from the organization, something of a stipend? In any context, have you seen a structure in which founders play this kind of role and in which, in the bylaws, a founder can fire a board member?
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
I was just going to ask Mr. Thomson if he'd ever seen it. I know I never have. I just wondered if there were any other charities in which founders play a role in governance but don't have fiduciary duties, as a board member would normally have.
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
Thank you, colleagues.
I just want to say, for Canadians who may find it hard to believe, that civil servants and cabinet ministers and everybody, including a bunch of us on this screen, worked 20-hour days, seven days a week, at the beginning of the pandemic. We all witnessed it.
I don't want to let the remark that you made, Ms. Telford, go forward without corroboration. You guys all worked.... You were killing yourselves in this period, but that doesn't mean we can't investigate.
I find it hard to believe that the Prime Minister was.... I'm not doubting that he did, actually; I just want to know. He seems very convinced that he thought Canada service corps was going to deliver this program up until May 8. He'd announced it on April 22. From the testimony of civil servants, including Rachel Wernick, we knew that they were considering WE before the announcement, at least a week before the announcement, and that on May 5, as we know, Minister Chagger took it to the COVID committee, clearly putting the WE Charity as the agency to deliver this.
Can you explain how it's possible...? Did no one want to tell the Prime Minister, to burst his bubble and tell him, that his favourite operation, Canada service corps, was just not going to be able to do it? Why did no one tell him before May 8 that Canada service corps was out of it and WE Charity was delivering the program?
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
I'm going to limit my comment to the matter of the procedure taken by a chair of a committee in a minority Parliament.
As a non-member of this committee, I'm extremely grateful to the latitude from you, Mr. Chair, but I recognize that all of my other colleagues, including Mr. Poilievre, whom I'm going to agree with and then upgrade in just a moment, are incredibly kind. I appreciate it.
I certainly can't lecture you, Mr. Chair, as I think you've been trying throughout this to be extremely balanced. However, I agree with Mr. Poilievre and Mr. Julian that you were having some difficulty yesterday in keeping partisanship out of this, and that's rare for you.
I want to remind Mr. Poilievre that way back in 2007, when he was parliamentary secretary to the President of the Treasury Board, his party put forward a handbook for committee chairs. It dealt with the difficult circumstances that a minority party in government faces in trying to control committee proceedings. It was a handbook that led Leon Benoit, then chair of the international trade committee, to adjourn a proceeding—and Peter Julian may remember this—and storm out of the room. He threw his pen down and said, “Adjourned”, leaving the majority of the members, who had just voted to proceed, in something of a quandary. The handbook was full of tricks like that.
I would ask my Conservative colleagues to bear in mind their own history, and I would ask all of us to be as non-partisan as possible, because the country is still in a pandemic.
I said I was going to limit myself, but I don't believe that we got great, helpful, forthcoming information from the witnesses yesterday. I appreciate Mr. Poilievre's efforts and Mr. Julian's efforts to get more information out. Canadians do want to get to the bottom of this, but I really hope that all members on all sides, regardless of partisanship, including the chair, can be way above the normal level of fairness, and that the gutter approach of the minority Parliament in 2007 is never approached again.
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